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Archived: English Roadsters







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   2 WOMEN'S RALIEGH SPORTS FOR FREE posted by: Albert on 6/16/2001 at 9:56:20 AM
I would like to give away two Raleigh Sports {women's). I have absolutely no room for them and would to see them go to someone who appreciates roadsters. One, 1973, is suitable as rider and is in good condition, the other is a parts bike. I will not ship; you must pick-up. There are locatwed just outside of Philadelphia in Elkins Park, PA---- near the juction of PA routes 73 and 611. E-mail me if interested. k3eax@yahoo.com


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:2 WOMEN'S RALIEGH SPORTS FOR FREE posted by Mike Stone on 6/17/2001 at 6:19:39 AM
That is a kind and noble offer, Albert. The Raleigh Sport is a nice machine.

Don't they have Sturmey Archer three speed COASTER-BRAKE hubs?

Mike Stone

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:???2 WOMEN'S RALIEGH SPORTS FOR FREE posted by Albert on 6/17/2001 at 7:25:07 AM
Hubs are AW.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:???2 WOMEN'S RALIEGH SPORTS FOR FREE posted by Albert on 6/18/2001 at 7:55:15 AM
If you have tried to reach me by e-mail, please try again. There has been aproblem with the account.






AGE / VALUE:   Pierce had a Humber type fork? posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/16/2001 at 8:38:46 AM
Interesting to see that the Pierce Arrow bicycle has a double blade or bifrubicated fork. The seller describes it as a spring fork. Item # 1156348605 Rare Pierce Arrow Bicycle
Pierce Arrow was a American car company that also made bicycles.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Pierce had a Humber type fork? posted by sam on 6/16/2001 at 6:10:29 PM
Chistopher,does the humber fork flex like the Pierce bicycle Fork?(No "arrow"in the name)---sam

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Pierce had a Humber type fork? posted by Brian on 6/16/2001 at 9:45:57 PM
Pierce manufactured bicycles in Buffalo, N.Y. from 1891 until 1918. In 1918 Pierce assets were purchased by the Emblem Mfg. Co. and were produced in Angola, N.Y until 1940 under Pierce and Emblem names.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Pierce had a Humber type fork? posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/17/2001 at 12:15:15 PM
I always believe this was for decoration, an neat artistic touch that made the bike special. I have seen this fork described as a spring fork however. I see no spring of any type and I don't know why this is described this way.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Pierce had a Humber type fork? posted by Brian on 6/17/2001 at 12:54:32 PM
The entire lower legs of the front fork are spring steel and made to flex.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Pierce had a Humber type fork? posted by sam on 6/18/2001 at 9:32:43 AM
Correct Brian,and the front helper spring is not connected solid to the rear spring thich lets it slid a little when they flex--works just like leaf springs on the rear of a car.I wonder how well it worked?

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Pierce had a Humber type fork? posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/18/2001 at 5:04:11 PM
Now I understand, thanks!






AGE / VALUE:   69 Hercules posted by: TL on 6/15/2001 at 4:28:07 PM
I have just recently recieved my 69 Hercules w/ rear rack and baskets. On a scale of 1-10 (1 being worst shape/ 10 being best shape) I would give my bike a 7. I have not had the opportunity to clean it up yet. However, I do know it has always been kept in doors and never ridden in the rain or snow. I expect to find it in increasingly better shape after cleanup. Can anyone tell me what the approximate value of the bike may be?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   69 Hercules posted by Ed on 6/16/2001 at 7:01:20 AM
I paid $40.00 for mine last april without racks or baskets.It had been stored inside and is in excellant mechanical condition but hadn't been cleaned up in a long time. Cleaning compound and wax brought the frame out nicely,but Iam planning to paint the fenders.The good thing is that they're black.According to the SA hub mine is a 69 also.Mine is an excellant ride.Good luck with yours.






MISC:   MESSAGE FOR ART SMITH posted by: ALBERT on 6/15/2001 at 11:26:05 AM
Art your package has been mailed today, June 15. Sorry for the delay. You should have it in afew days







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   fender posted by: elba on 6/15/2001 at 8:07:31 AM
Oops! On my previous message I meant I have 28" wheels.So
the front fender would need to fit. Thanks!







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   front fender posted by: Elba on 6/15/2001 at 8:00:25 AM
Please wanted front fender no rust,dent,ect for my womans
model 28" Raleigh rod brake bike circa 1963.Don't have to
have braces/attach plate , but if they come w/ fender that would be swell too.







FOR SALE:   Fibrax NOS pads for rod brakes posted by: Ray on 6/14/2001 at 8:00:01 PM
http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1154994902
Used on all old rim surface rod brake bikes.







WANTED:   Need this pedal posted by: Ray on 6/14/2001 at 6:22:41 PM
Need the left pedal that looks like this one. Will buy set if you have. It is from a 1955 Peugeot that is nearly complete.
http://albums.photopoint.com/j/View?u=1152841&a=8469637&p=37383820







WANTED:   Vintage English Baby Seat posted by: john on 6/14/2001 at 1:20:01 PM
I've just caught the sickness and bought two '70s DL-1 Tourists. I'd like to find an appropriate '60s-70s vintage baby seat that will fit the 28" wheels. Nice condition with seatbelt preferred.


   RE:WANTED:   Vintage English Baby Seat posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/14/2001 at 5:30:44 PM
That would be a Leico brand seat with the tartan covering. For display purposes it's ok. However I personally would not sit a child in one of these. Some of these had guards to keep the little ones feet out of the rear wheel and some did not and that is scarry. If you are going to carry precious little cherubs on the back then to heck with it looking period and quaint and origonal. I would put the best baby seat money can buy on it and I'd have the local shop install it.
I would think the modern baby seats are better and safer.
A good bell, (something loud) good reflectors and lights if you will be riding at night are a great idea.
I had one of these seats new in the box and I believe that I tossed it out after admiring the tartan covering.
I bought a new one and it had a plastic cowl around the childs head with reflectors (and a helmet is a must for everyone) I would guess that the cowl is good if you wipe out or another cyclist runs into you. The older seats didn't have the (current style) safer 3 way belt system so I would think that alone is reason to make changes.






AGE / VALUE:   Hybrid question posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/14/2001 at 8:51:39 AM
Is it possible to use a 3 speed freewheel that is not fixed like the Cyclo 3 cog piece on a Sturmey Archer hub? With the Cyclo 3 cog piece the hub does the freewheeling so you don't need the cluster to do it. But I was wondering if I can use 3 and 4 speed freewheels screwed onto old style Sturmey Archer( Hercules) threaded drivers. In this case the hub and the freewheel cluster both would freewheel together, and I don't want to mess up the pawl springs in the hub.
I have a bunch of old freewheels one that I was thinking of mounting on a Sturmey hub is a 3 cog piece marked "HiRay's made in France"

Also has anyone ever used a B.S.A. hub with deraileur gears together? A B.S.A. hybrid? The driver is not interchangable with Sturmey- Archer, and it is not threaded (I think,I will have to check)
I have nerver seen this done and I would like to try it.
The B.S.A. hub is very smooth.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hybrid question posted by Bill Putnam on 6/14/2001 at 9:54:39 AM
If you have the older style threaded driver on your
Sturmey hub a standard English threaded freewheel will
screw on to it. You will need a long axle for this to
work at all and even then it's a tight squeeze. Sheldon
Browwn discusses this modification on one of his bikes:

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/otb.html

Make sure your freewheel has English threads. Also, I
wonder how durable the axle would be because it will be
spanning a greater distance than intended between the
drop out and bearing. It will also be a bit of a trick
to remove the freewheel from the driver if you ever
wish to do this.

Bill Putnam

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hybrid question posted by Sheldon Brown on 6/14/2001 at 5:04:36 PM
Christopher Robin asked:

"Is it possible to use a 3 speed freewheel that is not fixed like the Cyclo 3 cog piece on a Sturmey Archer hub? With the Cyclo 3
cog piece the hub does the freewheeling so you don't need the cluster to do it. But I was wondering if I can use 3 and 4 speed
freewheels screwed onto old style Sturmey Archer( Hercules) threaded drivers. In this case the hub and the freewheel cluster both
would freewheel together, and I don't want to mess up the pawl springs in the hub."

Yes, this works. It doesn't matter that there are two freewheels, whichever one is loosest will freewheel and the other one won't.

The cone will be a permanent captive once the freewheel is tightened onto the driver, so use a good (old) one. The cone lock washer probably won't fit through the hole in the freewheel unless you grind the corners off of it. The cone itself can be adjusted with a flat-blade screwdriver.

"I have a bunch of old freewheels one that I was thinking of mounting on a Sturmey hub is a 3 cog piece marked "HiRay's made in France" "

Good call of Bill Putnam to warn you that this might very well be French thread--most 3-speed freewheels are!

I've got one bike with a Sun Tour Ultra 6 freewheel on an AW hub, and an extra sprocket bolted to the inner freewheel cog so there are actually 7 sprockets, giving me 63 speeds.

Sheldon Brown

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hybrid question posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/14/2001 at 5:34:15 PM
My sincere thanks to you both. I am certail I am not the only one that has enjoyed reading of your hybrid project.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:Hybrid gearing possibilities posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/16/2001 at 9:23:16 AM
The freewheel is "HiRy's" and it threaded so nicely onto the driver but then it stoped too soon and perhaps I cross threaded it in the first place.
One could have a whole wall full of all the diffrent freewheel removers made over the years.
The BSA hub has a threaded driver and I believe it is the same thread as most freewheels but is the axle long enough? I doubt it and BSA never offered longer axles, or did they? Not having had much experience with this hub I don't yet know.
There is a photo and description of the early Fitchel and Sachs coaster brake hub with a 2 or 3 cog set up. I think the Berto book "Dancing Chain" shows it with a 2 speed cog.
So it is possible to make a single speed brake hub into a multi speed brake hub as long as you use a Cyclo cluster that doesn't freewheel on you. The freewheeling action would bypass the brake mechanisim and the brake wouldn't work. But if you were able to somehow make the freewheel cluster be fixed and not able to spin backward. (Perhaps welding it in a way) This way you could have a deraileur type gear cluster on a single speed hub that has a built in worm gear operated brake hub. As long as you have it fixed so it doesn't freewheel backwards and if the 1/2 X 1/8 or 3/32 cluster could withstand the action of having it slamed in reverse to operate the rear brake. Why have I never seen this type set up in use? Deraileur gears with a built in brake?
I am trying to find a neat use for these 4 SC1 hubs I have. These have the 3 lugged pattern and only the Cyclo cog would be strong enough? Welding the cluster to the driver perhaps?

All those single speed brake hubs on English Roadsters, why didn't they market an adaptor to make it a multi speed hub. This is mentioned in the Tony Hadland book "The Sturmey-Archer Story" If I remember right it was Mr. Sturmey who at a Cycle Engineers meeting suggested that these not be mixed like this. Before the First S.A. hub was produced these guys sat around and had hybrid gearing all figured out. If you wanted more than a one speed hub then you were supposed to buy a Sturmey Archer or BSA. The French or "The Continental's" were into deraileurs. Where was it that I saw a deraileur set up inside an enclosed chaincase? I think it was a French bike. Another neat idea that keeps the mechanisim clean.

    Crazy Misc:Hybrid gearing possibilities posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/16/2001 at 9:33:14 AM
I would be really surprised if anybody ever got an English enclosed chaincase to accept a deraileur gear mechanism without an unbelievable amount of sugery. You would have to have the entire back end cut off and them having the chaincase wide enough to accept all the shenanigans of the chain moving (or dancing) inside of it. This would mean a longer spindle, a wider, modified chaincase.
People cut up all sorts of cars and now Humvee's and S.U.V.'s to make them into stretched limos( some of them grotesque in my view) So a chainguard wouldn't be too farfetched to these limo artists.

   RE: Crazy Misc:Hybrid gearing possibilities/ crazy sheetmetal or plastic project. posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/16/2001 at 9:39:19 AM
Front changers inside the case too. 2 or 3 of them in the front. As long as I'm at it.
If one can make homemade fairings to keep yourself dry then why not?






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   I love long cranks like this! posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/14/2001 at 8:45:14 AM
Item #1154132487 Collectible Phillips English bike.
Look at the crank length, it looks like it is a 7 inch or larger.







AGE / VALUE:   Yikes! Dunlop Stainless steel rims on e- bay! posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/14/2001 at 8:36:58 AM
Hilary Stone is offering some goodies on e- bay!
Item #1155977823 Dunlop Special Stainless Steel 26 inch(26X1 1/4) rims
These would go on a club machine such as my Raleigh Reg Harris Lenton Sports.
keep an eye out for what Hillary will be offering next!
( no relation to seller, not my auction, it is just exciting to see so many neat things offered!)


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Yikes! Dunlop Stainless steel rims on e- bay! posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/16/2001 at 9:40:29 AM
Now an A.S.C. hub too!

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Yikes! Dunlop Stainless steel rims on e- bay! posted by Norman F. Birnberg on 6/22/2001 at 1:09:35 AM
In all modesty, I must state I won that Sturmey Archer ASC fixed gear hub. I couldn't believe my good fortune. And if any one asks what it will go on, the appropriate bike is my Raleigh Twenty. Quite a combo there. :)






FOR SALE:   58/9 Raleigh 4 speed posted by: Bruce on 6/14/2001 at 3:39:03 AM
Listed on ebay 1155467067







AGE / VALUE:   Need help identifying this brake... posted by: GS on 6/13/2001 at 9:41:18 AM
Need Help....
Can anybody tell me what kind of brake this is?
Sorry for the poor pictures.
Any help will be appreciated. Thanks

http://web2.airmail.net/kgould/DGDiskpicture2.jpg







AGE / VALUE:   Honda's story is a fascinating tale of progress! posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/13/2001 at 9:10:21 AM
At first he adapted army two stroke engines, mounting them on bicycles. With fuel scarce they had to run on a fuel-extract made from pine tree roots which meant that they took interminable time to start. But anything sold in early post war Japan. The 1947 A type is a 28 inch wheeled, enclosed chaincase, rod brake roadster with a Whizzer style rear wheel inner rim that took a belt just like the Whizzer. A gas tank mounted on top of the top tube and the engine mounted between the frame. This is the very start of the Honda empire. Honda started a technical research institute in a 12 X18 foot shack in central war ruined Japan. His first product was the motorized bicycle. Pine tree roots made into fuel! Incredible!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Honda's story is a fascinating tale of progress! posted by Cal on 6/14/2001 at 5:09:27 AM
Cool.
I have an old Honda kick-and-go scooter. Not-motorized. You step down on a lever and it propels you forward using a rachet-like motion.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Honda's story is a fascinating tale of progress! posted by JohnM on 6/14/2001 at 10:01:56 AM
I had a Honda CB360 when I was in college. It was a sweet machine. I learned a lot about chain drive, which can be applied to bicycles. On a chain drive motorcycle, you check the chain tension and adjust to take up the "stretch" (actually: wear) every 500 miles or so. For normal driving around town, there is always a little slack to take up. But I also rode that little Honda coast to coast a couple of times. Every morning on the road, I would lube the chain and check the chain tension. I found that, after the first day, chain wear was negligable - not one millimeter in the last 3000 miles of the trip! By riding with a "wet" chain, all the dirt was thrown off by centrifugal force during the first day, and once the chain was clean - no wear. Of course, my rear rim was always a greasy mess. The problem with a "wet" chain on a bicycle is it attracts grit, and the centrifugal force is not normally enough for it to be self-cleaning. The more unprotected the chain, the more grit it attracts - my twelve speed seems to get about twice as much grit as I get with even a hockey-stick chain guard. And of course, the best solution is the full chain case, where you can use enough oil for good lubrication, and never worry about dirt. You can see the effects of dirt vs. lubrication in the life expectancy of a chain in different applications: On a motorcycle, you might get 10 or 15 thousand miles. On a three-speed, usually about a lifetime. On a three-speed with a full chain case, probably several lifetimes. On a derailer bike, usually about 1000 miles. Of course, it doesn't help either that the chain is tensioned at all those crazy angles on a derailer bike.

   You tell 'em JohnM posted by GL on 6/18/2001 at 9:22:19 PM
You are quite right about the superior life and reliability of 3 speed and enclosed chain guard equipped bikes.

The derailleur has its advantages but they are often exaggerated by their fans and the defects swept under the rug.