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Archived: English Roadsters







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Need Info posted by: Greg Leas on 11/4/2001 at 11:25:51 PM
We have a 1977 Raleigh Stowaway in very good condition with original everything, including tires. We were told it is a collectable and could be worth some money. Is this true and how much?

Thanks,

-Greg Leas


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Need Info posted by Ben on 11/6/2001 at 3:15:46 PM
Since I don't see anyone jumping in on this, I have casually looked for one of these in the past year and they seem to run anywhere between $75 - $200 and up. Your price will depend on demand at the time of sale.

Ben






AGE / VALUE:   Tactical Roadster posted by: Rudgematch on 11/4/2001 at 8:46:42 PM
Just a picture of a bike-riding soldier.
Thought y'all might be interested. Utility and soldiering seem to run hand in hand.

http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/p/ap/20011025/wl/1004023139attacks_afghanistan_alliance_mosb103.html


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Tactical Roadster posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 11/5/2001 at 4:37:53 PM
The fork on the bike is bent and doesn't look like it'll last much longer. Note the heavy duty rear rack and dropstand.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Tactical Roadster posted by Jorge on 11/6/2001 at 2:32:35 AM
Take a closer look, the front fork is not bent, the wheel
is towards the left of the soldier, it looks like some sort
of fork reinforcement. Long live British Roadsters.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Tactical Roadster posted by Randy on 11/6/2001 at 2:54:37 AM
Actually, Jorge, it looks like the fork is way bent. Put a straightedge down the center of the headtube, and you'll see there is almost no effective rake (i.e. the hub is almost on the steering axis) That'll give some interesting steering dynamics...

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Tactical Roadster posted by Jorge on 11/6/2001 at 6:14:43 PM
Yep, Randy you’re right, what do you think is the front tubes are for?,
it looks like a springer fork from Schwinn, they might be reinforcements,
i know sometimes they carry people in the handlebars.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Tactical Roadster posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 11/7/2001 at 12:12:48 AM
These are front fork braces just like on the old Schwinns. A lot of things are carried on these type bicycles all over the world and if you take a look at the book "Chasing Rickshaws" you'll see these braces on everything.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Tactical Roadster posted by sam on 11/7/2001 at 3:03:02 AM
I'm told there used to hang/park the bikes.Seen the same rods on a Japan roadester at Hanks shop.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Tactical Roadster posted by Jorge on 11/8/2001 at 4:00:08 AM
... and talking about fork braces, check out on e-bay item #1028685008,
very unusual Tricycle with a rod braking system and fork braces on the front,
they got a huge photo on the bottom.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   DL-1 rear wheel removal posted by: Michael Roumph on 11/4/2001 at 8:35:36 PM
I just bought a 1949 Raleigh DL-1 roadster. Except for a few broken spokes and a broken fender stay, it is all complete. What I would like to know is how the full chaincase comes off and the rear wheel removed. The front hub doesn't have any washers and locknuts, is that how Raleigh hubs are made?
Thanks, Michael


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   DL-1 rear wheel removal posted by Ben on 11/5/2001 at 10:06:57 PM
You have probably figured it out by now, but here goes:
1. To get the back wheel off you must take off the rear section of the chaincase, which has 2 pieces. One slides into place on the wheel side of the case. Remove the sliding piece then take off the end piece, 2 screws. You can now remove the rear wheel.
2. To get the entire chaincase off you will have to remove the cotter and right side crank. If this is necessary--to rebuild the bottom bracket for instance--then remove the front sliding panel on the round "pie plate" covering the chainring, then gently pry out the round cover. Then remove the cotter pin and crank (if you have not done this let me know and I will tell you how).
3. With the rear wheel and RH crank removed, the rest of the case comes off with the rear bracket near the dropout and one other bolt located under the chainring in front.

The front hubs (at least the ones I have seen) have no washers or locknuts. One of the cones is made to lock against a shoulder on the axle when screwed in all the way. The other you set when you are installling the wheel and the wheel nuts and washers act as the locknuts would.

Hope this helps,

Ben

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   DL-1 rear wheel removal posted by Randy on 11/6/2001 at 2:57:49 AM
And be sure to put the adjustable cone on the left side of the bike when installing a locknut-less front wheel. If the axle nut loosens, wheel rotation will tend to unscrew the cone. On the right side, it would tend to tighten and possibly bind the wheel.






AGE / VALUE:   Take a look! posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 11/4/2001 at 6:09:09 PM
Rudge poster on e- bay live auction. Do search under "Rudge"
3 Anoymous Rudge/LA Deesse.29/ 1 1/2 X 49 1/
Lovely, look at that outfit!
It's a bit much to be cycling in, I think.
I love these cycling posters and the outfits the riders wear.
Something marvelous in these vulgar times.







AGE / VALUE:   Take a look! posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 11/4/2001 at 6:09:09 PM
Rudge poster on e- bay live auction. Do search under "Rudge"
3 Anoymous Rudge/LA Deesse.29/ 1 1/2 X 49 1/
Lovely, look at that outfit!
It's a bit much to cycling in I think.
I love these cycling posters and the outfits the riders wear.
Something marvelous in these vulgar times.







WANTED:   Old Raleigh 28" wheel bike posted by: Ray on 11/4/2001 at 1:15:43 AM
I have an old Raleigh 28 inch wheel bike with rod brakes. It is a three speed alloy hub model but it also has a three speed cluster on the hub. Now it has the traditional SA metal thumb shifter and in addition it has a bar con style ball end alloy Cyclo shifter for the cluster. Problem is the derailleur is missing and I am trying to determine which model would have been on this bike. I have many older derailleurs but not sure which model would have come on the bike. There is no hanger for a derailleur so it had to be the type that bolts to the chainstay. Any ideas out there.


   RE:WANTED:   Old Raleigh 28 posted by Sheldon Brown on 11/4/2001 at 4:26:44 AM
The derailer would most likely have been a Cyclo Benelux Mark VII, that's what was supplied with all of the Cyclo conversion kits I ever saw.

If you're not looking for authenticity, a SRAM ESP series derailer would work with the Cyclo shift lever, which is designed for a derailer with a 1:1 actuation ratio.

Back in the day, I started out with one of these, later upgraded to a Hurét Alvit, and had to use a hacksaw blade to reduce the effective diameter of the drum of my Cyclo lever to be compatible with the parallelogram type Hurét unit.

Sheldon Brown

   RE:WANTED:   Old Raleigh 28 posted by Ian on 11/4/2001 at 7:06:18 AM
Ray, I have an English Knight lightweight from the early 50's which has this setup of Sturmey three speed and Cyclo-Benelux three speed derailleur and it works fine for everyday use although some of the ratio jumps are a little widewhile others are quite close. Possibly playing with the numbers of teeth on the cluster would help but it is a good reliable set-up. Regards, Ian.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spokes? posted by: Andrew on 11/3/2001 at 11:13:20 PM
Anyone know of a company that makes correct looking spokes for a 28" wheel on a Raleigh Tourist. I need one's that are shorter (on one side) because I'm installing a dynohub on the front wheel and don't want different looking spokes on one side, and what would this shorter length be?


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spokes? posted by Stacey on 11/3/2001 at 11:28:20 PM
Scroll down a few threads Andrew. You'll see Albert's post on Spoke Length. There's a link to BikeSchool's spoke length calculator, this takes a bit of effort to measure your hub, rim, etc. but will return an appropriate dimention for you.

In the wind,
Stacey

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spokes? posted by Randy on 11/6/2001 at 2:47:56 AM
Andrew, the Raleigh spoke chart says that for a GH6 on a 28x1-1/2 Westwood rim, use 12-1/16" cross 3 on the small flange and 11-11/16" cross 3 on the large flange. You really shouldn't use metric-size spokes on a Raleigh , but those work out to about 306mm and 297mm. They specify 14 gage plain spokes.






AGE / VALUE:   Wait until your brain is warmed up posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 11/3/2001 at 3:27:40 PM
A apartment complex sale is a good place to possibly find some cool bikes, but not if the place is a high rise senior citizen apartment center.
Knitting and baked goods and I actually, Oh never mind.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Wait until your brain is warmed up posted by Ben on 11/3/2001 at 3:38:06 PM
"Who was that strange young man and why was he ... oh never mind"

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Wait until your brain is warmed up posted by Jimm. on 11/4/2001 at 12:24:05 AM
Even better: Garage sales in old, established neighborhoods, early on a Friday or Saturday morning, wad of cash in pocket, bed of pickup truck empty.






AGE / VALUE:   SPOKE LENGTH posted by: ALBERT on 11/3/2001 at 10:54:04 AM
I noticed that my dear friend in B.C. , Edward, has posed a question about spoke length. As I build wheels with many hub and rim combinations the problem of appropriate spoke length was annoying. My solution was to purchase a Hozan(brand name) spoke threading machine which I use to place a thread of about an inch or so on a spoke whose lenght comes to within a half-inch of what I estimate to be the proper length. The wheel is laced, trued, and lastly the excess spoke is cut-off at the head of the nipple and filed smooth. This method is convenient and since I use salvaged spokes it is also quite economical. And, please save your replies with admonitions about using salvaged spokes since I've never had a problem with them. Cheers from Philadelphia!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   SPOKE LENGTH posted by Stacey on 11/3/2001 at 9:08:13 PM
I'm sorry for offending you whoever you are. Here is my post again, edited for your protection :-)
-----------------------------------------------------------
You are truly my hero, Ablert! I, for one, come to stand proudly beside you.

I see no problem with using salvaged spokes as long as there is no apparent
physical damage. A salvaged spoke would be pre-stretched and if it had a
predeliction towards failure from the manufacturer... it would have done so
already. Let's face it; Everything is used as soon as it's put in to service.

In the wind... & junk pile too
Stacey


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   SPOKE LENGTH posted by Robert on 11/4/2001 at 4:38:56 AM
What would be a source for a spoke threader and what kind of dollars am I looking at for one?

Thanks
Robert

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SPOKE LENGTH posted by ALBERT on 11/4/2001 at 12:45:21 PM
Robert, I purchased my Hozan from a mail order biccycle tool company, The Third Hand, for $ 100.Sadly, the company went out of business in March.






AGE / VALUE:    How do I dissassemble freewheel units? posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 11/2/2001 at 12:48:04 AM
Is it possible to take modern derailer cluster units apart and clean and re-grease them so that they turn better? You know, de- gump it and rebuild it? I don't know how and I don't see this covered in my stash of old books. I must have missed it.

Are tools offered anyplace to make it possible for me to do this. I soak them and oil them but I'd like to take these to bits and rebuild. Thanks!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:    How do I dissassemble freewheel units? posted by Jeff on 11/2/2001 at 2:51:55 AM
These actually are pretty easy to disassemble. Be prepared to chase about two billion little ball bearings all over the room though. Sheldon Brown has a nice little article about servicing thread-on freewheels. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/freewheels.html

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:    How do I dissassemble freewheel units? posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 11/2/2001 at 4:20:49 PM
As usual it's all there, neatly written and concise and if I had bothered to scroll all the way down I would have found it. Thanks!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:    How do I dissassemble freewheel units? posted by Ben on 11/3/2001 at 3:55:58 AM
Helps to disassemble in a stainless steel mixing bowl...

   RE:AGE / VALUE:    How do I dissassemble freewheel units? posted by MichaelW on 11/4/2001 at 3:42:30 PM
I usually flush out my frewheels with WD40 solvent, then drizzel bike oil in. Oil goes in at the large cog face, and comes out at the smallest one.
Sealed freewheels like Sachs don't respond so well to this treatment.






AGE / VALUE:   red rubber roadester tires for sale posted by: sam on 11/1/2001 at 8:11:37 PM
I have 3 sets of red rubber roadester tires(28"x1&1/2")that I picked up in Mexico.These are new tires,Swallow brand made in far east?will sell for $30 per set(2 tires)---sam


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   red rubber roadester tires for sale posted by freddie on 11/7/2001 at 12:21:04 AM
Do you still have any? Take a money order? Email me I need a set.






AGE / VALUE:   5 speed chainguard posted by: sam on 11/1/2001 at 1:46:07 AM
Not mine etc.--I know sometimes you'll put derailers on the sports model-well this is the chainguard for the 5-speed sports bikes of the 60s --check out ebay # 1025389761.







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoking an FG posted by: Edward in Vancouver on 10/31/2001 at 4:04:05 AM
Will be recieving a 40 spoke Raleigh rim soon, An I'd like to lace it to my newly aquired N.O.S. FG hub. Anyone know wher I can get info on lacing patterns (cross 4?) and the lenghts of spokes needed?
Regrds, Edward in Vancouver


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoking an FG posted by Randy on 11/1/2001 at 2:39:44 AM
Edward, look on my website at http://www.rickadee.net/'zephyrus/index.html (' is a tilde)

Raleigh gave me permission to post their old wheelbuilding book with illustrations and scans of the spoke charts (which include the FG...)

Best regards,
Randy

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoking an FG posted by Stacey on 11/1/2001 at 3:53:10 AM
Edward,

In my far reaching travels of this digital information highway kindly known as "The Web", I'd uncovered a site that had a kewl little java applet for calculating spoke length. You would plug in the variables and it would return the desired ingormation along with graphic representation. I forget where it was and like the dunder head that I am... I forgot to bookmark the page. I know... duh on me! Give me sometime to retrace and track down the URL for you. I think it might be just what you are looking for.

In the corner with a dunce cap,
Stacey

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoking an FG posted by Stacey on 11/1/2001 at 3:54:59 AM
Er... that's INFORMATION, not iGnormation.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoking an FG posted by Ben on 11/1/2001 at 11:27:51 AM
There are several spoke length calculators out there, most require you to measure the rim diameter (ERD) and diameter of the hub flange at the center of spoke holes. Some calculators have hub and rim data built in. You may also try to track down the hub and rim data by checking with your local shop and seeing if they have an old Sutherland manual, which contains data from the time of these bikes.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoking an FG posted by mike on 11/1/2001 at 1:49:04 PM
I use United Bicycle Institute's online spoke calculator. Type in www.bikeschool.com and click on Spoke Calc.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoking an FG posted by Edward in Vancouver on 11/2/2001 at 5:06:00 AM
Thanks for all the ionformation. I'm out shopping for someone who can get me or cut and thread me the spokes. Then I will, for the very first time, attempt to lace up a wheel. Wish me luck!

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoking an FG posted by Stacey on 11/2/2001 at 10:52:04 AM
May the gods of concentricity and parallelisim look favorably upon you and instill in you the wisdom to NOT cross you spokes over the valve stem hole (You'll never inflate the tire) If you can't find someone localy Edward, let me know I can get them for you from my dealer, nice stainless steel units for about $0.80US a piece.

In the wind,
Stacey

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoking an FG posted by Ben on 11/2/2001 at 1:52:13 PM
Here are a couple of hints to make life easier:
Spokes should be cut so when fully tensioned, the threads are just hidden. Screw the nipples on leaving three threads showing, this will bring the wheel to a good starting point when you are ready to put it in the stand. True for roundness first, then laterally. After each tightening cycle, true for roundness then lateral motion again. Get Jobst Brant's book at your local library or bike shop, it is a very good guide.






AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Golden Arrow posted by: Schwinnderella on 10/31/2001 at 3:51:22 AM
Was someone on this forum looking for info on a 30's Raleigh Golden Arrow?,or perhaps a BSA. I have an ad from 36 for a raleigh golden arrow. full size pic with some specs. let me know who needs this info.


   RE:AGE / VALUE: Golden Arrow/Art Smith posted by Warren on 11/1/2001 at 3:31:08 AM
I would love to have a copy of that pic although I didn't order it up. I think Art Smith was restoring an Arrow...Art, are you there?

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Golden Arrow/Art Smith posted by Art on 11/1/2001 at 2:34:14 PM
Yes, Warren I am. I e-mailed the poster earlier. I am interested in the info. The Golden Arrow has posed somewhat of a dilemma for me. I bought the bike from a photo and description of the bike by the original owner, an older chap from the Boston area. At the time he told me the original Brittania front fender had been replaced by a newer set of Blumels because at some point in the early 70's he ran into the back of a bus. I didn't think anything of it. There were enough interesting parts on the bike, tools, a large Brooks caradice bag, marsh bars, S/A 08 drums brakes, an older Brooks saddle, for me to justify spending $500 for it shipped. The bike came with an interesting history and some great stories and the the seller called to make sure I was happy with the bike; he even had his daughter in Az call to make sure the bike was doing well! On closer inspection, and some help from a bike friend, I realized that the fork was bent considerabley and that the top tube was bowed...the result I think of the earlier crash. I believe the damage is repairable but here's the rub, the bike is just a bit too small for me. My knew adage has been, sell it if you're not riding it. Paint is thrashed. Generally that wouldn't bother me because I really appreciate used bikes and avoid restored pieces. But if one goes to the time and expense of repairing a 60 year old bike, it probably should be restored...but it's really not my size. I won't sell this bike unless I can show it to someone in the flesh and there seems to be no one around here interested in it. I could part it out and offer up the frame to someone who wants a project. I could keep it hanging in my shed. I could try riding it backwards real fast into a bus and hope that I undo the damage. Ughh! Any suggestions? Art

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Golden Arrow/Art Smith posted by Warren on 11/1/2001 at 3:47:28 PM
If it's convenient, send me a picture of the fork Art...I have a couple of sources for old forks. Measure the steerer tube for me as well. If you can't get it straightened, then a replacement may be the way to go. Then you could sell it with the original fork as well.
I'd love to buy it, but the money just doesn't exist for me. I'm only into cheap buys these days.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Superbe Key posted by: Lane on 10/30/2001 at 11:09:17 PM
I have been given a 1966 Superbe and was wondering if anyone knows what key blank to use for the fork lock. I know a good locksmith who I'm sure can cut the key.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Superbe Key posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 10/30/2001 at 11:36:59 PM
The key number is stamped on the face of the lock in the bike.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Superbe Key posted by Clyde on 10/31/2001 at 12:41:20 AM
My locksmith cut a key using the code stamped on the lock. He used a ilco blank stamped KB1122. His locksmith references noted the codes were for British Leyland sports cars and Raleigh bicycles. Good luck.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Superbe Key posted by Edward in Vancouver on 10/31/2001 at 4:02:20 AM
At this site there are Raleigh/Humber diagrams, and there is one of of the locking fork. The picture clearly shows the type of lock, and how many wafers,etc. Give a copy of this to the locksmith, and he shouldn't take more that 5 minutes to cut a key.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Superbe Key posted by Lane on 11/1/2001 at 1:29:13 AM
Thanks very much for the info, it really helps.
LANE