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Archived: English Roadsters







AGE / VALUE:   Is your fork bent?,did you even look? posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 2/15/2002 at 6:15:48 PM
I'm seeing some bikes sell despite it having a bent fork.
Finding a replacement fork is a real challenge and not too many forks are rebuildable, are they?
I think sometimes folks get excited at the price or the fact that something they find interesting is being offered and they don't take a critical eye to it until the box is opened and they actually ride it and find out that something is not right.
It's best to take it apart and look it over.You don't want to be out trusting origonal brake and gear cables do you? Fraying and rust are things to look ut for.
Cables are available here at Oldroads.com I can't think of any sources for origonal bicycle forks except e- bay and even then, I don't see many offered.
Old shops are a good place to ask and look. If they have not tossed them out in the dumpster already.
Writing this makes me remember all those Carlton forks I passed over years ago, LIKE AN IDIOT!!
If only one could learn before you live and not "live and learn"


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Is your fork bent?,did you even look? posted by Mark on 2/15/2002 at 6:43:11 PM
I have successfully straightened forks several times with ni problems.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Is your fork bent?,did you even look? posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 2/15/2002 at 7:34:40 PM
Yes, you can and people straighten forks all the time.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Is your fork bent?,did you even look? posted by Mark R. on 2/15/2002 at 11:19:31 PM
Once, the guard at work put the main gate down on me while i was riding my Raleigh through, and I went right over the bars when the prong on the end of the gate went into my spokes. The forks bent under my massive weight, and looked very bad! the wheel was on the side of the down tube. Anyway, I little by little bent the steerer, and the blades back into their origonal positions and shape, and the darn thing is completely normal. You could never tell it was damaged.
However, this does not meen the people should go around selling bikes with bent forks without SAYING something in the add!
I see bike like that ALL the time on eBay.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Is your fork bent?,did you even look? posted by Dale on 2/15/2002 at 11:23:48 PM
I once criticized an EBay seller for showing a bike with bent forks and their reply was to play dumb. "I don't know anything about bikes and it rides ok to me."

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Is your fork bent?,did you even look? posted by Kevin K on 2/16/2002 at 7:40:24 PM
Hi. A bent fork is one thing. Try telling a guy that the down tube is bent and the top tube also is fractured as you can clearly see the damage, both in the tubes and paint yet the fork looks ok. He came back with I don't see anything. Alot of damaged bikes ride just fine that's true. Then it should be sold as damaged and the buyer be made aware. Kevin






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Hybrid gearing for AW hub / 2 sprockets posted by: Robert on 2/12/2002 at 2:09:02 PM
I want to set up a Raleigh Record with 2 rear sprockets and a rear derailler for 6 speeds.
I have some questions on doing this.
I may have asked this before but cannot remember , so bear with me if that is the case.

1. For my area I think rear cogs of 19 and 22 teeth would
work well. Anyone see any problems with this choice?

2. Will I need to install a longer axle to compensate for for the derailler claw on the right side?

3. Will the teeth on the rear cogs need to be shortened to get the derailler to work?


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Hybrid gearing for AW hub / 2 sprockets posted by Edward in Vancouver on 2/12/2002 at 3:06:54 PM
This is what I did to an AW last year: Pull off the driver and remove the cog. "Obtain" an older style Shimano Hyperglide 7 cogset. This is held together with three long screws, choose your desired cogs. With a Dremel tool, grind off three of the splines or tabs inside the cog, leaving you with three remaining splines. These may need to be re-shaped to fit to splined driver. There is enough space to fit both cogs on the S.A. driver. There is no need to grind down the teeth on these cogs, but if you use original S.A.cogs, you will have to grind them down a little to facilitate smooth shifting. You can use the original chain (lengthened, of course) for this set up, but you might have to put washers in the derailleur's jockey wheels to allow for chain thickness and the master link. I ended up removing the orginal chainring, replacing the bottom bracket axle,(any axle you want to use, but keep the original cups) and installing a newer chain ring with a thinner 7/8 speed chain. I used a Huret derailleur, shifting is pretty decent, so good, that I switched the AW for a FG four speed.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Hybrid gearing for AW hub / 2 sprockets posted by Randy on 2/14/2002 at 7:34:23 PM
Robert, 19 and 22T are appropriate sprockets. High gear on an AW is 1.333 ratio and direct is 1.000. For an intermediate ratio, you want the square root of 1.333, or 1.155. If you take 19T times 1.155, you get 21.9T, or your already-chosen 22T.

I would probably use 20 and 24T myself, even in flatland, because I like a little lower gearing (especially given that a Record has 27" wheels, doesn't it?)

For non-derailleur folks, S-A didn't make 24T sprockets, but I use Bendix 24T sprockets on AW's (the hole and splines are compatible).

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Hybrid gearing for AW hub / 2 sprockets posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 2/14/2002 at 7:48:57 PM
I believe a 24 tooth sprocket is available from Sheldon Brown.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Hybrid gearing for AW hub / 2 sprockets posted by Randy on 2/15/2002 at 5:17:59 AM
Yes, he does. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/sturmey.html is the link. But his are made by Sachs. :-)

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Hybrid gearing for AW hub / 2 sprockets posted by Peter on 2/15/2002 at 7:04:03 AM
Your other option is to change the driver on the hub for an older threaded type, and then you have a wider choice of sprockets you can thread on - either 2 back to back directly, or 3 (possibly 4) on a freewheel block.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Hybrid gearing for AW hub / 2 sprockets posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 2/15/2002 at 6:36:13 PM
Somebody should put together a kit of sorts with directions. It would have the extra long axle, a threaded driver, a acceptable freewheel cog, or two threaded cogs. A Huret Alvit derailer and all the other bits needed for one to pull this project off successfully.

   Isn't that the hard way? posted by Stacey on 2/16/2002 at 12:05:40 PM
I once did a 3 speed to 6 speed conversion. But instead of futzing around with the rear gearing, I changed to a double chain wheel, added a front derailer to handle shifting chores a rear deralier to manage the chain adjustment, and lengthened the cahin accordingly. Seems soooo much simpler that disecting your hub and hunting down "all the right parts". Thoughts?

In the wind,
Stacey

   RE:Isn't that the hard way? posted by Randy on 2/17/2002 at 3:34:03 AM
Yes, Stacey, that is a good arrangement. I used it on a prone recumbent bike I made in the late 70's while I was in college.

For the tensioner, I took the cage off a Huret rear derailleur and made a bracket that I brazed on the frame, since I didn't want the bulk of the parallelogram.

There are a couple of pictures of the bike at

http://www.rickadee.net/'zephyrus/misc/prone1.jpg

http://www.rickadee.net/'zephyrus/misc/prone2.jpg

(as always, the ' is a tilde)

It worked fine. The chainwheels were 56T and 48T, and the hub sprocket was a 13T. Wheels were 24".

Randy

   RE:RE:Isn't that the hard way? posted by Stacey on 2/17/2002 at 10:52:45 AM
Kool bike Randy! The same HI-Vis Red that mine was painted... It does attract attention! Curious though, how did you do the 'seat'? I've thought of doing a prone, just other projects seem to get in the way. LOL!!

In the wind,
Stacey

   RE:RE:RE:Isn't that the hard way? posted by Randy on 2/21/2002 at 2:02:48 AM
The "seat" was a unicycle saddle turned sideways, that I cut diagonally from the center of one side to each opposite corner, and re-brazed on the long triangles to the uncut side to make it sweep up and forward on each end. I covered it with foam rubber and wrapped liberally in rubber strips sliced from inner tubes.

The thin "V" tubes went from the seat down to a collar around the frame tube (lined with felt and with a couple of hose clamps around it to let it turn--I couldn't figure out quite how to use a head tube assembly sideways...)

The larger tube to the front was in two sections, one brazed to the frame and the other telescoping one brazed to the saddle. There was a valve spring from a Chevy 409 inside to provide springing.

I later molded a plastic cast of my pelvic bones, and actually laid up a nifty fiberglass saddle, but never got around to making the support structure for it to replace the original seat.

Randy






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   1969 Phillips posted by: Bob on 2/12/2002 at 2:48:22 AM
I've just acquired a 1969 Phillips 3-speed sports-type bike. The chain guard is missing. Anyone know where I could find an authentic Phillips replacement chain guard? Also, the handgrips are not original and I'd like to replace them with original, or original-pattern grips. Where could I find the right handgrips? Any help or advice would be much appreciated. You can either email me or post a response, or both. Thanks.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   1969 Phillips posted by sam on 2/14/2002 at 1:38:47 PM
By 1969 the phillips guard would be same as Raleigh--sam

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   1969 Phillips posted by Bob on 2/14/2002 at 6:47:12 PM
thanks, sam. would that go for the handgrips, too?

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   1969 Phillips posted by sam on 2/15/2002 at 2:07:06 PM
Grips would be the same too.Same as on any raleigh sports bike.






AGE / VALUE:   Bottom bracket cup update posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 2/11/2002 at 10:13:43 PM
Found the notes at last. This is info I am not certain about too.
Supposedly, Seatle Bike Service or S.B.S. has or can order 26 T.P.I. (straight) bottom bracket cups that are made my Tioga (Japaneese)
After the bottom bracket is run through with a tap of same type these new cups will fit into the Raleigh Sports or whatever model Raleigh you want.
First you have to locate a 26 T.P.I. taps and then order the cups. The 26 threading currently in the bike is "pipe threaded" meaning it contracts. You are supposedly able to straighten it out in the last few threads making it possible to avoid having to re tap the whole thing over to something more diffrent like 24 T.P.I.

I wish somebody would offer origonal replacement Raleigh bottombracket cups. These I never see on e- bay, not yet. That would be easier.







AGE / VALUE:   '59 Sports with Benelux derailleur posted by: Geoff Rogers on 2/11/2002 at 4:34:42 PM
I keep saying, "I have too may bikes; gotta sell some before I buy any new ones..." But last week I found a '59 Raleigh Sports with a TCW coaster brake hub and--yes--a Cyclo Benelux 3-speed derailleur setup. Plus two caliper brakes, really. It was cheap, so I had to buy it. Paint's okay but faded, decals all pretty decent. Later British saddle (not Brooks or Wrights, not leather either) installed, Japanese tires, and an odd rear rack.
The Bike was obviously a coaster brake 3-speed machine, and somebody converted it to a 9-speed with the Benelux setup. As a matter of self preservation, they put on the rear Phillips-type caliper brake, although the PO told me that, "The coaster brake works fine, although the chain sometimes falls off when you use it." Yipes!
Now my dilemma is, do I fix the bike as is? Do I put the Benelux setup on another old British 3-speed I own and avoid the deathtrap coaster brake/derailleur nightmare? Do I sell the whole thing? And what's it worth? I know nothing about these dangly chain things. It seems heavy.
I would be loath to change the TCW hub for a different, non-coaster brake hub, because I think the TCW is the original (dated 11-59).
I would appreciate advice.
Thanks,
Geoff Rogers


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   '59 Sports with Benelux derailleur posted by Art on 2/11/2002 at 7:20:35 PM
Geoff, If it were me, I'd pull the Benelux setup and the rack and move the Sports on. I think the Benelux would make a nice addition to a club bike or even that Record Ace you have. I have a TCW on a Windsor mixte frame I pulled out of the trash a week ago, but it doesn't stop very well and I've spent to much time on hand brakes not to be grasping for brakes were there aren't any. I also realized with this setup how much back pedaling is a part of my riding. Kind of hard to back pedal with a coaster brake, if it doesn't work very well. Art

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   '59 Sports with Benelux derailleur posted by Ian on 2/12/2002 at 8:17:53 AM
Geoff, just to toss in another sixpence (sorry five cents) worth, why not go the other way and toss the TCW, which in my opinion were never a great hub, and put in a non coaster Sturmey 3 or, even better, 4 speed. My daily rider is a 1949 English Knight with a 3 speed AW and a 3 speed Cyclo and it works fine with sidepull G.B. calipers. It was ordered in this spec from new. Sure it would be even better with a close ratio or 4 speed hub as some of the ratios overlap but I find it rides just fine. I use the hub gears most of the time with the deraillieur in the middle ratio and just change the Cyclo for hills either steep up or fast down. I even dream ocaisionally of putting a double chainring and deraillieur on the front as well just to really complicate things but so far I have managed to stay sensible and get on with the important jobs.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rust posted by: Gerry on 2/11/2002 at 2:12:21 AM
I just got a beautiful '74 Raleigh Sports that my brother took home from the Harwich dump. Bike is solid except for rust visible on a couple of dime size patches on the frame where paint had been scraped off. And the Brookes saddle has been exposed to the elements for 27 years. What should I do to remove the rust? And how can I restore the saddle. I've never restored an old bike but I've kept a variety of others on the road the last 30 years. This one still rides like a dream! Is there anything else I should be looking to set right other than the obvious surface corrosion? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rust posted by Randy on 2/11/2002 at 11:36:45 PM
For the saddle (I have a B66 that was in similar condition) I bought a jar of saddle dressing with lanolin, made in Australia, from a tack shop. I massaged in a heavy coating to the top and bottom of the saddle (be really careful to not flex the saddle while it is dry--it's really brittle) and repeated over a week or so. When the saddle was supple, I wiped the excess dressing off with a terrycloth rag.

For paint on my DL-1, I found that Mother's chrome polish (bought from a Harley-Davidson store) made a nice mild rubbing compound for the paint too.

If the bike has really been out in the elements for a long time, it's worth taking the bottom bracket apart and checking to see that no rust or loose crud has fallen down the seatpost/seat tube and gotten in the bearings. They are the most vulnerable in that way.

Enjoy your bike, Gerry!

Randy






WANTED:   1978 Raleigh Tourist Rod-Brake posted by: Robert on 2/11/2002 at 12:58:02 AM
Well time again to start fixing up my neglected roadster. I just picked up some n.o.s. tires to replace the rotten ones that nearly blew up in my face today(That was scary). So now what I need to do is replace my broken kickstand. If anyone has a spare or could give me an idea for perhaps another brand that fits and will stay out of the way of the bottom rod assembly, I would appreciate it. One last item of concern is that the previous owner had a mishap and broke off the bottom pump cleat. I am looking for ideas to fix this too(broken piece long gone). Thanks folks.

Robert
San Diego,Ca


   RE:WANTED:   1978 Raleigh Tourist Rod-Brake posted by Mark R. on 2/12/2002 at 4:04:35 AM
I may have a kick stand for you. I'll look and get back to you. I took one off my DL-1 when I got it as I never liked using them(guentees the bike will fall over sooner or later). You could fabricate a copy of the pump peg and have it brazed on. Or remove one from a lesser frame?

   RE:RE:WANTED:   1978 Raleigh Tourist Rod-Brake posted by Robert on 2/15/2002 at 10:26:44 PM
Hi Mark. Let me know if you find that kickstand. I would be interested.

   RE:WANTED:   1978 Raleigh Tourist Rod-Brake posted by Mark R. on 2/16/2002 at 2:40:32 AM
Robert, I have it some where and I WILL find it! It's amoungst the enormous pile of misc. bike goodies I have, and I will contact you here or via e-mail for your address.
Gxis revido, Marko






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Have NOS Dyno-Three, want Dynohub posted by: Randy on 2/11/2002 at 12:46:11 AM
I would like to do a little swapping.

I have a NOS Dyno-Three (3/64, 36H) with some surface rust (should polish out nicely with Mother's or--it looks--VVVintage Mixture, which I've not tried)

I need a nice 32H Dynohub. I'm also in need of a Dynohub axle and 6 of the little armature fixing bolts.

If someone would like to talk trading, please email me directly. Thanks.







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   information wanted posted by: bob on 2/10/2002 at 9:16:57 PM
I bought a Raleigh Competition Roadster new in 1976. It is still completely original (with the original sew-up tires and rims). It is in very good shape with all the badges and decals. It came with Huret derailer set, specialities cranks (42/52), reynolds 50l butted tube, and weinmann brake sets. I believe the serial number WA 5002/50 but will need to clean it to be sure (its close). It has not been ridden in years and I want to completely rebuild it. Any suggestions on how to start/find reference material. Also does anyone have any stats/specs on this bike. I paid about $200 for it new in 1976. What is it worth today? Thanks for any information you can give me


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   information wanted posted by Kevin K on 2/10/2002 at 11:52:34 PM
Hi. I had a beautiful Raleigh Gran Prix a couple years back. Other than a few odds updates ( cables ) I felt it alone. The cosmetics of our 2 bikes should be the same ( paint and decal likeness ) Use very mild soap to clean the frame/paint. Easy on the decals. Use 100% cotton also. I use only Zymol Wax on my bikes. It feeds the paint v using petro chemicals to make it shine. Expensive wax but worth it in my opinion. I've got the olded formula wax. About 10 years old. I was told the formula changed a bit so do a small section and see what happens. Enjoy your cool old English Roadster. Kevin

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   information wanted posted by DBean on 2/11/2002 at 11:49:00 AM
My notes from bicycle shopping in 1977 suggest your memory of $200 for a Competition may be inaccurate; I would guess somewhat more than that. It was the 4th from the top-of-the-line at the time. It has a very good quality frame with lower grade components than the more expensive models (Team Pro, Pro, International). I have an old one with no original parts and it's a light responsive bike. Bikes like them seem to sell on ebay for around $400, depending on everything you can think of. Some of your restoration jobs will be simple and cheap, like greasing all the bearings; but the 27" sewup tires may be a problem. They're no longer common at all. See Sheldon Brown's website for lots of info.






AGE / VALUE:   INFO ON PHILLIPS BIKES posted by: Kevin K on 2/10/2002 at 6:23:30 PM
Hi.I've a set of Phillips fenders( mud guards ) I wish to identify. I'm trying to determine the age of them. They are black with dual redish and gold pinstripe on them.Also very old looking Lion's head decal on back guard. So would you Phillips guru's please help me with these. Also, Christopher Robin would you please email at kbcurvin@aol.com. Thanks all. Kevin


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   INFO ON PHILLIPS BIKES posted by Jeff R on 2/11/2002 at 12:17:25 AM
If the decal says Birmingham at the bottom it would be 1960 or earlier, if it says Nottingham it would be a Raleigh made Phillips made in the 60's and 70,s. Look at where the fender stay connects to the fender. The Raleigh made bikes have one hole and the stay was fastened with a single screw, washer and nut or a reflector. The mid to late 50's Phillips fenders had two holes and the stay was held in place by a chrome oval decorative plate and two screws on the outside of the fender and a plate on the inside of the fender with two threaded holes that recieve the screws and clamp the stay in place. The early 50's fenders had a double stay on each side of the bike that fastened to two tabs that stuck out on each side of the fender. All the Phillips stays are wire.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   INFO ON PHILLIPS BIKES posted by Kevin K on 2/11/2002 at 1:18:25 PM
Hi. From your details of these fenders they are 50's pieces. They are also brand new so I have no hardware. I've considered several times getting rid of them but now I feel I should keep them and find a frame/bike and own a TRUE English Roadster. So thanks. I've been on Yahoo and not really seen any detailed photo's. Kevin K






AGE / VALUE:   INFO ON PHILLIPS BIKES posted by: Kevin K on 2/10/2002 at 6:23:30 PM
Hi.I've a set of Phillips fenders( mud guards ) I wish to identify. I'm trying to determine the age of them. They are black with dual redish and gold pinstripe on them.Also very old looking Lion's head decal on back guard. So would you Phillips guru's please help me with these. Also, Christopher Robin would you please email at kbcurvin@aol.com. Thanks all. Kevin







AGE / VALUE:   1951 Rudge Withworth posted by: flavio figlola on 2/10/2002 at 6:48:50 AM
Was just wondering, with seeing a photo of the forks of Rudge, and Humber which company came about first with the bike. Are the bikes similar in styling , i happened to own a 51, Rudge all acessorized, Headlamp, Rear Dynohub, leather saddle,Battery tube with accumulator unit, locking front forks, in good shape a lot of parts on it are number and registered. How many of these were made in 51, if the serial number is of use to determine how many were made This is it (73011 A.Z.) Please respond if anyone has some useful information of this bike.Oh forgot bike also has enclosed chain encasement thumb screw and 0il revsoir.







AGE / VALUE:   1951 Rudge Withworth posted by: flavio figlola on 2/10/2002 at 6:48:50 AM
Was just wondering, with seeing a photo of the forks of Rudge, and Humber which company came about first with the bike. Are the bikes similar in styling , i happened to own a 51, Rudge all acessorized, Headlamp, Rear Dynohub, leather saddle,Battery tube with accumulator unit, locking front forks, in good shape a lot of parts on it are number and registered. How many of these were made in 51, if the serial number is of use to determine how many were made This is it (73011 A.Z.) Please respond if anyone has some useful information of this bike.Oh forgot bike also has enclosed chain encasement thumb screw and 0il revsoir.







AGE / VALUE:   Swiss Army Bike posted by: Tom on 2/8/2002 at 10:19:30 PM
Here is a nice original Swiss Army Bike on Ebay. http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1702774647







MISC:   Ann Arbor Swap Meet Vendor Form posted by: steve on 2/8/2002 at 10:11:26 PM
If you are going to the Ann Arbor, Michigan show this year and want to be a vendor, we've included a sign up form on our web site for your convienence. Go to:
www.ann-arbor-bicycleshow.com

Click on the "VENDOR FORM AND FLYER" link. Follow the directions on the page.

See you in April!