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Archived: English Roadsters







MISC:   REVIL AIR PUMPS posted by: Mario Romano on 5/28/2002 at 8:15:04 PM
Revil air pumps are the original ones who came with the old english roadster bicycles, or the Revil air pumps are modern similar to the original air pumps who came on the old english roadsters?

M.Romano
Brazil


   RE:MISC:   REVIL AIR PUMPS posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 5/28/2002 at 8:42:07 PM
Mario,

Names of bikes and parts and brand names changed when these bikes turned up in other parts of the world.
I have never heard of nor seen the word "Revil"


But most of us are used to seeing and recognizing Brooks over "Five Rams" seats too.

It's just a diffrent maker and so therefore I can not comment not having seen or experienced it.

Keep it and use it.






AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh 'Rapier' posted by: P.C. Kohler on 5/28/2002 at 4:31:47 PM
Now that I've dug out my 1966 Raleigh (NA) catalogue....

Has anyone seen one of these (as described in the brochure):

'THE RAPIER-- a new model introduced in the 1966 range, the Raleigh RAPIER is a racer incorporating the Sturmey Archer 3-speed gear. Other features include drop handle bars, Dunlop Sprite Amber Wall Tires and Brooks B-15 saddle and polished alloy pump. This expertly designed model is offered in 21" frame and carmine red finish.'

This machine has full mudguards and chainguard so its really a Sports with dropped handlebars and a racing saddle.

P.C. Kohler


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh 'Rapier' posted by Chris on 5/28/2002 at 8:44:15 PM
Never seen one in person.

They are out there. I don't like the sound of the name. It's dumb.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Eaton's Glider update posted by: Mark Rehder on 5/28/2002 at 5:14:06 AM
Hello all,

The Eaton's Glider (a rebadged Raleigh Sports) that I found abandoned has now been stripped to the frame. The bottom bracket came apart just fine, but inside it was rather mucky from rain and debris getting in there (since the seat-top had worn completely away, stuff had fallen down the seat tube into the BB). But it's now back together and spinning smoothly. The headset was a bit of a bother, as the bearings were not in a retainer, so a few too many little balls came tumbling out, no matter how careful I was. But this part was otherwise uneventful, and things are now back together with a fair dollop of grease. All in all, not too bad for a bike that's been exposed to the elements for almost a year!

The only ugly part was that the right pedal would not come off the crankarm for love, money, soaking in oil, or anything else (and it wouldn't spin at all, either). Plus, I noticed that the chainring was a bit bent, so the idea of replacing the whole unit was much more appealling. And wouldn't you know it, but I found another chairing with the same design! I was doing the overhaul at my local bike recycling co-op (www.flora.org/re-cycles), and found one in the "old chainrings" box. I even found a pair of pedals that closely match what's currently on the bike.

The frame has rust spots all over it that won't come off using steel wool. The bike was painted white, and the Glider decals have faded to almost nothing (as has the nameplate) due to exposure. I could touch up the rust areas with white paint, but there are so many that I might as well do the whole bike. But if I did that I'd lose the decals. In its current condition, the bike really isn't worth anything, so I'm thinking of just giving it a good going over with a spray can in another colour (if it's going to change, it might as wel be dramatic, so I'm thinking of either purple or yellow!). I know, I know, spray cans don't give a great finish, but I figure that if I go slow, with multiple coats, and put a clear coat on top, that it will be better than nothing. Then the bike can be put back together for donation to the co-op, so we can sell it. If it looks good enough, I might even price it a bit higher than our usual 3-speeds ($40 Cdn.).

If the bike had come into my possession in better shape, I wouldn't think of painting it. I would proudly display the Glider name and badge. But it's probably not even sell-able as it currently looks, so I have to do something cheap n' easy to get it back on the road. (I was even toying with keping the 3-speed parts as spares for my Raleigh Sports or my Twenty, and turning it into a coaster bike, but I don't think I'll go that far!) Hopefully, the Old Bike Gods will smile upon my efforts at reviving this machine, and not frown upon the loss of identity from the new paint job.

I'll post some pics at my website when it's all done. (And pardon the length of this particular post!)

Cheers,
Mark



   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Eaton's Glider update posted by Dale on 5/29/2002 at 4:10:57 PM
Try Extend brand rust inhibitor. Yes, go for the brand name. It combines with rust to form a hard black coating. The stuff works wonderfully as long as you cover it with something, such as grease, rustproofing, or in your case, white paint. If it's cratered, you can smooth it over with auto body glazing or some Squadron Green putty (from a hobby shop) before painting. If the rest of the paint is in reasonable condition and you can find white paint to match you can spot paint it with an airbrush or a good artist's sable brush.






AGE / VALUE:   Lucas cycle lamp posted by: P.C. Kohler on 5/28/2002 at 3:03:55 AM
Question..... about cycle lighting....

I recently purchased on eBay and received today the most glorious cycle headlamp I have ever seen. It's a Lucas no. 316, chromium (the great old Rhodesian chrome too!), 3" dia. lens with a wonderful etched Lucas trademark and 'King of the Road', 'Made in England' on the glass. On both sides are green jewels and on the top is another Lucas 'King of the Road' marked jewel. I know little of such things (and thus underdeserving of owning such a splendid example).... there is one bayonet mounted type bulb in the centre with two wires (on attached to the bulb holder and another to another wire contact. There is no holder to this but a hole for another bulb (missing) above the main illumination one. I imagine this was to illuminate the jewels or the top logo jewel.

As there is no on-off switch, I would imagine this is run off a tyre dynamo not a dynohub. Can such lamps work off a dynohub? Any clues as to use/function of the second missing bulb. Clues as to what type of bulb is required? This seems to be missing the bayonet mounting; there is just a hole.

I wish we could post pix to this Board as I could take some digital shots of this lovely but intriguing lamp.

P.C. Kohler


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Lucas cycle lamp posted by JohnM on 5/28/2002 at 1:06:50 PM
You should be able to use any power source you want, as long as you use a bulb with the right voltage and wattage rating. Most bicycle dynamos are 6-volt, 3-watt - but be aware that dynohubs are 6-volt, 2-watt. If you are using a taillight, or in your case, a second bulb in the headlamp, include that in your wattage calculations. For instance, the classic dynohub/Sturmey-Archer combination is a 1.2 watt headlamp bulb with a .8 watt taillamp bulb. Usually both will have a miniature screw thread rather than a bayonnet mount, but maybe the holders are press-fit in your case? Try www.reflectalite.com for bulbs - they are good about accepting US dollars, and prompt shipment. Sounds like a great find.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Lucas cycle lamp posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/28/2002 at 2:24:53 PM
Many thanks John for this helpful information. I removed the remaining bulb; it's a twist fit bayonnet type mounting and a rather large bulb. No wattage indicated just 'Lucas 0203 Tester'. I'll check that website for bulbs; thanks for the lead. This is a such a splendid looking lamp, I'll use whatever power source required!

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Lucas cycle lamp posted by David Poston on 5/28/2002 at 5:27:26 PM
P.C. Kohler:

What would you recommend in the way of a battery-operated headlamp for an English roadster? Maybe the aftermarket versions they sell here at VVVintage bicycles? (I'm not looking for 100% correct parts).

Thanks,
David.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Lucas cycle lamp posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/28/2002 at 6:48:38 PM
David, most of the new cycle lamps you find would work just fine... they just look 'wrong' with a traditional roadster or sports. You won't be ticketed by the cycle fashion police but to some of us, the right accessories just help 'make' the look and feel of a classic British cycle.

Battery lamps are great; easy and reliable. If you want 'traditional' or 'correct' you'll most likely have to troll eBay. In the mid 60s the 'Elite' battery lamps were the most common, at least in N. America. These were made in Hong Kong, BCC, chromium-plated, well made and even had a spare bulb holder built in to the battery compartment. These were made to fit in the lamp brackets on British cycles. I was amazed when a mint condition one fetched $26 on eBay recently!! The British version of this are the PIFCO brand latterns which came in a matching headlamp and taillamp. These are wonderful looking on a roadster. Alas they have been caught up in the 'Chopper' craze and fetch AMAZING prices on eBay. A mint set went for £80 recently!!! That's more than an entire roadster can cost. Nuts!!

In the 1970s the last generation of traditional looking cycle lanterns were the 'Everyready" ones. These were made of a grey or tannish plastic with chunky white sliding switches. The taillamp was a bit 'boxy' and not very traditional. Very well made. They would suit any cycle of the 1970s-80s era. I use an Everyready headlamp on my roadster now until I get my swell Lucas one sorted out.

Or try a Miller dynamo set (offered by VVVintage). OK, so the Dynohub is the ultimate, etc. etc., but dynamo lighting is still worthwhile, a lot easy to install and find and I kinda like that 'whirring' noise as you generate your own 6 volts.

'Tis the season for those great summer night rides.... when all the roller bladers are off the paths and it's just you, your roadster, the tick-tick-tick of your Sturmey-Archer and perchance the hum of your dynamo..

P.C. Kohler

   mounting bracket for lamp posted by David Poston on 5/28/2002 at 9:00:05 PM
P.C.,

Would you mind taking a look at this link and telling me if this is front bracket you are referring to for mounting a battery headlight?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dllViewItem&item=2107851297#DESC

By the way, if you have a front wicker basket on your ladies model, where do you mount your lamp? Should you get a torpedo for the front fender?

   RE:mounting bracket for lamp posted by Jeff R on 5/28/2002 at 9:40:55 PM
I use an Eveready headlight and tailight. Mine are made of steel and are small. The case is the size of 2 D cell batteries side by side. They slide on the spade type bracket.These were made in the 50's. When you don't need them you just slide them off the bracket and you don't have to ride around with the xtra weight.

   RE:mounting bracket for lamp posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/28/2002 at 9:57:57 PM
David-- yes this machine and most British cycles have this same lamp bracket. On Raleighs it's a Heron's Crest cut-out but other makes often had the same bracket. It's standard. Works with any British battery lantern, Dynohub lamps, most dynamo sets.

Wicker basket on a ladies machine? Well I have seen baskets with a lamp bracket built in. Difficult to find methinks. Most common solution: a lamp bracket on the fork. There are even Heron's Crest ones out there by the way.

Before you plumb for this Raleigh ladies Sports, do an EBay search for 'Rudge' and check out the nice looking gent's Rudge on offer. Lovely machine with a bit of 'Cachet' being rarer than a Raleigh. Tip-top quality too.

P.C. Kohler






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Two Raleigh Sprites! posted by: Bob Gilbert on 5/28/2002 at 1:26:22 AM
Gentlemen:

I just nabbed two excellent condition Raleigh Sprites at a flea market this weekend. One is a Ladies' model, and the other is Men's. They are both white 5-speed bicycles that looked like they had never been used, save for light corrosion in some areas. Both have the aluminum racks, and apparently all original parts they came with.

Here is my qusetion: the website doesn't have serial numbers from the 70's - there are no numbers on the Sturmey-Archer rear hubs (although I may be looking in the wrong place). The decal says 'Made in England - Assembled in USA' on it. I can get the serial numbers if it will help. I am not so much concerned with the value (although I bet someone might pay more for these beauties than I did) so much as the year of manufacture - my wife says she drooled over this bicycle back in about 1975... I would appreciate any hints, and will provide photos if necessary. Thanks in advance for reading this!


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Two Raleigh Sprites! posted by chris on 5/28/2002 at 9:26:56 PM
Many people love the Sprite.
Not me, Im not into them ( not for long)
What do I do with these?
Well, it's not pretty.
I remove the Raleigh R nuts, ribed cable housing,
save front hubs, remove all bit parts and toss them in the box. I love the handlebar grips.
Remove derailers too. keep them. The frame and fork?
Well, after I have removed the badge. I toss the rest out.
The Sprite is in the same catagory as the Schwinn exerciser

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Two Raleigh Sprites! posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/29/2002 at 12:37:24 AM
Ouch.

And to think my Sprint 27 was my pride and joy when I was 14...

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Two Raleigh Sprites! posted by Bob Gilbert on 5/29/2002 at 3:24:15 AM
No doubt you would do the same to these, or sell them at the earliest opportunity, or at least the parts. You are not who I was interested in talking to - as a matter of fact, your opinion doesn't interest me at all. it is a shame you live your life being contrary. I hope someone will show you a better path someday, and if it hurts, so much the better.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Two Raleigh Sprites! posted by Bob Gilbert on 5/29/2002 at 3:25:41 AM
Thank you, Mr. Kohler. I guess my wife was right. :)

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Two Raleigh Sprites! posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/29/2002 at 4:42:27 AM
I didn't know Sprites aroused passion on either side of the 'issue'. I kinda liked them. They had the 'dignity' of a Raleigh: pinstriping, the Heron's Crest, Nottingham England, white painted rear mudguard but with derailleur gears, nice 27" dia wheels and they were quite lithe and responsive. I cycled 40 miles a day on the C&O towpath on mine practically every weekend. My only complaint (quickly rectified): they lacked 'pins' for a pump and had those yucky 'matress' saddles. I remember budgeting from my paper route: $105.00 for the 10-speed DL95 plus another $25 (ouch!) for a Brooks B72 leather saddle!

So here's to the apparently much-maligned Sprite! Fit for the parts bin for some, fondly remembered by others and still, real Raleighs.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Two Raleigh Sprites! posted by smg on 5/29/2002 at 6:10:21 PM
They weren't exactly to my taste but I always held the Sprites in high regard. Reason was that they cut across the rigid categories set by style and marketing by mixing the upright utility configuration with derailleur gears. There was no reason why cyclists should consider themselves limited by what marketers want to sell them, but should instead consider what combination of frame and components meets their needs and taste.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Two Raleigh Sprites! posted by Chris on 5/29/2002 at 7:34:48 PM
You can have the 20/30 carbon frame Sprite, I'll stick with the 531 Reynolds tubing in better bikes.
I can set up a better frame bike like the Sprite with upright handlebars, bar end shifters, a Pletcher rack and 28 X 1 5/8 X 1 1/8 tires on 700 X 28 C rims.
See, even this particular model has a strong, loyal following. Also, I knew I would get a reraction like I did when I said I would take it apart for bit parts! All the Sprite lovers would gasp, and they did!
Do whatever makes you happy with it.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Two Raleigh Sprites! posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/29/2002 at 8:57:33 PM
Chris-- no doubt you can and do, but I guess we're kinda talking about 'production' cycles here not custom jobs. I can tell you one thing: in 1973 you sure couldn't buy a 531 Reynolds tubed ANYTHING for the $105 I paid for a new 10-speed Sprite 27. For the price and the quality, the Sprite was VERY competitive for the era. The Sprite cost about $30 more than a three-speed Sports for heavens sake. It was at least as good as the cheaper Peugeot and Gitane 10-speeds and way better than the Schwinn rubbish. And it was among the very few production 5/10 speeds with 'touring' style frame geometry and set up. This 15-year-old was buying his very first new bicycle and he did his homework!

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Two Raleigh Sprites! posted by Chris on 5/29/2002 at 11:53:00 PM
P.C. Well said, You're right. I'm glad to see you are with us, you benefit the group here with your posts. I have back copies of cycle magazines that feature the Sprite only its an older version that I never see in person. I keep looking. We have a fellow here in the neighborhood and rides the thing all over, he loves it.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Two Raleigh Sprites! posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/30/2002 at 1:25:50 AM
Thanks Chris. The original Sprite came out in 1966 (DL-70 and DL-70L) with gents in 21" and 23" frames and ladies in 19.5" and 21" frames and 26" dia wheels (thus distinct from the later Sprite 27). Colours: fuchsia (honest!) and bronze green. They had rear carrier, Brooks B72s and Huret 5-speed derailleurs. No 10-speed model. I have seen one; a lovely job especially with the mid 60s transfers which were so attractive.

Sprites were bought in huge numbers by a certain 'sort' in the 1970s and now 30 odd years later, they seem to in every garage sale and flea market. Like most cycles, they are either completely thrashed or near mint. I saw an orange ladies one not long ago-- even I couldn't love a 70s orange Sprite! But a '66 Fuchsia, well.....

P.C. Kohler






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Two Raleigh Sprites! posted by: Bob Gilbert on 5/28/2002 at 1:26:22 AM
Gentlemen:

I just nabbed two excellent condition Raleigh Sprites at a flea market this weekend. One is a Ladies' model, and the other is Men's. They are both white 5-speed bicycles that looked like they had never been used, save for light corrosion in some areas. Both have the aluminum racks, and apparently all original parts they came with.

Here is my qusetion: the website doesn't have serial numbers from the 70's - there are no numbers on the Sturmey-Archer rear hubs (although I may be looking in the wrong place). The decal says 'Made in England - Assembled in USA' on it. I can get the serial numbers if it will help. I am not so much concerned with the value (although I bet somone might pay more for these beauties than I did) sp much as the year of manufacture - my wife says she drooled over this bicycle back in about 1975... I would appreciate any hints, and will provide photos if necessary. Thanks in advance for reading this!


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Two Raleigh Sprites! posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/28/2002 at 3:24:50 PM
Raleigh Sprites were great machines! I owned two, the first one bought in 1972 and another shortly after when the first was stolen. Indeed the second was stolen in 1974. So much for owning nice bicycles in Washington back then. Both were 10-speeds with Huret gears.

The 'white' was called Ivory Glaze and does indeed date from 1972-75. The had also an orange and a metallic brown (coffee) of course-- '70s colours!! My dad threw a fit when I chose the coffee colour; he thought the Ivory much nicer. Perhaps. But boy did it age poorly.

As for 'Made in England, Assembled in USA', never seen that before. My Sprites all had the familiar 'Made in England' script on the top tube. However, I know that in 1974-75 the cycling boom was in full swing and Raleigh were so hard-pressed to keep up with demand that Raleighs were made in Canada and imported to the USA (and they were horrible!!) and apparently then maybe some were exported from Nottingham completely knocked down and assembled in the USA.

P.C. Kohler






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rear carrier/rack for Raleigh Sports, DL-1, etc. posted by: David Poston on 5/27/2002 at 6:28:02 PM
Same question as below, except that I need to be educated on the type of rear carrier/rack that go well with these machines. And more importantly, where/how do I get one?

Thanks,
David







MISC:   BEARINGS ON ENGLISH ROADSTERS posted by: MARIO ROMANO on 5/27/2002 at 6:27:52 PM
did, the englishmen, bicycles with bearings or just with spheres?


   RE:MISC:   BEARINGS ON ENGLISH ROADSTERS posted by sam on 5/28/2002 at 3:13:37 AM
Mario, todas las bicicletas inglesas tienen todas las postas sueltas en el anillo, les ponen grasa al anillo y luego las postas son colocadas con la mano.






MISC:   BEARINGS ON ENGLISH ROADSTERS posted by: MARIO ROMANO on 5/27/2002 at 6:27:52 PM
did, the englishmen, bicycles with bearings or just with spheres?







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rear carrier/rack for Raleigh Sports, DL-1, etc. posted by: David Poston on 5/27/2002 at 6:28:02 PM
Same question as below, except that I need to be educated on the type of rear carrier/rack that go well with these machines. And more importantly, where/how do I get one?

Thanks,
David







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lighting system for Raleigh Sports or DL-1? posted by: David Poston on 5/27/2002 at 6:20:21 PM
I'm getting ready to go for my Raleigh Sports, DL-1, or bike of similar make. What kind of lighting system should I install (i.e. what kind of front lights were mounted on these machines)? I'm thinking to avoid the dynohub lighting system as these are complicated and I don't think they were used on Sports or DL-1's anyway, if I'm not mistaken. (If someone wants to elaborate on the dynohub system here, by all means proceed). So can someone please refer me to a practical repro or NOS front light that I should look for?

Thanks,
David


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lighting system for Raleigh Sports or DL-1? posted by Ed on 5/27/2002 at 6:55:10 PM
I own a DL-1 equipped with a dyna-hub,also two sports and a Superbe. The superbe,to my knowledge ,is the only one that was supposed to be delivered with a dyno-hub,however,in my opinion,Any system which is age appropriete to the bike will work.It all depends on the owner's preference.
Good luck with your bike.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lighting system for Raleigh Sports or DL-1? posted by David Poston on 5/27/2002 at 8:15:56 PM
Does the dynohub really work efficiently? How about a "torpedo" or "bullet"? Were these mounted primarily on American bikes, or did English roadsters have them too?

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lighting system for Raleigh Sports or DL-1? posted by Edward in Vancouver on 5/27/2002 at 10:40:21 PM
Oops, you've touched a subject near and dear to our hearts, Dyno-hubs. They are pretty much a worry-free item, and don't cause any resistance, unlike the "Bottle type" generators, which can slow you down considerably (and drive you nuts with the "whirring noise") Dyno-hubs function well in the rain, whereas the "Bottle type" will slip. Superbe's were originialy equipped with either an AG or FG dynohubs, and later on were equipped with the front GH6 dyno hub. Sports models came with an optional GH6. Sturmey-Archer also made the front and rear lights. These were typical bullet shaped chromed affairs, and the front clamped on to a special "Raleigh Heron" plate that was sandwiched in between the headset rings

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lighting system for Raleigh Sports or DL-1? posted by David Poston on 5/28/2002 at 5:24:01 PM
Is there a picture of this front lamp? I don't think I'll want to invest in a dynohub system, so I'll probably opt for a simple front lamp. Does it stick up above the handlebars, like the aftermarket bullet version they are selling here at VVVintage bicycles?

Would the bullet be more correct than the front-fender torpedo?

P.S. Do these old-fashioned lamps (dynohub included) really give enough output that you can see by? I noticed at bike shops these days they are selling some high-tech stuff for $150 that they claim is the only thing which will work. They say that if you really want "to see," not just "be seen," you need to invest in that stuff.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lighting system for Raleigh Sports or DL-1? posted by Bill Putnam on 5/28/2002 at 7:59:29 PM
Re: adequacy of Dynohub or generator lamps for bicycle lighting.

The new rechargable battery operated systems often come in 15, 20, or yet higher wattages, and there is even a gas discharge light available which is much brighter than anything yet made for bicycles. These systems do put out much more light than the old 3 Watt side wall generators or 1.8 Watt Dynohubs. I have read of people complaining that the new gas discharge light systems are too bright and are blinding to pedestrians and oncoming traffic. For unlit trail riding, however, they're probably great.

For my personal use which is mainly commuting on well lit city streets, I find the Dynohub adequate. I use a Union halogen headlamp with a 5 V 1.5 Watt bulb and regulator from Reflectalite. The Union headlamp has better optics than the original Sturmey Archer headlamps, especially if the Sturmey headlamp is old and the reflector tarnished or lens has darkened. I use a modern Vista Lite VL700 LED rear flasher, and have many parts of my bike covered with reflective tape. I also wear two flashing belt beacons on my belt. The light isn't enough to see by, but for me it is adequate for being seen. I do have a Raleigh Sports with a Dynohub and original Sturmey Archer headlamp, but only use it occasionally at night.

In summary, a lot depends on what type of riding you are doing. I found that the battery systems were problemmatic for winter riding, as batteries don't work as well at lower temps. I occasionally have night meetings in the winter and need two or more hours of run time in below 0F temperatures which isn't always easy or convenient with many battery systems. The Dynohub is always available for use for as long as I need to ride.

There are some modern generator hubs available which put out the standard 3 Watts and are also very efficient. I put a Schmidt SON generator hub on my wife's bike and along with a Lumotec headlamp it provides adequate lighting for urban riding. This is not a vintage set up, however.

Bill Putnam






AGE / VALUE:   2 Speed Roadsters? posted by: Pravin on 5/27/2002 at 3:02:00 AM
The other day I found a Raleigh with High-Neutral-Low Gearing; I didn't know they made 2-speed bicycles... Does anyone know when they made these? 1940s/1950s?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   2 Speed Roadsters? posted by Ian on 5/27/2002 at 9:38:15 AM
Did you ride it to check the number of gears? Two speed Sturmey Archer hubs are very old and fairly rare. If this is a fifties, sixties or later it will be three speed. The "N" on a Sturmey shifter is for Normal not Neutral. Just the English way of saying things, this was the normal gear to be riding in with one gear lower and one gear higher. Regards, Ian.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   2 Speed Roadsters? posted by Pravin on 5/27/2002 at 2:54:09 PM
Oh I see... silly me.

Thanks.






AGE / VALUE:   Steering head bearings posted by: Jeff R on 5/26/2002 at 2:10:24 PM
I replaced the steering head bearings on my Phillips made Indian Scout today. I thought all English bikes took 25 5/32 balls on each race. I had a box of 5/32 bearings so I disassembled the steering head and to my horror 1/8 dia balls fell out. I discovered that my 1952 Indian and my Phillips made 1954 Norman both have 1/8 dia balls and they take 30 balls on each race. Is peculiar to Phillips made bikes? Fortunately I had a box of 1/8 dia balls squirrelled away and I didn't have to run all over town looking for them. Does the 25 5/32 balls apply to Raleigh made bikes only?







AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Production Volume posted by: geo on 5/25/2002 at 11:01:51 PM
i've kind of caught the British bike bug, so occassionally when I see these fine Sports models I pick them up cheap. Now I was wondering, it seems everytime I buy one the rear hub is dated between 68 and 72. Did they make a zillion of these(like more than usual) between 1968 and 1972 or is it just some freaky coincidence? Just wondering. Thanks, Geo


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Production Volume posted by Warren on 5/26/2002 at 3:09:29 AM
Really interesting question...the late 60's was the beginning of a movement that embraced physical fitness. Younger people bought the millions of 10 speeds that made up the bike boom. Moms and Dads may have also purchased new three speeds and caused a big blip on the demographics of bike buying. I too, have had dozens of Sports/Superbes from the 67-74 range. I guess Mom and Dad are retiring in droves?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Production Volume posted by Hank on 5/26/2002 at 11:56:08 AM
Is there a source of units produced, model break down, by year ? Schwinn serial numbers can be broken down to the day of production. This would be good to know since many Raleigh's have had the rear wheel replaced, and the only date I know of is on the hub! Somewhere I read that the 3rd charactor of some Raleigh models signified the year, is this true?






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Superbe posted by: Jeff on 5/25/2002 at 2:35:55 PM
Just found a Raleigh Superbe this morning. 1966, Gumwall Sprite tyres, green, nasty mattress saddle, cable brakes, original aluminum "Britanialloy" (sp?) pump, and locking fork with key. It's pretty clean and may end up being my new rider. My question is, were some Superbes more superb than others? This one has no rack or dynohub. Could you order one with more goodies on it if you wanted? Also do I need a B-72 or B-66 saddle for this one? Thanks in advance!


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Superbe posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 5/25/2002 at 8:40:25 PM
Either the B- 72 or the B-66 will be origional. The B- 66 is better because the two large rear springs give you a better ride. So go with the B- 66. The front wheel dyno hub got left out of your Supurbe. Some folks took these out every now and then. One fellow commented that he didn't want it "slowing him down" Which is silly because it is frictionless. Some people preferred a plain hub that's all. The rear "Prestitube Minor" rear rack got left off or taken off. Probably taken off by somebody before you found it.
These parts are out there, Try e- bay.
but first I would find a set of alloy 26 X 1 3/8 rims. Try Sheldon Brown at Harris Cyclery.
http://www.Sheldonbrown.com
Enjoy the bike. Do you have your key? A locksmith can make up a key for you no problem.
Chris

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Superbe posted by Warren on 5/25/2002 at 9:27:11 PM
No doubt it had the rack and Dyno lights...not necessarily the saddle.The majority of Superbes sold in Canada had mattress saddles. I've had a dozen of them pass through my hands and only three had leather.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Superbe posted by Clyde on 5/27/2002 at 5:01:25 PM
I bought a pair of Sheldon's alloy rims to upgrade my green Superbe, but wondered if it's counterproductive to lace the Dynohub into one! My intension on the rear is to build up a 36-hole S-5 hub (BTW, the Dyno is also 36-hole). Would the Dyno weight offset the benefits of alloy rim? Not that I'll be trying to set any speed records, but I'm sure the braking would improve.

In addition to a green Superbe rack, I need a rear fender to finsh off that little project. Anyone want to swap a green fender for my black one temporarily mounted on it. I've got a Raleigh Twenty folder rack that needs a new home too. Cheers.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Superbe posted by Ed on 5/27/2002 at 6:30:37 PM
Jeff: I was quite interested in your posting because I found a 1966 Superbe at an antique mall exactly one week ago Mine also did not have the dyno-hub or rack. This makes me wonder whether or not they exported some 1966s without all of the accessories normaly found on the Superbe,Mine did have the Brittanic(sp.)pump,as yours did. Mine had a B-72 Brookes saddle badly in need of restoration. The paint and chrome on mine are in excellent condition, however the rear tire looked like it had been gnawed on by some kind of rodent when I tryed to pump it up it split although the tube was ok.The front tire is still on the bike and has held up fine for a week. I don't know the brand of tires the labeling is unreadable but they are definitly not Dunlops.
I found a 32 hole Dyna-Hub and appropriate head and taillight which cost me more than the bike and now I'am looking for an authentic rack, also I plan to consult a locksmith about getting a key made for my fork lock.
I think it's rather strange that we should find identical 1966s that are missing the same parts.
Good luck with yours I'am enjoying mine alot although what began as a great bargain becomes more expensive as I go along,but I still want to get it to my idear of what a Superbe should be.
Regards, Ed.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Superbe posted by P.C. Kohler on 5/28/2002 at 4:28:46 PM
When I was a boy I used to go to our local cycle shop (Tow Path Cycle in Georgetown) and check out the new Raleighs and come back with the latest brochure. This was carefully positioned on the dining room table for my dad to peruse hopefully with the idea of buying me one. Fat chance. But I still have some of the brochures, including the 1966 Raleigh North America one.

In it, the Superb is described thus:

'The Raleigh SUPERB, world's most elegant bicycle. The SUPERB incorporates such patented features as the Dynohub built-in generator, fork lock, Sturmey Archer Hub, Brooks Butt Leather Saddle [a B-72 judging from the photo], touring bag and pump. Gentleman's Model DL24 available with 21" and 23" frames. Ladies' Model DL24 incorporates 21" frame. The perfect choice in bronze green for those who demand the ultimate.'

Not mentioned are the really cool Dunlop amber wall tyres fitted to Sports and Superbes then.

So there you have it.... except for the saddle and tyres, same Superb as they made up to the end c. 1976.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Superbe posted by Bill Putnam on 5/28/2002 at 8:09:55 PM
In reference to Clyde's question on whether alloy rims will offset the weight penalty of a Dynohub:

First off, the alloy rims are vastly superior for wet weather braking. Regardless of whether or not you use the Dynohub, the alloy rims will make the bike ride much nicer. Plus you can pump the tires up to a higher pressure than with steel rims which reduces rolling resistance. I run my 26 X 1 3/8 tires at 85 psi on my Sports, and find this is much nicer than the 55-60 with steel rims.

Yes the Dynohub is heavy, and the bike will feel a bit nose heavy if you lift it, but in the big scheme of things one pound of difference isn't an issue unless you're racing competitively. The Dynohub is nice as it works in all weather conditions and there are no mechanical friction losses other than normally seen in the hub bearings.

My suggestion would be to lace up your Dynohub and S-5, use dual 3-speed triggers and enjoy.

Bill Putnam

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Superbe posted by Clyde on 5/29/2002 at 2:35:01 AM
Bill, thanks for input; that's the plan but just have to find the time. When the S/A S-5 hub was purchased, the LBS thru in a stem mount 5-speed shifter. However, I'm leaning to the dual triggers, or a friction on the left like Sheldon advocates. Can anyone provide a view or diagram of the clip to hold a bullet lamp to the standard Raleigh mount. I'll need something to wire the Dyno to.
Cheers