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which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your vintage bicycle.

Archived: Balloon Tire and Middleweights







BALLOON:   SN Newbie posted by: John on 3/19/2003 at 12:30:22 AM
OK. So I tried to search for where to find the SN and I must be too new because I did'nt (couldn't)find a string. When I was a boy I delivered papers on a big ol schwinn with square handlebars (for bags)and baskets (gone) in the rear. Anyway... my father brought it to me a couple of weeks ago and I thought I would fix her up for an around the neighborhood cruiser. The bike must be late 60's early 70's. It looks like a Cruiser SS (I guess). I think my first step is ID this bike so I can get some parts. The front fork bearings are kind of wonky and I would like this thing to be solid again.
I appreciate any help you kind folks could offer,
John


   Serial number info posted by Tom Findley on 3/19/2003 at 12:22:16 PM
http://www.bunchobikes.com/serialnumber.htm

Source for spare parts:

Jerry Herron

SCHWINN@BUCKEYE-EXPRESS.COM

   RE:BALLOON:   SN Newbie posted by John on 3/19/2003 at 4:49:07 PM
Thanks Jerry. That link should get me started. I'm begining to think this bike may be a Heavy-Duti but there are two holes about 2" apart on the top tube. I don't know if these were drilled by the PO or if they're for tank mounts. Will the SN give me any model info.? The front hub indicates Schwinn Model ?2 Made in Germany (probably normal). There is also a mounting bracket on the gooseneck.

   RE:RE:BALLOON:   SN Newbie posted by John on 3/19/2003 at 4:50:26 PM
TOM. Sorry.

   RE:RE:RE:BALLOON:   SN Newbie posted by John on 3/20/2003 at 1:37:42 AM
I got the SN on the lower left axel mount. H355522. I think that is a 1963 if I read the charts correctly.






BALLOON:   What is it????? Scwhinn but what else??? posted by: Tim Priest on 3/18/2003 at 6:20:09 AM
Hi,
I have an old Schwinn of some type but I cant figure out what model it is exactly.It has the same type of frame as a hornet and looks very much like on but has a slightly different chain guard.Its been painted a few times but heres what i could find was original....It was dark gree with a white head tube{it had the little scallops,i think they are called) and I can make out the big scwhin circle on the guard and a few letter that I believe are "orire".The serial number is DO8708.this is driving me crazy so I'd love any help! thanx:)


   RE:BALLOON:   What is it????? Scwhinn but what else??? posted by Tim Priest on 3/18/2003 at 6:28:00 AM
Oh yeah the seat clamp bolt had an "AS" on it instead of just an "S"






AGE / VALUE:   huffy daisy daisy posted by: Junior on 3/18/2003 at 1:33:41 AM
Forgot to mention the serial number it is 1H999813







AGE / VALUE:   Huffy Daisy Daisy 2 Speed tandem posted by: Junior on 3/18/2003 at 1:16:09 AM
Hello Guys! New to the bike thing, I just purchased my first bike with plans to restore it but not sure, it will need two seats, a rear handle bar, and tires/tubes. the paint is in fair to good condition, no rust except on wheels and very little there. i was wanting to know if anyone knew the age of the bike and any information available??? Please let me know your thoughts on restoring this will it be worth it in the long run?? any worth to this "bike built for two"? Thanks in advance!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Huffy Daisy Daisy 2 Speed tandem posted by Ken on 3/20/2003 at 9:26:49 PM
1) See discussion below re "Restoration" vs "Refurbishment"
2) This machine is not a candidate for restoration
3) If you clean it up and rebuild it and find it's a good rider, you can enjoy it or list on the magic auction site.
4) Post a picture to the oldroads database.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Huffy Daisy Daisy 2 Speed tandem posted by Nigel on 9/5/2003 at 3:03:25 AM
Hi,
I bought a Huffy Daisy Daisy Tandem frame on ebay from a chap in Seattle, had it shipped to the UK, have had it powder coated bright yellow and am rebuilding it with all new alloy components including 21 gears etc. So far it has cost me £1100 GBP approx.
If you want any help or advice let me know !






AGE / VALUE:   Huffy Daisy Daisy 2 Speed tandem posted by: Junior on 3/18/2003 at 1:16:09 AM
Hello Guys! New to the bike thing, I just purchased my first bike with plans to restore it but not sure, it will need two seats, a rear handle bar, and tires/tubes. the paint is in fair to good condition, no rust except on wheels and very little there. i was wanting to know if anyone knew the age of the bike and any information available??? Please let me know your thoughts on restoring this will it be worth it in the long run?? any worth to this "bike built for two"? Thanks in advance!







MIDDLEWEIGHT:   First restoration project. posted by: John on 3/17/2003 at 5:05:17 AM
I finally purchased my first restoration project. It is a 1960's Schwinn American. It has a basket, working light, both front and rear fenders.

Handle bars/stem: Need to have surface rust removed, hopefully not pitted. If they are I'll have them re-chromed when able to.

Seat: In remarkably good condition. Vinyl needs to be cleaned. Chromed parts, especially the springs, need to have rust removed, hopefully not pitted. If it is, I'll have it re-chromed when abel to.

Rims: Severe surface rust with pitting and rusted spokes. Will have to replace most if not all of the spokes and possible the rims. See questions below regarding this.

Chain guard: Some surface rust. Needs to be cleaned up and maybe touched up a little. Inside is pretty rusty but shold be no problem.

Frame/fork: Surface rust. No dents/dings or craks. Needs good cleaning and maybe some touch up.

Fenders: Some surface rust and dings and dents. Like the frame just needs a good cleaning and maybe soem touch up to the paint. Going to leave dings and dents alone, gives bike character.

Basket: In really good shape. Some rust. Needs a good cleaning.

Head light: Severe surface rust. But it does work. Needs to be cleaned and re-chromed.

Pedals: Need to be replaced.

Crank: Surface rust. Needs a good cleaning, may need to be re-chromed. And of course repacked.


All the bearings will be repacked or replaced.

Questions: As I mentioned the rims are pretty pitted and the spokes have rust on them. I know from experience never trust a rusty spoke. And as I am restoring this bike to be able to ride it I want good strong spokes on it. Replacing the front rim should be no big deal. My LBS can order me a chrome rim for this bike for a reasonable price. It is the back rim I have questions about. On the coaster brake arm is the brand name Bendix. I assume this means that the hub is also a Bendix. i want to keep the hub and have it repacked. But paying to have a new rim laced with spokes can cost quite a bit. So should I have my LBS just order me a new back rim with a new hub and coaster brake? (This is the least expensive) Or have them order me a new rim and have it built using the original bendix hub and coaster brake I have? What would some of you do? Is Bendix still being manufactured? If it is then maybe have a rim already built with Bendix hub is the best way to go.



   RE:MIDDLEWEIGHT:   First restoration project. posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 3/18/2003 at 12:17:20 AM
Go to e- bay and type In "Schwinn American bicycle"
or just Schwinn and wade thru it all until you see an "American " model bike for sale.

I hate to 'burst your bubble' but the Schwinn American is not old enough and not tricked out with enought accessories to make it worth while. In mint original condition these don't sell for enought to warrent you restoring it. You'll spend money on a plain middle of the road Schwinn. I don't hear of the guys in this restoring an American. Chrome plate is expensive, your wheel will need rebuilding.
These Bendix hubs are no longer being made. The company has moved on. If you don't find new hubs or the needed parts to re-vamp yours then look on e- bay for a bendix hub equiped wheel. The bendix parts are out there and not too expensive.
This was a 1960's era bike and you want to go back to like a Black Phantom or something like that and even then it's expensive.

I would not make this particular model the one to restore. It is not worth it. Have you been to the library or bookstore and seen some of the books on Schwinns.
The one by Pridemore and Hurd? Schwinn bicycles.
There were a lot of them.
Find a 1960's kids bike like the Schwinn Sting Ray or Krate series bike. The cissy bar models are jumping and these sell easily for a lot of money. If you pick up one of these for a good price you can be able to restore it and sell it at a profit if you get ahold of a Pea Picker for example.

Guys, help me out here, talk to this fellow, don't let him make the mistakes we did when we were just starting out in this. Good Luck.

P.S. Talk to Jim Wilson of Bike rod N kustom for advice and look at the bike rod n kustom web page.

   RE:RE:MIDDLEWEIGHT:   First restoration project. posted by Chris on 3/18/2003 at 12:19:26 AM
Listen to Tom, you're in good hands with him.

   RE:RE:MIDDLEWEIGHT:   First restoration project. posted by John on 3/18/2003 at 5:02:28 AM
I am not looking to sell the bike I collect and restore. I just want to collect and keep them for myself and my wife.

I understand that this was a middle range bike, even in the 60's, thats fine with me. All I want to do is collect bikes that are 1975 and older restore them to rideable condition and keep them for my own personal enjoyment. Any bike from the 1975 and earlier, except road bike styles are what I am looking for. It don't matter to me if it is a black phantom or not. Though I hope that some day I will find a black phantom to restore as well as a krate bike.

I know of people in my area that have bikes to sell me. One has a old complete Hiawatha and the other has a krate frame.

After I am done with the american I am working on one of those is my next project.

I do have a book on restoring a collector bicycle. It is a big help on how to do so. It gives step by step instructions and helpful tips. So I have done my homework and research before starting this.

Thank you for your advice though I do appreciate it and hope to get more advice from you in the future.

   RE:RE:RE:MIDDLEWEIGHT:   First restoration project. posted by Chris on 3/18/2003 at 2:44:41 PM
Everybody is diffrent in this. You said first restoration project and many times somebody new jumps into this and they spend more than the bike is worth.
We have Tom and Stacey and M.N. Smith and others here and you are in good company. Go for it!

   RE:RE:RE:RE:MIDDLEWEIGHT:   First restoration project. posted by Stacey on 3/18/2003 at 6:27:16 PM
I feel John might have his terminology clouded a bit. It sounds like he's using "restore" to mean fix up nicely and ride... a common mistake among newcomers. Whereas to the wisened and weary veterans of this hobby "restoration" means just that... to accurately return a bike to the condition in which it left the factory.

Reclaiming (fixing up nicely to ride) a bike, with all the disassembly, cleaning, polishing, lubricating, and reassembly, is a daunting task in and of itself. I'm doing a Crown, for a friend, right now and it's a lot of work.

Restoration on the other hand, John is MUCH more work, a massive time investment, and infinitly more expensive than a reclaimation.

Don't set your sights too high on your first venture. Make it look pretty with some elbow grease & polish and safe with some good preventative maintainence. You'll you'll amazed at the results. Then.... go ride it and revel in your accomplishment.

Good luck!

   RE:MIDDLEWEIGHT:   First restoration project. posted by sam on 3/19/2003 at 2:03:28 AM
The American isa good starter bike.Check out Bunch-O-Bikes web site for tips.I say try the spokes yourself & rebuild the bendix too.---sam

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:MIDDLEWEIGHT:   First restoration project. posted by John on 3/19/2003 at 4:02:06 PM
Stacey, thanks for correcting me on the terminology. The reason I stated that this a restoration is based on the book I bought to help me through this first one. The book is titled "How To Restore Your Collector Bicycle" It is by William Love. I've found it to be a very good and useful book. It talks about every aspect of restoring a bike, from what I am doing to restoring one to mint condition like it was when it was first manufactured. The book talks about restoration on all the differant levels. Guess it uses the term in its loosest definition, which makes sense.

After this project I don't know of I'll continue to just do reclamations, or if I'll actually do a full restore on a bike.

One thing I do know is I'll probably never sell any bike I do a reclamation on or restore. I'm not looking to make this a business.

One thing I have found is it is fun to do this, as well as educational.

Like I mentioned earlier I have a line on a Krate frame, the guy will sell it to me for $20.00. I've heard this guy in my area is very reputable when it comes to these old bikes. He makes regular trips to California to sell the bikes he collects and he sells a lot on e-bay as well. He's told me the frame is in excellent condition. So in learning that it sounds like all it needs is to be put back together with the proper components. That will be a full resstore to mint condition should I choose to do so.

Thank you for the advice Stacey. Look forward to more in the future.

John.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:MIDDLEWEIGHT:   First restoration project. posted by Stacey on 3/20/2003 at 4:36:38 PM
Glad to help John, and welcome aboard! Just be careful about getting that old grease under your fingernails... I understand that they've found that trans-cutanious absorbtion of one of the components in the grease is a major factor in the addiction to this zany hobby. LOL

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:MIDDLEWEIGHT:   First restoration project. posted by Chris on 3/21/2003 at 8:22:31 PM
All those beautiful, mysterious parts in magical boxes from a magic land called England being thrown out. That was what got me into this.
The swap meets! What does the old dude with the corncob pipe have this year?
Grease under the fingernails too.
Enclosed chaincases, alloy hub shells, leather Brooks seats! rod brakes, 28 inch wheels before there was 700 C stuff at all. That black paint, gold and red box lining.
The people and places the learning about the history.
No drinking, no smoking, no drugs, nothing immoral.
But bikes! Such wonderful bikes!
What exactly called me into this? I cannot describe it but we all understand it.






MIDDLEWEIGHT:   First restoration project. posted by: John on 3/17/2003 at 5:05:17 AM
I finally purchased my first restoration project. It is a 1960's Schwinn American. It has a basket, working light, both front and rear fenders.

Handle bars/stem: Need to have surface rust removed, hopefully not pitted. If they are I'll have them re-chromed when able to.

Seat: In remarkably good condition. Vinyl needs to be cleaned. Chromed parts, especially the springs, need to have rust removed, hopefully not pitted. If it is, I'll have it re-chromed when abel to.

Rims: Severe surface rust with pitting and rusted spokes. Will have to replace most if not all of the spokes and possible the rims. See questions below regarding this.

Chain guard: Some surface rust. Needs to be cleaned up and maybe touched up a little. Inside is pretty rusty but shold be no problem.

Frame/fork: Surface rust. No dents/dings or craks. Needs good cleaning and maybe some touch up.

Fenders: Some surface rust and dings and dents. Like the frame just needs a good cleaning and maybe soem touch up to the paint. Going to leave dings and dents alone, gives bike character.

Basket: In really good shape. Some rust. Needs a good cleaning.

Head light: Severe surface rust. But it does work. Needs to be cleaned and re-chromed.

Pedals: Need to be replaced.

Crank: Surface rust. Needs a good cleaning, may need to be re-chromed. And of course repacked.


All the bearings will be repacked or replaced.

Questions: As I mentioned the rims are pretty pitted and the spokes have rust on them. I know from experience never trust a rusty spoke. And as I am restoring this bike to be able to ride it I want good strong spokes on it. Replacing the front rim should be no big deal. My LBS can order me a chrome rim for this bike for a reasonable price. It is the back rim I have questions about. On the coaster brake arm is the brand name Bendix. I assume this means that the hub is also a Bendix. i want to keep the hub and have it repacked. But paying to have a new rim laced with spokes can cost quite a bit. So should I have my LBS just order me a new back rim with a new hub and coaster brake? (This is the least expensive) Or have them order me a new rim and have it built using the original bendix hub and coaster brake I have? What would some of you do? Is Bendix still being manufactured? If it is then maybe have a rim already built with Bendix hub is the best way to go.



   RE:MIDDLEWEIGHT:   First restoration project. posted by Tom Findley on 3/17/2003 at 1:59:56 PM
For this type of bike, replacing the rusty chrome parts will be cheaper than replating them.

You can get some of the Chrome parts at Memory Lane Classics:

info@memorylane-classics.com

Schwinn remade the chrome seat springs, and they may have them.

Bendix no longer makes bicycle hubs, but there are plenty of used ones for sale.

For these and other parts, go to www.ebay.com

Type

Bendix hub in the search box, and yopu'll see what's available.

For rusty rims, spokes, and restoration, you want to end up with the rims and spokes of both wheels looking alike. If your bike shop can supply a new front wheel and back wheel with a coaster hub, that is the cheapest way to do it, and I hop they will match. Getting new wheels will cost less than relacing the old ones, and maybe replacing rusty rims.

http://www.trfindley.com/pgbikes


   RE:RE:MIDDLEWEIGHT:   First restoration project. posted by Don on 3/19/2003 at 9:33:09 PM
Well I had to put my two cents in, Go for it! The American is a cool ride! Not a real collectible, so parts should be easier to find. These guys are right about the cost of a restoration. Once you have fixed it up, it will be priceless to you. All the parts should be easy enough to find. Schwinn Corvette's used to be looked at in this fashion, ie; not worth restoring. Check E-bay to see what they go for nowadays! Be cautious about restoring a Krate/Sting Ray, parts are expensive and hard to come by. I just started a full restoration on a 66 Deluxe Sting Ray.
Good Luck!






MIDDLEWEIGHT:   Schwinn Typhoon posted by: Brian on 3/15/2003 at 5:24:23 PM
I just bought a 1966 Typhoon and I am looking for vintage or NOS parts to replace damaged ones. I need a black&white "S" Messinger seat(or info. on refurbishing the one I have), Fenders (I want the original looking black&white ones in good shape, the front rack (mine is rusty, and cranks and seatpost. I would consider any other parts for the Typhoon as well.
Thanks,
Brian


   RE:MIDDLEWEIGHT:   Schwinn Typhoon posted by Tom Findley on 3/17/2003 at 1:46:06 PM
These parts sell regularly on www.ebay.com

Do a weekly search using

Schwinn seat
Schwinn fenders

They will eventually turn up.
Look at the Completed Items to see what they sell for.






BALLOON:   Tank horn's posted by: DannyJoe on 3/15/2003 at 4:08:08 PM
I have a '40's B.F. Goodrich tank bike with good clean tank internal's, everything look's like it should work. When I put in new batteries I had no sound, the button feel's like it work's, nice spring feel. Should there be a ground wire on the horn ? There is a screw w/nut (no wire) on the horn opposite the screw/nut wire to the horn button. Should I be seeing a second wire coming off the opposite screw grounded somewhere ? I'm no electrician but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night! Haha...


   RE:BALLOON:   Tank horn's posted by Stacey on 3/16/2003 at 11:24:28 AM
Danny-Joe, I didn't stay at an HI last night, but I believe that second screw/nut combo is used to adjust the pitch of the horn or set its air gap or something like that. Grounding is done via frame contact... like in your car, just a one wire system.

For a great How-To on getting your horn to honk, see MNSmith's article at www.bunchobikes.com

   RE:RE:BALLOON:   Tank horn's posted by DannyJoe on 3/16/2003 at 2:35:01 PM
Thank's for the direction Stacey, good article. This is my first tank/horn bike, I can't wait to hear the music.

   RE:RE:RE:BALLOON:   Tank horn's posted by Stacey on 3/17/2003 at 6:55:44 PM
You're welcome. Hopefuly the information there will be of some help to you. Lotsa good stuff on that site... worthy of a bookmark!

BTW ' Stop back and let us know how you made out.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:BALLOON:   Tank horn's posted by DannyJoe on 3/20/2003 at 2:09:14 AM
HONK! HONK..A HONK,HONK!! It only needed a good cleaning of the connection's and I found "another way of being annoying",said wife. DJ

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:BALLOON:   Tank horn's posted by Stacey on 3/20/2003 at 3:42:20 AM
SWEET!!! Congrats Danny Joe, now you can really annoy the neighbors. LOL






AGE / VALUE:   Elgin/Sears and Roebuck Ladies bike age? posted by: Dan Burmeister on 3/15/2003 at 3:05:01 PM
I have a Ladies original most all original condition bike that I believe dates in the 40's or early 50's. The front tag says Elgin with the V and sears and roebuck co. under the V. Under the sprocket the serial number is 12519. It is all orginal paint including rims a dark orange with alot of white stripping. Can anyone help me with the age and value? It has been in my family and no one seems to know wher the bike came from.The back sprocket is different than most I have seen ,it appears it might be a early 2 speed. Thanks Dan







AGE / VALUE:   sky ray cruiser posted by: metlhed on 3/13/2003 at 5:43:23 PM
I GOT MY NEW BISEECLE!!!! can somebody give me some more info about this bike? it is a sky ray super deluxe(the chaingaurd says super deluxe:the headbadge says sky ray with a jet lookin thing).i dont have the serial number now but i will post it later. the rear hub is a single speed coaster brake. the brake arm says perry b-100 made in england. i cant remember the name on the front hub but it is made in germany. the seat says bike pals made in japan. it has a schwinn type 7 hole sprocket. can somebody give me more info on this bicycle?







BALLOON:   1953 Schwinn Hornet posted by: Bill Champagne on 3/13/2003 at 3:41:54 AM
I am a mountain and road rider who just loves special bikes whether new or old. A few years ago I purchased a bike that was in beautiful shape, It is a schwinn hornet and I was told the year was 1953. I would like to discuss this bicycle with someone familiar with it.
Thanks, Bill


   RE:BALLOON:   1953 Schwinn Hornet posted by MNSmith on 3/13/2003 at 7:43:03 PM
Sure, what would you like to discuss??

www.bunchobikes.com






BALLOON:   1953 Schwinn Hornet posted by: Bill Champagne on 3/13/2003 at 3:41:54 AM
I am a mountain and road rider who just loves special bikes whether new or old. A few years ago I purchased a bike that was in beautiful shape, It is a schwinn hornet and I was told the year was 1953. I would like to discuss this bicycle with someone familiar with it.
Thanks, Bill







AGE / VALUE:   camaro posted by: rickey on 3/12/2003 at 3:58:00 PM
1969 huffy camaro missing headlight chain guard & chain med.rust tires hold air any offers welcome







WANTED:   1976 schwinn girls cruiser posted by: dale on 3/11/2003 at 9:57:38 PM
A friend of mine wants a 1976 five,or 10 speed cruiser.If any of y'all out there has one that you'd like to part with lemme know My email is ashlockdale@hotmail.com


   RE:WANTED:   1976 schwinn girls cruiser posted by Gordon on 3/12/2003 at 3:39:43 PM
I may have one but the snow has to melt some before I can get to the warehouse to check for sure.