OldRoads.com

This is an archive of Vintage Bicycle Information.
For current Discussions, go to our main site: OldRoads.com

If you are trying to determine the genealogy of your bicycle by it's features, go to our Vintage Bicycle Price Guide
which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, brake types, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your old bicycle.

If you are trying to determine the make and model of your bicycle, go to our Vintage Bicycle Picture Database
which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your vintage bicycle.

Archived: English Roadsters







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What kind of bike is this? (auction ends soon) posted by: David Poston on 6/13/2002 at 5:58:42 PM
This looks like a very interesting bike. Any ideas?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2110865537


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What kind of bike is this? (auction ends soon) posted by P.C. Kohler on 6/13/2002 at 7:01:52 PM
I have been puzzling over this one too; I doubt it's a Raleigh or English-make somehow. The stays are of a different pattern from the DL-1 being flatter. Anyway, what do I know? I just opened a box containing two gorgeous spare mudguards from an old Sunbeam bought on eBay. Beautiful condition. But they're GREEN! The brightest green you've ever seen. Problem is they looked BLACK on the scans. I mean jet black. So much for my eyes and my eBay "bargain". Anyway, I can at least use the reflector. Anyone got a bright green mudguard-challenged Sunbeam out there?

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   What kind of bike is this? (auction ends soon) posted by Chris on 6/13/2002 at 8:31:58 PM
E- bay bike has been painted, I'll pass.

   To bid or not to bid: That is the question posted by David Poston on 6/13/2002 at 9:13:59 PM
Man, this e-bay thing is really a temptation. To bid or not to bid: That is the question. This bike looks to be pre-WWII by all appearances. Any idea why it has 24" wheels? Maybe a boy's bike? It's only going for $20 and it ends in 40 minutes....






MISC:   Dyno + brake on ebay posted by: David on 6/13/2002 at 4:03:11 PM
NMA - Cool custom combined drum brake and dynohub for a tandem. (64 holes - use it on a roadster...?)
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2111627019







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   club bike "Reg Harris" posted by: Andy on 6/13/2002 at 12:23:29 AM
I need help on determining the age, and the type frame this bike used. I.E. type of metal in frame. It is a Lenton Grand Prix Reg Harris series, on the frame is the number 54 21 WH. the wheels are 27 in. Gold in color with white on the front housing.







AGE / VALUE:   1973 Raliegh Sports posted by: Carey on 6/12/2002 at 4:09:24 PM
I found a 1973 womens Raliegh Sports, 3 speed in pretty good condition. Does anyone have a general idea of what it is worth? Just curious.



   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1973 Raliegh Sports posted by David on 6/13/2002 at 12:43:09 AM
They're often hard to GIVE away. I think men generally prefer to ride the closed frames (and they're made in larger sizes) and there don't seem to be nearly as many women who like old bikes, which is too bad since the old women's bikes generally are in much better shape than their counterparts. (Is that a long enough sentence?)

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1973 Raliegh Sports posted by Dale on 6/13/2002 at 3:57:33 PM
My hypothesis is that it's more an issue of supply than demand. I think that more of the ladies models survived, probably because their owners were less likely to abuse them and less likely to need the latest toy.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1973 Raliegh Sports posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/15/2002 at 4:51:00 PM
These are sometimes found by the kerb in the trash.-to- These go up to $150.00 therabouts. People love these bikes many folks will tighten up their grip on the handlegrips when just casually asked if they want to sell the bike. They say No! Not for sale. They have signs on the bike that say not for sale. You don't see many of these. They are disappearing, being snapped up by the sharks that deal in other things but they look for and grab bikes too.
You did well, and we can help you overhaul it here. It's a fine riding bike. Grab you hubby and go for a bike ride, it's great.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1973 Raliegh Sports posted by carey on 6/13/2002 at 10:44:57 PM
thanks for the replies. I am female (ha ha). I have been wanting an old bike and found this one on the side of the road with a free sign on it. I was thrilled but have to wonder if I should have left it by the curb. I don't think it needs much work. I thought maybe my hubby or my daughter's boyfriend might help me fix it up. I'm not too mechanically inclined. I think third gear is out. Make me feel better... is it worth 10 bucks?! ha ha

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1973 Raliegh Sports posted by P.C. Kohler on 6/13/2002 at 11:21:01 PM
Carey-- if you got it for free, congrats! You got yourself a cycle that's better looking and better made than anything out there in terms of an everyday bike. The parts alone are worth way more than $10. But please don't "part out" another old Raleigh! Take her to a cycle shop (I may in a minority here but I do NOT recommend "tickering" with Sturmey-Archer hubs, headsets and other bits unless you know what you're doing) and get their recommendations. Then have fun "Riding Awheel on Sheffield Steel". Welcome to the Classic British Bicycle "fraternity" or is it a sorority with your DL-22L?

P.C. Kohler

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1973 Raliegh Sports posted by David on 6/14/2002 at 2:10:18 AM
I think we all like to brag about the great bike we got out of the trash. I know I do! People will ask you about your bike..."Nice bike, I used to have one like it." "I found this one in the trash and it's the best bike."






AGE / VALUE:   1969 Dl-1 Deal ? posted by: Nate L. on 6/12/2002 at 11:13:27 AM
The Dl-1 currently on ebay (#1835804748) might be a good deal due to no listing photo and no shipping. I stopped at the antique shop where the bike is in Salisbury MA to take a look, it looks decent. I've got 4 Tourists, so I'll pass on this one. If you're in Eastern MA or Southern N.H., it might go for less then the usual $200-300 !


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1969 Dl-1 Deal ? posted by JohnM on 6/13/2002 at 3:26:46 PM
Thank you, Nate. After wrestling with my conscience for a while, I couldn't let this one go by. I'm only about 40 minutes away from Salisbury. I have a Sports and a Twenty, but no DL-1 yet, so there's a clear need here (though my wife will tell a quite different story!). Looks like it might not even reach the minimum, though.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by: Robert Bailey on 6/11/2002 at 8:24:07 PM
I have just purchased a Raleigh Sports bike from Ebay. I feel like a kid before Christmas waiting for it to arrive. I look forward to giving it a good cleaning from saddle to tire tread. I have even found a good B66 to replace the mattress saddle.

It realize that it is going to be rough finding a can of S-A Cycle Oil in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Before I spend $7 on oil and $6 on shipping, is there an alternate oil that will do the job?


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by Bill on 6/11/2002 at 10:15:23 PM
I've always heard that a middle weight mineral base oil will due just fine, like a 30 weight motor oil, it's only $2.00 a quart.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by P.C. Kohler on 6/12/2002 at 3:35:09 PM
Me... I'd just as well stick with the 'real' thing; I mean when I think what I have just spent the last two months on dynohub fittings for my DL-1 (I finally have a complete rig, the battery case, the wire harness, clips,lamps, rear three-speed dynohub, the lot and all for more than I've spent on an entire cycle!!), $7 for a tin of oil pales in comparison. This stuff was always expensive; when I was a boy I remember my dad complaining about spending $3 for it; that was in the 1960s so it's cheaper now in real dollars. Of course now, people collect the old SA oil cans too but that's another story. Me I like 'em because they have that nice long neck; the plastic ones are useless.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by sam on 6/12/2002 at 3:10:04 AM
Go to the sewing machine store in BR and get the oil made for singer sewing machines.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by JohnM on 6/12/2002 at 12:49:01 PM
I've got a '55 Sports that I was feeding exclusively with Hoppe's gun oil, and a Raleigh Twenty I was feeding exclusively with Mobil One synthetic. Last year, they were both shifting equally well. This year, I switched the Sports to sewing machine oil for a while, and it seemed to be slightly more sluggish - not much, it's very subtle. So I'm going back to Hoppe's for that bike. Not a very scientific test, I'm afraid - bottom line is that gun oil, lightweight motor oil, sewing machine oil, or Sturmey Archer oil will all work acceptably well. If the hub's a little gummed up when you receive it, try a few shots of WD-40 first to loosen it up - not a good lubricant, but it seems to get things moving.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by smg on 6/12/2002 at 3:38:13 PM
I use Hoppe's gun oil as well, with success so far. Selection was on the basis of reading the fine print - the claim that it wouldn't gum up. A while back, someone here opined that the real function of periodic oiling was to keep the grease that actually lubricates the hub from congealing. There might be something in that; S-A's own oil is extremely light. Anybody tried kerosene?

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by Dewane on 6/12/2002 at 8:35:26 PM
This has been a topic of discussion before. I use sewing machine oil, which seems to work fine, and has a nice long tube that fits in the hub well.

I can't find the old thread(s) now, but I believe the only consensus is to NOT use 3 in 1. Now I can't remember why, but I think it has a tendency to gum up.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by David on 6/13/2002 at 12:51:27 AM
I recently cleaned up a gummed-up hub. It seemed to be dried-up vegetable oil all over everything and it wasn't easy to get it all off using WD-40. The grease in the hub is only in the bearings. I think only the driver bearings would be likely to get any oil on them normally. The oil should coat the planet ring and gears, the sliding clutch and so on. If there's a little pool of it in the bottom of the hub, it should keep all the turning bits inside coated. SA manual specifies two teaspoonfuls of oil [in addition to oiling the parts themselves] when assembling it and then add it periodically.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by Edward in Vancouver on 6/13/2002 at 2:23:01 PM
As a chef who's told countless cooks around the world never, ever, to use vegetable oil to lubricate kitchen equipment, the same principle applies with internal gear hubs. It dries up and makes a real gummy hard mess. When I caught cooks using vegetable oil to grease the meat slicer, my knee jerk rection was to make 'em clean it up, then scrape the dried gummy oil from the ventilation hood as punishment.
Interestingly enough when I salvage gummed up parts from beat up AW's, I throw them in a pot of cold water, bring it slowly to a boil, scoop off the scum, throw out the water, and start again with cold water, repeating untill the parts get clean. I wish I had access to one of those parts cleaning machines....

   How often do you lube? posted by David Poston on 6/13/2002 at 5:09:47 PM
I also will need to learn how to maintain my Rudge as soon as it arrives. Every day I come home after work and stare at the front porch. Where do you get SA oil (I don't mind paying $6), how much do you add, where do you add it, and how often? Any other maintenance necessary for the SA hub?

Help needed for a beginner here.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by Robert Bailey on 6/14/2002 at 1:59:59 PM
It may very well be that I already have my bike lubricant already. It has been sitting on my shelf the whole time. As my Scoutmaster used to pound into me 25 years ago, "Check your resources!" One of my several hobbies is collecting electric fans. In that I use Zoom-Spout Turbine Oil. It is a 20wt mineral oil that does not gum. At 1,000 plus RPM, it better not. I bet it would be perfect. About $3.25 a bottle and the spout works great.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by Geoff Rogers on 6/14/2002 at 3:18:53 PM
My friends, these bicycles we love so well are not sensitive, finely-tuned medical measurement devices. At best, most of the components of an English three-speed bike are kinda blunt instruments. Motor oil, 3-in-1 oil, whatever. It all works okay. We now know that vegetable oil is bad news, and maybe 90W gear oil or similar is not a good idea (besides it smells terrible), and kerosene or penetrating oil are too thin. But it's really not necessary to use the official S-A oil. I have been riding English bicycles with S-A hubs for thirty years, and have always used regular oil motor oil out of a squirt can, with never a problem. Your experience will be similar, I am sure. Just let the bike know you care about it, keep it clean and give it a little lubrication and a dose of common sense and it will last 100 years.
Happy riding!
Geoff Rogers

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by Geoff Rogers on 6/14/2002 at 3:19:12 PM
My friends, these bicycles we love so well are not sensitive, finely-tuned medical measurement devices. At best, most of the components of an English three-speed bike are kinda blunt instruments. Motor oil, 3-in-1 oil, whatever. It all works okay. We now know that vegetable oil is bad news, and maybe 90W gear oil or similar is not a good idea (besides it smells terrible), and kerosene or penetrating oil are too thin. But it's really not necessary to use the official S-A oil. I have been riding English bicycles with S-A hubs for thirty years, and have always used regular oil motor oil out of a squirt can, with never a problem. Your experience will be similar, I am sure. Just let the bike know you care about it, keep it clean and give it a little lubrication and a dose of common sense and it will last 100 years.
Happy riding!
Geoff Rogers

   How often do you lube? posted by David Poston on 6/13/2002 at 5:10:22 PM
I also will need to learn how to maintain my Rudge as soon as it arrives. Every day I come home after work and stare at the front porch. Where do you get SA oil (I don't mind paying $6), how much do you add, where do you add it, and how often? Any other maintenance necessary for the SA hub?

Help needed for a beginner here.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by Robert N. on 6/14/2002 at 11:38:07 PM
Nah.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by Robert N. on 6/14/2002 at 11:45:16 PM
Nah. I'm a Philistine.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by Clyde on 6/14/2002 at 10:40:59 AM
I should have "borrowed" my mother's can of Singer Sewing Machine Oil on my last trip home. The can had a "39 cents" price tag.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by David on 6/14/2002 at 10:54:07 AM
My hardware store carries two kinds of "3-in-1" oil; one is a petroleum product (probably ok for hubs) and one includes vegetable (castor?) oil (bad for hubs). Given the cost of little cans of oil, you're probably much better off to invest in one of those oil cans with a pump and pointy spout and a quart of 20 wt motor oil. You won't run out when you're assembling your precious ASC hub at midnight!

   How often do you lube? posted by David Poston on 6/13/2002 at 5:10:22 PM
I also will need to learn how to maintain my Rudge as soon as it arrives. Every day I come home after work and stare at the front porch. Where do you get SA oil (I don't mind paying $6), how much do you add, where do you add it, and how often? Any other maintenance necessary for the SA hub?

Help needed for a beginner here.

   How often do you lube? posted by David Poston on 6/13/2002 at 5:10:22 PM
I also will need to learn how to maintain my Rudge as soon as it arrives. Every day I come home after work and stare at the front porch. Where do you get SA oil (I don't mind paying $6), how much do you add, where do you add it, and how often? Any other maintenance necessary for the SA hub?

Help needed for a beginner here.

   RE:How often do you lube? posted by P.C. Kohler on 6/13/2002 at 7:11:46 PM
David-- you are nervous about getting your Rudge aren't you! You fingers aren't tapping the desktop but your Enter key!!

My advice when your Rudge arrives: get acquainted with her by giving her a good clean and polish. Then take her to a good cycle shop and have them give her a thorough overhaul: headset, cranks, axles, lube, maybe reshod her with new tyres and tubes. You can do a lot of the little adjustments yourself: check eBay for the original Raleigh maintenance booklets (I just got one circa 1950) or check Sheldon Brown's site for tips. But unless you're a cycle mechanic, I'd let a pro give this baby a once over. She's most likely been sitting in garage for 25 years.

P.C. Kohler, whose Rudge is languishing at some UPS depot when the shipper left out my street number!!

   RE:RE:How often do you lube? posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/13/2002 at 8:36:04 PM
You can overhaul this yourself, Ask us here. I'll guide you, the fellows can comment too and they will. It's not hard, and the shop will charge you too much and they might mess something up.
You would wait 4 weeks to get it back and then they might want $117.00 or some crazy amount. Lot of labor involved.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by Robert N. on 6/14/2002 at 3:52:33 AM
Same bike, same oil for the past 25 years. 3-in-1. A light machine oil (petroleum distillate) is a light machine oil. I don't use the manufaturer's recommended oil in my car either. Neither S-A or Ford is going to say,"Our competitors' oils are just as good and cheaper too." Forget kerosene. Too volatile.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lube for Sturmey Archers posted by P.C. Kohler on 6/14/2002 at 4:23:58 AM
Doubtless true Robert, but surely you must miss the buzz knowing your English Sturmey-Archer hub is lubed by British oil? Or maybe you're using British 3-in-1??

P.C. Kohler






AGE / VALUE:   do you ride posted by: rickey@knowlesbicycle334-756-7561 on 6/11/2002 at 3:45:54 PM
would you like to know how to stay cool in this summer heat







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Repainting old parts posted by: David Poston on 6/10/2002 at 11:55:44 PM
I was wondering if anyone here has some advice on how to repaint old parts without a whole lot of know-how (that's me) or expensive equipment (which I don't have). I recently got a rear carrier that is green, but I need it black to match my new Rudge (when it comes in the mail). How do I strip the old paint off? What kind of paint do I use?

Thanks,

David Poston.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Repainting old parts posted by P.C. Kohler on 6/11/2002 at 12:38:47 AM
You'll get lots of advice on this! My recommendations: do not remove the old paint. It's baked on and will give you a much better undercoat than you'll manage yourself. Raleigh undercoated steel with some pretty good stuff. Just leave it ALONE. Take some wet-dry sandpaper and just rub it down wet, removing as much of the gloss as you can. This will also take off any rust. Then wash down with paint thinner. Mask off the spring clip, get yourself some really GOOD spray black enamel and spray. Two light coats. Now remember this is NEVER going to exactly match the black on the Rudge. Ever. My dad collected Alfa Romeo cars and he always said the hardest colour to match was black! How true! Your carrier is just going to look newer than the cycle. But so what?! And when it chips... well it's going to be... green!

The carrier in question is one off an old Superbe and is painted.... of course.... bronze green!

P.C. Kohler

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Repainting old parts posted by Ray on 6/11/2002 at 3:31:07 PM
I agree with P.C. with how you prepare the rack. The old paint can act as a good primer but you must sand it down with at least 400 grade wet paper. As for the paint, I have had great results with gloss black rustoleum spray paint. It really comes out nice and will blend rather well. A tip, you should spray several light coats. Never spray thick coats to save time. It will either run or dry funny. A second tip is to wait a long time between coats. Although the can may say you can re-spray within 10 minutes or someting like that, do not. I actually painted a half of a frame to match the other half by masking the good part and light spraying the bad after prep. I gave the bad area about 4 coats after waiting a week between each coat. Then I gave it a final 5th coat after taking the 400 wet paper to it to remove any imperfections and smooth it out against the good paint. Again I waited a week and then very lightly sanded with 600 paper then compounded it to match the good part. It came out great but took time and patience.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Repainting old parts posted by David Poston on 6/11/2002 at 4:34:24 PM
Thanks, guys, for the tips. Does the spring-loaded clip come off easily?

I really hope it doesn't chip off, because that green will look a bit tacky.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Repainting old parts posted by P.C. Kohler on 6/11/2002 at 4:42:00 PM
David, if you follow's Ray's good advice and meticulous painting, I'd wager you'll have a better coat(s) of black than the green anyway. And chips or not, a Rudge never looks "tacky". Ever.

Speaking of paint, I remember when you could buy little bottles (like nail varnish) of touch-up paint from Raleigh. Has anyone found any readily available paints for some of the standard Raleigh colours like Bronze Green, Coffee? I'm fortunate to have nothing but basic black cycles but I wonder what folks with more colourful machines do.

P.C. Kohler, tempted by a Raleigh Super Lenton in 'plum' (Lentons always had the coolest paint jobs!)

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Repainting old parts posted by Dale on 6/12/2002 at 3:55:04 PM
One day I noticed that a co-worker's nails were a good match for my metallic blue Cannondale. I asked her the color and manufacturer and bought a bottle, and it matched really well. I just don't know if colors like Bronze Green are in style these days...






AGE / VALUE:   what year posted by: Andy Schechter on 6/10/2002 at 5:18:40 PM
Does anybody know what year this bike is? on the frame the #54 21 WH. is there any other location on the frame that would help in determinating the year. thanks







FOR SALE:   1950s Rudge on eBay posted by: P.C. Kohler on 6/10/2002 at 5:16:00 PM
Check out the LOVELY Rudge-Whitworth (enclosed gearcase, rear dynohub, cable brakes) on eBay. Circa 1955 by my reckoning and a 'Superbe' model in more ways than one. Will someone please bid on this (or buy it now for $500-- are they serious?!) before I am tempted....

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1835724917

P.C. Kohler


   RE:FOR SALE:   1950s Rudge on eBay posted by Mark R. on 6/10/2002 at 7:56:10 PM
DUDE! This would make a great compliment to the Rudge you recently bought from Bob in NJ!

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:   1950s Rudge on eBay posted by P.C. Kohler on 6/10/2002 at 8:56:10 PM
Please... don't tempt me! When my wife gets back from England and sees the bedroom of our apartment filled with our two Raleigh DL-1s, that '49 Rudge and now this one... Come to think of it, now's the time to do it! And it's great to be lulled to sleep with the subtle fragrence of Sturmey-Archer gear oil, 30-year-old-Dunlop tyres and Brooks Proofhide.

P.C. Kohler, ready for eBay rehab

   RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE:   1950s Rudge on eBay posted by Mark R. on 6/11/2002 at 1:59:20 AM
Now THAT'S what I'm talkin' about! Go for it! :-)

   RE:FOR SALE:   1950s Rudge on eBay posted by Jeff the Sting-Ray collector on 6/12/2002 at 2:39:25 AM
I just love how passionate you guys are about these bikes :) It's nice to see some folks who appreciate these machines for what they are instead of what they are worth.

   RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE:   1950s Rudge on eBay posted by Dale on 6/12/2002 at 3:59:09 PM
Now you have to rig up something so you can spin the wheel and fall asleep to the gentle "tick...tick...tick".

I appreciate a lot of things for what they are, such as Harleys and Corvettes, although I have zero interest in owning any of them.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Durability of Shimano 7 or 4 speed gear hub???????? posted by: Robert on 6/10/2002 at 12:48:40 PM
Slightly off topic. Anyone here have any extended experience / useage of the Shimano 7 speed hubs? Any problems , how well you like them?
Any experience with the 4 speed hubs??

I would like something with a little lower and with closer gearing.

Thanks


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Durability of Shimano 7 or 4 speed gear hub???????? posted by Tim on 6/10/2002 at 1:13:46 PM
I just tuned up a bike with a Shimano Nexus 7-speed hub this weekend. First one I've encountered.
It was skipping badly and the hub was dragging.
I wasn't impressed.
I flushed the hub with wd-40 and adjusted the shift cable and it seems a lot better. Not sure how long they take to get gummed up, but in my limited experience I'll say the Nexus 7 does NOT have the bullet-proof feel of a Sturmey-Archer hub.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Durability of Shimano 7 or 4 speed gear hub???????? posted by Bill Putnam on 6/10/2002 at 6:47:52 PM
For some discussion on the Shimano Nexus hub durability, see

http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=en&threadm=944b4b%24tlq%241%40nnrp1.deja.com&rnum=7&prev=/groups%3Fq%3Dnexus%2B7%26hl%3Den%26group%3Drec.bicycles.tech%26rnum%3D7%26selm%3D944b4b%2524tlq%25241%2540nnrp1.deja.com

A common difficulty with the hubs is inadequate lubrication. The newer variations apparently have better seals and hence if you do take care to lubricate the hub properly before riding it should do reasonably well.

Personally I have found my old Sturmey Archer S5.2 5 speed to provide many thousands of miles of trouble free service throughout the year (northern US) with maintenance consisting of regular oiling.

Bill Putnam

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Durability of Shimano 7 or 4 speed gear hub???????? posted by Albert on 6/10/2002 at 7:25:25 PM
While this discussion of hub durability is an interesting one, I question the need for anything more than 3-speeds in the type of use we give our roadsters. The range while not quite that of a 4 or 5 is never-the -less adequate especially when used with chainwheel/cog combination yielding 2:1. And of course the SA and Shimano 3's hubs are very robust. Cheers!

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Durability of Shimano 7 or 4 speed gear hub???????? posted by Robert on 6/11/2002 at 12:50:48 AM
I really like my 3 speeds , but on one of the local roads that I run pretty regular I have to deal with "El Diablo". That is what my son and I call it. It is about a mile long grade then a short desent followed by about another mile of grade. I have ridden it on a 3 speed with a stock front sprocket on the Sports with a 20 rear but MAN!!! It even got me to huffin this past Saturday on my 12 speed derailleur bike.
Anyway, the Shimano 7 has a lower low gear than the S/A. Plus I have not been able to locate a good later model S/A 5 speed hub. I can get a Shimano 7 with shifter new for about 120.00 shipping included , but if they are trouble prone it is not a bargain.

Thanks all for the feedback and info .

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Durability of Shimano 7 or 4 speed gear hub???????? posted by Jeff R on 6/11/2002 at 3:08:45 AM
I like my FW 4 speed. It takes a couple of drops of oil every now an then. I've never had any trouble with it. The AW 3 speed is nice but the xtra low gear on the FW 4 speed is even better.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Durability of Shimano 7 or 4 speed gear hub???????? posted by Dale on 6/12/2002 at 4:07:19 PM
My preference is for a 2-speed derailleur outside the AW. The gear jumps on an AW are too wide for my taste and you often find yourself wishing you had one in-between. Also, on the S5 the jumps are non-linear, though you have three even spaced ones in the middle where most used. An AW with 7:8 ratio (e.g. 21-24) exactly splits the 3:4 of the hub.

In any case, the 48-24 combo on my Superbe *still* isn't low enough if you have the 80 rpm habit, but I can't quite bring myself to replace the crank, even temporarily, with a smaller ring.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Durability of Shimano 7 or 4 speed gear hub???????? posted by Robert on 6/12/2002 at 8:54:20 PM
I tried the derailleur setup on my Dunelt. Found a NOS Huret Derailleur and set it up 19/22 cogs. Only problem was that, with this particular derailleur, the stop crews , when screwed in far enough , would interfere with proper derail. movement. With a more modern design derail. (Shimano/ Suntour),this would probably not be a problem .But I was trying for a "period correct" looking bike. So much for that notion.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Durability of Shimano 7 or 4 speed gear hub???????? posted by David on 6/13/2002 at 8:22:44 PM
I just had an email from Charlie Persons (www.permaco.com) and he found some more SA 7-speed hubs (I've got my order in). If you're interested, consider them; they may be the last ones for a while.






MISC:   SA on a tandem? posted by: JohnM on 6/10/2002 at 12:30:51 PM
Picked up an old Columbia tandem this weekend - appears to be late 60's or early 70's. It has a Bendix coaster brake hub, so right away I'm thinking how nice it would be with a Sturmey Archer 3 or 4 speed - are these hubs strong enough to use on a tandem? I'm wondering if the hollow axle might be too much of a weak point.

Interesting note on the tires - they're labeled as 26 x 1.75, and in pretty bad shape. I couldn't find that size in the listings at Harris Cyclery, so now I'm thinking I'll have to get new wheels before I can even ride it. I'd rather not do that until I'm sure the frame is true, and it has decent handling... Then I read Sheldon's article on tire sizing. Turns out, 26 x 1.75 was the original mountain bike tire. Tried it out, and sure enough - any mtb tire will fit on these rims! So I have a wide choice of heavy duty semi-slicks. Now if I could just find a spoke wrench to fit - these seem to be 13 gauge or maybe even 12.


   RE:MISC:   SA on a tandem? posted by Warren on 6/11/2002 at 12:42:49 AM
Apparently the biggest issue with SA axles is the alignment of the dropouts they sit in. The axles are very hard and brittle and they break rather than bend. Get the frame aligned first.

I'm not up on the variety of mtn rims out there but the tandem looks like a good candidate for a 40 hole AW. A nice strong alloy rim would be great but I'm sure a good Dunlop steel rim built up by the right person would work just fine. 36 holes for the front. How about a cyclo 2 or 3 speed conversion kit? They come up on ebay now and again. Big fun!









ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lamp brackets (part II) posted by: Bill on 6/10/2002 at 4:50:14 AM
I have two phillips with the bayonet type mounts welded to the side of the front fork and rear support. I just piced up a pre-war royal mail bicycle, it has them also...

QUESTION: When did they change over from this configuration to the single mount on the front neck. And, would these older bicycles use the carbine/oil lamps. If not, they may have used the square box light on the front, what would have gone on back.?

Anyone have the Phillips Serial number list?

thanks,
Bill


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lamp brackets (part II) posted by Jeff R on 6/10/2002 at 12:20:22 PM
I have a small list of serial numbers with years from Phillips made bikes. With them you can guesstimate the year of manufacture of your bike. When ever I see a pre 1960 Phillips made bike here or on ebay I ask the owner for the hub date and serial number. I have numbers and dates between 1952 and 1957.The numbers came from bikes named Phillips, Indian,and Reliance. They all start with the letter K. email me if you would like the list.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lamp brackets (part II) posted by P.C. Kohler on 6/10/2002 at 3:28:14 PM
I don't know if there was ever a 'when' re. fork-mounted lamp brackets or handlebar stem ones. It seems to have depended more on the type of machine up to the 60s. A lot of 'club' cycles had the fork mounts and certainly most ladies' machines with the idea a front basket would be carried. There were even dyno-hub rigs from the factory with the fork mounts, especially on club bikes like the Lenton Sports, with dropped handlebars. But I guess from the mid-60s onwards the handlebar stem rig seemed to become standard on Sports and roadster three-speeds. At least one doesn't see these brazed on brackets in most catalogues from the early 60s onwards. But you could still buy bolt-on ones even with the Raleigh heron's crest, Rudge "R" etc. It's also a matter of custom: fork-mountings are far more common in Britain and Europe than they are in North America. I don't ever recall seeing a cycle in the USA with a fork-mounted lamp.

P.C. Kohler






AGE / VALUE:   DL-1 outing posted by: Warren on 6/10/2002 at 3:52:07 AM
On ebay of course...http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2111799135

Looks to be in nice shape.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   DL-1 outing posted by Tom on 6/10/2002 at 1:42:33 PM
The same person has a matching mens. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2111789453






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lots of New Pix Posted in "Roll Britannia" posted by: P.C. Kohler on 6/10/2002 at 3:47:05 AM
I have posted a number of new pix in my Yahoo Group, "Roll Britannia". This now has 10 albums with more than 60 photos. Lots of posters, Sturmey-Archer stuff, lighting sets, catalogues, head badges, cranksets etc. Take a look:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/rollbritannia/

P.C. Kohler