OldRoads.com

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Archived: English Roadsters







AGE / VALUE:   Help, I am a oil idiot posted by: alex on 7/21/2000 at 8:07:37 PM
Chris R..... I already put some 3 in 1 into my 3 speed s/a hub just before reading your response advising against doing so. What's wrong with 3 in 1 oil??? Should I drain out the hub and start over?? PLease advise before I mess up this fine bicycle.... Thanx. alex


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Help, I am a oil idiot posted by JohnM on 7/24/2000 at 5:54:55 AM
Word is that 3-in-1 will gum things up over a period of time. The most readily available high grade, lightweight, non-gumming oil will be either sewing machine oil or gun oil, depending upon your neighborhood. I would stay away from anything which has additives like teflon or graphite. I've had good luck with Hoppes gun oil, in the orange and yellow can.

The good news is that oil hubs are pretty much self cleaning - you put new oil in the center fitting, and the old oil and accumulated dirt ooze out the sides, near the bearings. Sturmey Archer used to say to add 2 or 3 drops of oil a week - to flush out the hub I would start with maybe a dozen drops the first week. Remember to wipe off the ends of the hub frequently. Over a period of time the old oil will be replaced.






AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Spacerider posted by: Marilyn on 7/21/2000 at 2:38:22 PM
Have Raleigh Spacerider,female, light blue/white, front & rear fenders,
chain guard, tire size front & back is 24 x 1 3/8-original Raleigh
tires! Has original gold decals, paint, etc. in very good
condition & good working order. Need some idea of the year of
manufacture and value. Might consider selling if the price
is right! Tag under the seat has a number 2_30 (missing digit
is rubbed off) if that helps. Thanks for any information.







AGE / VALUE:   Greg Lemond's Gitane posted by: Frank on 7/21/2000 at 3:34:53 AM
Hi guys.
I posted some questions regarding my recent garage-find (a replica of Greg Lemond's Gitane, the blue bike on the cyclesdeoro.com french bike page) further down the page. Great response, thanks a lot, but one answer eludes me:
Hoe old is this bike? I thought Greg Lemond did't win TDF until the late 80's. And I know it's not that new.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Greg Lemond's Gitane posted by Keith on 7/22/2000 at 1:39:37 PM
Your bike remains a mystery to me. The plastic Simplex and Maffac brakes scream 1970s. But you say it's a dead ringer for Lemond's Gitane (look a Cycles De Oro site). But look closely -- his was not equiped as yours -- the brakes are small sidepulls -- Campy, and the derailleur is not a black plastic Simplex. Are your decals like his? If so, perhaps its a repaint (my '76 Paramount has late 80s decals from when it was repainted in Waterford). I think you've got a 70s machine -- way before Lemond (his years were '86, '89, and '90, right?). Still it's a nice bike -- basically a Peugeot PX-10 clone, and heck, there's a whole website devoted to them. The Simplex/Maffac/Stronglight/531 db combo was a huge winner in the 60s, before Campy eclipsed it. By the way, I had the pleasure of working on a friend's PX-10 last week. A piece of history. So's your Gitane.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Greg Lemond's Gitane posted by Frank on 7/24/2000 at 7:26:38 AM
My bike looks exacly the same frame and colorwise as Lemond's but as you pointed out it isn't equipped as his was. When did he ride that bike in the picture? If this wasn't before late 80's I cannot for the life of me figure out why my bike has been in its current shape and hue since 1986. I have campy pedals on mine, but they are so worn that I can't make out anything but Camp..... but they are aluminum.
Also, the brakes, chainrings and derailleurs are different. But everything else is a match, the seatpost, ram horns, brake levers, even the seat... And I'm pretty sure that it hasn't been repainted after 1986, at which point I was told that it was already a few years old. Anyway, if it is late 80's and not early 80's doesnt't really matter, for it is truly a sweet ride.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Greg Lemond's Gitane posted by Keith on 7/31/2000 at 6:22:24 AM
I checked a greg lemond book out at the library -- it shows him riding the Gitane in two races in 1983 -- the Tour of Lombardy, and the World Championships.






MISC:   Super Course posted by: Keith on 7/20/2000 at 7:53:24 AM
God help me. I'm about to buy a 70s Raleigh Super Course. Sure, it's not high-end, but it's Reynolds-Nervex-Raleigh combo, and understated French components sucked me in. My wife is going to leave me for this one.


   RE:MISC:   Super Course posted by phil on 7/20/2000 at 8:37:28 AM
Buy if you must, but sin no more.

Mine looks great hanging in the garage.

Super Course, that is, not wife.

   RE:MISC:   Super Course posted by Keith on 7/20/2000 at 10:57:46 AM
Alas, I am defeated -- outbid at the last moment while out of the office. Congrats to the winner -- hope it was one of you. Went for 105.96. Unless you'll sell me yours, Phil (wouldn't expect you to though). I need a vintage bike fix! Something pre-1975 in my size and with 531 tubes. AGHH!

   RE:RE:MISC:   Super Course posted by Oscar on 7/20/2000 at 7:21:36 PM
Better than sleeping on the couch.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   One Speed Not Working-Help! posted by: Paul on 7/19/2000 at 7:58:27 PM
I own a wonderful Raleigh Sports Tourist 3 Speed53.It has a rear Dynohub, that has a working internal generator. However, the low gear does not work(problem in the hub notthe shifter). I lubed the hub with the correct weight oil, butte low gear still does not work. Someone suggested squirting WD 40 into the hub to "loosen it up" but I am afraid of ruining the Dynohub electrical contacts, I wouldnever disasemble the Dynohub, and I really never use the low gear. All advise from you pros appreciated...It is a 1953.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   One Speed Not Working-Help! posted by Keith on 7/22/2000 at 1:42:57 PM
I still have yet to take one of these SAs apart. I avoided doing so once by spraying half a can of WD-40 into a gummed up one, laying the bike on its side, and letting it run out. I followed with fresh motor oil, and it works fine.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   One Speed Not Working-Help! posted by Sheldon Brown on 7/20/2000 at 4:30:46 PM
WD40 is wrong for almost any bicycle use, but this might be an exception. If your hub freewheels when it should be in low gear, it means that the low-gear pawls are stuck, probably by dried-up grease. A very light oil, such as the infamous WD40 may, indeed free these up if you get it in there and then ride the bike. This might take hours, days or weeks to work.

Since Dynohubs have a stationary armature with a rotating magnets, there are no electrical contacts, unless you count the screw terminals that the external wiring attaches to.

Good luck,

Sheldon






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   oil for the 3 posted by: alex on 7/18/2000 at 7:40:37 PM
greetings and thanx to C. Robin on the info on my Robin Hood 3 speed. After knocking off the light rust with #000 steel wool from the chrome and re-paccking the front bearing set, I really love this bicycle. The hub is stamped "69 16". I can guess that the 69 means 1969 but what does 16 stand for?? also what type of oil is used for the rear hub. The bike shifts and rides like a dream and I want to keep it that way.... thanx. Alex j.


   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   oil for the 3 posted by ChristopherRobin on 7/22/2000 at 8:23:23 AM
The 3 in one oil can lead to the pawls being gummed up and sticking when the oil dries up. I would follow it up with the sewing machine oil or the genuine Sturmey-Archer hub oil. If you are going to order from Sheldon then get some Sturmey-Archer oil. Do not worry, just do not do it again. If this gives you trouble then you will have to open the hub up and flush it out.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   oil for the 3 posted by ChristopherRobin on 7/20/2000 at 7:20:27 AM
Singer sewing machine oil found in fabric shops. Do not use 3 in one oil.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   oil for the 3 posted by alex on 7/21/2000 at 8:04:02 PM
Chris R..... I already put 3 in 1 oil in the hub just before reading the e-mail you had sent. (gasp!) What is bad about the 3 in 1 oil??? Is it the petroleum distillates (solvent)in the oil? Should I drain out hub and flush it out somehow? PLease advise before I kill my 3 sp hub.... Thanx---Alex






MISC:   Off Subject posted by: Tom Faust on 7/18/2000 at 7:25:14 PM
Following the responses to my question about lightweight bikes, I have taken the plunge. I found an Austro Daimler 10 speed, still in the box. It is black with gold pinstripes. Sound familiar? I was fascinated by a black bike, made by an Austrian gunmaker. As soon as I have completed the Shimano Nexus conversion on the Raleigh, I will put it together.


   RE:MISC:   Off Subject posted by Keith on 7/20/2000 at 6:58:10 AM
BRAVO! You won't regret it!






AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by: Tamara on 7/17/2000 at 11:24:25 PM
Hello all,

Just checking in with an update and a few questions. The update: I was pondering the purchase of a DL-1 a few months ago and heeded the sage advice of ChristopherRobin, Fred and others about the wisdom of purchasing a bike that might not be the perfect ride I was looking for, esp. being of relatively petite stature (that would be me, not the bike). :) Instead, I bided my time with a Sports, Sprite or Superbe in mind. Well, I've happened upon a lovely Superbe that is just my size, in absolutely pristine condition ('74) and within my budget. I am so delighted and can hardly wait to get it home!

My questions are thus: the bike is in original condition, including the tires (26"), but they don't hold air and the rubber looks a bit old and possibly cracked/leaky. What is the best route to go re purchasing new tires meant to fit old English three speeds? Does Harris Cycles perhaps carry them?
Also, it doesn't look like the locking fork comes with a key. Is that going to be a problem and is it possibe to get a replacement? What is the function of a locking fork - security?

That's all for now. I'll post more details when I've got the bike home!

Thanks and good riding!

Tamara


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by Wings on 7/18/2000 at 12:09:17 AM
Sounds great!!!
The Schwinn specialist with locks (he may be able to help you also) is Wes Pinchot; 847 259 0484.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by Fred on 7/18/2000 at 8:06:02 AM
I am happy for you, "All things come to she who waits".
Before discarding the original tires, I would dismount them and inspect the carcasses very carefully. If the fabric of the tires is good and the cracks in the rubber superficial, I would keep the tires. The source of the air loss is the tubes which should be replaced with the thorn proof type if possible especially if you keep the old tires. If the tires are not satisfactory I would replace them with all black ones. I no longer buy gumwall tires since the light rubber deteriorates very rapidly. 26 x 1 3/8 tires are available at most shops. If not in stock they can certainly order them. Good luck with your new bike and keep us informed of your experience with it.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by phil on 7/18/2000 at 8:06:46 AM
Tamara
Hoorah for you!! The bike sounds perfect. Yes Harris does carry tires (as do most of the local bike shops for this bike), but I have found a great tire online at "AgeeBike Shop" (in Virginia I think).
Go to: http://www.agees.com/opening.htm
Clic on Products and then on Tires & tubes,
Then scroll down to "67211 26 X 1 3/8 EACH 3 GUM 6.99"

I've ordered several of these tires at the very reasonable price of $6.99. They are Kenda Gumwalls (like a whitewall, but tan) capable of inflating to 90psi and they look sharp on the Raleigh Sports. I think the copy on their web page has a typo, it's really a 26x1 3/8 EA3. Might as well get new tubes at the same time.

To answer your second question, yes, the key for the front lock is to prevent anyone from riding your bike off. Cool, but not very secure. But as long as the bike isn't currently locked don't worry it won't effect the rideability. Maybe a locksmith could make you another.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by phil on 7/18/2000 at 8:13:19 AM
Gee, Fred, within a minute you're saying how gumwalls are bad choices and I'm saying that I like them for their looks. We're going to present Tamara a problem in choosing.


   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by Tamara on 7/18/2000 at 10:31:22 AM
Thanks, all!

I'll check out the tires, and I appreciate all the info on buying new ones -- I'm all for diversity of opinions. ;)

I'll give you a full report as soon as I can. The one thing I can report is that it was bought in Munich, Germany in 1974 and hasn't been ridden for about 20 years; it's in absolute lovely and original condition.

By the way, is there any type of checklist archived somewhere that lists the things one should check after acquiring a vintage bike? Any vintage bicycle maintenance book (aimed toward the English three-speed) recommendations -- for a greenhorn?

Thanks again!

Tamara

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by Wings on 7/18/2000 at 11:32:40 PM
I will not purchase gumwalls anymore because the gumwall cracks and falls apart while the black rubber is sound. I am taking off old tires from bikes all the time and the gumwalls have a much shorter life. They look cool but they do not last.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by ChristopherRobin@starmail.com on 7/22/2000 at 8:27:35 AM
Have you noticed while visiting this site that they do not offer a 28 inch tire (28 X 1/2)? You can buy a tube but not a 28 inch D.L.1. Roadster tire. What's up with this? they have an awesome selection don't they?,
but no 28's.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by Tamara on 7/22/2000 at 7:35:34 PM
Thanks, Bill! Well, I finally picked up the bike today, an it's a beaut. A bit of dust, no rust, all original and everything in place except for the small silver pump and the key for the locking fork. I pumped up the tires (Raleigh, made in Belgium) and they seem to be holding air so far! I took a spin, and the ride was smooth and steady except for first gear, which wouldn't hold in place without manually holding down the shifter. I expect this is a result of being in storage for so long and some dust and no lube has led to a sticky hub. I read the posting aka using WD-40 to loosen up the hub, but I'm not sure that's my problem. Should I try the light oil first, then, if it doesn't respond, go with the WD-40?
Also, can I go ahead and use a mild, diluted soap and water mixture to clean the frame/chrome before polishing w/auto wax? I'm not sure of the correct cleaning solution to use, so suggestions as to what/how to give the bike a good cleaning is much appreciated!
As an aside, the Prestube rear rack is the same green color as the bike, the tires (though cracked round the gumwall) still have the thin rubber nubbs around the sides and top of the tire (hardly ridden), and the pinstripes and decals look untouched. Quite a bike, and it won't take ,much at all to uncover its vintage beauty!

Thanks again for all the great advice and shared experience!

Happy trails!

Tamara

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by ChristopherRobin on 7/23/2000 at 9:27:26 AM
You are right, the gumwalls do not last as well do not look as nice but they are a faster tire.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by ChristopherRobin on 7/23/2000 at 9:28:06 AM
You are right, the gumwalls do not last as well do not look as nice but they are a faster tire.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by JimW. on 7/20/2000 at 9:13:29 AM
I don't even like the way they look. I call them "condom-walls". Black is beautiful!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by Bill Putnam on 7/21/2000 at 10:37:55 AM
Tamara,

Congratulations on your "new" bicycle! Sheldon Brown has
some great information on the care of old British three
speeds at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/english-3.html and
specifics on Raleighs at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/raleigh.html
Harris Cyclery sells several different tyres for these bikes,
the Kenda's mentioned above are a good value for the money
but if you want some nicer tyres Harris Cyclery has them as
well(look around their website). I'll stay out of the gumwall
vs. blackwall debate but will say that in the later years
(including 1974) the Superbe was supplied with gumwalls.
I had a local locksmith make a key for my Superbe, but we did
have to take the lock mechanism out of the fork. The fork lock
is to deter thieves, but in this day in age a would be thief
might sue you if they hurt themselves trying to steal your bike!

Bill

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by Bill Putnam on 7/25/2000 at 8:46:56 AM
Tamara,

Your description of needing to hold the shift lever
taught to engage first gear is likely due to the
shift cable being adjusted incorrectly (in this case
too loose). Again see Sheldon's web articles (noted
previously) for maintenance questions. One thing I
have noticed over the years is that sometimes the
indicator chains can get replaced by indicator chains
of a different length (the rod portion length varies
based on the axle length). Hence, adjusting so that
2nd gear has the rod flush with the axle end may not
give the correct setting. What I do is just tighten
the adjusting barrel a little bit at a time until
it's to a point where when first gear is selected,
there indicator chain can be pulled no further-the
chain should be taught but not tight. Of course,
adding some oil is very important to smooth operation
and long life. Sheldon indicated previously that WD-40
may loosen up old oil, but with the symptoms you describe
I would not expect this to be your problem. I'd recommend
oiling the hub, adjust the inicator chain. Of course it's
good to be sure that the hub bearings are adjusted correctly-
there should be ever so slight an amount of play in the
rear wheel at the rim (see Sheldon's web site).

It should be fine to use a mild dish soap with water to wash,
take care around the transfers not to rub them off. The older
3-speeds should not be waxed but rather oiled with a light oil.
The paint on the old Raleighs is different than
used on modern bikes or for that matter many older bikes, and
just wiping oil over the paint does the trick. I usually clean
my bike once per year in the fall when I put it away. I wash it down with
WD-40, wipe oil over the paint, and that's it. Of course
regrease the headset occasionally and bottom bracket if there
is no oiler. Regular maintenance includes oiling the hubs
(front and rear) and taking the chain off, soaking in Kerosene
then WD-40, then oiling, which is easy to do with a master link.
I don't ride my nice Raleigh in the winter
sand and salt, and park it under a covered area out of
the sun. Cleaning the finish too often will just wear
it out more quickly, so for me an annual cleaning is
adequate.

Bill

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by Tamara on 7/25/2000 at 1:13:24 PM
Bill,

Thanks so much for the information! I actually did a bunch of cleaning/basic maintenance work on the bike on Sunday and was able to both lube the rear hub with sewing machine oil (great stuff, the hub drank it up) and adjust the indicator chain so that the gears shift smoothly and first holds like a charm! I dove into sheldon's site for a good while, printed out a bunch of info and learned even more about my bike -- very cool!
I also ended up cleaning the frame and chrome with a mild soap and water solution, then polished it up on Sunday with turtle wax. The color and richness of the paint really came through and the chrome shone like it was brand new. Gorgeous! Hopefully I didn't cause any wear by using the turtle wax, but the bike seemed to really take to it, so I'm trusting it's an acceptable option...
I think I may change out the tires. They still hold air, but I wouldn't trust em any farther than I'd want to walk home, so for practicality's sake, think I'll retire the old ones to the basement and put on some tires that can take me the distance. Cause that superbe really needs some road time! ;)

Thanks again! I've now been officially bitten by the bug!
Bring on another fixer, I say!!

:) Tamara

Question for the day: What is the difference between a bike enthusiast and a fanatic? I'm afraid I'm definitely into the first camp and not sure how I can avoid the other!

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   from DL-1 fever to Superbe sickness ;) posted by Tamara on 7/25/2000 at 1:14:09 PM
Bill,

Thanks so much for the information! I actually did a bunch of cleaning/basic maintenance work on the bike on Sunday and was able to both lube the rear hub with sewing machine oil (great stuff, the hub drank it up) and adjust the indicator chain so that the gears shift smoothly and first holds like a charm! I dove into sheldon's site for a good while, printed out a bunch of info and learned even more about my bike -- very cool!
I also ended up cleaning the frame and chrome with a mild soap and water solution, then polished it up on Sunday with turtle wax. The color and richness of the paint really came through and the chrome shone like it was brand new. Gorgeous! Hopefully I didn't cause any wear by using the turtle wax, but the bike seemed to really take to it, so I'm trusting it's an acceptable option...
I think I may change out the tires. They still hold air, but I wouldn't trust em any farther than I'd want to walk home, so for practicality's sake, think I'll retire the old ones to the basement and put on some tires that can take me the distance. Cause that superbe really needs some road time! ;)

Thanks again! I've now been officially bitten by the bug!
Bring on another fixer, I say!!

:) Tamara

Question for the day: What is the difference between a bike enthusiast and a fanatic? I'm afraid I'm definitely into the first camp and not sure how I can avoid the other!

   Open the gate, Tamara is one of us, She's ok! posted by ChristopherRobin on 7/25/2000 at 4:45:47 PM
Welcome to the club,We will be here.

   RE:Open the gate, Tamara is one of us, She's ok! posted by tamara on 7/26/2000 at 7:17:31 PM
Thanks, ChristopherRobin! I consider it an honor to have the garden gate swing open before me and such a fine throng of English roadster fans welcome me so warmly into the fold. Tell me, is there a limit on the number of bikes I can drag into the yard?! ;)

   RE:RE:Open the gate, Tamara is one of us, She's ok! posted by http://www.ChristopherRobin@starmail.com on 7/30/2000 at 1:41:41 PM
Welcome Tamara, now that you are inside our secret bike garden please accept this key to the gate.You will need a bike rack on the back of your automobile so you can bring home future trophys. Know that we are here to help out.






AGE / VALUE:   Elswicks posted by: Tom Faust on 7/17/2000 at 7:54:11 PM
I have dug my self a hole again and need some help. I picked up a pair of Elswicks. One is in the general configuration of a Raleigh Sport. 26" 1-3/8". Hercules 3 speed hub "B Type 4". Small decal "U.S. Army" indicates to me that it was brought home after the war(the Big One). Mostly it needs rims and handlebars (rust) does anyone know of an interchange. The other is a childs bike, 24", single speed, rod brakes. Same rust problems as the bigger bike.







FOR SALE:    posted by: Tim on 7/17/2000 at 7:57:02 PM
Ladies large frame Raleigh Tourist F/S. with bag, pump, Brooks rear carrier and book. 1972.Brooks saddle. $250.00 located on Long Island, NY


   RE:FOR SALE:    posted by jay on 7/19/2000 at 6:35:52 AM
what color is the bike?

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:    posted by ChristopherRobin on 7/20/2000 at 7:25:13 AM
The bike is not mine, but I am sure it is black and $250.00 sounds reasonable to me. Ask for a picture of the bike Does this have an enclosed chainguard? bell? rear rack? basket? are the tires origonal? Says Raleigh Roadster(Semperit) on them. Chrome condition?






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Fun Stuff posted by: Keith on 7/17/2000 at 10:38:11 AM
20" rod-brake Dunelt(not mine)Ebay 381446528 -- looks rough and has non-original partys, but hey, maybe it will go cheap! More fun - lady with Rudge c. 1909, Ebay 383594938.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Fun Stuff posted by Bill H on 7/17/2000 at 2:57:02 PM
Keith, I had a hard drive failure and lost all my e-mail addresses, and also changed to a DSL line with a new e-mail address. Please send me your e-mail address so I may update my book. I'll send you a picture of the Mercian with new seat and moustache bars! Bill H






MISC:   Columbia Tandem (sorry off the subject) posted by: phil on 7/17/2000 at 8:00:47 AM
Sorry this off the subject of our "true loves", but I have a Columbia Tandem (probably 20 years old) with a 5 speed derailuer hanging in the garage. Every now and again, my kids and I take it down to fool around with. Problem is that when I shift it to the very lowest gear the chain comes off its front sprocket and jams. Now I know nothing (or very little) about derailuers (including how to spell it). Any suggestions on a fix? Need more info??


   An easy fix posted by Oscar on 7/17/2000 at 12:55:26 PM
Front and rear derailleurs have little adjustment screws that limit the amount the cages will travel. If your front derailleur cage can travel too far toward the bike or too far away from it, the chain will slip off. (I assume this is a problem with the front derailleur, but almost the same will apply to the rear)

If you're lucky, the derailleur screws will be marked H or L (high or low: high is the big chain ring and low is the little chain ring) Turning the H screw in will limit how far the cage will travel out, turning the L screw will limit how far it will travel in. Of course, you can always turn the screws too far, so play with it a little.

Good luck. Check in if my note is unclear.


   RE:MISC:   Columbia Tandem (sorry off the subject) posted by Wings on 7/18/2000 at 12:04:12 AM
I assume that you only have a rear derailer since you only have 5 speeds. Right?
"When I shift to the very lowest gear"-- By this I am not sure if you are talking about the small cog (highest gear) or the largest cog (lowest gear).
Either case:
1. Make sure the derailer keeps tension on the chain.
2. If the problem is with the largest cog--make sure the chain is not too tight. With the chain on the largest cog, pinch the chain and make sure you have at least 2 links that will double over each other. My recumbents have long chains and need more slack than regular bikes.
3. If that all seems to be ok--and you only have only one chain wheel in front-- (no derailer in front)-- Then I would do what the hard riding BMX kids do! I would add an old front derailer to the single chain wheel in front and turn the adjustment screws (as Oscar indicated) so that the derailer will not move and that it does not touch your chain in any of the 5 positions as you shift the rear derailer. No cable to the front derailer! The front derailer is now fixed in place to make sure the chain does not jump off. If the chain starts to jump it should get pushed back on!!!
Oh, the front derailer has a screw that can be unscrewed to allow it to slip over your chain without breaking your chain.
I am not sure exactly what the problem is, but with Oscar's good advice and this makeshift setup (if needed) you should have fun with the kids!

   RE:RE:MISC:   Columbia Tandem (sorry off the subject) posted by phil on 7/18/2000 at 8:19:49 AM
Thanks guys. Yes, the bike only has a rear derailluer and it jumps off the front chain wheel when going to the smallest cog. I'll try those suggestions.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   AMF Hercules - 3 speed posted by: Joe on 7/16/2000 at 7:40:18 PM
I just purchased this "Old" bicycle at a yard sale.
I was wondering if you "Professionals" out there can help me find out a few things about this bike.

I was wondering what the "Real Value of the bike is worth"?
what is the year it was manufactured?

Information is as follows;

AMF Hercules - Made in Nottingham England
3-speeds - shifter (Thumb or finger activated) on handle bars - Sturmey Archer (Cables)
Brooks Seat - made in England
2196022 stamped in frame under the seat mounting location
Bates Dunlap Lightweight tires 26 X 1 3/8 tires (made in England)

The rear rim has a small chain that changes the gears and operates very well. the paint appears to be in orginal condition (Black with Gold pin stripes) there is a riveted on plate on the frame in front of the handle bars. Both front and rear fenders are complete - even the rear reflector is not broken. the chain guard is there and complete with the AMF sticker. there is a sticker on the lower main frame rail (Men's Bike) that comes from the handle bars to the sprocket this sticker is about 1/2 missing but there is a picture of a Lion on it.
the rims cleaned up very nicely and all chrome is shinny. I feel like I made a good purchase!

Please let me know the history and value of this bike if anyone can! THANKS IN ADVANCE!


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   AMF Hercules - 3 speed posted by Warren on 7/16/2000 at 9:26:31 PM

It's monetary value can range from $25 to $150 in my part of the world...older bikes are now marketed as retro-chic in urban centres. It's real value lies in the fact it is likely a very good quality bike that will likely ride very well for as long as you wish to take care of it.Three speed Sport bikes are nimble and bombproof but plentiful enough that we won't likely see a lot of equity out of collecting them...there are exceptions of course and therein lies the thrill of the hunt for old bikes. Once every blue moon a gem will cross your path and hopefully we're awake and ready for it.

Look at the rear hub for a month and year stamp....

It's a good question...Real Value! I think bike people need to read "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance" if they haven't already done so...

I don't think the group represents professionals as much as it speaks for enthusiasts...I'm rambling now...must sleep!

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   AMF Hercules - 3 speed posted by Keith on 7/17/2000 at 6:15:32 AM
I too deny being a professional. For what it's worth, I agree with the $25 to $125, but I think you'd have to work very hard to get $125. As Warren suggests, the real value of the machine is not its potential selling price, but its the inherent value it has -- especially compared to contemporary bicycles -- due to its quality.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   AMF Hercules - 3 speed posted by Edpowers on 7/19/2000 at 11:51:19 AM
What a neat site --- so I'm new to it -- but you guys seem so good...I just started to put back together my old Hercules -- I got it new in 1956 or 1957 --- can't be sure of date-- and it's followed me through many garages and cellars since 1964, when I hung it up..... How can I find a serial #? I looked all over -- is it on the rear hub? mine is caked with oil...and is there a market for parts -- I need the kinda weak tin piece that bends around and holds up the rear fender -- and the screw on piece for the post that holds the tab on the chain guard .. -- need two pedals, all I've got left is two spikes..would like to get an original metal pump..mine is gone, but the little bracket supports are still there......Front piece says HERCULES Birmingham, England --- other ID are decals -- Finest Quality Steel -- Hand Brazed....Gear is a Hi Neutral Low...little chain goes directly into the rear hub,,I assume value lies in condition and it can't be worth more than $100 -- but my goal is to ride it again, not sell it. Can you guys direct me to parts places? Are there any other web sites that provide info on Hercules..any original or generic equipment sites?.and is the refinishing kit advertised on this site worth it?? Thanks for listening -- Ed Powers

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   AMF Hercules - 3 speed posted by EdPowers on 7/19/2000 at 4:46:16 PM
Ok -- I'm learning --I cleaned the hub and it says Hercules -- B TYPE 4 is above the name and address of the Company --- and I tried again to find a serila # but can't --- where would it be....couldn't find a response to my inquiry on the "database" section of the website - turned up a 1948 model --- any hints or directions for me? thanks againn -- Ed Powers






MISC:   Bike Weight Question posted by: Tom Faust on 7/16/2000 at 3:10:57 PM
This question is prompted by my girlfriend's constant comments that I need a lighter bike. My '73 Sport, converted to SA S5, seems to keep pace with her Specialized whatever. At 6'2", 185 lb., it seems to me that I should get down to 1% body fat before I worry about losing weight off the bike. Does a lighter bike have any independent value? Where can I get a stem that will allow me to raise the handlbars another inch or three?


   RE:MISC:   Bike Weight Question posted by Fred on 7/16/2000 at 5:19:40 PM
Tom: There are definitely advantages to a lighter bike. A lot depends on the type of riding you do, the terrain, and your own preferences. I have several Sports which weigh in at about 34 lbs. I also have several road bikes that weigh from 19 lbs. to 24 lbs. I love to ride both types of bike but there are rides where I would never use my Sports e.g., in the hills. Conversely, I wouldn't think of taking my 19 lb. Centurion on our weekly, dead flat, park ride. If you haven't experienced a light weight, I suggest you go to your bike shop and wangle a ride. As far as stems go; I have modified all but a few of my road bikes by adding an upright stem and Raleigh type bars. you should have no trouble finding either at shops.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Bike Weight Question posted by Wings on 7/17/2000 at 12:04:36 AM
My lightest bike is a very lightweight aluminum mountain bike. It is effortless to climb hills on that bike. The aluminum gives a nice ride also. However I have an old cruiser that I changed into a 24 speed with aluminum rims. The bike is heavy! I love it and tend to ride it more in the winter! I am 6'1'' and about your weight and I do not have the roadie body size although I love to ride. I should have my teeth drilled out (holes) and go on a diet, but even then my frame acts like a sail in the wind! Ride what you enjoy! Newer is not better! It is cool to keep up or beat the new merchandise on the older tried and true good feeling rides. Some bikes have a feel that just cannot be duplicated!

   RE:MISC:   Bike Weight Question posted by Keith on 7/17/2000 at 10:57:26 AM
IMHO weight matters, especially in hills. And lighter wheels accelerate faster, which matters mostly if you're a professional racer who needs to rely on sprinting to win. All in all, a 19 pound top-end modern titanium, carbon or aluminum road bike might get you there a few minutes sooner than a 23 pound bike vintage steel road bike, on a 100 mile ride that includes some hills. If you're in the Tour de France (go Lance go!), that 5 minutes matters. If not, it doesn't. I've found that I get home from work 5-10 minutes sooner on my 23 pound '76 Paramount as compared to my 40 or so pound DL-1, with the same effort. That's a small but arguably significant difference on a 14 mile ride. Mostly it's your legs that make you go faster. Your legs are stronger than your girlfriends, and, as you observe, makes up for whatever advantage her lighter bike gives her. Get yourself a lighter bike and try it out. You can easily find a nice, mid-range 70s or 80s lightweight road bike for under $100. As Fred and Wings suggest, it's fun to have both.

   RE:MISC:   Bike Weight Question posted by Oscar on 7/17/2000 at 1:02:08 PM
6'2" and 185# doesn't seem bad at all. You can get a heavier bike and still be ok!

   RE:RE:MISC:   Bike Weight Question posted by Bill H on 7/17/2000 at 3:02:25 PM
Hello, I rebuilt some wheels for a Raleigh Sport with aluminum rims from Harris cyclery, and the bike retains a classic look but is much easier to ride, especially up hills. Its not like suddenly having a 22 lb Colnago, but it is a spirited city bike. See "readers web pages", site titled "My Brit bikes, still the best way around town" for pictures. Have fun. Bill H.

   Thanks for all of the imput posted by Tom Faust on 7/17/2000 at 6:49:05 PM
I appreciate all he commentary. What I take from it is that lightweights have their virtues, more related to geometry and gear selection than weight. I have decided to compromise. I am going to have holes drilled in my teeth for weight saving. Then, I am going to convert to a Shimano 7 speed hub with a 20 tooth sprocket. I also spotted a Peugout 10PX. It is just that I hate to rely on the 1870's technology of the derailuer(SP?), I prefer the 1903 technology of the planetary gearbox. I hav decided to spurn the aluminum rim, I have an NOS Raleigh rim and prefer to maintain the look. Sort of like my car, 400 hp, all black with yards of chrome. Thanks again for the commeentary.

   RE:Thanks for all of the imput posted by Keith on 7/18/2000 at 5:54:18 AM
Here you go -- you love chrome! A 70s Chrome Schwinn Paramount with Nervex Lugs outlined in red. The ultimate vintage American bike! They show up on Ebay and various websites from time to time.

   RE:Thanks for all of the imput posted by Warren on 7/18/2000 at 11:05:49 AM
There will be spacing issues when trying to mount that Nexus hub in that frame. If you succeed in bending the stays out the dropouts may need tweaking...I know of a shop that does many of these conversions to older bikes. They say it's easier to convert the roadster style horizontal dropouts than the 3 speed vertical drops. Don't ask me why. Good luck.

   RE:RE:Thanks for all of the imput posted by Tom Faust on 7/18/2000 at 7:19:11 PM
I communicatd with Sheldon Brown about the Shimano conversion. He says that he has done the conversion several times. There is some bending and enlargement of the drop outs required. At heart, I am a car guy. In my workshop I have a hydraulic press and a verical milling machine. My only constraint is the Third World electric power available here in the 'burbs.






AGE / VALUE:   Fiamme Alloy rim, A thing of beauty posted by: ChristopherRobin on 7/16/2000 at 9:58:48 AM
I polished up this Fiamme alloy rim and it really looks wonderful. Yellow sticker with red horse says Fiamme made in Italy. Milano This is a 700 C but has no stamping. I am going back and not rest until I find another. Magnificent!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Fiamme Alloy rim, A thing of beauty posted by Keith on 7/17/2000 at 11:08:35 AM
A classic. I remember Fiamme Red and Yellow label rims from when I was a kid. I think a lot of the old top-end road stuff was beautiful. Look at the graceful shape of the old Campy record brakes, the elegant little curves of well-brazed,hand-filed Nervex lugs, or the gorgeous chrome on the old steel Campy pedals and straight quick release levers. The vintage racing stuff is art right along with the Brit 3-speed stuff. Build it into a wheel, collect other components, and put it on a classic vintage British road bike -- a Mercian, Bob Jackson, Raleigh Pro, etc.