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Archived: English Roadsters







AGE / VALUE:††† posted by: Mark R. on 8/6/2002 at 2:07:46 PM
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1849265036
Check it out!







AGE / VALUE:†††So manny different tyres posted by: sam on 8/6/2002 at 2:33:26 AM
To day I found a set of roadester tyres 28X1&1/2 in the giant stud pattern.These are advertized in Mead catalogs from 1910-to-1939.Only the mead tyres are single tube and these are tube type.These differ from the avon pattern studded I've found earler.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:†††So manny different tyres posted by phil nalrite on 8/7/2002 at 4:38:12 AM
sam,thanks for your reply to my post in the baloon tire and middleweights.I have a bike that i think might be a mead ranger.where can i find info on meads?is the neck on these bikes unique?this bike matches the pictures of a mead ranger i've seen online.pedals,sprocket,handlebars, and paint pattern.if it is a mead where would i find the serial #'s.do you know much about elgins?

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:†††So manny different tyres posted by sam on 8/8/2002 at 3:17:12 PM
phil,I'll get back to you next week on this , i'm on vac and not on my computer.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:†††So manny different tyres posted by ken on 8/8/2002 at 7:56:52 PM
Phil, I'll watch this one with interest- there are a few old Meads around. Sam has helped me out more than once too. You may have discovered that the repro singletube tires cost an arm and a leg... let me know if you want to see a pic of a ca. 1920 Pathfinder.






MISC:†††WHAT'S GOING WRONG HERE? posted by: highphysics@yahoo.com.br on 8/6/2002 at 12:57:10 AM
I posted an message about "rust on my rims" and no one replied it! What's going wrong here, the people who enters this forum select who's will get replies in a discriminatory way? I send my doubts and no one reply me, what miseducation of the people who frequents this forum and know the answer!!! I feel myself as some kind of "invisible man" at Oldroads english roadsters forum!!!!!


   RE:MISC:†††WHAT'S GOING WRONG HERE? posted by Mr. Bike Boy on 8/6/2002 at 1:43:25 AM
I believe there are a few responses. I hope you will be patient with this often absent minded lot. They mean weel, but are often lunkheads!

   RE:MISC:†††WHAT'S GOING WRONG HERE? posted by Mr. Bike Boy on 8/6/2002 at 1:44:16 AM
I believe there are a few responses. I hope you will be patient with this often absent minded lot. They mean well
, but are often lunkheads!

   RE:MISC:†††WHAT'S GOING WRONG HERE? posted by Fred on 8/6/2002 at 2:39:20 AM
Some times we overlook some of the common questions that crop up frequently. We need to be more senstive to questions that are old hat to some and realize that we can't expect everyone to know everything. I didn't see your original query but have been guilty in the past. Here is how I deal with rust. If it is light rust any good compound will do. If the rust is more than light, but not deeply pitted, I use Brasso, (you old army vets should know what that is) and 0000 steel wool. I would use brass or copper wool but I never see it. Heavy rust, I just sigh and wish it wasn't so. You can use acidic chemical removers e.g., Navel Jelly, but I don't reccomend it. If you leave it on too long it will turn any remaining chrome black. Small parts can be completely de-rusted by immersing them for a couple of days in Oxalic acid mixed with water. This is a very weak acid and is quite safe. Oxalic acid does not affect the chrome or any substrate material at all. I hope this helps. Don't give up on this bunch. There is more knowledge and good will here than you can imagine.

   RE:MISC: WHAT'S GOING WRONG HERE? posted by Sheldon Brown on 8/6/2002 at 2:53:35 AM
Dreadfully, dreadfully sorry that you didn't get the instant answer you were owed by everybody on the list. How could we all have been so derelict in fulfilling our duty to your lordship?

I'll see to it that your money is refunded in full. You might be wise to take your business elsewhere in the future so you'll get your money's worth more promptly.

Steel rims are chromium plated, that's why they're shiny. With age and brake usage, the chromium eventually wears off, and once the bare steel is exposed there is no way to prevent further rusting. On the bright side, a rim with a rusty braking surface stops better in the rain than a nice shiny one! ;-)

There are many chrome polishes available at automotive stores, but most of them will contain wax or other materials that are likely to degrade braking if you use them on the sides of your rims.

Sheldon "Lunkhead" Brown

   RE:MISC:†††WHAT'S GOING WRONG HERE? posted by Mark on 8/6/2002 at 5:06:11 AM
I find that powered rotary brushes work very well to clean corrosion from steel rims. The key is to use the appropriate type of brush, so as not to damage the rim finish. There are bronze bristle brushes that won't harm the chrome, but you can also use steel bristles if they're of a fine grade, and ideally already broken in by prior use. A new wire brush is more aggressive. One that's had some use becomes a bit "dulled," and has a gentler action. Pay careful attention to the surfaces while using this method, so that you don't do any harm to the rim. I've had great success using this technique. Done properly, the rims won't be harmed and come out as clean as you'll ever get them.

Also, I've found that rims rusted on the outside surfaces are often even worse on the inside, under the tire. A fairly aggressive steel brush can be use here without as much concern for the finish on the rim.

Brushes such as I'm describing can be mounted on the shaft of a grinder, or you can get an arbor so that they can be chucked in an electric drill. The drill can then be clamped in a vise or to a workbench. Then You're hands are free to hold the rim, or whatever part you're cleaning.

Of course it should go without saying, that you should never use rotary brushes without wearing eye protection. An efficient dust mask is essential too. Work outside if at all possible. The stuff that comes off is not good to breathe.

Lastly, I saw your post earlier today, but I was too busy at the time to write this response. I meant to come back later, and I did as you can see. Try to show people a little more respect, and have some patience. Everyone around here is happy to help, given a fair chance.

Mark

Mark

   RE:MISC:†††WHAT'S GOING WRONG HERE? posted by Mark on 8/6/2002 at 5:10:30 AM
I find that powered rotary brushes work very well to clean corrosion from steel rims. The key is to use the appropriate type of brush, so as not to damage the rim finish. There are bronze bristle brushes that won't harm the chrome, but you can also use steel bristles if they're of a fine grade, and ideally already broken in by prior use. A new wire brush is more aggressive. One that's had some use becomes a bit "dulled," and has a gentler action. Pay careful attention to the surfaces while using this method, so that you don't do any harm to the rim. I've had great success using this technique. Done properly, the rims won't be harmed and come out as clean as you'll ever get them.

Also, I've found that rims rusted on the outside surfaces are often even worse on the inside, under the tire. A fairly aggressive steel brush can be use here without as much concern for the finish on the rim.

Brushes such as I'm describing can be mounted on the shaft of a grinder, or you can get an arbor so that they can be chucked in an electric drill. The drill can then be clamped in a vise or to a workbench. Then You're hands are free to hold the rim, or whatever part you're cleaning.

Of course it should go without saying, that you should never use rotary brushes without wearing eye protection. An efficient dust mask is essential too. Work outside if at all possible. The stuff that comes off is not good to breathe.

Lastly, I saw your post earlier today, but I was too busy at the time to write this response. I meant to come back later, and I did as you can see. Try to show people a little more respect, and have some patience. Everyone around here is happy to help, given a fair chance.

Mark

Mark

   RE:MISC:†††WHAT'S GOING WRONG HERE? posted by Stacey on 8/6/2002 at 2:31:52 PM
Let's all line up to put a big old smooch right on Mr. Romano's posterior! Be at his becon call to drop everything and share with him all knowledge and information we've collectivly gathered over the years.

A reply isn't offered in 24 hours and we're Labeled discriminatory?!?!? A quick archive search of the word "rust" on Mr. Romano's part would have returned numerous valid hits on the topic in question. But NOOOOOOOOOO it's all to easy for him to rehash the same old question, then vilify us all for not responding post haste.

A gross injustice!

   RE:RE:MISC:†††WHAT'S GOING WRONG HERE? posted by Edward in Vancouver on 8/6/2002 at 3:22:11 PM
Oxalic acid, great stuff. Heard about from this very website. Like to tell you how to use it on your rusty rims, but I'm a very impatient person, and don't have the time. Gotta go...
Edward in Vancouver

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:†††WHAT'S GOING WRONG HERE? posted by Christopher on 8/6/2002 at 4:09:02 PM
I believe that they just improved the archive search here at oldroads too. So if you don't want to wait for a thread to develop after you write something, look it up and see what was said.

   Forget rust- related sqabbling- find more Humbers! posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/6/2002 at 5:46:11 PM
Mario, I don't know but it sounds like you are in an area of the world where you can find neat, fun, historical bikes and parts that the rest of us (or some of us) here on the group here would have great difficulty finding.
Go and bring back more cool bikes. Those Humber bikes with split/ double forks. Any more in your your area?
Tell me about your finds. Looks like you steped on Sheldon's toes. That was not a good thing to have happen.
Anyways, I'm wishing I could come and work your territory. You can laugh at me because you are finding goodies I would love to find but cannot. Looks like you are having more fun with this than I am.
-chris

   RE:MISC:†††WHAT'S GOING WRONG HERE? posted by paul on 8/6/2002 at 10:56:49 PM
Mario: I see your postings are under two different names......please "chill out" your first posting immediately drew three replies, and your second which was posted same day drew 10 replies...I think that's quite good..your previous postings have been pleasant, kindly keep your future postings equally cheerful, sincerely, Paul

   RE:MISC:†††WHAT'S GOING WRONG HERE? posted by Matthew on 8/7/2002 at 9:25:22 PM
Only one two things needed to shift all rust; elbow grease (available in large quantities at all cycle workshops, home or commercial) and patience. On of which, at least is lacking in the case in hand. Matthew.

   RE:RE:MISC: WHAT'S GOING WRONG HERE? posted by ken on 8/8/2002 at 8:03:28 PM
uh oh, C. C. Umber got up on the wrong side of the mattress saddle...






AGE / VALUE:†††Motobecane Tri Star posted by: John Hall on 8/5/2002 at 11:11:06 PM
Found, Motobecane Tri Star, 3 speed, Motobecane USA, reading Motobecane approved, made in Taiwan, 3 speed hub is Shimano. Runs very well, relatively light weight for such a bicycle, the steel butting tubes say it is even made to be light tubes; Motobecane Tri Star, Silvery Blue, in very good condition.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:†††Motobecane Tri Star posted by Mark R. on 8/6/2002 at 1:49:51 PM
Can you send a photo?

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:†††Motobecane Tri Star posted by Chris on 8/6/2002 at 5:49:33 PM
I have heard of Schwinn approved, but Motobecane approved? It actually says that on the bike?

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:†††Motobecane Tri Star posted by John on 8/6/2002 at 8:21:42 PM
I will seek to get photos soon. One thing, I didn't say, is it has fenders, all matching the metallic blue paint job (by the way, it seems very likely that though a good paint job, the paint has faded somewhat, it almost seems like it could be a '50s bike I am searching for more info); and definitely reads "Motobecane approved" with the seal the same as at "http://www.motobecane.com/"; a nice leather seat, with rivets as well. After riding it very frequently for three days since finding it at the Thrift store, I may finally take a breather ; however, I ride very high in the saddle on this bike, 27' inch wheels, seems to make it ideal for touring, as far as your regular types of handlebars go vs. the racing sorts of rams horns handlebars. Has got me sold on Three Speeds. Lastly, please have patience, in this discussion. I am not able to accesss a computer as frequently as before.






AGE / VALUE:†††GPO cycles posted by: Matthew on 8/5/2002 at 6:52:10 PM
I'm sorry guys (& gals) but I have to do some illusion shattering. The GPO (general post office) did not use DL-1's. They had a standard cycle design which was introduced in 1929 and was revised in 1989. Just about everyone made post office cycles in batches of a few hundred at a time. Certainly Elswick, New Hudson, CWS, Federal, Townsend and many others made them. They were long wheelbase, single speed, with built in flat carrier at the front (about 18" by 15") which bolts through the top and fornt down tubes. The top tube, or crossbar slopes for the last 6", nearest the saddle, and the forks and fittings are generally heavy duty like any trade cycle (cycletruck) eg 26" X 1.5" rims. In 1989 the new design was built by Pashley who have now moved on to the second (really the third) generation with a more MTB look and feel about it. The first Pashleys had SA hub brakes, an integral stand and SA three speed hub gears. This was a first as all previous GPO cycles had single speed, even the telegraph boys cycles which were a different pattern. There were very, very few ladies models, until the new generation came along. ALL of the remaining fleet of rod braked GPO cycles were scrapped or exported in 2000. They went to third world countries or were cut in two and destroyed. Some ne'er-do-well in the GPO (now Royal Mail) decided that their poor braking performance made them a health and safety risk incompatable with a modern postal delivery service and at the stroke of a pen they were gone. Despite lengthy 'phone calls with people in the right department, I could not secure the safe release of even one cycle for posterity. I did manage to get a few genuine GPO spanners and parts.
I have an early GPO cycle with cottered crank and I use it often. It is painted an awful metallic green 'Hammerite' colour but I have some genuine GPO red for the eventual repaint. It is a low geared joy to ride with the big Brooks B66 saddle. I take it three miles to work and carry all sorts of stuff on it, recently two shovels, across the carrier, great at fending off cars as they whizz by.
I am sorry about shattering the DL-1 postal cycle myth but I am willing to be proved wrong. A life time of observation and solid background information makes me think I am right about this.
The most important thing is that we ride our cycles and care for them too. I am glad that we can share our thoughts and expertise freely across the pond. Don't think I don't learn from you guys, I do. Thank you, Matthew


   RE:AGE / VALUE:†††GPO cycles posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/5/2002 at 9:10:39 PM
Very interesting Matthew and thanks; wish you'd post a pix of your GPO bike on my Yahoo Group "Roll Britannia".

When I lived in the UK c. 1998 I remember the Sidmouth (Devon) post office still had rod-braked bikes and, you're right, they were NOT DL-1s. They looked in good nick too, what a shame they were just disposed of willy-nilly. At least they didn't suffer the indignity of being badged "Consignia", the half-wit "rebranding" of Royal Mail.

The other "official" use of roadsters is (or was) Royal Air Force stations. I remember when Colindale (London) still had an active RAF base and there were lots of ancient rod-braked machines about whose origins were hidden under coats of RAF Blue.

P.C. Kohler


   RE:AGE / VALUE:†††GPO cycles posted by Matthew again! on 8/5/2002 at 9:48:37 PM
Peter, Service cycles used in the RAF Navy and other armed services were heavyweight roadsters with 26" X 1.752 (or 2")rims and very robust frames. They were ridden by all ranks and looked after by none. They are very saught after nowadays and fetch good prices, £100 plus, sterling. Not to be confused with the banana framed BSA paratrooper folding cycle, wing nuts and all. Matthew

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:†††GPO cycles posted by Dewane on 8/6/2002 at 3:53:35 PM
Good to get first-hand information, rather than half-baked ideas from somebody across the pond such as... (clearing throat and pointing to oneself)

Thanks for the good information.

BTW I was in Japan over the New Year's and police and postal workers still use a mini (looks to be 26") version of the rod braked roadster. I've never seen such a sit-up-and-beg stance, these bars almost are at shoulder length, and the legs never straighten more than about a 55 degree bend. Average speed seems to be about 7-8 mph.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:†††GPO cycles posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/6/2002 at 4:18:44 PM
Not to diasgree, but I was told that Raleigh sold a lot of remaining parts to the Post Office or was it the police there? I'm not sure exactly who got what but I remember being told that Raleigh made parts were used for some of these bikes.

Pleaee contribute to the Roll Britania website and hang out with Mr. Kohler and keep in touch with us here, great to read your post

   RE:AGE / VALUE:†††GPO cycles posted by David on 8/7/2002 at 2:04:42 PM
Pashley's web site (www.pashley.co.uk) has the lowdown on their current postal and delivery bikes. They're not cheap, but the ones I've inspected in the UK look pretty good. SRAM 3-speed and brake hubs seem to be the choice now.






AGE / VALUE:†††Blumels Airweight mudguards, I recommend you find a set! posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/5/2002 at 5:34:01 PM
Yesterday, I put a set of Blumels Airweight alloy mudguards on my 26 inch wheel Humber. These have the two sets of rods with rubber covers on each side. One in the middle and one down below. I don't care for this kind of mudguard stay arrangemet. I did not drill and use the one piece wire stay like we see on bikes meant for the U.S. market. These were too nice and new for that but I have to say it was not easy to keep it original because these can jab you and it's a more finiky arrangement. Everybody was gone and I made progress with this bike. I had a great time. I had to wade through a lot of junk to rescue these. I screamed Landfil? scrap man? No you are not! and I got a truck and took everything. The rear reflectors on some of these mudguards are my favorite part. They're beautiful!







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††interesting cyclometer on e-bay posted by: David Poston on 8/5/2002 at 4:52:19 PM
A very interesting cyclometer came up on e-bay for 28" wheel bikes. Doesn't appear English, but very antiquish. I was going to bid, but price went a bit too high.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2126530539&rd=1


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††interesting cyclometer on e-bay posted by Jeff on 8/5/2002 at 10:04:31 PM
That one looks a little heavy duty, even for a Dl-1. I found a small cyclometer made by Raleigh for my Tourist, it's acurate and was free.






MISC:†††RUST ON MY RIMS... posted by: Mario Romano on 8/5/2002 at 4:26:40 PM
I purchased an Raleigh Roadster 1953 recently. The bicycle paintwork is ok, but the bicycle's rims are rusted. I rub the rims with an steel brush and I could remove many of the godamn rust but a little amount of it still on place. How can I do? Could I try to use liquid for rust?


   RE:MISC:†††RUST ON MY RIMS... posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/6/2002 at 1:19:05 AM
The best results I've gotten is to use copper (NOT steel) wool and then Barkeepers Friend (a simply wonderful cleanser type product that does a remarkable job on chrome). Of course if the chrome is really rusted, you can buff it down to.... bare steel. Or use one of the harsh chemical (acid) rust removers. But again that's not going to revive chrome. I have some bare steel spots on my Rudge rear wheel but happily this is a rod-braked cycle so the steel is kept clean and polished by the brakepads. So "at a distance", she passes "muster". If you saw what the rims looked like on this before copper wool and Barkeepers Friend and lots and lots of effort, you wouldn't believe it. I am resisting rechroming since it's expensive and "new" chrome doesn't have that wonderful blue-tinged quality of old Rhodesian chrome.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:MISC:†††RUST ON MY RIMS... posted by Mark R. on 8/6/2002 at 1:37:23 AM
I too have often had problems with the rust that I sometimes have on rims, but have never found an adaquate answer to it. Often when I scub off the rust, what remains is a very rough area that tends to grind down my brake pads. The best idea would be to replace the rims with good aftermarket items if the manufacturers and shops would actually make them!! Are you listening????
Best of luck with the rims, and let us know if you come up with a good idea!

   RE:RE:MISC:†††RUST ON MY RIMS... posted by Stacey on 8/6/2002 at 2:34:12 PM
Sandblasting will remove the rust.






AGE / VALUE:†††BSA ladies bike posted by: Ian Buunk on 8/5/2002 at 8:15:35 AM
hi
I just got given the frame of an old BSA ladies bike
it has a curved frame with a very long headtube
the chainring has BSA shaped into it, the rear fender has holes for skirt protecting string
i have found (through extreme coincidence and luck) one exactly the same in an antique shop so i know it had dunlop 28 x 1 1/2 rims, a coaster rear brake, and a rod front brake.
would anyone have any idea of what age this would be??

also i have a raliegh twenty style folding tandem (it folds into three or if you remove the centre section and put the others together you have a single bike) made by rideable replicas does anyone know about this type of bike, value,age rarity etc

i have just recently decided to start restoring older style bikes so please forgive me if my use of the lingo is off

other projects i have on the go are a 1958 humber clipper series three that my uncle got new for his 10th birthday and a raliegh sports of my mother's

thankyou for your time
Ian


   RE:AGE / VALUE:†††BSA ladies bike posted by Ian on 8/5/2002 at 9:00:09 AM
Ian, B.S.A made this style of bike for many years almost without change and in several years of searching and of being a member of various vintage cycle clubs I have never come across records of serial numbers or any definitive way of dating them. The only things I have established are that :- a) If the bottom bracket bearings are help in by cotter pins through the frame rather than the more common screwed in cups and lock rings then it is pre approximately 1926.
b) If it has the string net type skirt guard it is probably pre W.W.2 or at least pre 1948. The vinyl skirt guard appears to have taken over about 1948 and the "C" frame was discontinued around 1950.
Hopes this helps a little. The best source of info would probably be the Veteran Cycle-Club in England. Look at their web site at http://www.v-cc.org.uk/ to see about joining. The other thing to realise is that far more bikes were built by other manufacturers using fitting kitsets supplied by B.S.A. than the number built by B.S.A. themselves. B.S.A. would supply acreddited manufacturers with all the bits including the chainwheel, complete bottom bracket, all the frame lugs, handlebars, hubs etc etc and a transfer (sorry "decal") that said "Made with Best B.S.A. Fittings" so you may have a frame made by a small manufacturer which is almost identical to the frames made by many others. I have a catalogue which shows a variety of frame lugs for various styles of bikes but unfortunately it is undated. Hope this is a little help.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:†††BSA ladies bike posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/6/2002 at 4:35:52 PM
OOO, a Humber Clipper! I have diagrams, and catalog sheets of that. I saw this catalog and it got me hooked on Humbers. I want a "Royal Elf" something terrible.
Wonderful to hear that you have one!

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:†††BSA ladies bike posted by Ian Buunk on 8/7/2002 at 5:08:04 AM
can you scan your diagrams etc and email them to me? please
is a clipper better than a sports?? it doesn't have the split fork tubes but is still pretty nice.

just missed out on a humber ladies bike of about the same age but with a rear 3 speed dynohub
oh well

would be great if you could get me that info :)

Ian

thanks also for the BSA info, i dont know that it definately had a string guard just that it has little holes all around the fender






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††Exposing one's bike to the elements posted by: David Poston on 8/5/2002 at 4:01:07 AM
Yesterday, I had a near run-in with a tornado and a thunderstorm from hell. I was at a bike shop here in Houston with my Rudge and Raleigh in tow on the back of my trunk, with the intention of purchasing a new rack to carry these beauties about. Well, I had noticed that dark clouds were gathering for the past hour or so, and it looked like something major was going to hit. We had got the new rack on my trunk, and the guy was helping to set it up, when he pointed to the sky. "See that green light in the sky?" he said. "Green means tornado. And it's headed right for us." True enough, I looked up and black clouds were headed right our way, with an unearthly patch of green in their midst. Tornado or not, I knew something was bearing right down on us. With a wrenching sigh, I parted with my bikes (in a hurry) and left them in the shop for the weekend. It was well that I did so, for 30 seconds later I was in the worst rainstorm I had ever been in. I am not exaggerating. I couldn't see ten feet in front of my car, the rain was so thick. Had my bikes been on the back of my trunk, they would have been totally drenched, if not blown off my car altogether. I barely made it home safely before the streets were flooded.

I was wondering what everyone's thoughts were on exposing one's bike to the elements. Are there plastic covers on the market to guard against rain and sun? Aside from rain, we have sun here in Houston to fry one's brain. What should I do to protect my precious Sheffield steel? Had it gotten soaked, would I have had to repack bearings and all? Any and all thoughts welcome.

--David, who is out of sorts being without his Rudge all weekend long.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††Exposing one's bike to the elements posted by David on 8/5/2002 at 1:27:29 PM
Unless your old bike is really lucky, it has been left out in the rain a lot. Rain, even a good drenching, shouldn't have much effect on oiled or greased parts (remember oil and water?). It will promote rust on painted and chromed parts, so dry them off as soon as you can. The worst effect, I think, is on leather saddles. If you use Proofide on them occasionally, they should stay fairly water repellent, but dry them promptly if they get wet. I put a plastic bag over the saddle if I'm expecting rain when I park for the day.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††Exposing one's bike to the elements posted by Dewane on 8/5/2002 at 4:15:53 PM
There's a reason the DL-1 was called the "Bobby Bike". And DL-1s were used by by the British postal service (until the '70's)? And English people used English roadsters to go to work, every day, in all kinds of weather. These bikes are the antithesis of the mountain bike you put on your bike rack and haul to the nearest recreation area, they were made for commmuting and recreation (and occasionally work).

British weather is not the best weather in the world. I think that most of these bikes have seen bad weather. The seats, as David mentioned above, would be the biggest problem. I wonder how police officers/postal workers dealt with this.

Hurricane weather is a little out of the ordinary, but I'm sure you wouldn't have to worry about most kind of weathers.

These bikes were made to be ridden, not hauled around. I don't want to cause a storm the size of the one you went through, just my .02 cents / .015 pence.

- Dewane

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††Exposing one's bike to the elements posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/5/2002 at 5:05:12 PM
Dewane asks how British postmen and police got around the problem of rain-soaked leather saddles. Remember that Dunlop made a whole line of rubber saddles that looked just like Brooks leather ones. These were very common through the 1950s when the vinyl mattress saddles became popular. Many of the police bikes I've seen in the myriad local police museums in the UK had these rubber saddles. At first glance I thought they were leather too! Right down to oval Brooks-like Dunlop embossed logo. For regular cycle commuters, most of the big factories and offices etc. provided cycle sheds for their workers. Same at village bus stations, railway stations etc. So these machines were not at the mercy of English weather all the time.

If anyone saw the closing ceremonies of the Commonwealth Games the other day in Manchester, you know that's the rainiest city in the English speaking world! These machines were designed and built precisely for such conditions. Heck, they might even like "a spot of rain" lest they start feeling homesick!

P.C. Kohler, in rain-starved Washington

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††Exposing one's bike to the elements posted by David Poston on 8/5/2002 at 5:06:32 PM
Thanks for above replies. I certainly mean to ride it, I was looking into a rack primarily for long-distance transport (perhaps another city). I will try the plastic bag trick, I'm just wondering why they don't make a plastic cover the saddle at the very least, if not the rest of the bike.

David

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††Exposing one's bike to the elements posted by Stacey on 8/5/2002 at 6:08:41 PM
A quick trip to the HBA section of your local WalMart (we all have WalMarts, don't we?) and secure yourself a shower cap. With some ingenuity you could even rig up a drawstring to securly fix it on your seat.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††Exposing one's bike to the elements posted by David on 8/5/2002 at 6:12:49 PM
When I bought my Paramount in 1975, I got a plastic seat cover for the Brooks Pro. It was like a vinyl shower cap and fit the saddle very nicely. I haven't seen them since and I don't know if it was an extra or was std with the bike.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††Exposing one's bike to the elements posted by Sidney Sideline on 8/5/2002 at 7:31:46 PM
Dewanne, not 0.15 pence, fourpence dear fellow, pronounced fawpunce. Coppers and posties kept their rear ends dry by using very heavy weight waterproof trousers made from and almost bombproof plastic. Sidney

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††Exposing one's bike to the elements posted by geo on 8/6/2002 at 2:09:22 AM
Let's see. We could dip the entire bike in wax or construct a big plastic bubble to ride around in like that movie from the 70's with John Travolta, "Boy ih the Plastic Bubble". To store my bike I have built a hermetically sealed chamber with a HEPA air filtration system with ultraviolet light protection. What happened to riding your bike and wiping it down when it got wet, besides you shouldn't ride your bike in tornados. My advice is put the bike in a safe deposit box and go out and buy a cheap mountain bike at Walmart.






FOR SALE:†††BSA hublite on eBay posted by: P.C. Kohler on 8/5/2002 at 3:47:33 AM
Now this is news to me: BSA made their own version of the Dynohub, the Hublite.

A nice example is on offer through eBay:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2128329196


   RE:FOR SALE:†††BSA hublite on eBay posted by David on 8/5/2002 at 1:38:58 PM
Looks like it's grounded thru the frame. I wonder if BSA failed to get the patent and SA made 'em stop selling.

   RE:FOR SALE:†††BSA hublite on eBay posted by Matthew on 8/5/2002 at 7:34:15 PM
The hublite worked very well as did the BSA three speed hub gear too. Top gear was at the bottom of the shifter and bottm at the top, if you see what I mean. Matthew

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:†††BSA hublite on eBay posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/6/2002 at 4:26:24 PM
Remember that B.S.A. bicycle related stuff came to a halt in 1955.
The Hublite was offered in an alloy shell. These are a lot more rare than a Sturmey-Archer G.H.6. and finding parts like replacement armatures is almost impossible.
Tony Hadland wrote about these in the book the Sturmey-Archer Story.
Tony has a web site that is well worth looking at and it's been updated from time to time. An ongoing thing, so look it up.

   RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE:†††BSA hublite on eBay posted by Chris on 8/6/2002 at 4:30:13 PM
The B.S.A. hub is very smooth and very nice. Round axles prevent it from being put in a Raleigh made frame. It was meant for a B.S.A. bicycle.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††Sheldon's repro Raleigh grips posted by: Mark Rehder on 8/5/2002 at 12:41:23 AM
A friend of mine just got back from a pilgrimage to Harris Cyclery. Before leaving, he asked me if there was anything I wanted from there, and I said "Yes, please get me a pair of the 'repro Raleigh grips' that Sheldon advertises at their site". Well, I just installed them on my Sports, and I gotta say that they are very nice indeed! I have a pair of original grips on my Twenty, and these repros do have a slightly nicer feel (granted the originals have had 30 years to harden a bit with age). These new grips cost me $20 Cdn., but are definitely worth it, in my opinion.

I used the "cheap hairspray" trick for installation. For those of you that don't know this one, it's simple: get the cheapest dollar store hairspray you can find (the stuff with the most 'stick' and least amount of conditioners and fragrances), and spray it on the bare handlebar ends. Then, quickly slide the grips in place, with the wet spray acting as a lubricant. Wait an hour or so for it to mostly evaporate, leaving behind a nice sticky bond that will really hold those grips in place! Didn't quite set it right? Gently wedge a flat-blade screwdriver down the grip, spray a little soapy water inside, work it around, and off they'll come! (WD-40 will do the job as well, but who wants to pollute with solvents if you don't need to?)

Cheers, Mark







MISC:†††Speedometers posted by: David on 8/4/2002 at 11:28:50 AM
At the risk of starting an auto-da-fé, let me inform you that Nashbar has a good deal on 2-bike computers; $15 for one with two sets of mounts and sensors. It stores two sets of information, too; e.g. wheel size. I got one for the Sports and the Roadster. Now I'll know my mileage!







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††Spreadin' the faith posted by: David on 8/3/2002 at 7:10:27 PM
It happened again. I had guests and in the morning, as usual, supplies were needed for breakfast, so guest and I headed for the market on the Sports and the Roadster. When we got back, she said "What a great bike! It's comfortable and fun to ride and you can see what's going on!" Moral - keep getting your friends aboard the "English Iron"


   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††Spreadin' the faith posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/5/2002 at 2:02:52 AM
Other side of the pond indeed.... today I made my customary ride from Georgetown to Mt. Vernon along the Potomac on my '49 Rudge. Whilst cooling down from the wretched heat (it was 97 deg F. or something dire today) at the entrance to the George Washington estate, a group of tourists noticed my Rudge. They turned out to be English and mostly from Yorkshire and said how delighted they were to see a bit of Sheffield steel still going strong after 53 years!

Heat or not, me Rudge and I clocked our best time for 36-mile roundtrip, averaging 16-17 mph. Those Yorkshiremen should be proud of her; I know I am!

P.C. Kohler

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:†††Spreadin' the faith posted by leafy lane brit on 8/4/2002 at 4:50:50 PM
Greetings from the other side of the pond! As a Brit, and an owner of several "English Roadsters" (none of which date from after the First World War), I'd like to say how great it is to find that there are fans of these machines in the States. Over here, you can still visit any junkyard, and rescue roadster type machines for just a few pounds. One of my machines was rescued from a dumpster 2 years ago, and turns out to be one of only 4 surviving examples of the FOLDING military bicycle used by the British army in the Great War. It seems that most people regard these old bikes as worthless scrap. Sales of new bikes are mostly made up of far eastern manufactured mountain bikes. Buy your state of the art machine this week, and behold!, next week it's an old model. As a member of a couple of our veteran cycle clubs, I enjoy meeting up with like-minded enthusiasts, to ride and display these old "sit up and beg" clunkers. Anyhow, keep those old wheels rolling. I'll raise a glass of our warm beer to you.






MISC:†††LUBRICATION NEEDED FOR THOSE STUCK ON SA OIL posted by: Albert on 8/3/2002 at 5:06:11 PM
I read with some interest the thread about hub lubrication. As one who has ridden some 5 to 10 thousend miles a year on internal hubs for the past 25 years, I thought my comments might be of some value.

I have never lubricated my hubs with anything other than a straight 20-weight engine oil. I have experienced NO problems with hub internals: no sticking pawls, pawls that have an extremely long service life of 20,000 miles or so, no excessively worn planet pinion pins, etc. All of this I say as a fairly experienced cycle mechanic who performs all needed servicing and repairs on my machines.

May I say that I question the use of the highly tauted sewing machine oil. This oil was made for use on a device that does not have highly loaded bearing surfaces such as those found on the planet pins of SA hubs.

Those who recommend their "pet" oil without properly evaluating it in long term use are not doing the casual, and somewhat inexperienced, reader of this site a service.

Cheers from Philadelphia.


   RE:MISC:†††LUBRICATION NEEDED FOR THOSE STUCK ON SA OIL posted by David on 8/3/2002 at 7:10:08 PM
Amen.

   RE:RE:MISC:†††LUBRICATION NEEDED FOR THOSE STUCK ON SA OIL posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/3/2002 at 10:24:35 PM
Indeed. All the more reason to do as the manufacture of the bloody gears recommend in the first place: use the oil specifically blended by THEM for THEIR product! It's so simple yet seems to be the cause of so much debate. Why risk using anything other than what's designed for the thing and readily available? A Sturmey-Archer hub is NOT a a) sewing machine, b) a typewriter or c) an internal combustion engine. Why persist in lubricating it as if were any or all of these things to "save" $7.99?

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:MISC:†††LUBRICATION NEEDED FOR THOSE STUCK ON SA OIL posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/5/2002 at 3:36:50 AM
Chris.... Colin Powell should send you to the Middle East!

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:†††LUBRICATION NEEDED FOR THOSE STUCK ON SA OIL posted by David Poston on 8/4/2002 at 5:17:06 AM
Yes, I agree with Peter. Why try to subsitute something for the real thing, especially when it is available?

David

   RE:RE:RE:RE:MISC:†††LUBRICATION NEEDED FOR THOSE STUCK ON SA OIL posted by Chris on 8/4/2002 at 6:52:27 PM
Ok, so what to use inside the hub is: The use of straight 20 weight oil is acceptable- (Albert) Phil Tenacious-(Sheldon) The original Sturmey-Archer cycle oil also.
Do we all agree to stay clear of 3 in 1 and anything vegatable based? Yes? Good.
Pass the word.

Lets leave it at that then.