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Archived: English Roadsters







AGE / VALUE:   old 28" bike on ebay posted by: samclingo@hotmail.com on 9/10/2002 at 1:26:17 AM
This bike does look pre-war with the "L" seat post and goosneck,but does not look American.Is it Canadian?Any guesses?http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2139391677


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   old 28 posted by Tom on 9/10/2002 at 3:15:44 AM
I think that bike is an Eatons Glider from the Eatons stores in Canada. I have a few of them and have seen many of them here in Winnipeg Canada. The bikes were made in England and badged for Eatons. They ride great and smooth. Most of the early ones were single speed. We had coblestone streets up to about the 70's that is why most of the bikes were 28"( smoothed out those bumps). The Eatons bikes came with the 28 x 1/2" 700 rims. Bottom brackets were British as well as the frames. I have a few with transfers saying made in England. They also had double top bar bikes made in England. The Eatons company in Canada has been around since the turn of the century and went bankrupt a few years ago. The original store in Winnipeg is being torn down this month. Top floor(8th)went down last week.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   old 28 wheel bike with Wilby's rare saddle on e- bay posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 9/10/2002 at 10:47:26 PM
Sam, That seat is pure British! Old School and unique and rare! The seat and post alone is worth it.
Wilby saddle's were British.
Definitly pre-war
I can't make out if this bike is missing rod brake gear or not. Unique too that it is a camel back frame too.

The chainguard makes me think it could be a Eatons but I am not sure.

I have not seen a seat like that in a long time. Wonderful leather seat. and those posts, if they fit your bike are awesome and rare.






AGE / VALUE:   D.B.S Jonas Oglaend, made in Sandnes, Norway posted by: Martin on 9/9/2002 at 11:43:16 PM
Hi!!! I am from Argentina, and I want to know where to find info and photos of a vintage D.B.S bike. Yesterday a found an old woman D.B.S bike in a warehouse, the serial number is 355812. I want to know in wich year it was made. Where can i find info? I want to restore it as well as it was made by the factory. Thanks for all, Martin.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   D.B.S Jonas Oglaend, made in Sandnes, Norway posted by Aimee Martin on 12/11/2005 at 7:33:37 PM
Hello,

I found your post while researching the same bike. Any luck??? I am having a hard time finding anything.
by: 68.3.211.50






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sturmey Archer AG for DL-1 Tourist posted by: David Poston on 9/9/2002 at 5:43:15 PM
Is this what I would need to put a dynohub on my DL-1 Tourist?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1856696854

What other accessories would I need to make the light work?

Thanks,
David.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sturmey Archer AG for DL-1 Tourist posted by Mucus on 9/9/2002 at 5:53:34 PM
David, this appears to be what you need. You just have to find wires, and lights which show up from time to time.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Sturmey Archer AG for DL-1 Tourist posted by Chris on 9/9/2002 at 5:56:58 PM
You would need to have a 40 hole drilling rear rim. Not a 36 with a 40 hole drilling hub. You would need the wiring, and lights and that bracket you mentioned.
A visit to hadland.net for the wiring page and somewhere you might want to read how to adjust this monster, althought it looks like it may not need adjusting. hadland.net again for that.
I would e- mail and ask if this has ever been taken apart and overhauled because you don't want to run the risk that this armeture has ever been seperated from the keeper ring.

   How to rebuild my rear wheel? posted by David Poston on 9/9/2002 at 8:49:14 PM
Yes, my rear wheel, like all DL-1 Tourists do (I think), has 40 holes in the rim. Now, would it be hard to rebuild this dynohub into the wheel using the components I already have? I noticed that the Sturmey Archer AG, being a dynohub, has one side bigger in diameter than the other. Would this cause a problem when re-lacing the spokes, since I assume the regular SA hub is equally sized on both sides?

Thanks,
David

   How to rebuild my rear wheel? posted by David Poston on 9/9/2002 at 8:50:33 PM
Yes, my rear wheel, like all DL-1 Tourists do (I think), has 40 holes in the rim. Now, would it be hard to rebuild this dynohub into the wheel using the components I already have? I noticed that the Sturmey Archer AG, being a dynohub, has one side bigger in diameter than the other. Would this cause a problem when re-lacing the spokes, since I assume the regular SA hub is equally sized on both sides?

Thanks,
David

   RE:How to rebuild my rear wheel? posted by Edward in Vancouver on 9/9/2002 at 9:56:40 PM
I built my first wheel last christmas, using a N.O.S. Raleigh pattern 40 spoke rim and a FG hub, and using original Raleigh wheelbuilding instructions. All this came about fro people on this site. I forget who has the wheel building istructions, but they come with a spoke length chart. The flange sizes of a AG and a FG are the same, and I used the same spoke, 280mm I think, for the whell using a cross 4 pattern.

   RE:RE:How to rebuild my rear wheel? posted by Chris on 9/10/2002 at 4:16:38 PM
Are you sure about the flange sizes being the same
If so, then my book is correct!


   RE:RE:RE:How to rebuild my rear wheel? posted by Chris on 9/10/2002 at 5:52:22 PM
The hub shell of the A.G. and the F.G. is the same hub shell between the two.
So you don't need to change spoke length if you want an F.G. in place of a A.G.
Now I understand.






WANTED:   Source for NOS or repro Westwood rims posted by: David Poston on 9/9/2002 at 5:39:07 PM
I'm thinking about replacement rims for my Raleigh Tourist DL-1. Does anyone here know a reliable source for NOS or good repros? I believe they would be Westwood rims, 28" x 1.5".

Thanks,
David


   RE:WANTED:   Source for NOS or repro Westwood rims posted by Tom on 9/10/2002 at 3:27:52 AM
Would the Canadian size 28" rims work on a DL1? I know the tires are a different size but would the rim be too far from the brake pads.

   RE:WANTED:   Source for NOS or repro Westwood rims posted by Fred on 9/11/2002 at 3:11:15 AM
Tom; I recently checked out the Rigida website and found out that they have repro rims in Raleigh styles. Now we need to find a retail source. I think Harris has some Repro rims but I haven't checked it out.

   RE:WANTED:   Source for NOS or repro Westwood rims posted by Fred on 9/11/2002 at 3:11:59 AM
Tom; I recently checked out the Rigida website and found out that they have repro rims in Raleigh styles. Now we need to find a retail source. I think Harris has some Repro rims but I haven't checked it out.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh lamp brackets posted by: David Poston on 9/9/2002 at 5:24:54 PM
I'm wondering if these will work on a Raleigh Sports or DL-1. The seller says "chopper," but is there a difference when it comes to lamp brackets? I need help quick b/c the auction ends soon. Now don't you go stealing these from me! :)

Thanks,
David.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh lamp brackets posted by David Poston on 9/9/2002 at 5:28:19 PM
The url would help:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2139203738&rd=1

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh lamp brackets posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 9/9/2002 at 5:46:59 PM
Yes! Exactly for the D.L.1 and Sports, Superbe, e.t.c. and the chrome looks good too.
I saw a adjustable cup that I would grab if I were you, IF it is n.o.s.
I didn't see if it was n.o.s. or not. the real bug a boo is an n.o.s. fixed cup. That's not offered recently.

I had a tool made custom to get that out. Good Luck with the auction!






AGE / VALUE:   Robert Whiter's book:The bicycle manuel on Repair posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 9/9/2002 at 4:49:29 PM
Look for this 1970's book, read it and keep it handy.
It's an orange paperback book hopefully found at your local used book store.

The Bicycle repair manuel: by Robert Whiter
It says in the front leaf that he built bicycles in Wood Green in London and then it says the fellow was in Los Angeles, Ca.

Anyways, it's one of the best books I have yet seen on repair tricks and methods. A great useful, well written book by a real master. The dude is on par with masters like Sheldon and that's rare.
The book is written well so it is easily understood. It's a book that should be re- printed and offered to folks like us here.
I hope to see a bike with his crest one day. It's a Viking type guy with a winged hat and it says Wood Green, London. neat badge/decal.
So far, no mention of this man or his bikes that he made has appeared. Hopefully, someday soon we'll see a bike and a description at Cycles De Oro. I'd like that.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Robert Whiter's book:The bicycle manuel on Repair posted by Michael on 9/9/2002 at 5:46:08 PM
Go to Google...insert Robert Whiter as a name, and watch as links pop up to his stuff...the guy seems guite prodigious...tons of bike books...

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Robert Whiter's book:The bicycle manuel on Repair posted by Michael on 9/9/2002 at 5:47:17 PM
Go to Google...insert Robert Whiter as a name, and watch as links pop up to his stuff...the guy seems guite prodigious...tons of bike books...

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Robert Whiter's book:The bicycle manuel on Repair posted by Michael on 9/9/2002 at 5:48:48 PM
A good link with tons of his books:
http://www.allbookstores.com/browse/SPO011000:4

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Robert Whiter's book:The bicycle manuel on Repair posted by Walter on 9/10/2002 at 1:08:02 AM
I have had a copy of that book since 1978 or so. nfortunately the binding quality is poor so in essence it's a stack of single pages now. Still well preserved and frequently consulted. Anything from brazing frame tubes to tube patching. If still alive he's more than a it older than Sheldon and has (had) first hand experience with alot of treasured "vintage" bits when they were just bikes that customers needed fixed.






AGE / VALUE:    posted by: dave on 9/9/2002 at 2:05:29 PM
anyone know anthing about st etienne bicycles? I found one on the side of the road in great shape.....looks like it is from the 70's


   RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by John on 12/28/2002 at 4:30:23 AM
I own a St. Etienne, bought new in Boston in 76, small bike shop was closing, MSRP said to be $1000+, I paid $350, have put 000's of miles on it. Never ran across another; don't know anything about the manufacturer. Pretty beat up, don't know if I should save it or throw it out. Have you found out anything?






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   AW trouble posted by: Peter on 9/9/2002 at 9:54:29 AM
...got a problem with an AW I put in last night. The hub 'freewheels' perfectly, clicking softly as it should. Rotating forwards there is a tight spot once every revolution, which needs firm hand pressure at the wheel rim to get past. This is with the wheel running on its bearings, no chain fitted and no toggle chain screwed in.
I tried slacking off the cones (having previously set them correctly) and eventually undid each one half a turn without making any real difference, so I suspect the fault is internal.
Before I strip it, I'd be pleased to hear if anyone has experience of this problem. regards, Peter.







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   bicycle posted by: randy on 9/9/2002 at 12:34:34 AM
I have two raleigh superbee cycles in my posession; one has 73 stamped on the SA rear hub and the other has 57.My question to the cycle geru is;the 57 has a dynohud in the rear wheel were the newer one has it in the front.Was it common on these bikes to have one or the other(front wheel or back) or is one a rarity?Secondly' is there any value to these bicycles, Any info would be greatly appretieated


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   bicycle posted by P.C. Kohler on 9/9/2002 at 3:53:10 AM
The better models of Raleighs, Rudges and Humbers c. 1947-1960 had rear dynothree or dynofour hubs since dynohub lighting was an inclusive feature of these top of the line machines. The front GH6 dynohub was offered at the same time as an extra cost feature for other models. I have a dynothree hub dating from 1969; I am not sure when this was phased out. Superbes for the North American market, at least, had the GH6 front hubs as standard equipment as early as 1962 and no references to dynothree or dynofours. Also, I don't think the dynofour hub was ever offered in the American market.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   bicycle posted by Chris on 9/9/2002 at 6:22:52 PM
You got me on the Dyno-four being offered in the states. I own one hub in one bike and the other I saw on a bike at a shop awhile ago. The fellow said that the bike belonged to his late father and that he did not like his father for some reason. The man brought in the bike for new tires but as I helped him put it into his car he got stranger/creepier by the minute. He was remembering something bad associated with his father and his bike and I got the impression this fellow was gonna get it home and take a hacksaw to it or run it over. Now, I'm looking with starry eyes at this mint but dirty wonderous bike. I tried like heck to rescue it and buy it. No dice! The guy wanted to destroy it more than recieving top dollar for it. I had cash in hand and he waved me off. There was a real story there and that man had some issues. The bike was mint! I was young and wanted badly to be able to buy it, but it was not for sale. Today I have one in better shape, and there is no wacky history with mine.
Probably, not offered in the states because of the weight regulations about being over 40 lbs. Mine and the one that likely got hacked up both have (or had) enclosed chainguards on them as standard.
That was the second time I heard about angry heirs or widow's taking out anger on the bike. One lady ran it over with the car on purpose.

You don't see many dynofours in 28 inch wheel bikes. These were reserved for the 28 inch Superbes with locking forks I think.
Unless it was a Raleigh Sport/ Superbe type bike with the 26 X 1 3/8 inch wheels.
Still, not many there either. I have only seen a few of those.
Good Question.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   bicycle posted by P.C. Kohler on 9/9/2002 at 7:24:03 PM
I hadn't thought about the weight issue, but none of the US-market catalogues I have for Raleigh, Rudge etc. list the dynofour as a stock item. Only the dynothree. Of course one could buy a dynofour and retrofit it, it's just the cycles don't appear to have been offered with this "as is", at least in the USA.

In England, dynofours seem to have been the standard in the "glory years" of the 1950s. All machines with the rear dynohubs also came with the battery tube/F.S.U. thingy too.

But if you were adding a dynohub to an existing bike, the front axle GH6 of course made the only economic sense. There was no eBay then to flog barely used Sturmey Archer AW hubs! Or did they offer a "trade in"??

Me, I am awaiting a 1948 dynothree hub from Cycles of Yesteryear to retrofit my '48 Raleigh. Battery tube/F.S.U. next on the list as this Raleigh Dawn "ordinary" morphs into a De Luxe model. The darned thing is still languishing in bits and pieces as I await parts and goodies from the far corners of the globe. My cat meanwhile enjoys lounging against the enclosed gearcase...

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   bicycle posted by Edward in Vancouver on 9/9/2002 at 10:12:08 PM
Just to throw a wrench into the works, my Superbe came with a Dyno-three (1954), locking front fork and "hockeystick" chainguard. Was it an import "destined for the N.A. market?" I have no reason not to assume the rest of the bike wasn't from the mid 50's because of the pulley braze-on, full chaincase mount on chainstay, and the forged front drop-outs. I don't know when Raleigh set up shop in Canada (Warren, your input?) but I don't think it was before 1960. I do know that there were a lot of "Cheap" Superbes made in Canada from the early 70's onwards with the AW/GH6 set up.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   bicycle posted by Chris on 9/10/2002 at 5:04:30 PM
If the bikes are not shown in the U.S.A. catalogs with F.G. dynohubs but instead with A.G. 3 speed dynohubs instead than perhaps Raleigh offered the four speed dynohubs as an after sale option and you paid to have it installed in the rear wheel?

Question is: Was the F.G. intended for export to the states or not?

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   bicycle posted by P.C. Kohler on 9/10/2002 at 9:37:20 PM
OK.... here's what I have

Raleigh catalogue A.D. 4253 (UK market)

Raleigh Superbe Sports Tourist model no. 24
fitted with Sturmey Archer dynofour FG hub

-------------------------------------------

Raleigh catalogue X.A.D. 4129 (US market)

Superbe Sports Tourist model no. 24
fitted with Sturmey Archer dynothree AG hub

assuming these are the same years (and why the &$)#$#@ can't Raleigh just print year on the darned things!!), it seems clear that the FG was not featured on export cycles. I have Rudge catalogues from the same period, both US and UK market, and again American machines had AG and British ones FG hubs.

Again, I wonder if you could specify a FG to be fitted to your machine... I frankly doubt it, at least at ordering stage, since there is NO reference to it in the US catalogue as an option. Moreover, if you had this done by the dealer post-purchase, it meant rebuilding the whole wheel and what did the dealer do with the unwanted AG hub??

Not conclusive evidence of course... and remember Americans got around a lot in the 1950s. There must be zillions of Raleighs purchased overseas, shipped back home on ss UNITED STATES and moldering today in basements with their dusty FG hubs to prove us all wrong.

P.C. Kohler


   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   bicycle posted by Chris on 9/10/2002 at 10:56:40 PM
You bring up good points, P.C.
A lot of bikes were brought over when folks moved. A lot of folks, once they got on the thing and rode it wherever in the world they saw it decided to bring it back home because they loved the feel , the look, the ride of the Raleigh bike.
One family draged along a small red childs tricycle all the way from South Africa when they moved here, and they threw it out when she outgrew it. I have the Raleigh badge off of it.
I don't know for certain and it is very irritating to not have years printed on these books and catalogs. It is a problem because these catalogs are relied upon to determine a year the bike was made and offered for historical purposes.






AGE / VALUE:   High Pressure Tires for Raleigh 20 posted by: paul on 9/8/2002 at 11:56:50 PM
I need to replace the original tires on a 1973 Raleigh 20. To reduce rolling resistance, I am thinking of using high pressure (about 90-100) tires (like those I use on my two recumbents). I expect the ride will be harsher, but could high pressure tires ruin/warp the "old" steel rims? If so, I'll just go with Primo V-Monsters. Any thoughts? Thanks.


   RE:AGE / VALUE: High Pressure Tires for Raleigh 20 posted by Sheldon Brown on 9/9/2002 at 5:04:31 AM
I bought my first Twenty used in the mid '70s. It had the original Raleigh "Vinylon" tires on it. The first thing I did after buying it was to check the tire pressure. One tire had about thirty, the other had 112! I was impressed.

There's no risk of damaging the rims, but narrow tires on the wide steel rims will give a very harsh ride.

I'm currently using Primo Comets on mine, with a front suspension fork and a sprung saddle the ride is OK.

All the best,

Sheldon

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   High Pressure Tires for Raleigh 20 posted by edgarecks on 9/9/2002 at 5:33:14 PM
I use Continental Top Touring 2000s at 80 pounds on my Twenty, they're a very good compromise between low rolling resistance and traction in the sand and gravel I invariably find myself in (even on the 1.3 mile ride to work!)






AGE / VALUE:   What's up in the rafters?/ Sunday morning cheap thrills! posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 9/8/2002 at 7:27:44 PM
I asked "Any other bikes?" for sale.
She said yes! She led me into the garage and we looked up.
Inside the very, very messy garage was two bikes.My eyes adjusted to the darkness as they come into view.
What were they gonna be? Rudges with enclosed cases? Phillips? Schwinns? perhaps an Iver Johnson?
It was getting good! Were the gods of old bikes gonna reward me? Whatever they were, they had not been picked up already!Wonder why?
My heart fell as a Columbia 10 speed and a Sears Free Spirit came into view.
Oh well. I have to keep looking. She had this large bucket of oil just sitting there and it brought back bad memories of when I spilled that oil in my garage.
God, what a mess that was.
Lucky I didn't knock it over or step into it.
Lately, I have been buying 1960's white vintage luggage,but I think that's run it's course.







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   GAZELLE roadster , please help. posted by: William on 9/8/2002 at 1:03:26 PM
Hello,how're you guys doing? I'm William from MALAYSIA.Well,I own an old Gazelle for more than a decade now and recently I came across this wonderful website,so I decided to learn more about my 'Old Faithful'.Old Raleighs are rather common here,Herculeses are usually used with a side carriers at the wet market,Robin Hoods are in numbers too,Rudge-well,I do bump into them once in a while but mine is the only Gazelle around here,or so it seems to me.I don't seem to find much info regarding Gazelles here,(but I may have overlooked them),hopefully you guys could provide me with some information.Thanks!!!

Mine is a men's Gazelle with a typical diamond frame;on the copper/brass head badge is the carving of the head of a Gazelle with horns and underneath it is written 'The GAZELLE,Nottingham,England'.
On the seat lug,right underneath the saddle is the vehicle number - JA 20957.
It uses 28 x 1 1/2in rims,rod-type brakes with a Sturmey Archer hub brake(with the number '357' written on the hub)at the front while the rear is the conventional rubber-block pull type.It's a single speedster.

I do hope you can help me to determine its age,or at least give an approx. figure.Once,an elderly gentleman told me that it's from the 1930's,but I'm not sure about that.I obtained the bike from an old neighbour years ago;it was in a dilapidated condition but at least the frame was sound.I had it fixed up and I had many fond memories riding it during my schooling days;mine was the only 28-inch roadster in the whole bike compound with over 300 bicycles.Recently,I had it sent for a complete overhaul and a paint job(I know,I know,that would somehow 'damage' its originity but then again,it was all rusty without a trace of paint on it when I first got it),I would like to have it in a good condition for weekend leisure rides,you see.

So,you see,I would very much like to learn more about it-age,how common is it,original parts or add-ons,etc.Your help would be much appreciated.Thank You. :D :D :D

WILLIAM


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   GAZELLE roadster , please help. posted by Stacey on 9/8/2002 at 4:44:34 PM
Hello William from Maylaisa! Would a closer look at your rear hub possibly read 3 57? If so, then that hub was made in March of 1957. If it is the original hub to the bike, which the S/N of JA 20957 seems to support, then your bike is a 1957 model.

Tha, tha, tha, that's all from me! Anyone else?

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   GAZELLE roadster , please help. posted by ME on 9/8/2002 at 5:01:33 PM
I also own a Gazelle, 1961 model. They are very rare indeed! Mine is the only one I have ever seen, & I have seen a lot of bicycles. hold on to it William. Its most likly a March 1957 model.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   GAZELLE roadster , please help. posted by Humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 9/8/2002 at 6:55:10 PM
I own a Gazelle bicycle only mine is the 26 X 1 3/8 wheel cable brake version. Mine is called the Campus Special which is an economy version of the famous Rudge Sports. Now yours is a better bike because of the 28 inch wheels and the drum brakes.
Raleigh in England changed their Gazelle models into the Robin Hood brand of bikes because the Raleigh made Gazelles were getting confused with the Dutch made Gazelle bikes being made in Holland. So this bike is earlier than 1957-1958 in there.

Since you live in Malaysia I will advise you to find the limited edition Raleigh 28 inch wheel rod brake roadsters with the motor slung underneath. These were not made for too long and these are rare and collectable. If I was in your part of the world this is what I would be looking for. It was the only African motorized bicycle to come from Raleigh.

Raleigh South Africa was bought by it's management and we don't know what happened after that. What is being made in those factories? Can you tell us what happened after the Raleigh Co. sold it's operations there?
What brand of bicycle is being produced? Are any bicycles being made in South Africa?
Thank You.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   GAZELLE roadster , please help. posted by Stacey on 9/8/2002 at 7:19:15 PM
Ummmm, Chris..... Time for a geography lesson old chap. Maylasia is an island in the Pacific Ocean, Southeast of Viet Nam, Northwest of Oz. Nowhere close to Africa.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   GAZELLE roadster , please help. posted by Fronk on 9/9/2002 at 10:13:00 AM
We know where Maylasia is you Moron. Lets leave the bicycle talk up to the Men folk.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   GAZELLE roadster , please help. posted by Jonathan on 9/9/2002 at 11:33:40 AM
You got Stacey's discription right!

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   GAZELLE roadster , please help. posted by Chris on 9/9/2002 at 4:49:01 PM
I'm the moron for not knowing where Maylasia was on the globe. Sorry, I'm blushing.
Anyways, the tale about Gazelle and Robin Hood is straight out of the Raleigh book. The very book being offered a few posts from this one. Buy the book, it's better any day than my regurgation.
The part about the Gazelle being no later than 1957 in there is correct. The fellow who wrote us about his Gazelle is in a part of the world where other whole bikes and replacement parts and available. Think of all those oiginal enclosed chaincases!
See hadland.net for service info, Sheldonbrown.com for a real treat of a tour of "English 3 speeds, care and feeding" and we have exploded (phantom) diagrams of the Raleigh, Humber, Rudge bikes here at oldroads.com under resources.

I don't see the fellow needing parts, just information.
For me, it's Back to Geography, estate sale tactics 101, and how to hagling a price out.

   RE:RE: STACEY IS A STUDDERING MORON. posted by JOE on 9/9/2002 at 10:34:50 PM
Tha, tha, tha? Studder much? You idiot. Ha Stacey, You leave a black eye on Old roads com. Find some other board to harass.

   To the three stooges; Fronk, Jonathan & Joe posted by Stacey on 9/9/2002 at 11:41:37 PM
Fronk - Well I guess that leaves YOU out of any conversation, eh?

Jonathan ' Spelling was YOUR strong point I see.

Joe - Clearly my "Porky Pig" impersonation went in one ear and straight out the other with nothing in between to slow it down.

Should you three stooges care to continue this dialog, please have the courtesy to continue it off board. My eMail address is gmarten@hotmail.com

   RE:To the three stooges; Fronk, Jonathan & Joe posted by Albert on 9/10/2002 at 12:01:08 AM
Stacey, Malaya is a PENINSULA!

   RE:RE:To the three stooges; Fronk, Jonathan & Joe posted by P.C. Kohler on 9/10/2002 at 3:26:08 AM
God heavens-- is this what is called a 'flame war'; on a discussion site about calm and civil English roadsters?!?

Ok, back on topic with a useless bit of trivia: how many out there know that one of the reasons the Imperial Japanese Army made a complete hash of much superior British Imperial Forces in Malaya in February 1942?

The Japanese troops, largely 'mounted' on roadsters (and doubtless some nice English ones pinched en route) quickly wore out their tyres. With no replacements, they rode on their bare Westwood rims. To the British forces, this sounded like tanks on pavement and caused a rout in some forward lines.

The rest is, as they say, history. And a real war, not this squabble on geography. It's all the pink bits on the map that count anyway...

P.C. Kohler

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   GAZELLE roadster , please help. posted by William on 9/11/2002 at 12:18:20 PM
Hi guys!!!Whoa,I've never imagine that a simple comment from me can spark off such a lengthy 'debate'!!It seems that you guys have known each other for some time to have that kind of good-natured bantering and that's good.Well,I want to thank you guys for replying;so that means my bike is SURELY made in the 1950's but NO later than 1957/58,is it correct??
Well Chris,I'm sorry but I haven't seen or heard of any African Raleighs around here,let alone the motorised version!!Anyway,a big thanks again to you all and let us keep our 'Old Faithfuls' riding high!!! :D :D :D






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   SW hub posted by: Ian Buunk on 9/8/2002 at 8:29:57 AM
Hi
one of my recent purchases has a '57 SW hub
just how unreliable are these hubs, in what way do they fail
don't get me wrong i'm pretty excited about this bike/hub but am unsure of how much i can trust it with my welfare

thanks
Ian


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: SW hub posted by Sheldon Brown on 9/9/2002 at 5:08:49 AM
The SW hub was supposed to replace the AW. It was lighter, had a wider range, and nearly silent in operation. When they work well they're delightful.

Unfortunately, few of them work well. The're prone to skipping, particularaly in high gear.

Never, never, never, never, never, never NEVER EVER stand up to pedal a bike with an SW hub. Not EVER!!!!!

All the best,

Sheldon

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: SW hub posted by Ian Buunk on 9/10/2002 at 4:20:19 AM
Thanks for your reply Sheldon
I will certainly heed your warning

regards
Ian

ps Your site is one of my top three most visited sites, along with this one






FOR SALE:   The Story of the Raleigh Cycle book posted by: Kevin C. on 9/8/2002 at 3:04:25 AM
FOR SALE: One copy of "The Story of the Raleigh Cycle" by Bowden & Sillitoe. Nice condition, hardcover, with dust jacket, published in London, 1975. 216 pages jammed with Raleigh bicycle history, Raleigh photographs and Raleigh trivia. Just the thing for that DL-1 junkie in your life!! $45 postpaid.







WANTED:   Greetings posted by: Mike P. on 9/7/2002 at 11:16:07 PM
This newbie to the craft has brought home two ladies' Raleigh Sports in critical condition. The S-A hubs are dated 79, so I know they probably are slightly inferior in the componentry department (Weinmann brakes, etc). Looking through the crust, it looks like I could put together one fairly good example out of the two, and be able to make a presentable ride for the wife. My apologies if this has been already covered elsewhere, but where would I be able to dredge up some nice coffee brown sheetmetal, i.e. fenders, chainguard, maybe a correct rear rack? Many thanks in advance for any assistance or advice. Since these bicycles are not really in abundance in SE Texas, "Find and buy a good one" is easier said than done.
Also, on the Sheldon Brown '3-speed timeline', it shows a 1980 (Canada) Sports. Pardon my ignorance, but when was the Sports (in Roadster form) last sold in the US? Does a Nottingham headbadge really mean Nottingham-built? Thanks again.