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Archived: English Roadsters







MISC:   WHAT IS DL-1? posted by: Mario Romano on 5/20/2002 at 6:45:37 PM
What is DL-1? I could call my Raleigh badged bicycle a DL-1? Raleigh english roadster model means DL-1 or vice-versa? If the DL-1 is not unique, how many models exists?


   RE:MISC:   WHAT IS DL-1? posted by Marko on 5/20/2002 at 7:08:20 PM
Mario, The model that had 28 in. wheels, rod brakes, B-66 saddle is the DL-1. They were built for many, many years, and had many changes. Some were called "Tourist". If you see a Raleigh called "Tourist" that fits this description, THAT is a DL-1( the Raleigh model code number).

   RE:RE:MISC:   WHAT IS DL-1? posted by Mario Romano on 5/21/2002 at 1:00:47 AM
Yes! My bicycle is equal to the way you told me. So, definitively, it´s an DL-1 bicycle.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   1965 Moulton 4-speed (Sturmey Archer) posted by: Camman on 5/18/2002 at 6:45:51 PM
Just dug out my parents 1965 Moulton 4 speed bike. Very unusual looking. 16 x 1-3/8" tires, Middlemore seat, Slightly tired looking but overall OK. Anyone know what it might be worth or where to find our more information about it? Thanks


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   1965 Moulton 4-speed (Sturmey Archer) posted by David on 5/19/2002 at 1:08:33 PM
There's a [possibly] similar one on ebay now (search on Moulton) in England. I'd expect you could do a little better than the English seller, assuming you're in the States.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   1965 Moulton 4-speed (Sturmey Archer) posted by smg on 5/19/2002 at 5:16:26 PM
I see enough Moultons and similar bikes here in Seattle to make me think that there's a decent stateside market for Moultons.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   1965 Moulton 4-speed (Sturmey Archer) posted by Camman on 5/20/2002 at 1:40:15 PM
David, Thank you for the e-bay information. Yes, the "Moulton Major 4 speed FW cycle" is the model that I have, and yes I'm in the states. The description that was on the e-bay bike is helpful. I might try and get the bike running again. I'll need to get new cables and tires, but it'll be nice to ride it again.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   1965 Moulton 4-speed (Sturmey Archer) posted by Peter on 5/22/2002 at 5:45:22 AM
Wellhouse is the name of his house, and his name is Tony Colegrave.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   1965 Moulton 4-speed (Sturmey Archer) posted by Auldooly on 5/22/2002 at 6:05:01 PM
A wealth of information about Moulton bicycles can be found at this website: http://www.moultoneers.net/

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   1965 Moulton 4-speed (Sturmey Archer) posted by Camman on 5/22/2002 at 7:10:37 PM
Auldooly, Thanks for the Great link on Moultons. This is a whole new world for me. I'm glad I held on to the Bike all these years. Now to find time to work on fixing it up. Thanks again for all the replies to my inquiry.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Brooks Saddle posted by: Catfood Rob on 5/18/2002 at 3:23:44 PM
Im told you can date a bike by its Brooks saddle.... different name tags, etc....
My BSA (yep, still trying to date it) Has a brooks model 66 with brass nametag.... anyone any ideas?


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Brooks Saddle posted by sam on 5/18/2002 at 5:03:22 PM
Contact,A.Colgrave Wellhouse , northian Rye,East Sussex TN 31 6HY England --he restores old Brooks saddles and has the correct stamps for the old seats so maybe he can date it.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Brooks Saddle posted by Ian on 5/19/2002 at 8:54:43 AM
And if you suceed by this or any other method to date your B.S.A. don't forget to give us all the info on how to do it! I won't hold my breath but I will look forward to the day when someone figures out how to with delicious anticipation. Thanks for giving those of us who own B.S.A.'s some hope. Cheers, Ian.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Brooks Saddle posted by Catfood Rob on 5/19/2002 at 10:14:24 AM
Just found "B4805" on the top tube, where the saddle tube goes in...... that, along with "patent no 109682" is all I have found..... will keep digging.
Sam, is that "wellhouse" part of the fellows name, or name of his house?

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Brooks Saddle posted by sam on 5/19/2002 at 9:33:20 PM
I think it's his name.I don't have a phone number,just that adress for him.I coppied it down sometime back off this site.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sturmey Tricoaster Hub posted by: Tom on 5/17/2002 at 11:48:09 PM
I just got a Sturmey Archer Trcoaster hub and there is no dating on it. The hub has a number 10549N on it and Sturmey Archer Tricoaster (patented) Nottingham. Nice skip tooth sprocket on it. I am not sure of it's age, maybe teens or 20's. Anyone out there with knowing the age. I also got 2 bare Tricoaster shells with KC76586and KC76604. What years would these be and does anyone have spares so I can put them together.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sturmey Tricoaster Hub posted by Catfood Rob on 5/18/2002 at 3:29:17 PM
Have you tried Stermeys website? Ive not been for a while, but I seem to remember that either them, or a site on their links list, had a thorough history of Stermey ...might be worth a look. www.stermeyarcher.co.uk

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sturmey Tricoaster Hub posted by Tom on 5/19/2002 at 6:10:16 AM
I tried that site and it does not come up. Anyone have any ideas what age the hubs are.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sturmey Tricoaster Hub posted by Albert on 5/20/2002 at 11:24:58 AM
Tony Hadland's book, the Sturmey Archer Story, would help you i.d. the hub. Unfortunatly, I'm unable to locate my copy. Cheers!

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sturmey Tricoaster Hub posted by Tom on 5/20/2002 at 3:39:05 PM
Thanks for the help on the hubs. I just got an email from one of the old pros in England and was told the complete hub is an early teens and the 2 shells late 20's or very early 30's. Now to find the parts for them. The guy I got these from has a half a dozen more but won't sell right now.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   AN ORANGE HUMBER BICYCLE??? posted by: M.Romano on 5/17/2002 at 9:40:04 PM
I saw, on the internet page of another brazilian bicycle collector, an Humber bicycle painted orange!!! How all collector, this way named, needs to have just bicycles with factory specs (I believe), I turns severely confused about original Humber paint options and I decided to ask for my friends of Oldroads.Com if Humber offered 1946 model or 40-50's bicycles with the color option of ORANGE? Is that bicycle painted according original specs, it's an fake copy or just painted with the wrong color? The page is www.bicicletasantigas.com.br!

Thanks a lot by all replies!

Mario Romano


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   AN ORANGE HUMBER BICYCLE??? posted by WTheis on 5/18/2002 at 3:41:46 AM
I don't know if they painted that model orange but that is a great site. Wonder how many more there are out there we don't know about. That military bike is really something. Wonder how it got to Brasil.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   AN ORANGE HUMBER BICYCLE??? posted by David on 5/18/2002 at 2:31:29 PM
Notice the "bubble car" (Isetta?) peeking into the first Prosdocimo picture?

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   AN ORANGE HUMBER BICYCLE??? posted by Ben on 5/18/2002 at 3:34:23 PM
Yes, that's an Isetta alright. I owned one for 15 years, what a fun little car. Alas, bicycles won my heart in the end.

Ben

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   AN ORANGE HUMBER BICYCLE??? posted by sam on 5/18/2002 at 3:45:02 PM
Mario gracias por a great web site.
me dio mucho gusto ver tus bicicletas alemanas, no se ven por aqui con regularidad.






AGE / VALUE:   his & hers triumph bikes posted by: Pete Glogowski on 5/17/2002 at 9:26:45 PM
Hi,

I have a pair of black his & hers 1969 triumph bicycles in very
good shape. The only problem I can see with either of them
is that the mens bike has a different seat on it. I'm thinking
about selling them and don't know what they are worth. Can
anyone tell me appoximately what these are worth? I don't
see how to attach a photo to this message, but could send a
powerpoint picture of them if needed.

Thanks,

Pete


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   his & hers triumph bikes posted by David Poston on 5/20/2002 at 8:21:07 PM
Are you ready to sell? If so, please e-mail me a full description (e.g. frame size) and pictures.

Thanks,
David






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Handlebars: straight back or to the side? posted by: David Poston on 5/17/2002 at 7:51:33 PM
Sorry for the flurry of posts here, I hope I didn't inundate you guys.

I was wanting to know if there is a name for the type of upright handlebars that are used on English roadsters. Also, some seem to go straight back towards the rider, while others flare out to the sides slightly. Can someone explain the different types of handlebars for me?

Thanks,
David.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Handlebars: straight back or to the side? posted by Mark on 5/17/2002 at 10:33:13 PM
UK Raleigh catalogues from the 1950s refer to these type of bars as 'North Road Raised', and this description is used for both rod (i.e. Superbes) and cable (i.e. Sports) brake versions. I believe the North Road was the popular name for a famous course used in the UK for cycle time trials.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Handlebars: straight back or to the side? posted by David on 5/20/2002 at 3:23:29 AM
So there are rod-brake bikes with flared-out handlebars? I had assumed they were all like DL1s, with the grips bent straight back. It seems like the brake levers would work a bit oddly.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Handlebars: straight back or to the side? posted by David Poston on 5/20/2002 at 4:45:12 PM
No, I was probably referring to cable-brake bikes. What I was really wanting to know is if later English-made models (60's and 70's) started to flare out to the sides slightly rather than bending straight back. I don't own such a bike, it just appeared that way in pictures.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Open vs. enclosed chainguards (oil bath) posted by: David Poston on 5/17/2002 at 6:13:43 PM
What's the scoop on open vs. enclosed chainguards, often referred to as an "oil bath"? Which is easier to maintain, which will preserve the gears better, which are used on what models/types of bikes?

Thanks,
David.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Open vs. enclosed chainguards (oil bath) posted by Mario Romano on 5/20/2002 at 2:43:57 PM
I heard about 1937 Rudge bicycle who had oil bath system. Consult www.bicicletasantigascom.br for further information. Send an e-mail for the page owner!






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wire vs. woven baskets posted by: David Poston on 5/17/2002 at 6:10:58 PM
Which is more "traditional," wire or woven-type baskets (such as the type selling on this site), and which is more suitable for a men's bike?

Personally, I think the woven-type look more classic.

David.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wire vs. woven baskets posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/18/2002 at 12:01:10 AM
A nasty, American style wire 'basket' on a British roadster? Certainly not. Never. Ever. And please not on a gent's machine. Just not done. Try and find a rear black enamelled carrier instead. And Brooks saddle bags. In the mid 1980s I tried so long and hard to get some of the larger Brooks saddle bags that eventually Brooks UK sent me two free with an apology!

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wire vs. woven baskets posted by David Poston on 5/18/2002 at 7:03:21 AM
Where do I put my briefcase? I'm almost tempted to put a wicker basket in front, for convenience's sake? I mean, where am supposed to stick my briefcase or bookbag? Those rear racks look nice, but it's some trouble getting something to stay on top. Tell me more about these saddle bags, where they attach, what use are they, etc.

David

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wire vs. woven baskets posted by Stacey on 5/18/2002 at 11:14:53 AM
David, you could try using a courier bag. They are an over the shoulder bag similar to the french mussette (sp). One source of courier bags is www.aerostich.com they are primarily into protective apparel for motorcyclist and the goods are quality stuff.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wire vs. woven baskets posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/18/2002 at 1:21:58 PM
Better still get yourself a briefcase with a shoulder strap!

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wire vs. woven baskets posted by David on 5/18/2002 at 2:48:52 PM
The best baskets I've found are ubiquitous in Switzerland. (I've never seen 'em sold in USA, though) They're enameled wire in various colors with a folding handle, much like the baskets in grocery stores. They have hooks on the bottom that engage a rear rack, and the spring clip holds them in place. You can lift them right off and go in the grocery store and then clip them right back on. They're great on standard and "Athlete" Pletscher racks. Although they're not a perfect fit, I think they'd work ok on the wide English spring clip racks,too.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wire vs. woven baskets posted by David Poston on 5/19/2002 at 1:01:45 AM
Would it be "period-accurate" to put a pair of wire baskets on the rear rack of an old Raleigh from back in the day? How did they keep things on their rear racks? I mean, surely men carried briefcases and portfolios; they didn't have the modern over-the-shoulder bags or nylon backpacks like they do today.

Maybe I would be better off defying the laws of gender and putting a wicker basket in front? Or would that just be too much of an insult to an old English gent's bike?

Thanks all,
David.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wire vs. woven baskets posted by David on 5/19/2002 at 1:16:02 PM
"Period-correct" in the US would certainly include those wire rear pannier-style baskets. For UK, I think you can safely assume men would use those wicker baskets, too (Have you seen the movie "Iris?" A little depressing, but there's a repeated bike scene and I think both of them have such baskets.) And you commonly see pictures of men on bikes with their briefcase strapped on the rack with a belt? bungee cord? ??

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wire vs. woven baskets posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/19/2002 at 3:05:36 PM
Most if not all of the photos I've seen of men cycling to work during the 'glory days' of roadsters (c. 1930s-1960s) in England are of working class men; shipyard workers that sort of thing. No briefcases of course. And no baskets. Not a one. Rear carriers, saddle bags or 'musette' bags. A surprising number of 'racing' or 'club' type machines too with dropped handlebars, no chainguards and maybe those cool close-ratio Sturmey-Archer three-speed 'racing' hubs with the wingnuts. I guess the executive types went by tram or tube. I got a great leather dispatch case type briefcase (made in India so it's c. 1950s in style!) from Marks & Spencer a few years back which has a detachable shoulder strap so it's ideal for cycling. I don't know of any whicker basket for cycles nearly big enough for a briefcase of any description. All I know is that when I was growing up, no boy would ever, ever put a girl's whicker basket on his bike. Silly perhaps, but that's how conventions are made.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wire vs. woven baskets posted by chris on 5/19/2002 at 8:25:01 PM
Brooks made metal rear racks that had pannier boxes made out of reinforced Brooks leather and with a Brooks leather bag attached to the rear seat. A Brooks seat, that is.

Rare, rare, rare! Bags and seats are out there, the boxes? Good Luck! Only in the picture books!
My Brooks leather seat bag was in the Shoe Shop for sewing and it caused a stir with the customers who were there to have shoes repaired. They knew what it was, and they were all wanting it. Is that for sale? Call this customer up!
He said to me, "Come get this thing out of here, they're driving me nuts!"
BUT....

I deserve a kick in the *uts for asking this guy to dress up or apply dressing to a Ideale saddle! He did it, alright and made a royale mess out of this poor origonal seat. I can't sell it now, the origonal finish has been altered into a mess.

Keep your leather bicycle saddles out of the shoe repair places or else this will happen to you.

Unless the shoe repair guy belongs to lists like these and is into old Brooks leather seats and old Brit bikes.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wire vs. woven baskets posted by glen on 5/20/2002 at 4:55:53 AM
I have a Wald wire front mounted basket on my 3 speed and I LOVE it! It may not be "period", it may not be stylish, but it's THE best addition I've ever made to my bike. I like to ride instead of drive whenever possible, but I was limited by my touring bag and luggage carrier. I love my wire basket. I'm MAD -stark raving MAD I say!

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wire vs. woven baskets posted by David Poston on 5/20/2002 at 4:52:49 PM
By "pannier boxes," I assume that you all are referring to the ones that hang on either side of your rear rack?

Some leather pannier boxes would be ideal for me. Wow, those would look great! Wonder where I can get one of those, or at least a substitute. Do you think a motorcycle accessory retailer might carry something that could be adapted to a bike?

David

P.S. What can you fit in a Brooks leather seat bag?

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Wire vs. woven baskets posted by Chris on 5/21/2002 at 2:01:29 PM
Brooks stoped making bags years ago,and when they finally did stop, the bags were leatherette or imitation leather. The older, real leather bags are hens teeth.
Take a look at Rivendell Bicycle Works for a more modern equivilent. Perhaps something they offer will catch your eye.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Cable vs. rod brakes: what's the story? posted by: David Poston on 5/17/2002 at 6:03:19 PM
Can someone fill me in on the difference between cable and rod brakes? Which is more maintenance-free, which last longer, which were used on what models?

thanks,

David


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Cable vs. rod brakes: what's the story? posted by Kevin C. on 5/18/2002 at 2:17:38 AM
Rod brakes are great to look at, but they don't have the stopping power of cable brakes, in my opinion. I love to ride the big old Tourist, with its rod brakes, on leisurely trips where there is little traffic, but for city riding and possible sudden stops, I stick with the Sports, with its cable brakes.






FOR SALE:   Butterfly kickstand for sale posted by: Robert on 5/17/2002 at 4:39:50 PM
I have a butterfly kickstand (2 legs)for sale. Steel construction , good condition, 20.00 plus shipping.







FOR SALE:   Single speed Raleigh Roadster ebay posted by: P.C. Kohler on 5/17/2002 at 3:00:44 PM
eBay has an interesting "1940s Raleigh Roadster" up for bid starting today. It has a single speed coaster brake hub, 28" wheels and 24" frame, rear carrier rack. And no chainguard of any sort. I believe Raleigh started small imports of their machines into the USA circa 1938 and since this example has an early 1950s Burbank, CA cycle license plate, it may well be of the advertised vintage.

P.C. Kohler


   RE:FOR SALE:   Single speed Raleigh Roadster ebay posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/17/2002 at 3:10:33 PM
here is the url for that Raleigh on eBay:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1829765297

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Single speed Raleigh Roadster ebay posted by Kevin C. on 5/18/2002 at 2:27:56 AM
Has it been stripped of its rod brakes? There appears to be a stud on the headtube for the front brake. Just wondering: I know they made single-speed Tourists with rod brakes, but were they made with coaster brakes?

   RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Single speed Raleigh Roadster ebay posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/18/2002 at 3:45:04 AM
They apparently did make such machines with coaster (or foot brakes as the British call them); the Photo Archives on this site has a 1957 Humber with such brakes. If the rod brakes were removed from this Tourist, then the handlebars, too, have been replaced as there are no fittings for the rods. I think the vast majority of Roadster cycles in the world are indeed single speed; 3-speed hubs are virtually unknown in Africa and the Indian Sub-Continent. But to find a single-speed, foot-brake Raleigh roadster in the USA is surely unusual. Then again, if it dates from the 1940s, it was surely more in keeping with local practice?!

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Single speed Raleigh Roadster ebay posted by Ian on 5/18/2002 at 10:52:15 AM
In fact the Enlish usually do refer to them as coaster brakes. Almost all the single speed English bikes I have, dating from the 1930's to the 50's, are fitted with them. The common ones are the Eadie (which actually has "Eadie Coaster" on the brake arm) and the Perry. The catalogues I have do not seem to refer to "back pedal brakes" but they are sometimes called that in advertising from the 60's. To begin with most cycle manufacturers bought in components such as brakes but eventually the component manufacturers ended up being owned by either Raleigh or Tube Industries (who made Phillips, Hercules etc etc) and eventually were swallowed by Raleigh also. Hope this sheds a little light. Regards, Ian.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   INFORMATIONS CONCERNING MY HUMBER BICYCLE posted by: Ali Mohammad El-Hajj Gassin Ahoun Alisabulabeba on 5/17/2002 at 12:25:43 AM
I have an Humber bicycle, it sounds all original except by it's gear hub, from Hercules Cycles and Motors (is that the same manufacturer of Hercules bicycles?). It's by it's serial number is from 1949, but it have (with Hercules gear hub), gear passing lever and plastic pulley from Sturmey Arches. Is the gear hub from 1949 too? It haven't the year on the hub!!!

Signed,

ALI MOHAMMAD EL-HAJJ GASSIN AHOUN ALISABULABEBA


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   INFORMATIONS CONCERNING MY HUMBER BICYCLE posted by David on 5/17/2002 at 2:36:05 AM
Jeez. Can we knock off parodying poor Mario Romano for a day even? At least he posts a Brazilian email address, so I, for one, don't think he's putting us on; unlike Hajji here.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   INFORMATIONS CONCERNING MY HUMBER BICYCLE posted by Dewane on 5/17/2002 at 9:29:23 PM
Mario, listen to Chris, I like reading your English, and I've never had a problem understanding it. It's quite a bit better than my Portuguese.

Actually, the cool thing about English roadsters is that they were exported all over the world. I just saw an e-mail regarding a BSA (motorcycle, unfortunately) that was for sale in Zaire. Before the sun set on the British Empire, these bikes were everywhere.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   INFORMATIONS CONCERNING MY HUMBER BICYCLE posted by MARIO ROMANO on 5/17/2002 at 9:45:26 PM
Quem dorme com cães acorda com pulgas, eu vou ignorar isso mas é apenas desta vez, leva fé? Então está bom, seus bifes metidos! Estão me tirando é? Não mexam com el cigano (the gypsy)....





   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   INFORMATIONS CONCERNING MY HUMBER BICYCLE posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/18/2002 at 12:26:34 AM
To be sure! In fact, I have never even seen a 28-inch wheel roadster in Britain. Not in a land where you can't find an inseam over 33" "off the peg" in Marks and Sparks. Most of the roadster, rod-braked machines in England are 26-inch wheel jobs but still with rod brakes, gearcases etc.

Africa (the former British bits)is the Mother of the Roadster. When I was researching a book on East African ships (British India Line), I used East African newspapers extensively c. 1930-1965. The most wonderful adverts you can imagine on British roadsters. All of the top makes too: Raleigh, Humber, Rudge, BSA, Sunbeam, Hercules and so forth. Beautiful illustrations. And of course never, ever, any women. Men cycle in Africa not women! Africa is where the most famous Raleigh ad of all time originated: an African asride a Raleigh roadster laughing as he outruns a pride of lions! Africans remain quite astute about Roadsters. I had Nigerian clients once who saw me arriving at work on my Raleigh and they spent several minutes fawning over a "real" Raleigh. Africa is also where the famous Boss Bike was made famous: the entirely chromium-plated DL-1 Superbe. This cost so much that it was reserved for tribal chieftans.

Today, I believe Raleigh roadsters are still made under license in Nigeria, maybe also in South Africa. There, the wheels are of wider profile for unpaved roads.

Africa would be a great place to go on a Classic Roadster Safari. So treasured and expensive were these machines that they were cared for with enormous pride and passed from father to son. I suspect there are some great examples still around.

P.C. Kohler


   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   INFORMATIONS CONCERNING MY HUMBER BICYCLE posted by Mario Romano on 5/17/2002 at 4:43:31 PM
Hey, why you talk about me? I don't understand it.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   INFORMATIONS CONCERNING MY HUMBER BICYCLE posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 5/17/2002 at 5:26:45 PM
Ignore it, Mario.

    Stay away from mean, crabby Elephants with you bike!( Elephant hit and run) posted by Chris on 5/21/2002 at 2:52:42 PM
I saw this on the television. The African bike rider comes around a corner and meets up with a angry bull elephant in the path. He jumps off the bike and flees with the elephant chasing him. He gets away and then the elephant returns to knock the bike all around and step on it and the elephant is trumpeting loudly and it's all mangled up and the elephant picks it up and slings it! The shaken African is there watching from afar and he's excitedly speaking bad words about this elephant. He could have been killed. A Elephant can really mess you up.
Mace and a tire pump are no good when dealing with Elephants. It was a big one with tusks and everything!
Can you just see him tapping it with the tire pump and saying "Go away"
This was caught on film!






MISC:   AN ORANGE HUMBER BICYCLE??? posted by: Mario Romano on 5/17/2002 at 12:09:38 AM
I saw, on the internet page of another brazilian bicycle collector, an Humber bicycle painted orange!!! How all collector, this way named, needs to have just bicycles with factory specs (I believe), I turns severely confused about original Humber paint options and I decided to ask for my friends of Oldroads.Com if Humber offered 1946 model or 40-50's bicycles with the color option of ORANGE? Is that bicycle painted according original specs, it's an fake copy or just painted with the wrong color? The page is www.bicicletasantigas.com.br!

Thanks a lot by all replies!

Mario Romano
Brazilian Collector of English Roadster Bicycles







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Importance of gender in English roadsters? posted by: David Poston on 5/16/2002 at 10:38:44 PM
Will I look like a sissy if I get a women's English roadster with a wicker basket in front? Historically speaking in England, did men ride women's model bikes and vice versa?

David


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Importance of gender in English roadsters? posted by Stacey on 5/17/2002 at 12:53:30 AM
You pose a very valid question David and by no means am I trying to trivialize an answer for you. Short and sweet... Who cares as long as you're comfortable riding it!

To me it would indicate a man who is confident and secure with his gender self-perception regardless of what he was riding.

I feel there is too much emphasis on gender stereotypes, especially here in the states. Hey Catfood Rob... How 'bout some input from across the pond!

You see women by the droves riding standard framed... read "Men's" bikes. Does that make them more butch? I don't think so... I see it purely as what they choose to ride. At 5'10" I've yet to find a step-thru framed... read "Women's" bike that fits me comfortably, so I ride a standard framed bike.

If sizing and or physical limitations on your part, if it's a family heirloom, if it's just a neat old bike that you saved from an inglorious demise by all means get on and ride and if you find yourself subject to the the derision of others, take comfort in knowing that it's they who are insecure.

In the wind,
Stacey

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Importance of gender in English roadsters? posted by sam on 5/17/2002 at 2:50:10 AM
The "girls" frame is a nix frame invented if France for men,it was not intended for Ladies.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Importance of gender in English roadsters? posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/17/2002 at 3:48:32 AM
Of course, there is nothing wrong riding a ladies roadster (I have a lovely ladies DL-1 for my wife) and it's great to do a "matched team". But why rush and buy a ladies' machine (admitedly they are more readily available and almost always immaculate).. I'd wait, shop around and enjoy the "hunt". Get yourself a proper gents 28 inch Roadster of any British make. If nothing else, Roadster Riding should be TRADITIONAL. Gents and Ladies, each with his or her own machine. Unisex notions just don't work with rod brakes, gold carriage lining and Riding Awheel on Sheffield Steel!

P.C. Kohler, a bit sore after a first ride on a new Brooks B-33 for his DL-1....

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Importance of gender in English roadsters? posted by Edward inVancouver on 5/17/2002 at 2:40:29 PM
My first "rainbike" I got when I moved to this city was a ladies Eatons Glider, basically a Raleigh. Although the frame was small, it fit me quite well, and I never had any qualms about riding a ladies bike. Never got raised eyebrows or taunts either, even when I took it through Stanley Park.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Importance of gender in English roadsters? posted by Stacey on 5/17/2002 at 3:04:25 PM
C'mon Edward... that's because you're in Canada. It's a well known fact that our brethern to the north are so much more cosmopolitan and tolerant of individual choices that us cretans to the south. LOL And belive me, the further south you go, the worse it gets... Those poor Philadelphians! :-)

   RE:Size for a small gent; advantages to men's bike? posted by Warren on 5/18/2002 at 1:57:19 AM
I'm 5' 9" and have the same problem...I had a DL1 and had to get rid of it. The DL 1 or Tourist came in 22" and 24" frames but I've never seen a 22" frame in Toronto, although I have seen dozens of the larger frame. There are options...the camelback mens frames did come with the 28" wheels and they provide a close rival to the large DL 1s. They did not come with rod brakes. You can find examples of roadsters with the SA 3 speed hubs with cable activated drum brakes from the 50's...BH or BA hubs? They are not great stoppers however. Another option is the 26" wheeled, rod brake roadsters which are rare over here but not impossible to find. My smaller Hercules is a treat to ride.

We've got about 20 vintage bikes between my wife and myself and although we each have our favourites, we both ride everything. Women's, men's whatever...

   Size for a small gent; advantages to men's bike? posted by David Poston on 5/17/2002 at 5:22:54 PM
1. Since I am not very tall (only 5' 7"), what size bike would I need? And can someone please explain frame size?

2. I guess I thought the ladies model would be more convenient; I mean, you can step through and be off in a flash instead of swinging your legs over that bar. Dismounting is much easier, too. What advantages does the men's version have (if any) over the ladies version (e.g. structurally stronger)? I mean, isn't it more convenient to step-through rather than straddle?

David

   Stir things up posted by Ray on 5/17/2002 at 5:25:59 PM
The only thing those girls bikes are good for is a source of parts to restore the boys bikes. There I said it, now I will turn the shields back on. ;)

   RE:Stir things up posted by chris on 5/17/2002 at 5:52:13 PM
The ladies D.L.1.L is a special bike.
It's a great bike.

   RE:RE:Stir things up posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/17/2002 at 7:24:13 PM
The DL-1L (ladies roadster) is indeed a lovely machine especially with that very graceful curved top bar. Ideally with a skirt guard on the rear mudguard, enclosed gearcase, whicker basket and Raleigh heron's crest lamp bracket mounted on the fork. I have a 1970 DL-1L which I bought for $70 about 10 years ago. She still has her original Dunlop Roadster tyres.