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Archived: English Roadsters







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   NEEDED INFORMATION... posted by: Mario Romano on 8/14/2002 at 12:22:31 AM
I need to know the trademark of the original english roadsters wheel locker. It is Avon, Metro or anything else? I have a picture of my Rudge Kustom at http://ciganobikes.vilabol.uol.com.br and soon I will provide yours with some pics from my new Raleigh Club (?) for more acurate informations on dating the bike.







AGE / VALUE:   Riding the B.S.A. shaking my head at another idiot posted by: Chris on 8/13/2002 at 10:38:49 PM
The B.S.A with the reverse brake leavers is in my grubby hands at last.
Dispite another idiot saying "Don't sell that to Chris, You didn't sell it to Chris did you?" Not that one with those rare leavers!

It's mine anyways! The seller didn't want to wait and I was there the next day before the idiot could raise funds. I didn't even have to reach in the rare parts box of mine and trade anything.
Now if this guy ever asks me to part with it I'll say "No!"
and Sorry..... Can't help you.
I don't know where these undeserved crappy attitudes come from. I love these B.S.A.'s and will treat it well. It's not like I'll go hopping curbs with it and abuse it.
Some people just choose for no reason at all to be an idiot.
If the seller is an abrasive idiot, and painful to talk with, I send over a friend and he buys it and then later after it's overhauled and detailed he decides to sell it to, to, Oh, lemmee see "Oh Yes,....... That Chris character that you don't like." (ME!!!) We can let him learn later that "Oh, Yes, Chris and I go way back. Why?"
Over pizza I ask "What IS his problem?"

This is better as I'm not stressed over the bad experience of having to deal with the jerk.
My pal and I talk bikes and I relate stories of teeth pulling experiences I went through to buy this one or that one.
Usually, everything is nice and pleasent.


   RE:AGE / VALUE: Riding the B.S.A. shaking my head at another idiot posted by Randy on 8/15/2002 at 4:52:00 AM
Chris, do you have (or can get access to) a digital camera and if so, would you be willing to take some snaps of the levers (apart while you're working on the bike, preferably!) I need to reproduce a pair of reverse brake levers for my Faux-Pedersen project (since I have not been able to find a real steel pair in several years of looking--I did buy a pair of modern aluminum ones "for the interim") Thanks in any case.

Randy






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Shipping bikes across the big pond posted by: David Poston on 8/13/2002 at 7:37:53 PM
This website, www.cyclesofyesteryear.com, sounds like a goldmine.

They offer a wide range of choices:

reconditioned roadsters, cable or rod-braked, with original parts wherever possible, chrome replated, repainted, everything in like new condition

a long list of used roadsters in varying condition and age (they have many old ones from the 1920's), some are serviced while others are not

their own original roadster, made to look 1930's, with rod brakes, enclosed chainguard, etc.

I'm just wondering what it costs to ship these across the big pond...

David


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Shipping bikes across the big pond posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/13/2002 at 8:01:47 PM
Too good to be true? Possibly. I sent a query off to them, noting the website has not been updated for more than a year. So all of the listed used cycles are unavailable. They promise to send me an updated list. As for their reconditioned/rebuilt machines, don't know. Still, it's a great site and an even better concept.

Shipping: up to them of course, but figure £100 or approx $150.

P.C. Kohler






MISC:   WHAT'S ORIGINAL? posted by: Mario Romano on 8/13/2002 at 6:32:18 PM
What is the original trademark of the standard 1950-1960 english roadsters wheel lock (mounted on the frame, below to the saddle)? The standard original trademark is Avon or Metro?


   RE:MISC:   WHAT'S ORIGINAL? posted by sam on 8/13/2002 at 8:34:33 PM
Mario,I had to go back and look at that "ugly"orange humber,sorry I been bussy with other things.It's a very interesting bike.Can't say much on the color,but that frame is wonderful.The front slopping top tube started in the early 1900s.Infact your friend has done a good job on all these bikes.I like the full curve hocky stick guard.






AGE / VALUE:   1955 Female Humber posted by: Lisa on 8/13/2002 at 5:47:08 PM
I have an 1955, 3 spd. 26"wheel light blue, female Humber bicycle.
I am looking for an approx. value. It is in fair to good condition and rideable.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1955 Female Humber posted by Mario Romano on 8/13/2002 at 6:30:26 PM
You must check all parts in search of original parts and mechanical/paintwork wearings. The Humber bicycles have the fork types featured at OldRoads resource pages and five human beings one behind other as sprocket disk cutout pattern. Check this first!

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1955 Female Humber posted by Chris on 8/13/2002 at 10:20:52 PM
Light blue, beautiful!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1955 Female Humber posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/13/2002 at 11:26:35 PM
Is that a double tube type front fork? Where the front wheel goes in, is the fork having two small tubes side by side and they come together?
In that light blue, these are lovely bikes.
150-350.00 in there perhaps. Hard to say.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   DUNLOP RIMS ARE OK? posted by: Mario Romano on 8/13/2002 at 4:37:20 PM
I read at Sheldon Brown's english roadster homepage that the old Club models (used by cyclistic clubs on England) have special lightweight steel rims made by Dunlop. These Dunlop rims was 28" diameter. My bike have this Dunlop rims, so, can I date my bike 1950-1960 or the Dunlop rims was used on other era Raleighs?


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   DUNLOP RIMS ARE OK? posted by Warren on 8/13/2002 at 10:58:23 PM
I would say no. The club bikes had rims that say "Special Lightweight" on them (I think) and do not resemble roadster rims. I should think that 99% of all the rims Dunlop made were steel with first nickel, then chrome plating. Dunlop likely made the majority of bike rims in the world for many different models and countries and you can't date your bike based on having Dunlops 28" Endrick, Westwood or Westrick rims.

There was an early 28 X 1 1/14 Dunlop race rim that wasn't necessarily stainless. These were huge rims...I think the bead was 647mm...it is not listed on Sheldon's web pages. If you have these rims you won't find tires for them and you can be sure that your bike was made before 1960. Always use the bead size as your guide...there are no less than three different 28" rims I can think of...several 26" rims etc.


   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   DUNLOP RIMS ARE OK? posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/13/2002 at 11:50:53 PM
Heaven, Mario's in heaven... Finding all sorts of heavenly bikes and parts. Heaven..
Ok!

I'm not disagreeing with anything Warren said.
Dunlop made a lot of difrent rims.
I have a 26 X 1 3/8 Westwood rod brake rim and it is narower than the basic 26 X 1 3/6 rim. These rims go on my Hercules mens bike and they are cool rims. Very fast rims. If there is such a thing in the rod brake world.

The 27 X 1 1 /4 rims on my Record Ace say Dunlop Special Stainless Steel Lightweight.
Mario, you are lucky to be finding any rim made by Dunlop.

To learn that "strange tires" are out there lurking like the Loche Ness Monster or Ogo Pogo and being spotted by sober witnesses of upstanding character is scarry.
Here I am thinking there is nothing that has not been already done and mentioned by Sheldon's table guide on tire size.
Just when you thought you have covered it all, up pops something else!

Pictures! Haul it up, bring it in! We wanna see it and look it over!
Dunlop had great plating and these were solid and fine quality. No cheap garbage ever wore the Dunlop name. The fact that these say Dunlop means it is "solid quality" I'll be off on vacation for two weeks, trying to keep sand out of my hybrid derailer chain mechanism.






FOR SALE:   eBay: Vintage English Hopper/Humber 3 Speed posted by: Chris on 8/13/2002 at 5:01:39 AM
Hello Matthew,
Thanks for your reply on 8/2 about the Hopper bicycle. It turns out that I looked to quickly and mistook the HOPPER letters in the chain ring for a Raliegh design. The front decal also says "Barton on Humber." The bike appears to be circa 1944 or 1953. Anyway, I decided to try selling this bicycle on eBay. Here's the link if you are interested:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2130863222


   RE:FOR SALE:   eBay: Vintage English Hopper/Humber 3 Speed posted by Ed on 8/13/2002 at 1:06:02 PM
Interesting bike. I believe that it more likely dates from 1953rather than 1944. I base this on condition and the fact that I believe that Queen Elizabeth was crowned in 1952. they have recently celebrated the fiftith anaversery of her reign. Good luck with the auction.

   RE:FOR SALE:   eBay: Vintage English Hopper/Humber 3 Speed posted by David on 8/13/2002 at 1:41:32 PM
It's certainly 1953. ERII was crowned 2/6/52 and the "44" number is where we'd expect to find an ordinary serial number. Chris might want to put the tire size (26 x 1 3/8 almost certainly) in the listing - that "23 inch" mention might mislead someone.

   RE:FOR SALE:   eBay: Vintage English Hopper/Humber 3 Speed posted by Chris on 8/14/2002 at 7:59:20 PM
Ed & David, thanks for the info. I revised my listing on eBay. And I gave a nod to this discussion area too!
This is now in the listing: (Thanks to members of the oldroads.com Vintage Bicycle Discussion Area for their help with this listing).






AGE / VALUE:   Men's Raleigh Sports: $40 posted by: Kevin C. on 8/13/2002 at 2:45:37 AM
There's a nice, men's 1977 Raleigh Sports on eBay right now that can be bought outright for $40 under the "Buy It Now" option. Not my bike, and I don't know the seller.







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   GIVE A LOOK AT THIS BICYCLES... posted by: Mario Romano on 8/13/2002 at 12:20:45 AM
After I refused my friend tryings of sell me the "ghastly" orange "Humber", the man continued to offering me new bicycles. Now I'am really confused because these bicycles are not orange and appeared really english-made bicycles. Anybody could give me some comments on these bicycles?

Raleigh 28 Wheels, year 1949
http://www.bicicletasantigas.com.br/fotos/i007-a.jpg
Hercules 28 Wheels, year 1947
http://www.bicicletasantigas.com.br/fotos/i006-a.jpg
Humber 28 Wheels, year 1953
http://www.bicicletasantigas.com.br/fotos/i008-a.jpg


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   GIVE A LOOK AT THIS BICYCLES... posted by David on 8/13/2002 at 3:25:30 AM
Anything's possible, but they all look too darn new for 50-year-old bikes. The Raleigh and the Hercules look like 26" wheels not 28". The angle on the Humber makes it hard to tell very much at all. Have you seen these bikes? Or only photographs?






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   GIVE A LOOK AT THIS BICYCLE... posted by: Mario Romano on 8/13/2002 at 12:20:45 AM
After I refused my friend tryings of sell me the "ghastly" orange "Humber", the man continued to offering me new bicycles. Now I'am really confused because this bicycles are not orange and appeared really english-made bicycles. Anybody could give me some comments on these bicycles?

Raleigh 28 Wheels, year 1949
http://www.bicicletasantigas.com.br/fotos/i007-a.jpg
Hercules 28 Wheels, year 1947
http://www.bicicletasantigas.com.br/fotos/i006-a.jpg
Humber 28 Wheels, year 1953
http://www.bicicletasantigas.com.br/fotos/i008-a.jpg







AGE / VALUE:   C.W.S. Cycle Works( forgot what the S was for) posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/13/2002 at 12:04:57 AM
Ladies frame "Cycle Works" Bicycle. Smaller tube on top, Tysley, England
Not a Raleigh, in any way. The headtube has a curve over and around the inner ball bearing races one on top and one on bottom. It takes tiny 1/8 bearings. It's a neat bike, my pal save it, and it was in the garage loft where I found it and dragged it home. After a full overhaul it rides like a dream.
The cranks are Williams and they are lovely. Chromed steel

I wish it was a mens frame, a taller mens frame and it could have been rod brake. Still, I love it. Someday I hope to get a peek at other bikes to come from this company. For now, at least as I'm concerned it's still in the "Two Wheel Twilight Zone" as I know nothing about it.

The decal that says "Made in England" is beautiful!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   C.W.S. Cycle Works( forgot what the S was for) posted by phil nalrite (not today) on 8/13/2002 at 2:32:43 AM
you like your smaller manufacturers don't you?I was able to drag up some paperwork from the courts of london about charles twigg&co.the sturmey archer hub is a fw.the little i read it appeared as if c.t. & co. breached a contract and the buyer held all the bikes without payment.twigg&cco. went bankrupt the next year.pictures may appear next couple of days.dunlop rims/tires CLEAN MACHINE need to sell to fund other projects.trade optional.pictures were filed in database 08/11/02 there's a band whose singer rides an ace.funkin groovy surfer style music "return of the ace" www.acecafelondon.com fun funn funnnkee sounds

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   C.W.S. Cycle Works( forgot what the S was for) posted by Peter on 8/13/2002 at 12:41:24 PM
I always thought it stood for 'Co-operative Wholesale Society' , known over here as the 'Co-op', still going strong as a supermarket chain but not making bikes any more.
Peter.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   C.W.S. Cycle Works( forgot what the S was for) posted by Matthew on 8/13/2002 at 8:26:24 PM
Yes, Peter is right. Co-operative Wholesale Society, a good old fashioned socialist organisation founded in Manchester and owned by each of its members. Still going today but alas not making cycles. Tysley is, I think, the part of Manchester where the works were situated, but I could be wrong on this. The cycles were also, earlier, sold as 'Federal' models. I have seen several including trade bikes (cycle trucks?). Usually well made budget cycles for the masses. Certainly an unusual and rare find in your neck of the woods. I can't imagine that the Co-op ever exported cycles but it might have come over with a home coming GI or student. Yet another E.R. hits the road again Hoorah!
Matthew

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   C.W.S. Cycle Works( forgot what the S was for) posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/13/2002 at 10:26:22 PM
It says "Cycle Works" on the round brass badge and Tysley, England.
I love reading all this, it's interesting!






AGE / VALUE:   I lost; no wonder. posted by: David Poston on 8/12/2002 at 11:45:15 PM
I lost. This has to be the highest selling DL-1 on ebay yet.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1849265036&r=0&t=0&showTutorial=0&ed=1029194716&indexURL=0&rd=1


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   I lost; no wonder. posted by Mike on 8/13/2002 at 12:09:33 AM
Especially for one that isn't authentic.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   I lost; no wonder. posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/13/2002 at 12:39:52 AM
Before e- bay, I sold these this high and up to $1000.00 and without all the tasty accessory candy this one has on it. Much harder today, it does not go this high usually anymore.
Personally, for me this confirms that I was not out of my head when I paid 675.00 for a locking fork model Superbe 28 from 1957 in mint shape.

There is a mixing of accesory parts between years to dress up this bike and that's why the other post said it was not authentic. It odd.
The bike itself is from 1975 BUT, it is mint condition, and that is not easy to find, no small accomplishment.

The Dunlop saddle is the prize, then the enclosed guard, the watch holder is a awesome little piece and you never see these today. The Lucas bell is great too. These Brooks bag holders are from the 1960-s 1970's in there. They move back and forth and scratch the bike. They don't hold worth a darn and are not really functional. No rack? Bummer! I want a beautiful, nice rack complete with leather straps! Where is the matching Sturmey-Archer "Bullet" tail light? It's better than the Lucas light but I'll forgive it because of the stop light. Still, it's been altered. The headlight is called "the flatglass model" The bag is later day, leatherette. Nice but like I said, later day. The older ones are really something. Whomever put this bike together would have put an older bag on it if they could be found.
I hope whoever won the bid takes most excellent care of it and for mercy's sake please don't dent that enclosed chainguard or the mudguards.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   I lost; no wonder. posted by Chris on 8/13/2002 at 12:46:14 AM
Why no trigger shifter on the handlebar? I don't wanna reach down to shift.

First thing I'd do is upgrade that rear hub. I love a four speed!

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   I lost; no wonder. posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/13/2002 at 12:56:27 AM
$700! For an dossed up DL-1 with a rubber saddle and an odd, inauthentic downtube shifter? A fellow collector in my apartment building (can you believe two English bike freaks under the same roof?!) took a look at this and said: "contrived". Not mutton dressed as lamb, but still...

$155 for a dynohub even with 40 holes?

It is indeed SILLY SEASON!

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   I lost; no wonder. posted by John Bayless on 8/13/2002 at 2:32:38 AM
Yeah, almost as silly as paying $7.95 for a nickel's worth of 20-weight motor oil.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   I lost; no wonder. posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/13/2002 at 3:46:38 AM
Ouch.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   I lost; no wonder. posted by Drew on 8/13/2002 at 11:42:17 AM
All it takes is two hyper bidders, one of them placed 15 bids?,....more coffee please! I would spent the money on something more interesting, like a roadster from the 40's maybe. Boy do I feel lucky having found my nearly unused '74 Tourist for $45.00!






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynamo vs. dynohub: Education needed here posted by: David Poston on 8/12/2002 at 4:18:10 AM
Can someone please educate me on the difference between dynamo vs. dynohub lighting? How do they work mechanically? How do you install them? Which was used when? Which is more efficient?

I am thinking about retrofitting a late 70's DL-1 to look like a pre-war bike. What kind of lighting system should I look for? I have heard about a Miller dynamo system that generates voltage off the back wheel? The only thing is that I'm dreading the possibility of having to rebuild an entire wheel, which I understand is necessary to install a dynohub.

Any and all comments welcome.

David


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynamo vs. dynohub: Education needed here posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/12/2002 at 3:48:20 PM
David

Dynohub vs. dynamo: same principal, just different. Dynohub is a dynamo integral with the hub either rear hub (combined with a 3 or 4-speed hub) or front hub (GH6). Benefits: no friction, noiseless, no tyre wear and let’s face it, dynohubs are the paragon of English cycling fitments. Disadvantage: yes, you’d have to have the existing wheel rebuilt. Less of a problem than finding the dynohub, lamps, wiring harness and sundries. Remember with a DL-1, you need a 36-hole front dynohub, not the common 32-hole one. Last one on eBay sold for, and get this: $155 with 26 bids! Easier to find a rear 40-hole dynothree hub. That’s what I’m doing with my own DL-1. Hub cost me $50 but the lamps, wiring harness and battery tube cost twice that! Then add $45 plus to rebuild the wheel. As Everett Dirkson said, pretty soon you’re talking real money.

Dynohubing is way cool. You feel like you need a cigarette after you’ve wheeled about piercing the dark producing those measly 3 amps. Even better if you have the “accumulator” battery case fitted with the “Filter Switch Unit” so your lamps glow even when stationary. You WANT a red light or stop sign just to show off.

Dynamos: easy to find, fit and use. Some real classic ones appear on eBay: Millers (common), some gorgeous Lucas and Philips ones occasionally (cost a bomb). No fitting worries. Work well. Friction yes. Tyre wear: yes. Whirring noise: yes (which I rather like). But not a major concern unless you ride all night. I used a French (horrors!) Soubitez on my DL-1 for years.

Now.. David why would you want to retrofit a DL-1 to “30s condition”? A DL-1 is as timeless a machine as there is out there. I’d be hard-pressed to advise what you’d have to add/delete to achieve this goal. Strip off the nasty DOT reflectors, maybe find pedals without reflectors... that’s about it. Decals or transfers? Well the early Raleighs had practically none anyway. Gearcase: fit if you can find. Maybe invest the money and buy one of the magnificent pre-war Lucas generator sets you see on eBay occasionally. Me, I’d leave the thing alone. Classics don’t need tinkering with. Just my two cents.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynamo vs. dynohub: Education needed here posted by edgarecks on 8/12/2002 at 5:24:48 PM
Also, there is a type of dynamo that rubs on the "tread" of the tire instead of the side. I have one each made by Sanyo and Union, both work nicely. Some noise, but way less friction.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynamo vs. dynohub: Education needed here posted by Steve on 8/12/2002 at 6:45:56 PM
I must have lucked out, last year I purchased a 36 hole Dynohub with lights(dated 11/73) in A1 condition for $66. It realy makes my '74 Tourist complete, though the steering is a bit heavy, these hubs must weigh over 5 lbs.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynamo vs. dynohub: Education needed here posted by Robert on 8/12/2002 at 7:16:20 PM
I have considered getting a dynohub a number of times , but have always changed my mind because there are no axle cones available. At least that is what I have been told. My solution was to go to the "bottle style" dynamo. With my setup there is nno discernable tire wear. And there is less friction. You accomplish this by going to your local builders suppy "Home Depot". Go to the electrical dept. and look for the black rubber grommets that are normally used to pass wires through sheetmetal without cutting the wires. There look like little black rubber donuts. They are packed 3 or so to a package for about $2.00. For me the ones that were 5/8 inside diameter fit snuggly over the wheel on the dynamo. Using these the generator turns easier and is almost silent. Doing this and making sure that the "bottle" is in line with the axle, as specified in the directions, will give you good service . The only negative is that the light is dim for a little longer till you get up to road speed. Hope this helps

Robert

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynamo vs. dynohub: Education needed here posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/12/2002 at 7:29:24 PM
Steve-- you did "luck out"! But I had not even considered the effect on steering with the front mounted GH6. DL-1s can be a chore to steer as it is. Maybe this is why most of DL-1s with dynohubs had the combined rear dynothree or dynofour hubs.

By the way, I found out recently (and of course everyone on this board already knew) that in April 1952 the design of the GH6 was changed from having the adjustable cone go from the left side to right so that's why you see dynohubs on side of a particular machine compared to another. Another factor to consider alas if you're trying to keep everything authentic and "period". My 1949 catalogue also mentions a new and improved dynohub that year with increased output (1/2 an amp I think).

P.C. Kohler

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynamo vs. dynohub: Education needed here posted by David on 8/13/2002 at 2:58:12 AM
Don't most DL1s have 32-spoke front wheels? Mine certainly does, so it could use a "cheap" Dynohub. And a Dynohub, since the massive magnet is at the center of the wheel, should have little effect on the steering. The Dl1 has "slow" handling due to the long wheelbase and frame angles. And last but not least, which end of the axle has the adjustable cone is irrelevant to how the wheel is mounted. It's not like the Raleigh front hub which has the "self-tightening" cone when mounted backwards.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynamo vs. dynohub: Education needed here posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/13/2002 at 4:07:07 AM
My 1978 vintage DL-1 has a 36 hole front wheel and 40 hole back wheel. My 1970 DL-1L has a 32 hole front wheel. Hmmm. Not complaining I can use a "cheap" dynohub as well on her.

As for steering, I guess I was worried about the added weight.

Information on mounting the two versions of Dynohub from the Sturmey Archer manuals can be found on:

http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/'hadland/samaintind.htm


P.C. Kohler

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Dynamo vs. dynohub: Education needed here posted by Steve on 8/13/2002 at 11:28:09 AM
The steering just feels heavier than before I added the Dynohub, boy does it stay straight as an arrow on the open road though!






AGE / VALUE:   Kalkoff Roadster posted by: Mark on 8/11/2002 at 10:42:34 PM
ebay #2129999128, I just wish he would start it at $50 and led bidders set the price. If this is a 30's German bike, shouldn't it have the DAF symbol (German Labour Front), which controlled manufacturing of bikes in Nazi Germany. Must be a strong bike, their roads were horrible, pot holes, rocks and mud. Few cycles survived.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Kalkoff Roadster posted by Chris on 8/14/2002 at 12:10:54 AM
I wonder if there are bikes out there with that aweful Nazi symbol on them. I mean, people paint and decorate bikes and they had that symbol on everything, everywhere for awhile before it was all pulled down and burned and covered up with dirt. It would be chilling to find one, I mean an authentic German bike from this time with that symbol anywhere on it.
Even so, WEould it be listed on an internet auction site for all of us to see?






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   English DL1's ? posted by: Art Hill on 8/11/2002 at 9:49:45 PM
I just found a Old Roads post from Oct. 2000 discussing that if a 1970's Dl1's had a stylized "R" on the seat tube, this meant the frame was built in Asia along with some of the other parts. Then sent to England to be painted, stickered, and built up. I know Raleigh had factories all over the World...is there any truth to this post of two years ago, any replies & info helpful, just looking for the facts concerning DL's made for the US market.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   English DL1's ? posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/12/2002 at 1:59:14 AM
Dead wrong, at least to my knowledge. ALL Raleighs had that nasty "R" from the mid 70s to the end. And ALL DL-1 frames were made in Nottingham and nothing, to my knowledge, was made in Asia on these machines. The tyres were Austrian towards the end, the pedals and kickstands German and the rest British. DL-1 type frames were made in Nottingham and shipped to Denmark and the Netherlands etc. through the 1980s. Now, Raleigh did have factories around the world but there was no "funny business" here: if it said "Made in England" on the frame, it meant just that. Raleigh made some Sports in Canada or at least assembled them there. Ditto the Netherlands. But when that happened, the frame was clearly so marked. The Canadian assembled bikes were, with apologies to our friends in the great Dominion to the north... crap!

So relax, if you have a DL-1, she's British born and bred.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   English DL1's ? posted by Chris on 8/13/2002 at 10:33:50 PM
Canadian bikes will say "Assembled in Canada." on the bike.
Canada was a huge source for English parts.
Huge!
This inexperienced,young, whippersnapper, hit gold and nearly killed himself dragging it all home.
Oh, Canada!
What memmories! What fun!