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Archived: English Roadsters







AGE / VALUE:   Addendum to Shimano vs. Sturmey posted by: Albert on 11/17/2000 at 12:54:58 PM
That mileage figure should read 5-10 k per year.







AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by: Albert on 11/17/2000 at 12:41:57 PM
The pasr 25 years has seen me travel 5-10 k miles on roadster-like 3-speeds that I've configuered from disgarded bike parts. The machines have 27 hp tires, alloy rims and 3-speed hubs. Having tired of the "Sturmey Tumble " that occurs when you slip out of gear as youpedal standing ,I've switched to using Shimano 3-speed hubs. These do not slip and do not have what Sturmey calls an "intermediat gear". They seem to be as sturdy as tha AW and can tolerate up to a 22-tooth cog. The latest version is easily repaird by replacing the inner cassette as a whole. I would like to hear from other dedicated planetary enthusiasts on the matter


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Jon on 11/17/2000 at 4:41:17 PM
Part of the reason that you have more thn one speed on your bike is so you don't have to stand on the pedals. Use the gears to your best advantage. Low gear for low speeds and hill climbing, high gear for higher speeds and down hill. I saw a lot of repairs from people who would ride in one gear all of the time. Especially prematurely worn sprockets and overstretched chains.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Albert on 11/18/2000 at 11:17:12 AM
My good man, I suggest that you become a little more familiar with S/A problems before you attempt to offer advise.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by ChristopherRobin on 11/18/2000 at 12:38:19 PM
There is something wrong about fitting a Shimano hub to a English bike. I grew up on a Shimano hub but prefer the Sturmey-Archer anyday. I rented a bike and cycled around Macinac Island, Michigan where "Somewhere in Time" was filmed and I hated the Shimano hub. The feel is diffrent, I don't know if the ratios are the same or what. Just don't like it! I personally believe the Shimano is not as strong as the Sturmey-Archer. I went back with one of my bikes with the f.m. four speed hub Sturmey-hub and really enjoyed myself.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by ChristopherRobin on 11/18/2000 at 12:38:54 PM
There is something wrong about fitting a Shimano hub to a English bike. I grew up on a Shimano hub but prefer the Sturmey-Archer anyday. I rented a bike and cycled around Macinac Island, Michigan where "Somewhere in Time" was filmed and I hated the Shimano hub. The feel is diffrent, I don't know if the ratios are the same or what. Just don't like it! I personally believe the Shimano is not as strong as the Sturmey-Archer. I went back with one of my bikes with the f.m. four speed Sturmey- Archer hub and really enjoyed myself.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by ChristopherRobin on 11/18/2000 at 12:40:11 PM
Sorry for the double post

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Albert on 11/18/2000 at 2:57:18 PM
Christopher, The Shimano ratios are 74% 100 133% nerarly identical to the SA AW. I can detct no differance in feel.Perhaps what you sensed was peculiar to that particular bike. I was not suggesting that British-made roadsters be converted to tha Shimano hub but rather that frams from derailer equiped machines be converted to a rather better performing roadster-like bike. You might say using the best qualities of each. The roadsters thta I've configured are a delight.They are what Nottingham and Coventry should have produced. I still hold that the SA AW unless kept in perfect adjustment is a hub that you should use with caution.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Jon on 11/18/2000 at 3:25:15 PM
I spent twenty years in the bicycle business with factory service certifications from both Schwinn and Raleigh. I can take apart and put together any SA hub blindfolded(and just about any other hub for that matter). I am familiar with just about any problem caused by improper riding or inadequate design, be it broken pawls or or worn chain. Fact of the matter is ,if you don't ride it right don't expect it to last.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Jon on 11/18/2000 at 3:34:15 PM
My experience with Shimano hubs is that they don't just break, they completely self destruct. Something about SA steel is much harder or the Shimano steel is too brittle.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Albert on 11/18/2000 at 5:54:40 PM
Jon, thank you for your vida. However, I cannot undrestand why you blame the SA user? Surely all of those years servicing SA hubs with your eyes blindfolded must have made you aware of the problem of the SA AW and its derivitives, the FW, FM, S5, and S52,slipping out of gear when the control cable is not perfectly adjusted. Perhaps if your eyes had not been blind folded, you would have seen machines whose cables had stretched causing a loss of proper setting; or then again perhaps the blind fold made it difficult for you to see the shift of the fulcrum stop cause the control cable to lose its setting and cause the hub to skip out of gear; maybe too the blind fold made it difficult for you to notice that a rear wheel moving only sslightly in the rear fork dropout could cause the hub to slip? Please Jon don't continue to blindly blame the user-victim for problems cause by the hubs design. I might that the Shimano never slip even when the gear control cable is out of adjustment.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Wings on 11/18/2000 at 11:49:02 PM
I think it is easier to shift the Shimano 3 speed hubs.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Kevin C. on 11/19/2000 at 7:28:18 AM
That's it, boys! Off to bed!!!!

   Sturmey-Archer VS Shimano posted by ChristopherRobin on 11/19/2000 at 9:58:26 AM
I have a small plastic bag of Shimano 3 speed hub parts on cards in plastic if anybody can use them let me know. I do not like the Shimano and have no desire to take one apart if it should ever go haywire. ChristopherRobin@starmail.com We have some sharp people here don't we? I picked up a Royal Scot and a Raleigh Sports and the seller remarked how he liked the Sturmey-Archer hub. Shimano did have the benefit of hindsight, didn't they? They took apart the Sturmey-Archer and examined it and wondered how to improve upon it. I wish the Sturmey hub didn't have the slipping problem. Really, If you know how to keep it adjusted properly they're fine. I am very, very fond of the A.W. F.W. F.C. A.C. A.S.C. and I love the look and weight of the alloy shell. I want to collect the old Shimano hubs now too after seeing "The Dancing Chain" I don't know what to think about which hub is stronger really. I have a friend who swears by the newer Shimano hub and he claims to destroy the Sturmey hub almost immediately but he is this huge brute who destroys parts that common mortals would never have a problem with.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Bill Putnam on 11/20/2000 at 10:00:35 AM
If your Sturmey-Archer hub is slipping, it is either
improperly adjusted or in need of rebuilding. On an
AW, the clutch and pinion pins can wear if the 2-3
shift is done with out taking pressure off the pedals-
this to me is abuse. As long as you have the cable
adjusted properly (it's not difficult to adjust), shift
with some care, oil on occasion, it will not slip.

The Sturmey AW hub is very easy to rebuild, and parts are still
available. I've ridden a 1950 AW hub for 30,000 miles
after rebuilding it (new pinion pins, pawls, pawl springs,
and clutch)and it has required no maintenance beyond oil.
It has never slipped once rebuilt. I think it's
pretty impressive that a component of that durability is
available, and that a hub produced from the 30's can be
easily serviced and used. This is in stark contrast to
modern day throw away bikes and components (Shimano
changes their line up all the time!) which are for people
who use their bikes more as toys than as transportation,
or who don't mind throwing away bikes every few years. I
tried to find replacement parts for a Shimano 3 speed hub
once, but was unable to locate the parts needed. If they
had stuck with the same design and provided spare parts
easily I might have a more positive view of the Shimano
3 speed hub, as it is I prefer the Sturmey.

I have used ratios of 34/22 without trouble with the AW
hub, this on a bike ridden in winter through snow which
takes a lot of torque, so I don't think that the hub is
weak.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Albert on 11/21/2000 at 1:02:06 AM
Bill,while it may be true that Shimano does change its derailluer line regularly and that those parts are not interchangeable the same cannot be said for their 3-speed hubs. With the exception of the righthand ballcup, even the present design is interchangeale on the module level with the earliest hubs sold in this country --- back to the 50's. Also, while it is very difficult to rebuild a Shimano at the decrete part level, the modules can be replced in minutes. And then again I ask, why has a company like S/A continued for so long (since 1938) with a design that was so clearly a hazzard to the ordinary user?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Bill Putnam on 11/21/2000 at 6:42:39 AM
I am glad to hear that Shimano 3-speed hub design has
remained stable. If only the small parts were more
readily available. I just don't like throwing things
away that might easily be repaired but for a small
inexpensive part. How much is the Shimano module, and
where can you obtain them?

I think Sturmey Archer stuck with the AW so long because
it was a sound design. In the late 50's they did try to
make a hub without the no drive position (the SW) but this
was prone to failure and quickly withdrawn. From my
perspective, it's not unreasonable to expect some care
from the ordinary user in the form of not shifting under
load, occasional oiling, and checking the shift cable
adjustment. If you follow these basic maintenance
requirements, the hub will give excellent service.
My 1950 AW hub outlasted the Schwinn Traveller frame
it came with-the frame fatigued and broke at the
seat tube/bottom bracket, but the hub was still fine
(after the previous postings mention of small parts
needed to rebuild it). A friend of mine rode his 3-speed
every day year round to work for 30 years (4 miles each
way) and the hub never required anything beyond oil.
Perhaps the Shimano would have given the same service,
but all the Shimano hubs I have seen have not had provision
for oiling, which means that without regular dissassembly
and relubing, the durability of the hub would likely be less.

We expect the ordinary user to maintain the pressure in
their bicycle's tires, why not a little bit of maintenance
with the drivetrain? If the user is incapable of
maintaining air in their bicycle's tires, then any competent
bike shop can easily check the shift cable adjustment
and oil the hub (along with a basic safety check including
brake cables) when filling the tires. This should be a
frequent enough interval to ensure proper adjustment
of the hub.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by ChristopherRobin on 11/21/2000 at 7:11:03 AM
The Ross Apollo 3 speed I had as a kid was equiped with a Shimano hub and it had a plastic oiler cap with the strap and we sat and put oil in our hubs after washing,drying and waxing the bikes. This was the 333 hub. However most of the Shimano hubs do not have this feature.I have a newer version hub and it is sealed at factory. Also, the riders of British working man's(women too) commuter bikes were adults who knew how to look after their bikes.Also keeping them in proper adjustment was essential if you wanted to get to and from work without a problem. I'm sure the cycle shops covered this and there was a lot of bicycle related instruction in the schools, C.T.C. related functions, local police programs e.t.c.. I have old magazines and Raleigh did a lot of cool functions with young children up on rollers and there is this huge clock like meter with Raleigh emblazoned on it and they had timed contests. Also the cycling laws were diffrent with cycle lights having to be able to meet this new lighting change. They had to be able to meet changing requirements.A traffic cop actually checked your lights to see if they were proper and in working order. You could get a citation if something was not right.Things were just diffrent. When I read old Cycling and Mopeds, Cycling and the C.T.C.publications I never see folks writing in with this concern about slipping gears. Nobody ever said I slamed my *** with my S.A. hub. Folks wrote in with really good questions and concerns but the Sturmey hus was very well loved.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Albert on 11/21/2000 at 9:20:31 AM
Bill, I obtain just about all the replacement parts I need from salvaged bicycles. These parts are removed and stored milk crates until needed. In just a few years I've accumulaed 60-70 3-speed hubs. Of course this is more than I will ever need; but, once you're smitten you cannot stop! I regularlly visit the collectio yards of two townships and do quit well. The cycle is an ecologically friendly means of transport; why not use an ecologically freindly way of obtaining replacement parts. Now about your comments regarding reasonable exspectations for owner maintenance. I would suggest that you ask 12 average citizens-- say those you might find on civil-suit jury-- about what might be reasonable. And, what would you say to the father of a 12-year old who suffered a mishap? And, if C.T.C. members in-days-your never complained, it may be because the problem was simple accepted as a customary hazzard of cycling--- after all, many British cyclist saw the 3-speed as the only means of obtaining multiple gearing.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Albert on 11/21/2000 at 9:37:37 AM
Robin, the Shimano hub is not "sealed". The hub can be lubricated by removing the ballcrank an pushrod and then applying an oil gun to the end of the hollow axle. The lack of an oiler is a very big plus. These oilers actually permit the oil to leak-out when the wheel is in such a position that the oiler is on the bottom of the hub. Why do you think S/A hubs always have a coating of grime on them. You will never see this on a hub that doesn't have an oiler. Also, I think you have a highly romanticized view of the maintenance abilities and awareness of the British cyclist in the 30's, 40's, and 50's. When I last cycled in Britain, in the 70's, I found the club cyclist and certainly the commuter cyclist to be only as knowledgeable the American counterpart.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Bill Putnam on 11/21/2000 at 11:41:39 AM
Albert, I commend you on saving usable parts that would
otherwise have gone to the scrap heap.

Your mention of
a civil-suit jury brings to mind a separate issue/concern-
that being how responsible do we expect people to be for
their own well being. It disturbs me that we are turning
into a society where our government(s) are looked to as
the source of our protection from our own ignorance. The
plethora of absurd lawsuits, and the frequency with which
they are won or settled out of court at cost to the
defendant, illustrates part of the problem. In my view,
there is a minimum amount of knowledge and judgement one
should have to operate a bicycle, or a car for that matter.
Locally, I am involved with groups that educate both
children and adults on
proper bicycle operation and maintenance. I would much
rather see us working to educate users with basic information
than looking to a lawyer to deal with a crash after the fact.

But back to the Shimano vs. Sturmey 3 speed hub issue. Some
of the oil that leaks out of the Sturmey hub comes from
between the hub shell and right hand ball ring. Only the
old metal oilers leaked, the later plastic ones sealed
pretty well. Also, some leakage isn't a bad thing, this
in effect flushes out dirty oil and has the side effect
of preserving the wheel from corrosion. If you ride
on salt covered roads in the winter, some barrier to
corrosion is a help. If you do oil a shimano hub through
the axle as you describe, sooner or later it will come
out of the hub somewhere, so I don't see this as a
significant difference, other than Sturmey intended for
the hub to be oiled (at least until recently) and Shimano
did not.

Around here (Madison, WI, USA) the Shimano 3 speed hub
is found only occasionally, while Sturmey's abound.
Hence good used parts are much easier to find for
Sturmey's than Shimano. Also, if you're in a fix,
the Sturmey replacement parts are readily available.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by Albert on 11/22/2000 at 5:31:23 PM
Bill, one thing thta you must always remember about lubricating oil is that it always keeps moving, always keeps moving, always keeps moving. The oil that is deposited between the flanges on an S/A hub most definatly comes from the oiler whether it be the old style steel or the newer plastic. I have emoved the oiler on several hubs over the years and have found the barrel to remain grime-free. Also, the Sturmey line about the oil "flushing" the dirt out is rather specious. I have never found any thing that remotely appeared like dirt entry in any S/A hub---and I opened many. The frquent oiling S/A reommends results from oil loss and evaporation. None of my Shimano hubs has ever over flowed. I oil them every 3k or so.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHIMANO VS. Sturmry Archer 3-speed posted by bicyclepriest on 11/23/2000 at 10:15:25 PM
what an awesome topic. been awhile since I have seen so many
replies. I am impartial. Of course I have not taken apart too
many three speeds. Albert go it going on. It is best to know
about both styles, and I will need info in the future about
those Shimanos. I have exploded diagrams of a multitude of different
types of hubs. Single speed, coaster, three , four and five speed,
S/A, morrow, shimano, new depature, bendix, and more. Let me know
if your in need of a drawing. I could possible disassemble any
"old skool" hub with my drawing references. Then again being
"book learned" as compared to "street learned" makes all the
difference.

   1952 Raliegh Space Rider posted by Andrew Matthews on 12/1/2000 at 9:01:16 AM
I found a Raliegh bike called Space Rider. I had to write Nottinham England and they told me It is a 1952 model. It is green and and a 24 in boys bike. 3 speed S/A hub and has hand brakes as long w/ a pedal brake. Its very rideable. What may this bike be worth? Thank you all so much?






AGE / VALUE:   Confounded rust!I'm too late!! posted by: ChristopherRobin on 11/17/2000 at 11:54:47 AM
The ancient cardboad barrel in the corner of the basement has yielded some odd goodies but also some painful finds.I have found 3 old Simplex deraileurs (nothing that special) only one is usable the other two are only good for a part of it or two.( I love metal pulley wheels!!) The arm is rusted, the spring is 30% rusted, the whole piece is frozen solid. Its junk now, but I see the cool simplex logo on the one part that isn't rusted. It's in the ammonia solution and I hope to salvage something. Someone took apart hubs of all kinds and left the cogs on the drivers and gutted these hubs tossing parts into the barrel. New departure, Sturmey-Archer, Bendix, Mussleman, e.t.c. One dirty and partial rust on a Bendix brake arm. yellow or blue, or two speed red band hub. A star shaped hole in it never seen before. Two more hub shells, one is Elgin perhaps? Ribbed shells. A sturmey-Archer four speed planet cage rusted completely through! This was submerged I think. I'm absorbing "The Dancing Chain" so I can recognize parts and what they are and what they go to. e.t.c. Picked up a Lightning Dart 26 X 2.125 tire in all black, only one. Why can't it be the all white one? Schwinn front derailur N.O.S.made in France. What bike it's to? I dunno. More crazy skip tooth cogs with a slot in it. Theyre stuck on the drivers threaded or with snap rings. Threaded 1/2 X 1/8 cogs all sizes, threaded skip tooth stuff. Some of these skip tooth cogs have holes in them. Who did that? All kinds of rusty innards from hubs of long ago. So much peeling chrome and rust.


   RE:AGE / VALUE: Confounded rust!I'm too late!! posted by ChristopherRobin on 11/20/2000 at 5:27:44 PM
However I have pulled out a lot of things that have survived and most of it has a coating of oil. It's bothersome because I don't know if it has any value and I guess I will just pick up anything that is usable. Unidentified but usable.
If I had a bike pal with me there he/she would likely point to something and say "Why havn't you already snapped that up?" Don't you know those are sought after?

What hurts is knowing that so much of this stuff has been thrown away and is in landfill somewhere. The owner looks up in wonder and asks "Now what did you find?" Those solid rubber tires on the wall are driving me crazy!!! Childrens tricycles or wagon stuff, should I get it or not? Someone has a old tandem on e-bay so I finally get a look at the bike I have the cranks to.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian Roadsters posted by: JimW. on 11/17/2000 at 11:07:31 AM
There's an Indian bike company which has a very neat-looking
classic-style roadster. It has cable brakes, but everything else
is very traditional. It has 28x1 1/2" Westwood-style rims, full
oilbath chaincase, mudguards, hub-generator lighting, etc.
The really interesting thing is that they also sell all the
parts and accessories. Their site's worth checking out-
http://www.sameerexports.com/bicycles/cycles.htm


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian Roadsters posted by ChristopherRobin on 11/17/2000 at 12:24:18 PM
Very nice. Notice the twisted metal rear rack supports. Brooks made these racks long ago. I love the enclosed chaincase and even Raleigh's famed tubular fork.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian Roadsters posted by Tim Powell on 11/17/2000 at 2:38:04 PM
There are several sites in India that have old looking roadsters. The problem is that they will only sell you 25 plus bikes or a container load. I have been trying to find a mail-order outfit in India where I could buy single items. I have tried Ralson, Lowson, Big Ben Exports, Neelam Cycles etc. all to no avail. I will keep trying and if succesfull, post the results here.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian Roadsters posted by ChristopherRobin on 11/18/2000 at 7:52:26 AM
If I leave the country and go to India and apply at the factory will they hire a hard working American? I would enjoy the job. I can see them now saying "You too slow, need to hurry up!" Some people want to run away and join the circus...

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian Roadsters posted by Mark on 11/23/2000 at 10:46:54 AM
I bought one of the Indian roadsters( a Roadmaster), and frankly the damn thing was a piece of sh**!! It was scratched, the forks were WAY bent, the chain rubbed against the chain case, the saddle had a thick layer of MOLD growing on it, the chrome was a funny sort of fuzz that rubbed off on alot of parts,the brakes were baddly designed in such a way that it was impossible for them to actually stop the bike, the springs on the saddle sacked out the first time I sat on the bike( I had to replace them with Brooks springs),on and on. I would avoid them, unless you actually get to SEE it and RIDE it before you buy, I guess it is possible someone may have one that is better quality, but I doubt it!






AGE / VALUE:   Phillips date stamped cups posted by: ChristopherRobin on 11/17/2000 at 6:48:57 AM
Phillips bottom bracket parts have date stamps on them! One says 2 52 and these are machined cups that are really hard.







AGE / VALUE:   Indian posted by: sam on 11/17/2000 at 5:45:35 AM
Jeff,thinks for the info on the Indian Scout.I have a Hercules with the same chain ring and chain gard,the crank arms are stamped raleigh.It has a brass headbadge(I figure about1960)I wonder if raleigh built the B-grade bikes in the Phillips factory when they bought phillips?Any thoughs on this?Also there is another Scout on e-bay a girls model(499133886)------sam


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Indian posted by ChristopherRobin on 11/21/2000 at 5:28:23 PM
Good question! I'm not sure but the Smethwick factory was huge! I wonder what happened to it all when Raleigh bought up Phillips.






AGE / VALUE:   Phillips 3speed posted by: chuck on 11/16/2000 at 3:07:00 PM
When I got it 6 or 7 years ago, I cleaned it up and rode it around proudly, I love it! But it has no fenders or chaingaurd to keep my pants clean, so it sat! Now that I know it's worth it, I want to restore it. Where can I get parts?







MISC:   Sun Tour / Strumey Archer hub??? posted by: Robert on 11/16/2000 at 10:38:35 AM
Just picked up a Columbia lightweight " roadster". It has a 3 speed Suntour rear hub. It looks very much like a S/A hub.
Chain type indicator, old style shift trigger...., but no oiler hole.
Is this a restamped S/A unit or ???
What kind of maintenance should be done?
thanks


   RE:MISC:   Sun Tour / Strumey Archer hub??? posted by ChristopherRobin on 11/18/2000 at 1:27:30 PM
Same as in any Sturmey-Archer hub. The Sturmey-Archer book says the Columbia equiped bikes had improved hubs. Sturmey fixed the problem of it slipping into a no-gear free wheel and so these were hubs free of this annoying problem even when it is out of adjustment it will go into one gear or another. Get some Singer Sewing machine oil and put it in the oil hole, not too much. If there is no black plastic cap then it is factory sealed and uses grease. But I think this one still used oil.Look at Sheldon's page at http://www.Sheldonbrown.com Old bikes, Raleigh 3 speeds, e.t.c. This is an important shrine we stop at along the way.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Sun Tour / Strumey Archer hub??? posted by Albert on 11/19/2000 at 7:26:18 AM
Christopher, How do you identify the S/A hubs found on some Columbia cycles as having the no slip feature. Again, I understand not all Columbias were so equiped.

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   Sun Tour / Strumey Archer hub??? posted by ChristopherRobin on 11/19/2000 at 10:02:26 AM
I was mentioning that one book says that at some point Sturmey supplied hubs that had the slip problem fixed. I'm sure many Columbia bikes had hubs that sliped.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Sun Tour / Strumey Archer hub??? posted by Robert on 11/19/2000 at 8:22:42 PM
No oiler hole on this Suntour hub. Plan on removing the indicator and trying to feed it a little oil through the axle opening.
I know it was talked about in the past , but this Columia is truely an American Roadster. Nice "Tweety Bird" yellow paint with black pinstriping.
Looking forward to getting it fitted with new rubber and giving it a run.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Sun Tour / Strumey Archer hub??? posted by Robert on 11/19/2000 at 8:23:52 PM
No oiler hole on this Suntour hub. Plan on removing the indicator and trying to feed it a little oil through the axle opening.
I know it was talked about in the past , but this Columia is truely an American Roadster. Nice "Tweety Bird" yellow paint with black pinstriping.
Looking forward to getting it fitted with new rubber and giving it a run.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Sun Tour / Strumey Archer hub??? posted by Robert on 11/19/2000 at 8:23:54 PM
No oiler hole on this Suntour hub. Plan on removing the indicator and trying to feed it a little oil through the axle opening.
I know it was talked about in the past , but this Columia is truely an American Roadster. Nice "Tweety Bird" yellow paint with black pinstriping.
Looking forward to getting it fitted with new rubber and giving it a run.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Sun Tour / Strumey Archer hub??? posted by Robert on 11/20/2000 at 5:57:42 AM
Sorry about triple post!!!!!






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   DL-1 headset adjustment posted by: Leon on 11/16/2000 at 7:26:14 AM
I own a late 70's DL-1. I need help adjusting the headset. The upper 3 races seem to be aligned but the bottom one seems to be slightly tilted with more of the race showing at the back and less at the front. As a result, there is either too much play or there is a bind when I turn the bars to the right. Is there any easy answer? Could a good bike shop easily get the races correctly aligned? I assume the misalignment is due to some accident before I purchased the bike because there are some indentations on the right side of the fenders. Hope to hear from all of you!


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   DL-1 headset adjustment posted by Jon on 11/16/2000 at 9:05:16 AM
From either side of the bike, the rake of the fork should always curve forward from the centerline of the head tube. If it curves even slightly behind and then forward, then you can assume that the fork is bent. It's also possible that the top of the fork tube is bent inside the head tube. You may also inspect the head tube for signs of stress around the lugwork. If the fork is knocked out of alignment left or right, and/or the head tube is not parallel to the seat tube, this will affect how the bike tracks when you sit straight up on the bike and attempt to ride no handed.(You have to lean left or right to make the bike track straight.) In any case, an experienced mechanic should be able to identify and repair it.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   DL-1 headset adjustment posted by Dale Oswald on 11/20/2000 at 5:55:33 AM
Probably suffered an injury. Headset races may be out of round, at least will probably need to be re-milled. Many good shops have a milling tool. Also check if the race is moving around on the fork, it shouldn't.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   DL-1 headset adjustment posted by Bill Putnam on 11/20/2000 at 11:47:00 AM
I have a Raleigh built Dunelt which had the head tube
faces skewed (not perpendicular to the axis of the head
tube). My local bike shop milled the head tube faces
and the fork crown race face, and now the headset adjusts
and works fine. It seems that this was one area Raleigh
wasn't too careful with, at least in the 70's, and whoever
sold the bike originally didn't care enough to make sure
that this was correct. If the frame and fork haven't
been damaged as Jon and Dale have mentioned, milling
the head tube and fork should do the trick.






AGE / VALUE:   Phillips 3speed posted by: c.s. on 11/15/2000 at 1:55:59 PM
I have a Phillips with mechanical instead of cable brakes. Made in England, but it's now in California. 28x1 1/2 tires(flat now). Sturmey Archer with AW 64 11 stamped on the hub. I love the chrome bars for brakes! How and where can I get parts for this? Is it worth restoring? Any info on it?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Phillips 3speed posted by ChristopherRobin@starmail.com on 11/15/2000 at 5:35:54 PM
Cool!
Phillips was a huge company and this was their version of the Raleigh Tourist D.L.1 this is worth getting tires and tubes for, shifter cables, brake cables, a overhaul of bearings and bottom bracket parts. Go take it out and have a ride and you will fall in love with it. This is a nice bike and bike collector people will buy it if the price is right. The only version of this still made is the Pashley and it is like $1000.00 shiped. You have a commuter bike, an English Roadster and if you haven't see Sheldon Brown's page you should. http://www.Sheldonbrown.com Harris cycle section under old bikes, English Roadsters. These are even more cool if you have the enclosed chaincase and a rear rack and a bell maket it more neet. You will get looks and offers to buy and it is a romantic, cool bike and you don't turn these up very easily anymore. I have to go looking as we all do. Now there is E-bay and these pop up there but mostly the 26 inch cable brake versions are found. Welcome to our little club. Sheldon Brown sells the tires, and some other parts. Whatever you need, let us know here. Origonal parts are hard to come by, but you are in the right place for spare parts and they offer things for sale here at oldroads.com so check it out here under things for sale. I know this bike very well and we have Keith and Sam and Sheldon is with us too. You couldn't have found a better group.There are exploded diagrams here under Raleigh, Rudge, Humber these are very similar, taking the same tires. Phillips had 24 t.p.i. threads which is easier to get parts for.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Phillips 3speed posted by sam on 11/16/2000 at 7:30:12 AM
Great that you have a real phillips,will add that at sometime after Raleigh took over they licensed the Phillips brand to be made in Mexico.These were not as good , the chrome not very high quality and usualy only one speed.But it's good to know because the tires are sometimes still available and cheep too.So if you are near the border check out the Mex bike shops---sam






AGE / VALUE:   Phillips 3speed posted by: c.s. on 11/15/2000 at 1:55:59 PM
I have a Phillips with mechanical instead of cable brakes. Made in England, but it's now in California. 28x1 1/2 tires(flat now). Sturmey Archer with AW 64 11 stamped on the hub. I love the chrome bars for brakes! How and where can I get parts for this? Is it worth restoring?







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh posted by: Doug on 11/14/2000 at 10:59:56 PM
Can anybody tell me all the makes of bikes Raleigh made. I have a 1973 Raleigh Sport, a 1952 Rudge, a 1967 Hercules, and a 1964 Armstrong. Are there anyother makes.


   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh posted by ChristopherRobin@starmail.com on 11/15/2000 at 5:41:02 PM
Someone who loves Indian Motorcycles would like to have the bicycle too just for the name. Even better that is is genuine Phillips. This means it probably has full ball bearing pedals too.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh posted by sam on 11/15/2000 at 6:15:31 AM
There is a list of companies raleigh took over on the Raleigh serial number list on this site.As for all the names Raleigh used I dought even Christopher Robin can tell you that,Raleigh shiped bikes world wide and made models for whoever ordered a large enough order.Most bike makers did the same.On ebay I saw a bike called Indian Scout,It was a raleigh made bike.With dew respect I'm sure Christoper could list quite a few raleigh model names he's seen over the years.---sam

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh posted by Jeff on 11/15/2000 at 4:20:00 PM
The Indian Scout on eBay is of '51 vintage. It was made by Phillips. This is not my bike, but I also have one of the same vintage, and the component parts have Phillips stamped on them. Raleigh didn't buy out Phillips until around 1960. These bikes were made for the Indian Motorcycle Company in Springfield, Massachusetts, and like Raleigh, Phillips also made bikes for anyone who would order them in large numbers.

   RE:The Indian to find is a motorcycle! posted by ChristopherRobin on 11/18/2000 at 1:36:11 PM
Everyone stops chewing and they ask me to bring in the Indian Motorcycle I found. Next day the whole place is in a circle looking at this. They all agreed I wasn't ready for it yet. Wonderful book out on Indian Motorcycles too. Lovely bicycle though.






AGE / VALUE:   Bicycle swap meet December 3, 2000. Swansea, Massachusetts posted by: Joe on 11/14/2000 at 8:33:45 AM
Bicycle swap meet December 3, 2000. Swansea, Massachusetts. Free to all vendors and the public. Please email me if interested.

Thank you, Joe







AGE / VALUE:   NOS Dynohub Magnet with Keeper For Sale posted by: Jon on 11/13/2000 at 3:41:12 PM
See For Sale/Wanted







AGE / VALUE:   28 inch tires on E-bay posted by: ChristopherRobin on 11/13/2000 at 11:52:47 AM
Item # 497414364 tires 28X 1 1/2 OR 28x1 1/2 X1 1/2 Seller says this is a rare size. Check it out 6 days left