OldRoads.com

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Archived: English Roadsters







AGE / VALUE:   The Motor Cycle magazine( British) posted by: Christopher on 3/16/2002 at 4:52:27 PM
I noticed an ad for Verrall's in England yesterday. In one of the British motorcycle magazines they offer a collection of machines like the Vincent Firefly motor with the associated cycle. These are bikes with clip on type motors and we don't see these very often. They have a Bianchi tandem with a motor on the back and some other names I have never heard of. If you don't see the old British motorcycle magazines you are missing a real treat.
This magazine is a real treat! Well written, I never miss it.At your book seller or news stand.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   The Motor Cycle magazine( British) posted by Ian on 3/17/2002 at 6:24:58 AM
Add on motors for bicycles have bben around since the very early 1900's. I have a 1913 Wall Autowheel which was later sold in an improved version in U.S.A. as the Smith's motorwheel, the Briggs and Stratton motorwheel and the Dayton. The most popular era for cyclemotors was immediately after WW2 when all sorts of big-time manufacturers got involved because of the lack of money and petrol. Even Ducati first built a clip-on motor before they got in to motorcycles. There is a neat English club called the National Auto Cycle Club (N.A.C.C) whose magazine is called "Buzzing". Happy to help anyone who wants to find out more. Cheers, Ian.






MISC:   HE SAYS GIVE IT TO YOU FOR $10! posted by: IAN on 3/15/2002 at 8:49:46 AM
When the lady who answers your "Old bikes wanted" ad says "we have been married 65 years and he had it before we got married. He used to ride it work when he was an apprentice", it has to be worth a trip of two hours each way surely? Especially when he calls out "give it to him for $10" and she says he used to be a bike racer and if I bring some of my old programs and photos and have a cup of tea he might be able to tell some stories of the racing days, and now he seems to think there might be some of the race bike stuff in the shed under the house but its ten years since he was well enough to go down there so I will have to dig around for myself! Can't wait for Sunday,will keep you all posted! Just had to share the excitement. Cheers, Ian.


   RE:MISC:   HE SAYS GIVE IT TO YOU FOR $10! posted by Edward in Vancouver on 3/15/2002 at 2:33:25 PM
I suppose when you find the mint Claude Butler track frame with Chatter Lea components all nicely tucked away, you'll have the grace to tell us that it was only some grand-kid's cheapo BMX bike. You're making me turn green, Ian, and it isn't even St. Patrick's day yet!

   RE:RE:MISC:   HE SAYS GIVE IT TO YOU FOR $10! posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/15/2002 at 4:24:35 PM
Try to take notes on what he has to share with you. Bike history, personal contacts, recollections, when picking up the bike try to be complete and thur- o. (I need a dictionary!)!
Who did he ride or race with? Where are they today? Addresses? Keep this lucky streak running!
Offer to rake leaves, run errands, do something in the future. Make a friend, don't just take everything and leave.
He does not have to let you have it for $10.00
He must think kindly of you.
Don't mess that up.
I don't think you would, anyways.
Excellent!

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   HE SAYS GIVE IT TO YOU FOR $10! posted by Ian on 3/17/2002 at 6:32:53 AM
Well it was worth the trip to meet some nice people and fill in some more details of old-time racing days. The bike was no big deal, just a single speed coaster brake roadster but for NZ$10 (US$4.50) I can't go far wrong and at least I know it is all original except the seat and tyres. And then there is the promise of the programmes and photos when she finds them. Next month they have to pack up a lifetime to move in to a retirement village and you just know that when someone of that age says "I promise I will post them when I find them" you can rely on getting them so a nice day in the city was worth the drive.






WANTED:   restore posted by: rickey on 3/15/2002 at 12:11:19 AM
WE RESTORE OR REFURBISH ANY BIKES POWDERCOAT PAINTS WE PROVIDE PARTS S&H EXTRA 334 756 7561 RAD CUSTOM'S ECT KNOWLES BICYCLE SHOP VALLEY AL.NOS PARTS IN STOCK
ACCESSORIES COME SEE CALL







WANTED:   restore posted by: rickey on 3/15/2002 at 12:11:19 AM
WE RESTORE OR REFURBISH ANY BIKES POWDERCOAT PAINTS WE PROVIDE PARTS S&H EXTRA 334 756 7561 RAD CUSTOM'S ECT KNOWLES BICYCLE SHOP VALLEY AL.NOS PARTS IN STOCK
ACCESSORIES COME SEE CALL







AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh quits England... posted by: Warren on 3/14/2002 at 11:11:02 PM
I pulled this news item from another list...

"<< rom www.bikebiz.co.uk Thursday 14th March 2002 :

Raleigh to cease UK assembly; move to new factory is shelved

280 assembly and factory jobs are to go. From 2003, Raleigh bikes will come
in to the UK fully-assembled and sales will be handled from a
Nottinghamshire distribution centre. Triumph Road is currently chocka with
radio cars, photographers and camera crews...

Raleigh staff were told the news at 2.30 this afternoon.

The decision was made by the twelve members of the Executive of The Raleigh
Cycle Group on 11th March.

The Executive decided to cease assembly of cycles in the UK from the end of
2002.

Raleigh executive chairman Phillip Darnton told BikeBiz.co.uk that in a
price fight only those companies who could reduce their costs would survive:

"Chinese bikes have a 45.6 percent duty against them yet imports increased
by 150 percent last year. There are key countries that have no tariffs such
as Bangladesh and Vietnam. The quality of the bikes from these countries has
increased dramatically over the last couple of years.

"Product will also become cheaper from Taiwan because the bicycle industry
across there has all but collapsed. They will do almost anything to keep
their factories turning over.

"Over-capacity is hitting hard. It's a price fight out there and
profitability forecasts for the next few years are nowhere near as good as
they were in 1999 and 2000.

"Re-investment in a new assembly plant in the UK cannot now be financially
justified. Tariff protection does not extend beyond 2005, and it cannot be
assumed sufficient in the medium term to ensure the financial viability of
the investment required in a UK assembly plant of Raleigh's scale."

Darnton told Bikebiz.co.uk he was "very, very disappointed" at the loss of
UK assembly.

"I thought it could be done but it can't."

Darnton will leave Raleigh next year.

"There's no place for a top heavy management structure, myself very much
included. However, I would like to see things through to completion."

In 1999 the previous owners of Raleigh - the US-based Derby Cycle
Corporation - sold the Triumph Road site to the University of Nottingham.
Derby CEO Gary Matthews also sold Sturmey Archer to a flaky investment firm
for £30.00 and when Sturmey Archer was soon thereafter closed, Derby Cycle
Corporation came in for worldwide criticism, including from this website.
Matthews was later shown the door and in August last year Derby, led by Alan
Finden-Crofts, filed a voluntary petition under Chapter 11 of the US
Bankruptcy Code.

Derby's assets were bought by Raleigh Cycle Limited, formed by a management
buy-out team, consisting of Alan Finden-Crofts and a number of key managers
within the existing business. The purchase includesd Raleigh America,
Raleigh Canada, Raleigh UK, Derby Cycle Werke in Germany and Derby Trading
Company in Taiwan and China and was completed on 26th October 2002.

Under the Asset Purchase Agreement between Raleigh Cycle Limited and The
Derby Cycle Corporation, Raleigh Cycle Limited acquired approximately $95
million in assets of the businesses and was established on a debt-free
basis, with trade suppliers of the business being paid in full. The
businesses acquired had annual sales of approximately $280 million in 2001,
including approximately 1.4 million bicycles.

The Triumph Road factory had to be vacated by December 2003 and Darnton was
charged with moving to a new assembly plant on allotment land in Bulwell,
north of Nottingham. However, this is currently being held up in a legal
tussle between three allotment holders and a rich farmer who wanted Raleigh
to move on to his land.

The judicial review was due to heard on March 20th but with the Bulwell plot
no longer required, the court has been informed there is no longer a need
for the judicial review.

280 assembly jobs are to go by the end of 2002, including the job of Steve
White, factory manager. Raleigh currently employs 380 people. 100 jobs will
be safe, including sales, marketing, finance and product design jobs.

The Raleigh Cycle Group CEO, Alan Finden-Crofts, expressed his regret at the
loss of jobs but said redundancy payments would be made in and "loyalty and
commitment at this most difficult time will be financially recognised and
rewarded appropriately."

Phillip Darnton said: "We are absolutely committed to continue to supply
'Raleigh-quality' cycles, built to our specified high standard by partner
suppliers overseas. We are seeking an appropriate location locally for our
distribution centre, as well as offices, so that we will maintain our own
distribution fleet with which to support fully our customers nation-wide."

He said the problems encountered over the proposed move to Bulwell did not
overly influence the decision to shed jobs and cease UK assembly:

"The protracted uncertainty about the availability and timescale for a move
to [Bulwell] site has not helped the company's position. Nevertheless we
very much regret that the Raleigh Cycle Group's decision should have quite
unforeseeably coincided with the latest phase of the litigation concerning
the Judicial Review of the City Planning Application.

"Throughout the anxious and difficult period since the sale of the [Triumph
Road factory in 1999]we have endeavoured to keep everyone - especially our
own employees - advised of any developments in this extended effort to
maintain a UK assembly facility. This present situation is no exception -
inevitably there are many details still to be worked out, but we will strive
to maintain clear and open communications with all who are concerned with
the future of our company.

"It was a serious decision we had to make and one that clearly has impact
throughout the UK cycle industry." >>

What a shame...sometimes global economics suk...



   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh quits England... posted by Andrew on 3/14/2002 at 11:57:42 PM
It was just a matter of time....25 years of decline hits bottom! Happened in the U.S. to, in 1970 we produced ten million cycles in the States, the low thousands today. They say some things never change....but the truth is, everything does eventually. End of an era....

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh quits England... posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/15/2002 at 1:48:54 AM
Truly terrible news. I was so hopeful for a turnaround. The man on the top, the fellow in charge dearly loved Raleigh Cycles. He cared and fought for it when others ran it amok and deserted. Still, interest in what this marvelous company enriched our lives with, continues to flourish.

Efforts to hold the lamp steady and illuiminate the glorious, interesting past for all to see and enjoy will continue.
Raleigh bicycles rule!






AGE / VALUE:   19th century bike posted by: Ben on 3/14/2002 at 3:59:35 AM
Check this out.....it has been newly discovered that vinyl was actually developed just after the War of 1812!

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1083531096


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   19th century bike posted by Mark R. on 3/14/2002 at 11:48:17 AM
I wrote to this guy, and I think we all should.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   19th century bike posted by Stacey on 3/14/2002 at 3:13:51 PM
So did I. He's got to be smokin' crack!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   19th century bike posted by dafydd on 3/14/2002 at 4:57:56 PM
I'd like to think he accidentally reversed the "8" and "9" in "1890," but his heading tells me otherwise...

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:It's a Raleigh Colt posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/14/2002 at 7:59:42 PM
People don't know what they have, they don't know about the date on the hub either. They just want to sell it and get something for it and get it out of the way.
I love the rear Prestitube minor rear rack!
Actually, it's from the 1960's- 1970's in there.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   19th century bike posted by Mark R. on 3/14/2002 at 8:21:23 PM
Closer to 1980, it has the late model crankset with the little eschelons removed. I suppose someone rased on modern titanium rockship nightmare bikes might look at some thing like that and have not a clue of it's age.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   19th century bike posted by Mark R. on 3/16/2002 at 11:15:40 AM
Well, I guess he came to his sences. He ended the auction early. I suppose he had visions of dollar signs dancing in his head, untill he found out what he has was fairly common.






AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Rudge Humber diagrams posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/14/2002 at 12:04:28 AM
When oldroads.com put together the Raleigh/ Rudge/ Humber exploded diagrams a lot was left out of the scan. Space probably was an issue, Also, there is a note there about needing a better scanner. I'm so happy it's even there at all! So I am not complaining. I have seen a few folks mention it and that has been really neat!

However, If you want to see the rest of it, like the needed 8 pages entitled "Spare Parts list" that decipher what all those numbers that go with every little part mean let me know. E- mail me.

Also: The page showing the early version of the Raleigh Record Ace complete with drawings on the decals! is currently ommitted as well.
A page on gearcases, chainguards, F.S.U. unit as well. The F.S.U. ( Filter switch unit) is the old style battery tube.

Also 3 pages of spoke lengh guides for dynohubs, regular hubs, the spoke lengths for the primo Airlight front hubs that go in the vintage Record Ace bike are not listed in the diagram scans as well.

Also a page showing drawings of vintage Sturmey- Archer or (really Raleigh mainly) workshop tools is shown and with the Spare parts list you can look it ALL up.

I will drop a envelope off to Cycles De Oro and hopefully they can post this page about the Raleigh Record Ace on their site. It's up to them. Not all the tools are shown there was a whole lot of Sturmey-Archer tools and you would have to scare up an old Sturmey- Archer catalog for these or look at Tony Hadland book The Sturmey-Archer Story where a section on old workshop tools is there to help.

I saw an old Sturmey- Archer tool on e- bay recently, they seldon show up.
I see a gap here and there in Cycles De Oro's excellent pages and I asked a pal who has two awesome bikes to contribute pictures and info to the site and he half heartedly replied. I hope he will, He has listened to me before! He is probably waiting for me to go first and there he's got me!

Also have two phantom diagrams of the later 1970's Raleigh Tourist D.L.1. in the guise that most of us know. The later day model. It would be helpful to see it on the web.
E- mail me if you are interested in this.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Rudge Humber diagrams posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/14/2002 at 12:46:51 AM
I am wondering if I have diagrams to the Raleigh Chopper bike. I'm looking. I will send it in and hopefully that can get posted somewhere too.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Rudge Humber diagrams posted by Catfood Rob on 3/14/2002 at 8:06:54 PM
Id love to see scans of any Chopper stuff you have..... I have space to post it on my site, RaleighChopper.info
Cheers!!!!!






FOR SALE:   TIRES FOR RALEIGH ROADSTER posted by: Larry on 3/13/2002 at 11:26:35 PM
I have aquired two 28 x 1 1/2 tires,one an original Raleigh
Roadster tire in that says Raleigh roadster on the sidewall.
It is in very good shape,no cracks and only a little tread
wear.The other a Cheng Shin? after market tire that appears
to not have been mounted.Let me know what these are worth as
I have no clue and would like to sell them.Please be fair.

THANKS,Larry Gau


   RE:FOR SALE:   TIRES FOR RALEIGH ROADSTER posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/14/2002 at 12:44:14 AM
The Raleigh Roadster tire is made by Semprit and is a fine tire. The other one is all we can get these days. What really threw me was the whitewall tires that were made in the Bahamas on my 1957 Raleigh Supurbe Tourist. 28 inch wheel, 24 inch frame black roadster. Just like the basic D.L. only older and with the light kit and locking fork.
Actually, whitewall tires in 26 X 1 3/8 and especially in 28 X 1 1/2 were common on these bikes but that is far enough back that most of us don't see it. At least with the 28's.

I don't know what to say what yours are worth.Before Sheldon offered these on his web site we went crazy looking for awhile there in the 1980's. Good heavens the memories! The Semprit Raleigh Roadster tire is no longer available or made. go to http://www.Sheldonbrown.com The Harris cyclery section and look at the tires that he offers.

Pass the word, don't go crazy look for tires like I did. Today, it is not necessary.

   RE:FOR SALE:   TIRES FOR RALEIGH ROADSTER posted by Mark R. on 3/14/2002 at 3:58:32 PM
Who in the heck makes all the roadster tyres they all still use in Europe? I know somebody must.

   RE:FOR SALE:   TIRES FOR RALEIGH ROADSTER posted by David on 3/15/2002 at 11:46:44 PM
Cheng Shin and Kenda make 'em in Taiwan. No doubt they're made in Europe, too, but no US importer wants to bother.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   BROOKS B12 posted by: Andrew on 3/13/2002 at 11:01:30 PM
I'm looking for information on the Brooks B12 saddle with the large coils, when were they produced and which bikes were they used on?







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Great British Bike Weekend update posted by: Michael McGettigan on 3/13/2002 at 2:27:42 PM
Greetings: just an update on the GBBW "Three Days for 3-Speeds!" in Philadelphia, 4/19, 20 & 21" It looks to be shaping up into a nice event with people registered from MN, CT, NJ, PA, and NY thus far...
MOST EXCITING NEWS Had a call from a dealer who wants to bring a 26-ft truck full of New Old Stock Raleigh bikes, parts, bags, jerseys, etc. He has a number of NOS 3-speeds, Records, Supercourses and Internationals -- all in box new.
Could be a very nice swap meet....

Here's the rough sked.
FRIDAY registration, tea, and a quick Night Ride.
SATURDAY early am "Dynohubs Made Complex" -- a workshop by Sam Fitzsimmons and Brian Kenson.
late am...Brit Bike Picnic Ride and visit to the Kenson Kollection of british bikes and etc.
late afternoon, the famous British Bike Pub Crawl will be led by an individual not connected with Trophy Bikes (NOTE THIS EVENT IS NOT SPONSORED BY TROPHY BIKES--which may make it even more enjoyable!)
SUNDAY early am to 2pm BRITISH BIKE SWAP MEET
late morning BIKE ON RAIL TO CHESTNUT HILL, group ride along the Wissahickon...
late afternoon Final Gathering and group promenade down the Parkway....

as usual registration is $25 for all...includes swap meet selling space... register before Mar. 15 for free GBBW 2002 T-shirt...
email mcget@aol.com for more info....
or visit www.trophybikes.com
thanks for reading
cheers
mcg/Trophy Bikes


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Great British Bike Weekend update posted by Christopher on 3/13/2002 at 4:49:39 PM
"Chris, If you are calling in sick, then how come the caller Id say's you are in the Philly area code?"
You have to think of these things!


   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Great British Bike Weekend update posted by Edward in Vancouver on 3/13/2002 at 9:26:33 PM
(..Sigh..)This sounds really great, especially the dynohub workshop. I've heard that before the 6 volt dyno was made, there were short lived 12 volt and even 8 volt versions! I just need one teeny, insignificant item before I can make it to Philly for this weekend, time!...

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Great British Bike Weekend update posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/13/2002 at 11:09:16 PM
I have a 12 volt N.O.S. boxed and a used one. Never had one of the 8 volt ones though. I have seen only one 12 volt models offered and it was in a bike. I love these!

It is very large and heavy but it's great.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Great British Bike Weekend update posted by Stacey on 3/14/2002 at 3:17:02 PM
Mr. Mike, I ride a domestic Raleigh, would it be welcomed or would I be a laughing stock? Enquiring minds want to know. 8-)

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Great British Bike Weekend update posted by Catfood Rob on 3/14/2002 at 8:09:47 PM
Domestic Raleigh?? Is that one you tamed yourself, as opposed to the wild variety?

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Great British Bike Weekend update posted by Stacey on 3/14/2002 at 10:44:16 PM
LOLOLOLOLOLOLOL! Not domestic-ATED... Domestic! Ya know, made in the USofA. Well, I guess to those of you across the pond it would be a ferin bike. LOL To be specific it's made by Raleigh USA an English bike from an American manufacture that was produced in Japan. What a pedigree!






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   BB size for Raleigh posted by: Evileye on 3/12/2002 at 7:30:44 PM
Doing some replacement and overhaul. Can anyone tell me the size of ball bearings for a Raleigh headset, as well as, the ball size for front and rear hubs. The bike is a '71 Raleigh Sportster, 3 speed 'AW' hub. Thanks, evileye


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   BB size for Raleigh posted by M.R. on 3/12/2002 at 8:43:02 PM
1/8 in. for headset, 3/16 for front hub, and various sizes: 3/16, 1/4 etc for rear hub.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   BB size for Raleigh posted by Mark R. on 3/12/2002 at 8:53:21 PM
1/4 in. for the B.B.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   BB size for Raleigh posted by Evileye on 3/13/2002 at 3:42:53 PM
Thanks Mark.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   BB size for Raleigh posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/13/2002 at 4:26:14 PM
The headset is 25 5/32 size bearings.Older headsets could be 1/8 if they are really small.
Bring some old ones to check at the shop.
Bottom brackets are 1/4 size
Isn't this covered in Sheldon Brown's web site?Old Raleigh bicycles, in there?
http://www. Sheldonbrown.com






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian/Phillips posted by: Brian on 3/12/2002 at 4:12:48 AM
I recently bought a pair of Indian 3 speeds made by Phillips and it's amazing the quality of the paint on those old bikes. Paste wax brought out the shine after 50 years of neglect and abuse.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian/Phillips posted by Evileye on 3/12/2002 at 7:26:43 PM
I think that almost all the parts, paint, chrome from 'back then' was quality. I recieved old Raleighs from people that just seemed to have left them outside in the elements for years yet with some steelwool and some time these bikes come back to life as if new. And to amazement to the ones that gave me the bike in the first place.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian/Phillips posted by Cal on 3/13/2002 at 1:48:54 PM
Oy! Don't use steel wool, it will score the chrome!
Use BRONZE or COPPER wool. It is softer than the chrome and will not scratch it.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian/Phillips posted by Geoff Rogers on 3/13/2002 at 5:16:51 PM
There is certainly no harm in using copper instead of steel wool on chrome. But I must add my two cents' worth here. I have been using steel wool on chrome parts, both bicycles and British cars, for thirty years. In my experience, it does not scratch chrome. Chrome is a very hard material indeed, and much harder than steel wool. I normally use 00 or finer steel wool, which may be gentler than the coarser stuff, but I have also used very coarse steel wool as well, with no discernible damage to chrome plating. I have head it said that steel wool leaves tiny bits of steel in the "pores" of the chrome and that will rust later, although I have never had this experience. I always wax the chrome when I am finished steel wooling, and find that this helps preserve the shine very well. Sometimes the dust from the steel wool gets into nooks and crannies and it can rust later, but if you blow the dust away, it's not a problem.
Geoff Rogers

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian/Phillips posted by Geoff Rogers on 3/13/2002 at 5:18:10 PM
There is certainly no harm in using copper instead of steel wool on chrome. But I must add my two cents' worth here. I have been using steel wool on chrome parts, both bicycles and British cars, for thirty years. In my experience, it does not scratch chrome. Chrome is a very hard material indeed, and much harder than steel wool. I normally use 00 or finer steel wool, which may be gentler than the coarser stuff, but I have also used very coarse steel wool as well, with no discernible damage to chrome plating. I have head it said that steel wool leaves tiny bits of steel in the "pores" of the chrome and that will rust later, although I have never had this experience. I always wax the chrome when I am finished steel wooling, and find that this helps preserve the shine very well. Sometimes the dust from the steel wool gets into nooks and crannies and it can rust later, but if you blow the dust away, it's not a problem.
Geoff Rogers

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian/Phillips posted by Mark R. on 3/13/2002 at 8:40:10 PM
You know this is interesting, because I have used "Brillo" pads for ages to clean bikes, and I also have used steel wool. I have indeed seen certain steelwools scratch chrome on the english bikes, but not always. I have no idea why this would happen occationally but not always. I have always had great luck with "Brillo" pads. I regularly use light steel wool( ooo, and 0000), BUT just last night I used some on an "Elite" lamp, and damn if it didn't scratch the chrome! So, I suppose it depends on what, the grade of chrome??

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian/Phillips posted by Stacey on 3/13/2002 at 10:29:36 PM
To all of you who use STEEL WOOL to polish your chrome all I can say is... Better thee, than me! It's painfull obvious that all it takes is one scratch on the wrong item and you're screwed. For me, the only way to go is a COPPER scrubbie that's easily available at the grocery near the dish soap. I also use a copper or bronze brush to get the nasties in the corners, follow up with some chrome cleaner, then finish up with a Never-Dull rub down. With this method you never run the risk of scratching your work, and the "splinters" won't rust. Take it or leave it, copper works great for me!

In the wind,
Stacey

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian/Phillips posted by Brian on 3/14/2002 at 4:50:27 AM
I have always used fine steel wool but use it with paste wax. I wouldnt use it on new chrome but for an older piece it works well.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian/Phillips posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/14/2002 at 7:36:07 PM
Not only will you scratch the chrome on certain pieces but everybody will point to the bike and ask you "Why did you do that to that fender?"
I remember fenders on the schwinns all messed up with circular rubbing marks.Perhaps a very fine rubbing compound and some extra patience?
I'm not sure because some rubbing compound will scratch too, won't it?


   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian/Phillips posted by edgarecks on 3/14/2002 at 10:30:55 PM
I have an "Elite" lantern made in Hong Kong and I think it would be quite a stretch to call the tinfoil they made it out of "chrome".

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Indian/Phillips posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/15/2002 at 1:41:24 AM
For a while there I had trouble finding an E- lite lantern. Then at a swap meet it ended. I managed to pry TWO BOXES FULL away from a guy. I tell you it was wonderful. Now we see these on e- bay and they are selling for more than 5.00 these days! The older true British made lights are really cool like the EverReady lanterns and a whole host of them.






AGE / VALUE:   Use good sense, go with your gut feeling posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/12/2002 at 1:38:24 AM
I have met so many decent folks during my adventures chasing the Raleigh bikes. They have been of good character, knowledgable,polite, educated, friendly and all the diffrent variations of bikes I have seen and some of which I have had owned has been a real treat. This is a cool, rich hobby and I have learned a lot. Whenever you make a contact to buy something and you wind up with a address it is best to bring along a friend. After all, you are meeting a stranger in a strange place. I have been too innocent, and happy with this, happy to be adding another bike to the fleet. Or happy to be meeting a fellow collector or bike rider. It has always been neet to jump in with both feet and get back into the garage and see what it is the person has hanging up in the garage. Many times I brought parts to sell, performed minor adjustments, and showed books and struck up numerous discussions. It has been fun, a lot of fun. I am sorry that I am not older, I am sorry that I was not born earlier, sorry that I missed the Golden Era as it were. I am sorry I didn't get to see it all, carry my leather satchel around to all the various shops for the last 40 years like one guy I know. I missed it when it was really great. I am taking about the bicycle business. All the personalities behind it. The men who owned this or that company. Oh well, nobody gets to choose when one is born.
I had to not go with one lead, the fellow acted weird, it didn't small right. I got uncomfortable with what he said.

Nobody offers 6 very vintage valuable bikes for free. If they do, I feel, I cannot accept it. One has to be careful, and not to be too trusting or naieve. I have been lucky and blessed along the way. Something in me said to tell the guy I wasn't interested. He didn't seen to me to have all his marbles and it is important to go with your senses and not to ignore them just because it seems a great thing at the moment. If you are under 18 it is wise to do vintage bike hunting with somebody because you never know.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Use good sense, go with your gut feeling posted by Lenny Dintenfass on 3/12/2002 at 5:31:33 PM
Hello ChistopherRobin; I'll second your caution about going to see bikes alone. About 25 years ago, while a college student, I accompanied a fellow bike enthusiast while to go have a look at a Schwinn Paramount. The seller turned out to be not quite of sound mind, and blocked the door of his apartment (and our escape route) while wanting to discuss religion (his particular brand) and the state of our souls with him. After some tense minutes (and after politely explaining that we already had our own views on the subject) we were able to leave without having to resort to shoving him out of the way of the door. Could have been much, much worse, but my friend was still glad I came along with him. I'll never forget that feeling when he blocked the door, however.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Use good sense, go with your gut feeling posted by Lenny Dintenfass on 3/12/2002 at 5:32:35 PM
Hello ChistopherRobin; I'll second your caution about going to see bikes alone. About 25 years ago, while a college student, I accompanied a fellow bike enthusiast while going to have a look at a Schwinn Paramount. The seller turned out to be not quite of sound mind, and blocked the door of his apartment (and our escape route) while wanting to discuss religion (his particular brand) and the state of our souls with him. After some tense minutes (and after politely explaining that we already had our own views on the subject) we were able to leave without having to resort to shoving him out of the way of the door. Could have been much, much worse, but my friend was still glad I came along with him. I'll never forget that feeling when he blocked the door, however.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Use good sense, go with your gut feeling posted by Mark R. on 3/12/2002 at 5:59:42 PM
I have sold a few items over the internet in the past years to people who turned out to be KOOKS. I suppose that caution is probably a very good idea. Don't go down into basements, or up into attics without an escape route! I try to avoid such, but sometomes I don't know, you know, you've got to go into some old places where things get buried to get the good stuff. Just be cautious.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Use good sense, go with your gut feeling posted by Ian on 3/13/2002 at 8:44:38 AM
Hey don't be too worried about missing an earlier era, most of us who were there at the time missed it as well! I don't mean from drugs or anything, just that when you are living it as part of your regular life you don't appreciate how special some of the moments are. "You don't know what you got till its gone". It is not until you mature enough to appreciate the finer points of life that you realise that you have lived through some great moments. Believe me being smart does not equate to being wise and wisdom comes from the experience of doing things wrong enough for long enough to finally get a few things right. The only things we can do now is appreciate it all every time we get a chance and try and help a few others appreciate the good things in life, which of course usually gets us called interfering old busy-bodies. Fortunately I am finding that a great many younger people today actually seem to listen to the voice of experience a darn site better than I ever did. Gives you hope for the future don't it! Cheers,Ian.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Use good sense, go with your gut feeling posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/15/2002 at 4:38:38 PM
One needs to be on guard. Many times the weirdo's leave the evil garbage they have planned for you for the- very- last- moment.
It's done, and they are out the door and down the street before you even know what just happened to you. Let alone be able to think on what action to take to fix it.
Carry a cell phone, bring a friend.
I'm a very good judge of character, you need to listen to them and use common sense.I always did use my head and it kept me out of trouble.
Don't think just because "We are all bike collectors or bike buddies that automatically you are in good company." That feeling must be earned.
If something is weird somehow, say "Next!" and move on.






MISC:   old bike posted by: curtis on 3/11/2002 at 8:13:48 PM
found old bike in house i just brought.cant seem to find any info on.its a royce union with royce union emblem on front,royce union tires,union seat,that has a metal tag on it that says made in holland,if anyone can help me with info i would greatly appreciate it.







AGE / VALUE:   DL1 on ebay posted by: dafydd on 3/11/2002 at 7:00:11 PM
Check out the heading:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1082604169

I'm not trying to be mean and hope I don't insult anyone, but what other kind of brakes would it have? chemical? psychokinetic?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   DL1 on ebay posted by Stacey on 3/11/2002 at 9:09:22 PM
Well, there is always hydraulic like on a car... or air brakes like on a tractor trailer... or thrust reversers like on an airplane... or Fred Flintstone brakes like what you use when all of the above fail! LOL

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   DL1 on ebay posted by Mark R. on 3/12/2002 at 12:43:26 AM
I think they mean as opposed to cable actuated. That's a very nice piece of bike there by the way!