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Archived: English Roadsters







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help needed (quickly) on DL-1 rear reflector posted by: David Poston on 5/23/2002 at 4:48:19 AM
I'm getting ready to bid on a DL-1 on e-bay. It has the rear reflector under the seat, not on the white blackout strip on the rear fender. Is this correct? (I prefer it on the rear fender. Could it move it there?).

Thanks,
David


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help needed (quickly) on DL-1 rear reflector posted by David on 5/23/2002 at 10:06:36 AM
On my c. 1968 DL1, the rear reflector consists of a rubber housing with an interior steel plate and [missing] plastic lens. It's attached to the fender by two bolts. (The usual SA white rubber reflector has one bolt) The fender has a flatter profile than the deeply curved and ridged Sports-style fender. Have you determined if the fender is punched for the reflector? The same bolts retain the fender struts. If this is the 22" framed one on ebay, it looks like the reflector is missing, but the Pletscher rack w/reflector is definitely aftermarket, so I would guess that the fender has the normal holes. You could wait [a long time!] to find a correct reflector - I am!

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help needed (quickly) on DL-1 rear reflector posted by Andrew on 5/23/2002 at 11:23:39 AM
I say it is correct, I just bought a 1977 lady's DL-1 with the same reflector under the seat...mounted to where fender meets frame via a bracket. I've seen several later DL-1's with these reflectors. My 1974 mens is mounted on the back of rear fender ( round, white plastic ) I say Raleigh made this change in '76 or '77.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help needed (quickly) on DL-1 rear reflector posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/23/2002 at 2:02:28 PM
That's about right; I think 1976 actually when the USDOT mandated all those reflectors on bicycles. Not only did we lose the classic white "blackout" stripe on the rear mudguard but also the lovely Heron's Crest lamp bracket. The new bracket was solid and drilled to accommodate the horrible front reflector. When I saw these Americanised Raleighs in the cycle shop, I remember thinking they all looked like 'orrible Huffys or something! Yuck!!

When I bought my first DL-1 in early 1978, the very first thing I did when I got her home was to rip off every single one of these god awful looking reflectors. The rear mudguard stay is bolted to the same hole as the reflector on the later (post 1972 machines) so it was easy to find a reflector, install this and spray paint the white blackout stripe. To me, it just wouldn't be a British cycle without this!

So if you do get a post-1976 DL-1, you can still make her look "proper" IF you can find the rear white reflector. This, too, by the way, evolved from the black multi-piece Lucas style one described above to the white one to the larger 1972 era one. I think the black ones were used on the older square profile DL-1 mudguards with the different stay assemblies. I have this on my 1970 DL-1L ladies machine.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help needed (quickly) on DL-1 rear reflector posted by Andrew on 5/23/2002 at 10:59:25 PM
Yes.....those mandated reflectors really made a classy bike look tacky, it's good they come of so easy. I have two additional things to ask, can one mount a closed chain case on a later DL-1 without making any frame modifications, and did Raleigh send late Tourists over with vinyl seats, the '77 I mentioned above had one. First thing I did was locate a Brooks B-72 and pull those darn reflectors off! Must be tons of discarded reflectors out there.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help needed (quickly) on DL-1 rear reflector posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 5/23/2002 at 11:06:49 PM
The one that everybody loves is a smaller round rear fender mounted reflector. Later on, Sturmey- Archer made silver dollar size reflectors and these might have been on more bikes than just what was intended for the states.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help needed (quickly) on DL-1 rear reflector posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/24/2002 at 1:07:05 AM
Of course you can add an enclosed gearcase on a DL-1 without one originally. I had no problem with my 1978 model; it took me about eight months to get a gearcase from my dealer. The dealer installed without any problems. Then I ordered two extras direct from Nottingham in 1986. Interestingly, the last DL-1s shipped to the USA all seemed to have gearcases fitted. It was my understanding they were not hitherto so fitted because of some moronic weight limit on import cycles into the USA. I dare say all those crappy reflectors weighed as much as a gearcase!

Funny, although most North America DL-1s did not originally have gearcases, I simply cannot imagine a roadster without one. It's what everyone notices even before the rod brakes!

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help needed (quickly) on DL-1 rear reflector posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/24/2002 at 1:48:46 AM
Sorry I forgot about your query about DL-1 saddles. I never saw vinyl mattress "saddles" on DL-1s although they were standard fit to Raleigh LTDs, Sprites, Colts, Space Riders and Mounties as well as the RSWs.

DL-1s were usually fitted with the classic Brooks B72 "loop spring" saddles as were the Sports (DL-22). Superbes had the B-66. About the same time (1976-77) that all those reflectors appeared, DL-1s were fitted with B-66s. I have B-33s on my DL-1 and DL-1L; these are wonderfully comfortable, look quite imposing with all those springs and coils even if they must weigh 6 lbs each!

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help needed (quickly) on DL-1 rear reflector posted by David Poston on 5/24/2002 at 4:45:52 AM
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dllViewItem&item=1830448172

If you don't mind, somebody take a look at the rear fender on this one and tell me how you would put a "proper" reflector on it. You're right, those big reflectors (under the seat and in the front) are so ugly. The ones on the wheel spokes, too. The first thing I would do if I had this bike is to rip them off. They make an old-fashioned bike look so constrained, so modern and high-tech.

P.S. How come most DL-1's for sale out there are post-1970? How did the pre-1970 ones look?

   ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help needed (quickly) on DL-1 rear reflector posted by David Poston on 5/24/2002 at 5:02:22 AM
OK, take a look at this bike. (Go down one picture and enlarge to see the rear view).

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dllViewItem&item=2105058826

Now, is this the "correct" reflector on the rear mudguard?
And what is that reflector doing on the rear carrier?

P.S. Is that carrier "correct", by the way?

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help needed (quickly) on DL-1 rear reflector posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/24/2002 at 4:12:41 PM
It's easy! When you get your rear reflector you'll find a screw in the back of it. Remove the single screw in the back of the mudguard that holds the braces, keep the washer and little nut (the ones that always roll under the radiator or something when you're working!) and just insert the reflector in the hole and tighten the washer and fixing nut. The reflector screw threads into the mudguard braces. Of course, first you need to carefully mask off the rear mudguard and spray paint the white black-out strip which should end just below the heron's crest decal. Just make jolly sure you mask off the rest of the machine before spraying or remove the mudguard for painting. Presto! You have a classic DL-1.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help needed (quickly) on DL-1 rear reflector posted by Chris on 5/24/2002 at 5:45:51 PM
The bolt and nut that holds the reflector on the mudguard( fender) rusts in place solid. with a lot of the older bikes, these are a bear to remove.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help needed (quickly) on DL-1 rear reflector posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 5/24/2002 at 5:54:08 PM
Im big and ugly and I'm sitting in a car and she say's "Oh, I didn't see you!"
Well,God help- you on a bicycle with the folks that are out there! How about a lighted flagmast that blinks like a strobe light and a recorded, repeating, speaker boosted message that screams out "pedestrian or cyclist"
mounted on my back!

As long as you have some type of light or reflector. I wanna know in the afterlife that they paid a huge settlement and did time for running me over!






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Mystery Bicycle posted by: bill on 5/23/2002 at 3:27:03 AM
I have recently gotten in the bicycle at:

www.io.com/tog/grnbike.html

Specs and info on the site. Just once I want to find a bicycle with a headbadge! take a look!
thanks


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Mystery Bicycle posted by Marko on 5/23/2002 at 10:53:18 PM
It looks like a Raleigh with a Sunbeam crankset.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Mystery Bicycle posted by bill on 5/24/2002 at 4:50:46 PM
I havc just found out that Sunbeam made bicycles for the french and english for WW1. This would explain the sunbeam crank without the oilbath. Anyone know of a Sunbeam Historian?
thanks

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Mystery Bicycle posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 5/24/2002 at 9:03:28 PM
The Vetrans Cycle Club in England has a "marque enthuiast" and for Sumbeam, I would think more than one person could help you.






AGE / VALUE:   Whats up with Shimano? posted by: Chris on 5/22/2002 at 11:50:33 PM
I was called on Monday, he was trying to reach me. He's telling me to get all the Shimano parts and hubs I can get. "Anything internal hub" because all they want you to have is derailer stuff. Some lawsuit between Schramm and Shimano or something like this. Can't get Shimano 3 speed shifters because of a supply problem. The big boss was in so we couldn't really rap and therefore I don't understand whats going on. No word like this in any of the discussion groups I am into. This might be fresh news or else he's screwey or misinformed. Perhaps it's local. He said the whole U.S. market would not be anything but derailer bikes. That's what it is now. I dunno, he said to buy all the internat hub parts I could lay hands on. I left to snap up supplies of Shimano parts. He's very busy and the schedule is all messed up with alternating days. My project is sitting while real customers are handled. I felt like the sky was falling today.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Whats up with Shimano? posted by smg on 5/23/2002 at 4:25:39 PM
The general air of hysteria suggests the usual Internet paranoid rumor to me. (I've run into sites where the level of Shimanophobia would have qualified them for John Birch membership!) Something like this ought to turn up in the legitimate trade press, if true.






AGE / VALUE:   Whats up with Shimano? posted by: Chris on 5/22/2002 at 11:50:33 PM
I was called on Monday, he was trying to reach me. He's telling me to get all the Shimano parts and hubs I can get. "Anything internal hub" because all they want you to have is derailer stuff. Some lawsuit between Schramm and Shimano or something like this. Can't get Shimano 3 speed shifters because of a supply problem. The big boss was in so we couldn't really rap and therefore I don't understand whats going on. No word like this in any of the discussion groups I am into. This might be fresh news or else he's screwey or misinformed. Perhaps it's local. He said the whole U.S. market would not be anything but derailer bikes. That's what it is now. I dunno, he said to buy all the internat hub parts I could lay hands on. I left to snap up supplies of Shimano parts. He's very busy and the schedule is all messed up with alternating days. My project is sitting while real customers are handled. I felt like the sky was falling today.







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Sports Brakes posted by: Dick on 5/22/2002 at 2:49:16 PM
I am completing reassembly of my first restoration project, a '52 Raleigh Sports gents model and all has gone extremely well except for getting the brakes to work properly. I am using NOS cables and have followed all of Sheldon Browns "Four Commandments of Cable Routing". The problem I am having is that there seems to be no "happy medium" setting of the adjusting barrel that will provide a good firm feel when braking, yet still allow BOTH pads to clear the rim when brake is released. The wheels are very true, i.e., no noticeable lateral runout. The calipers are working freely and not binding.
I am hopeful that someone has a good tip on Raleigh brake setup.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Sports Brakes posted by Dale on 5/22/2002 at 3:58:45 PM
The old English cable brakes took a lot of hand effort to work. This is because the brake blocks are hard and the leverage is set that way. The upside is that you can adjust them out to accomodate a bent wheel and still have working brakes. The downside is that they're hard to work.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Sports Brakes posted by JohnM on 5/22/2002 at 6:58:00 PM
First, make sure there is lubrication at the pivot point, where the calipers are attached to the center bolt. If the pads are still off to one side or the other, you can bend the spring a little on one side, so that the pads stand off by the same amount on each side of the rim.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Sports Brakes posted by Warren on 5/23/2002 at 2:43:18 AM
Something is not right... as mentioned above, please make sure the brakes are centred, loosen off the rear nut and adjust. Make sure there is a little toe-in by using an adjustable wrench on the calipers where the pads mount. Your brake cable housing should be of decent quality and there should be metal end caps at the lever end. With straight wheels you can get these brakes rock solid with only a little amount of lever movement.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tandem roadsters posted by: David on 5/22/2002 at 2:51:37 AM
There was a tandem roadster on ebay some time ago that I longed for (but it was in the middle of nowhere and would have cost WAY too much to ship). I believe it had 28" wheels, and an AB hub, front rod brake (scary!!), Brooks saddles, etc. Looked terrific. How common were bikes like this? How frequently imported? Am I likely to see another?


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Tandem roadsters posted by Ian on 5/22/2002 at 10:09:18 AM
David, I have no idea how common English tandems were in the U.S.A. but there were plenty made and many of my thirties and forties catalogues and magazines show them in common use, mostly by couples, in the English cycling scene. I have a 1937 Sun tandem which was brought to New zealand by an English couple when they emigrated. It has Sturmey archer drum brakes front and rear, a Sturmey two speed hub and a Cyclo two speed derailleur. Happy to email you some photos if you are interested, it might give you some idea what to look for but I guess you are far more likely to come across a Schwinn tandem. Regards, ian.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   3 DL1s on Ebay posted by: David on 5/22/2002 at 2:47:25 AM
Needs work: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2104873090
Needs chainguard: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2105058826
Short frame, overpriced: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2104976433







AGE / VALUE:   Rudge posted by: Tim on 5/21/2002 at 11:34:58 PM
Hi! I am a vintage lightweight fan, so dont' know much about roadters. A local bike shop has a beautiful old Rudge (or was it Rudge-something - I need to go back a check) with rod brakes, and all parts intact and nice. Extra special on it is a rear child's seat that looks period correct, and tough as a brick ****-house. Any guidance on possible value, and what I should look for on it to better date and assess it? Thanks for any input.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge posted by Ian on 5/22/2002 at 10:20:47 AM
Tim, It will be a Rudge Whitworth. They made very good quality roadsters and also some great vintage motorcycles. It will be at least as good quality as a Raleigh of the same period, will use many of the same components such as hubs and rims, brake parts etc as all the manufacturers bought in these parts and in my eyes is much more desireable than a Raleigh just because of the build quality and rarity.The kids seat is probably a Lesro accessory one. Can,t help with dating but they were made in this style from the 1920's to the late 1940's. After about 1950 most had 26 inch wheels. Get back there and grab it! Regards, Ian.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge posted by janson maciver on 5/22/2002 at 11:30:15 AM
Dear tim my farther has a rudge whitworth at the moment it had only one oner befor hand it was made in 1918 we put it on the market at £7500 hope this helps.






AGE / VALUE:   Rudge posted by: Tim on 5/21/2002 at 11:34:58 PM
Hi! I am a vintage lightweight fan, so dont' know much about roadters. A local bike shop has a beautiful old Rudge (or was it Rudge-something - I need to go back a check) with rod brakes, and all parts intact and nice. Extra special on it is a rear child's seat that looks period correct, and tough as a brick ****-house. Any guidance on possible value, and what I should look for on it to better date and assess it? Thanks for any input.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 5/22/2002 at 12:07:55 AM
What size wheels are on this? 26 X 1 3/8 or 28 X 1 1/2
the 28 inch wheels make it more valuable. Offer 150.00 and get it. Get it home, rer- pack the bearings, clean it up replace something like a gear trigger cable.Get new tubes in it, possible tires that can be ordered and go have the time of your life riding it. This is probably made by Raleigh biut a wonderful bike. If it's older and an origonal Rudge than even better.
Parts are available, so is information and you can even see the diagrams to the bike here under Raleigh Rudge Humber exploded diagrams. Many folks here have this bike or ones very similar. You don't see these in Shops too often so go for it.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 5/22/2002 at 12:09:39 AM
What size wheels are on this? 26 X 1 3/8 or 28 X 1 1/2
the 28 inch wheels make it more valuable. Offer 150.00 and get it. Get it home, rer- pack the bearings, clean it up replace something like a gear trigger cable.Get new tubes in it, possible tires that can be ordered and go have the time of your life riding it. This is probably made by Raleigh but a wonderful bike. If it's older and an origonal Rudge than even better.
Parts are available, so is information and you can even see the diagrams to the bike here under Raleigh Rudge Humber exploded diagrams. Many folks here have this bike or ones very similar. You don't see these in shops too often so go for it.






AGE / VALUE:   holland posted by: rickey on 5/21/2002 at 11:26:08 PM
just acquired a 26" bike from holland it's a EMINENT it's brown and has rear rack & generator on the front. fully covered chainguard light rust any info would be appreciated it' for sale make offer rides realy nice







AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh ID posted by: J.Green on 5/21/2002 at 10:08:26 PM
I purchased a Raleigh s/n 5217 ladies cycle with a full leather chain guard and string laced rear fenders. need help with rim size and rim id.







MISC:   Chinese and Indian roadsters posted by: Pravin on 5/21/2002 at 9:57:20 PM
I am curious to hear people's opinions about Chinese-made (e.g., Flying Pigeon, Forever, Phoenix, etc.) and Indian-made roadsters (e.g., Hero, Atlas, etc)...

Thanks,
Pravin


   RE:MISC:   Chinese and Indian roadsters posted by paul on 5/21/2002 at 11:02:37 PM
I have a Forever 21 inch frame, 26 in 1 and 3/8 wheels, Raleigh Pattern, the bicycle is very pretty and very heavy. This model was poorly set up, it's got a 3 speed derailleur, I had to shorten the chain and replace the thumb shifter with a stem shifter. The paint and graphics are very attractive. I really like the bicycle but I must confess it's not a Raleigh. I understand there are many one speed coaster brake versions in Cuba. Thanks! Paul

   RE:MISC:   Chinese and Indian roadsters posted by Mark R. on 5/22/2002 at 7:17:15 PM
I had a Forever that originally was disappointing. The pedals fell apart, the stem broke, and had a few other minor defects. But it looked beautiful! I replace the pedals, stem etc..and it wasn't bad. I subsequently sold it. I would highly reconmend avoiding the Indian bikes! They are very very poor quality beyomd anything you'd be willing to believe. I bought a Roadmaster, and it was in absolutely horrible condition new right out of the box. It had corrosion on everything, the saddle was mildewed, the chaincase was dented, the chrome was only flashed on and everthing was really shi**y! The brakes were DESIGNED so that they could NOT function properly, I'm serious, you could not even MAKE the brakes work correctly! It looked good from a distance though. I was given my Forever as a replacement, and I's say that it was much much higher quality except for the few problem areas I mentioned before. Buy a used raleigh, they're out there, and you'll be a lot happier!

   RE:RE:MISC:   Chinese and Indian roadsters posted by J.Green on 5/23/2002 at 11:56:04 PM
I own a "HERO" Its real HVY and nasty to ride. Looks good as a lawn ornament.






MISC:   Chinese and Indian roadsters posted by: Pravin on 5/21/2002 at 9:57:20 PM
I am curious to hear people's opinions about Chinese-made (e.g., Flying Pigeon, Forever, Phoenix, etc.) and Indian-made roadsters (e.g., Hero, Atlas, etc)...







AGE / VALUE:   Keepa you hands offa my bike! Wait, how much you offer? posted by: Chris on 5/21/2002 at 2:18:03 PM
The customer brought it in for some reason and when my pal touched the bike to look it over, he was told not to handle the bike. To take your hands off of it. At that point, a offer was made and accepted and the bike was sold!
I got called in to see it, it was then offered to me. I was told this story with my pal grinning and saying to me. "Before he left, I put my hands all over it!" I tried to explain how people feel about these bikes and how would you feel if I touched your stuff? Same feeling, and all that. He shook his head and replied that the customer was a idiot, and he was glad to buy the bike and see him leave.
He lit up a cigar and said between puffs "It's just a bicycle, Chris" He then says "I go through all this for you, because I know how you love these! ( Also because he's gonna make a few dollars off of me too!) I'm looking with saucer eyes and running my hands all over it.
Despite all these strangers touching it, I bought it and took it home.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Keepa you hands offa my bike! Wait, how much you offer? posted by smg on 5/21/2002 at 2:56:03 PM
Some people just gotta be neurotic about something. It gives their life meaning,

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Keepa you hands offa my bike! Wait, how much you offer? posted by RICKEY on 5/21/2002 at 11:35:18 PM
luckily it wasent some drunk hippy's old harley cause his buck knife is very sharp... don't sit on it don't touch it & hope no one causes you to fall to close to it






MISC:   Tall Bikes posted by: Pravin on 5/21/2002 at 3:29:54 AM

I was wondering about how tall a person should be to ride a 'tall'-framed bicycle... (height range?)

Thanks


   RE:MISC:   Tall Bikes posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/21/2002 at 4:43:13 AM
Raleigh usually said that the DL-1 was suitable for those 6 ft. and over; I am 6'2" and the 24-inch DL-1 fits like a glove. The worse thing you can do is to ride a frame too small and whilst it's true the DL-1 can be a handful to ride to newcomers (she corners like an Austin Princess!), it's amazing how comfortable this machine is. And so efficient to pedal when the frame is so matched to your height. I have quite often (and effectively!) road-raced lads in spandex astride 15-speed featherweights and rather like the notion of showing them that white-painted rear mudguard as 40 plus pounds of Sheffield steel cruises by in 3rd gear! Who needs titanium this and derailleur that? Kid stuff.

P.C. Kohler


   Short bikes posted by David Poston on 5/21/2002 at 9:14:11 PM
I take it that I (at 5'7") would be too short for a DL-1? Did they only come in one frame size?

What frame size do you think I would need? 20", 21", 22"?

   RE:MISC:   Tall Bikes posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/21/2002 at 9:39:00 PM
The 24" frame on a DL-1 would be too large for you; you could manage nicely with the 22" inch frame however. DL-1s were supplied in both sizes up to the end of production. So if want the traditional "roadster" look with the rod brakes and the super comfort of the DL-1 long wheelbase and big 28" wheels, the 22" DL-1 is the best option. These are often available on eBay, cycle shops etc. Indeed, the 22-inch often fetches less money. Your height also makes any of the Raleigh 26" wheel three-speeds (Sports, Superbe), Rudges, BSA, Dunelts and so forth also very suitable. At 6' 2" I am "confined" to the 24" DL-1s. I also believe the DL-1 was offered at some point in a 25" and even 26" size. Wow!

P.C. Kohler, whose beloved DL-1 in the shop with a poorly Sturmey-Archer AW hub-- the indicator rod keeps pulling out of the hub. Hmmmm.

   RE:MISC:   Tall Bikes posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/21/2002 at 9:40:02 PM
The 24" frame on a DL-1 would be too large for you; you could manage nicely with the 22" inch frame however. DL-1s were supplied in both sizes up to the end of production. So if want the traditional "roadster" look with the rod brakes and the super comfort of the DL-1 long wheelbase and big 28" wheels, the 22" DL-1 is the best option. These are often available on eBay, cycle shops etc. Indeed, the 22-inch often fetches less money. Your height also makes any of the Raleigh 26" wheel three-speeds (Sports, Superbe), Rudges, BSA, Dunelts and so forth also very suitable. At 6' 2" I am "confined" to the 24" DL-1s. I also believe the DL-1 was offered at some point in a 25" and even 26" size. Wow!

P.C. Kohler, whose beloved DL-1 is in the shop with a poorly Sturmey-Archer AW hub-- the indicator rod keeps pulling out of the hub. Hmmmm.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Tall Bikes posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 5/22/2002 at 12:22:52 AM
The indicator threads into a clutch key so that needs replacing, probably.

The Raleigh Tourist D.L.1. was offered in 22 and 24 inch frame sizes. Older Raleighs exactly like it as well as Humber, Phillips, Rudge, e.t.c. were offered in 26 inch frame sizes and also even 28 inch frames with 28 inch wheels. A pal of mine has a Phillips Royal Imperial with a 28 inch frame.
The 26 inch frames seem to have stoped about 1955 or so. I own two and they were excedingly difficult to find and buy. You have to have connections in this crazy game for these.
These 26 and 287 inch frames rarely, if ever pop up on e- bay. When a 28 inch frame no longer became an option I don't know. Pashley has the ability to make a 26 or even a 28 inch frame but they don't unless it is a special deal. You would have to ask them. I saw where they made a bike for this extra tall postal worker in England and his bike came from Pashley. Huge frame! Now people in other parts of the world may still see these about. Not in the States, and they are scarce in most places. I'd like to have somebody offer it to me if they have one. In the U.S. the 22 or 24 inch is all you are gonna find.

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   Tall Bikes posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/22/2002 at 12:43:10 AM
Many thanks for this information! Especially the hint on my AW hub problem.

As for frame sizes, I note that in my 1974 Raleigh catalogue (USA) the DL-1 is offered only in a 24" frame size (gents) and 22" (ladies). Any clues as to when the 22" gents was discontinued?

I would love to get my hands on a 26" DL-1 or other roadster; what an experience that would be to ride. My seat post is raised sufficiently that I could even "fit" that size.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:MISC:   Tall Bikes posted by Ben on 5/22/2002 at 1:00:01 PM
I disagree that the worst thing is a too small frame. I think the too large frame is the worse thing.

   RE:MISC:   Tall Bikes posted by Dale on 5/22/2002 at 4:07:54 PM
The inseam measurement on your pants is a better indicator than your height. As a starting point for fitting customers to bikes, I've used inseam less 8" for an initial frame size. For example (me): 33 - 8 = 25, and that's about right or a little short. The seat on my 23" Superbe is up about 6", on my 24" International it's up about 4".

   RE:RE:MISC:   Tall Bikes posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/22/2002 at 4:24:07 PM
Now that's an very useful 'formula'; my inseam is 34" so my 24" DL-1 really does fit like a glove. What I dislike is riding a machine with too small a frame (or indeed with 26" wheels after getting so used to 28" ones) and having the seat post raised too high.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:MISC:   Tall Bikes posted by Ben on 5/22/2002 at 10:04:21 PM
From an aesthetic point of view, I dislike seeing a seat post set at the bottom of travel. This is a clear indication that the frame is way too big for the rider. And, in my incredibly rigid mindset, I think frames larger than 24" do not look like bicycles anymore.

   Why DL-1? posted by David Poston on 5/23/2002 at 4:18:56 AM
Is there a reason why a DL-1 is preferred over a Raleigh Sports, etc., or why it has achieved preeminent "classic roadster" status? What makes it so comfortable to ride compared to the rest? And what are the advantages to the big 28" wheels instead of the standard 26"? Rod brakes as good as cable?


   RE:Why DL-1? posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/23/2002 at 2:19:15 PM
The clue is in the names: "Sports" has a "tighter" frame geometry (i.e. shorter wheelbase) and smaller 26" dia wheels. It's just a smaller, lighter and more "nimble" machine than a roadster. So much so that people still persist in calling them "English Racers"!! Don't ever do that! If you can fit a Sports type, they are every bit as worthy as a DL-1 or "roadster" bicycle. And you can also get these type machines with enclosed gearcases (there is a Rudge on eBay right now with one), dynohubs and even rod brakes (common in the UK but rare in North America).

What makes a Roadster a more comfortable machine (well to some of us) is the "relaxed" frame geometry which means a rather longer wheelbase. Longer than any bicycle you'll find on the road. And the 28" inch dia. wheels. It just gives the smoothest ride you can imagine and, to me, the most elegant looking bicycle out there.

But don't let anyone tell you a DL-1 is "better" than a Sports, or Superbe or Rudge, BSA etc. 26" dia. type machines. It's just different. Heck if I weren't so tall, I'd grab that enclosed gearcase Rudge on eBay in a heartbeat!

P.C. Kohler

   RE:Why DL-1? posted by Dale on 5/23/2002 at 4:53:36 PM
I attended a Raleigh one-day sales & service seminar in the 70s. It's kinda funny, the gent (a Brit, even) giving the talk kinda badmouthed the Tourist. He explained the geometry and said it was "a postman's bike", and it wasn't meant to be a kind remark. No judgement from me personally - ride the bike you like - I just prefer the Sports style because it has a nice balance of nimbleness and stability, where the Tourist aka DL-1 is more of a straight line cruiser.

   RE:MISC:   Tall Bikes posted by Ben on 5/23/2002 at 9:45:47 PM
It is very much like the difference between drivig a Rolls and a Triumph sedan. However, I fell in love with just the shape and looks of "roadsters," having come from loving Colnago road bikes. Much to my surprise I found that I coud ride the roadster all day without discomfort, which I credit the long wheelbase and larger wheels for. The steering angle does take some getting used to, but after a year I can make just about any turn with ease. Some may agree also that at speed, the sounds one hears from a roadster are different - bigger, more stately perhaps.

Ben