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Archived: English Roadsters







MISC:   Fun Boston event posted by: David on 8/11/2002 at 10:00:22 PM
Next Sunday's the Larz Andersen show in Brookline, Mass. An item in today's Globe describes what looks like a fun event the night before:

Free wheeling

Since having a bouncing baby bike, my boy hardly knows me anymore. I mean, since having a baby boy, I'm a tad sleep deprived. So when we heard about the Midnight Greenway Ride next Saturday, Aug. 17, which will tour a large part of the city's greenspace on bicycles beginning at 11:30 p.m., we fell asleep.

But there is one very cool aspect to this generally cool ride. You get to pedal through the Ted Williams Tunnel. And it's free; no tolls.

The ride begins at Copley Square and ends at Castle Island. There will be breakfast and coffee at sunrise on the Harborwalk by Waterfront Park in the North End.

In all, the ride is 30 leisurely miles through the Back Bay, Dorchester, East Boston, the South End, the North End, and South Boston.

It's sponsored by Boston Natural Areas Network and the Back Bay Midnight Pedalers.

No registration is necessary, but have the proper gear, including a helmet, reflective clothing, and a bike light, and bring some money.

Call 617-542-7696 or visit www.bostonnatural.org for more information. zzz ... zzz








AGE / VALUE:   Look at the cool rear bag! posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/11/2002 at 5:07:49 PM
E- bay item # 2129708291
Rare Vintage Raleigh 1968 Bike Bicycle and More

I love this awesome rear bag. Talk about your period accesory!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Look at the cool rear bag! posted by Drew on 8/11/2002 at 6:37:13 PM
Just think, when your plane, bus or train arrives...no waiting for a cab or shuttle...just hop on this little machine and go. On the subject of bags, I see many folks paying $20-30 for the vinyl seat bags. Never hear much about the grey & black 'RAMPAR'(RAleigh-AMerican-PARts) oiled canvas and leather seat bags, they are really classy bags, big step up from plastic. It makes my DL1 complete!

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Look at the cool rear bag! posted by Bob on 8/11/2002 at 6:56:24 PM
Where can one purchase these RAMPAR bags? Where can we see and shop for them?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Look at the cool rear bag! posted by Matthew on 8/11/2002 at 9:07:51 PM
This lovely little bike is a Raleigh RSW 16 (Raleigh small wheel) the attempt by the big R to compete with Moulton, not a great success which is rather sad because it is a great bike. If you keep the tyres pumped up hard it is a good fun ride. The gearing, SA 3-speed, is geared up to acheive a reasonable road speed and the dyno-hub provides effective but not dazzling light. This actual cycle is a good example and looks to be in approx. A1 condition. Some body give it a good home, you will certainly wish you had if you miss it. I have got one the same colour, 1967 one owner from new until I accquired it last year, not in the same condition, maybe only A2 / A3. I ride it the six mile round trip to work occasionally and it always causes heads to turn and folks to ask about it, more so than when I ride bicycles thirty years older. In good old England the Ebay item would fetch around £40 to £50 sterling.
I am nothing to do with the vendor of this cycle, I'm not even on the same continent!
Matthew

PS:- for those of you with a really radical out look on life Raleigh made another model like this, called the Wisp. What's so special about that you say? how about the fact that it had an engine!! The Wisp was a 'moped' with a 50cc (3cu") two stroke engine capable of reaching about 30 mph in standard trim & alarmingly enough, with tuning, able to acheive 45mph with tuning mods. Now look at the picture again, 45mph on that, only for the brave.
sorry this is a little off line for us E.R. fans but I thought you'd like to know.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Look at the cool rear bag! posted by Drew on 8/12/2002 at 6:53:53 PM
Found mine at a bike swap, as far as I know they haven't been made for years, pretty scarce item I think! not even seen on ebay.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   DL prefix posted by: benjamin floyd on 8/11/2002 at 3:15:24 PM
P.C. Kohler
Yup you are right! I guess that I should have specified just the last 42 years! By the way do you consider the carlton and the lenton machines english roadsters? I have only seen these with racing h/bars although with SA gears.
thank you
ben







MISC:   Humber Clipper??? posted by: Ian Buunk on 8/11/2002 at 5:01:34 AM
Hi
I have a Humber clipper series III
or at least i thought i did
now i suspect i have a Humber C.S.3 frame with other stuff on it and i am trying to determine what is original

it has a brooks B5N seat, aw 1964 hub with plastic pulley clamped to seat tube,and handle bars of the sort you would normally find on a raliegh sports, it does not have split Humber type forks
BUT
my uncle (the original owner) says that when he got it in 1958 for his tenth birthday it had a fixed/free flip flop rear hub and low racey handle bars, (it has had at least 3 owners between him and me)
BUT
the frame has brazeon cable guides and a mount on the down tube that make it look suspiciously like it was designed for a rear derailleur

so my question is what should have been the original setup
-internal 3 speed
-fixed wheel
-or derailleur of some type?

thanks for you time, any info on this bike would be greatly appreciated

thanks
ian







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   raleigh-DL posted by: benjamin floyd on 8/11/2002 at 2:03:51 AM
Matthew
Thank you for your help on this subject! I have tried many times over the years to find out what DL means! Many people who claim to be english roadster guys have not been able to come up with what I belive should be a very basic answer. We use this prefix all the time but do not know it's meaning.
thank you
ben


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   raleigh-DL posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/11/2002 at 2:29:45 AM
Ben-- you got more of a reply than I did when I posed the same question about a month ago!

Now.. the pre-1960s catalogues I have for Raleigh did NOT use this "DL" prefix. They had simply "Model no. 1" or "No. 1" but all Raleigh-made cycles (including Rudge, Humber) had model numbers. Nor was this DL prefix found on Carlton or Lenton machines. So your or other's guesses are as good as mine...

P.C. Kohler, pondering whether he'll be riding his Raleigh DL-1, his Rudge no. 124 or no. 111 tomorrow..

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   raleigh-DL posted by Chris on 8/11/2002 at 4:37:44 PM
I'm stumped on this one too. But the last L as in D.L.1.L. means ladies, as in ladies frame.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh-DL posted by Chris on 8/11/2002 at 4:54:50 PM
The factory and the shops called the bike a D.L.1. but, the customer knew it as a "Raleigh Tourist" then for awhile, it was called the "Royal Roadster" then they stoped making it.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dunelt or Campy with Reynolds 531 posted by: modestmike on 8/10/2002 at 11:15:43 PM
first thing is i want to suck-up to all you folks out there, this site seems to be full of knowledgeable people.


i have a few questions for you:

1. do you know if Dunelt had any frames built by Campagnolo?

i have a nickel or chrome framed 12 speed with a Dunelt badge on the head tube and "Brev. Campagnolo" stamped on the rear dropouts. the bottom bracket hanger has "L2893" stamped on the bottom. the frame has a "Reynolds 531" tubing decal. just about all the components are early "Campy" with some Shimano and Ijin thrown in.

2. i'm trying to date the frame. i looked in the serial numbers on this site, but did not find anything that resembled my "L" series and have not received any responces from e-mail to Campagnolo.

3. do you think this is a nickel plated or chrome plated frame?

. is this possibly a "Campy" frame and some joker attached a Dunelt badge?

any info you can provide is appreciated, pics can be seen at http://www.selectivecollectibles.com/misc.htm

thanks,
modestmike@hotmail.com


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dunelt or Campy with Reynolds 531 posted by Mark R. on 8/11/2002 at 2:32:08 AM
No, the frames were never made by Campagnolo, and I don't believe Campy ever made frames at all, but the drop outs certainly were. Many bike frames have campy drop-outs and fittings. The Dunelt could easily have been assembled with Campy components, but I'd bet many of your components were added on as up-grades.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dunelt or Campy with Reynolds 531 posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/11/2002 at 5:34:02 PM
The bike was built with Campy dropouts, the best kind available. This way, the bike was all set to use Campy derailer equipment.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   D-L, D/L, D.L etc posted by: Matthew on 8/10/2002 at 8:50:36 PM
Okay lets have a go at the best D-L derivation. We had Deluxe and Dead limey (brake performance in the wet) we could have Dead lucky too onthe same point. Come on folks give us your ideas1 What does D-L mean? The best entry wins ...... bags of admiration.
Matthew.:-}


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   D-L, D/L, D.L etc posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/11/2002 at 12:12:56 AM
D.L. : Decidely Lovely

P.C. Kohler

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   D-L, D/L, D.L etc posted by David on 8/11/2002 at 2:42:38 PM
But it could be ANYTHING (or nothing!), someone's name, even. (Remember Aston-Martin cars; David Brown's DBR-1, DB-2, DB-5, etc.) I don't think we'll know unless someone with inside info steps up.






WANTED:   Reynolds 531 Roadster? posted by: Dick on 8/10/2002 at 8:23:35 PM
I don't usually hang out on the roadster area. I don't even own one. I have a 5-3-1 fettish. If I could find a roadster with a larger frame (23"+) made of quality tubes and lugs, I'd be interested. Does such a bike exist? What should I look for?


   RE:WANTED:   Reynolds 531 Roadster? posted by Ken on 8/11/2002 at 10:18:12 PM
I don't think a 531 Roadster was ever made. Roadster frames are very strong, but i don't think there was need for "light and strong". Components for these machines were all steel and HEAVY, my DL1 with accessories weigh's in at 47+ lbs. You could take a Raleigh International frame, then build it up with Rod brakes, etc. one of a kind? Yes, but it still would weigh 35 plus!

   RE:WANTED:   Reynolds 531 3-speed? posted by Dick on 8/12/2002 at 2:33:34 PM
I see that I've already gotten myself in trouble here. I'm definitely not looking for a "lightweight" DL1! I'm looking for a lightweight 3 or 4 speed hub-geared 26" wheeled bike constructed of quality lugs and tubes. I take it that what I want is not a "roadster". What do you call what I'm looking for?

   RE:RE:WANTED:   Reynolds 531 3-speed? posted by smg on 8/13/2002 at 4:42:12 PM
What you're thinking of is called a "club" bike or "clubman" and is a racer/tourer fitted with internal gears or fixed/freewheel single-speeds instead of a derailleur system. British riders were slower to adopt the derailleur, and such bikes were apparently common up into the 1950s. Go to a site called "Ninesprings" and you'll see a sampling, including a beautiful 1949 Raleigh "Record Ace" that so far has inspired me to assemble two replicas using mid-70s Raleigh "Super Course" frames and various Sturmey hubs. (The dream is to find a full-531 frame with plain rear dropouts.) Until then the partial-531 DL-100s are a lot of fun for both commuting and pleasure riding. I do admit that 3 to 5 internal gears can't be anything other than a compromise, but there's something endearing about the clean-looking drivetrain.

Easiest way to get started would be to have a wheel with an AW hub built for whatever available lightweight with horizontal dropouts you have, and see if you like the results. If so, you can then think about coming up with something more permanent/elegant.

I don't think you're going to have much luck with 26" wheels, though. The available frames will all have been designed for tubular, 700C, or 27" wheels in mind, and you might have trouble fitting brakes. I finally decided to break down and join the modern 700C world with this project, and have come very close to having problems with brake reach.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Shipping a Pashley posted by: Mike on 8/10/2002 at 2:32:40 PM
I would like to ship a fully assembled and boxed (i.e. large and heavy) Pashley bicycle from the West Coast to the East Coast. So far, I've found that Amtrak is the only carrier that will accept such a package. Anyone have other suggestions, especially motor freight? Thanks...


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Shipping a Pashley posted by Stacey on 8/10/2002 at 3:52:21 PM
Yeah, partially disassemble the bike! Take off the front wheel, fender, handlebars, seat and pedals. Then it will fit in a standard bicycle box (obtainable at your local bike shop, usually free) then you can ship the whole shebang via UPS/FedEx coast to coast for around $50.00.

There wiil probably be enough savings to pay a bike shop on the other end to build it for you.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Shipping a Pashley posted by Mike on 8/11/2002 at 1:21:46 AM
Close, but no Kewpie doll. The Pashley has a 24" frame. Too big for most bike boxes even with the wheel, fenders, etc. removed. Hell, I'm going to use Amtrak. $47 coast to coast. Can't beat that. Plus, I'm not gambling that the drones at FedEx and UPS will trash it!

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Shipping a Pashley posted by David on 8/11/2002 at 2:35:50 PM
I've checked out shipping tandems and Amtrak seems to be the best big bike bet by far (how's that for alliteration?). If your dropoff and pickup points are served by Amtrak it will be MUCH cheaper for anything over UPS' max size. Regular size bikes; ship UPS.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Just Posted late 60's Sport for sale posted by: Al on 8/10/2002 at 2:11:08 AM
I just posted on all original late 60's Raleigh Sport for sale - $75 or best offer. Check the For Sale Discussion Area if interested or contact me for more information.







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   1956 AutoMoto posted by: Lane on 8/10/2002 at 12:17:02 AM
It's not English but it is a roadster. I have just found a AutoMoto Bicycle. Made in France. Badge shows AutoMoto name as a racing bicycle with rider and has 3 leaf clover? below. Have not been able to find anything out on it. Any information would be helpful. Very nice deep red color with really nice gold pin striping. Aluminum rear fender with red bands on each side and steel rack painted to match attached to fender with supports to rear of frame. Front fender missing but fork has brace holes in behind axle and above axle as well. The line are very nice with long sweeping fork. Also missing chain guard but attachments shoe it was not a chaincase. The frame and fork appear to be large enough to fit 27" wheels Has a Sturmey Archer AW dated 1956 with 26 X 1 3/8 Rigida rims. Front hub is rusty but looks like NEW-STA stamped. Cable Rear BEBO brake and lever and English made fronts ( probably replace, looks like Hercules style). AVA Stem. Brooks B-15 seat. Plan is to rebuild to ride. Geometry may make it a nice ride. Thanks


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   1956 AutoMoto posted by Drew on 8/11/2002 at 12:07:50 PM
Yes, the seldom discussed French roadster. I have a 1951 La Perle, SA 3-spd., 26x11/2 demi balloon tires, amazing aluminum Art Deco fenders w/ bullet headlight, chain guard. It's all original except someone put an English 'Elswick' chain ring on it? The bike is very well made- alloy handle bars, brakes.

   La Perle posted by Sheldon Brown on 8/11/2002 at 4:46:57 PM
I used to own a La Perle too, first bike I ever had with tubulars. I bought it used in the mid-'70s. It was too small for me, so I built clincher wheels for it and gave it to my sister.

I've seen photos of superstar Jacques Anqueteil (first ever 5-time Tour de France winner) riding a La Perle in the early part of his career.

Sheldon Brown
Newtonville, Massachusetts






AGE / VALUE:   MY NEW RALEIGH BIKE... posted by: Mario Romano on 8/9/2002 at 10:33:01 PM
Recently I bought an Raleigh bicycle and I need some information concerning about the approximately year of manufacture. For this purposes, I send below some data I collected at the bicycle for help anybody that can help me:

-WHEELS
Chrome-plated 28" rims named "Dunlop" and a irreadable measure on decimal fraction. The Dunlop and the numbers are engraved on the steel where the brake grips.
-FORK
Is a two tube standard Raleigh fork according Oldroads sources. In the top there are two side holes covered by polished metal buttoms. (pictured as Raleigh fork top at the Oldroads page I posted on the below messages).
-BADGE
Is badged "Raleigh" trademark and "Notthingham, England" manufacture place
-SERIAL CODE NUMBER
Start with two letters "AK" in upper cases and follows five numbers.
-GEAR HUB
Single speed bicycle
-WHEEL HUBS
Drilled with 32 holes (for spokes) at front and 40 holes at rear wheel. The wheel hubs have central holes for greasing/lubrication purposes and a little metalic sheet covering them.
-SADDLE
Is no longer one of the original Brooks saddles, it is actually an vintage brazilian saddle named Cruzeiro (ex-owner add, of course).
-BRAKES
Rod brakes front and rear
-COLOR
Standard factory royal black color with tinny yellow and red stripes all over the frame. The end of the fenders (close to the ground) is painted glare white.
-PEDALS
Appears to be original Raleigh pedals with two "sheets" where the pedal joints with the cranks. There are a little metal cap above the hexagonal nut that locks the inner parts of the pedal.
-HANDLEBAR
Appears to be standard original Raleigh.

Superficially, the bicycle appears with Sheldon Brown's 1953 Raleigh Superbe Roadster. But my bike haven't the total enclosed chainguard or the three-speed internat hub. But looking at Sheldon Brown's Raleigh you will see mine Raleigh.

Thanks!



   RE:AGE / VALUE:   MY NEW RALEIGH BIKE... posted by Warren on 8/10/2002 at 2:22:45 AM
Your bikes appears it may have been built between 1961 and 1965 according to the serial number.

Go to http://www.speakeasy.org/'tabula/raleigh/ and have a look.








AGE / VALUE:   PICTURE FROM THE TOP OF THE FORK posted by: Mario Romano on 8/9/2002 at 10:26:57 PM
This is the picture from the top of the fork. Note: is the RALEIGH fork, not the Rudge or the fork of the big bicycle exploded view!

http://www.oldroads.com/mn1.gif







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Cycles of Yesteryear: any experience with these? posted by: David Poston on 8/9/2002 at 9:58:20 PM
On the suggestion of Tim Powell, I checked out this website:

http://www.cyclesofyesteryear.com

Wow! What a lot of used, reconditioned, and even replica English 3-speeds! Has anyone ordered from these people? I'm wondering how their replicas would compare to original English cycles (e.g. Raleigh, Rudge, etc.).

David


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Cycles of Yesteryear: any experience with these? posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/11/2002 at 5:02:00 PM
I just pushed my chair back, got up and danced around the room for joy. About time I see this! An actual shop, that is working to preserve the cycling heritage. They are putting them back together, setting right what time and neglect has put wrong.
This is excellent!

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Cycles of Yesteryear: any experience with these? posted by Anon on 8/11/2002 at 9:19:28 PM
Please be aware that whilst the quality of the product from this workshop appears to be absolutely excellent, and I have no personal experience of the company, this is not the cheapest way to purchase a genuine English cycle. I feel the prices are set at the upper end of the market particularly over eager stateside collectors. Don't be put off but do be aware. Bargains are elsewhere.
Anon.






AGE / VALUE:   MY NEW RALEIGH BIKE... posted by: Mario Romano on 8/9/2002 at 8:55:23 PM
Recently I bought an Raleigh bicycle and I need some information concerning about the approximately year of manufacture. For this purposes, I send below some data I collected at the bicycle for help anybody that can help me:

-WHEELS
Chrome-plated 28" rims named "Dunlop" and a irreadable measure on decimal fraction. The Dunlop and the numbers are engraved on the steel where the brake grips.
-FORK
Is a two tube standard Raleigh fork according Oldroads sources. In the top there are two side holes covered by polished metal buttoms.
-BADGE
Is badged "Raleigh" trademark and "Notthingham, England" manufacture place
-SERIAL CODE NUMBER
Start with two letters "AK" in upper cases and follows five numbers.
-GEAR HUB
Single speed bicycle
-WHEEL HUBS
Drilled with 32 holes (for spokes) at front and 40 holes at rear wheel. The wheel hubs have central holes for greasing/lubrication purposes and a little metalic sheet covering them.
-SADDLE
Is no longer one of the original Brooks saddles, it is actually an vintage brazilian saddle named Cruzeiro (ex-owner add, of course).
-BRAKES
Rod brakes front and rear
-COLOR
Standard factory royal black color with tinny yellow and red stripes all over the frame. The end of the fenders (close to the ground) is painted glare white.
-PEDALS
Appears to be original Raleigh pedals with two "sheets" where the pedal joints with the cranks. There are a little metal cap above the hexagonal nut that locks the inner parts of the pedal.
-HANDLEBAR
Appears to be standard original Raleigh.

Superficially, the bicycle appears with Sheldon Brown's 1953 Raleigh Superbe Roadster. But my bike haven't the total enclosed chainguard or the three-speed internat hub. But looking at Sheldon Brown's Raleigh you will see mine Raleigh.

Thanks!