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Archived: English Roadsters







AGE / VALUE:   Dynohub wire madness( mostly self imposed) posted by: humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 9/13/2002 at 4:37:59 PM
I discoveded breaks in my dynohub wiring and being out of wire I sighed and looked up. On my bench was this Black and Decker cordless battery operated screwdriver and the matching charger with the cord and wall socket thingie.
I looked at that cord and then at the wire on the bicycle. Only diffrence to me was the color of the casing. The origonal Sturmey-Archer wire casing was grey and the other stuff is black with a streak of white. It is two wires running side by side but still it looks to me that it's very similar and compatable. The grey wire provided with the Dynohub is two wires running side by side also.
Now it would be wasteful to hack up a charger's wiring for this project. Still, I already have a plug in charger that does not have any wire just a plug in two battery holding charger. The one I am using was a garage sale find and I paid like 50 cents for it.
So, I cut it and striped the ends and twisted the wire and made a harness.

I have gone to Radio Shack and been unable to find wire that is near exact or else I missed it. Anyways, replacing dynohub wire has been a bear and until I saw this charger wire I had not gotten arond it. I have found "Perfect" brand wire leads at a hobby shop and proceded to make up a dynohub wiring harness.
I have yet to test it to see if it will work acceptably.

I don't know the specs when it comes to what type wiring Sturmey-Archer used and not being knowlewdgable about wiring in general. It would have helped if I brought along a sample of original wire but still, usually the folks manning the counter don't know anyways and this is not something I have gone chasing after far enough to get it done properly.
However, I think this might work out fine. The cable is more flexable than the original. The copper strands are slightly smaller that Sturmey's and because of this I think there will possibly be a problem with it working well.
Sometimes the thing that has me grinding to a halt is really a stupid, trivial little matter that others would have no problem with.
Of course, the real solution is to snap up dynpohub wire when you see it in the shops and just buying a whole new in the box N.O.S. dynohub kit and being done with it is the best route to go.
An old school mechanic pal of mine ran the wire inside and along the fold in the rear mudguard. I have tried this and can't remember how he did it! You have to watch and really pay attention when folks show you things like this. I'll let you know if the lights work well with the "new" wire.I must have sold my batch of dynohub wireing sometime along the way. I remember batches of it with little price strings and brass terminal fittings. Who got it and when I don't remember.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Dynohub wire madness( mostly self imposed) posted by Mucus on 9/13/2002 at 5:11:16 PM
Chris,
This ought to work just fine. You can always replace it with something more like the origInal when you find it. I used wire something like you're talking about on a similar setup years ago when I had one, and as I recall it worked just ducky.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Dynohub wire madness( mostly self imposed) posted by Chris on 9/13/2002 at 5:17:43 PM
I sent dynohub stuff to this dude who was hitting coconuts in the dark that had fallen into his path. Where the rest of my wire went to, I don't know.
Thanks.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh African Advertising posted by: P.C. Kohler on 9/13/2002 at 2:22:50 PM
Quick, what was the single most successful and longest-lived bicycle advertising scheme?

Stumped?

Raleigh's wonderful African astride a roadster outdistancing an enormous lion. This was introduced in the 1920s and continued in various forms until the 1970s. Raleigh itself credited it with selling more of its product in the Third World than any other ad.

Well, I never knew there was a wonderfully clever reposte to this ad... just came up on eBay in the form of a fabulous enamelled sign from Thailand:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=713590371

Here, our African Raleigh rider is relaxing under a palm tree, dreaming of his victory over the lion. Meanwhile the lion is depicted as smiling as he steals the roadster, sight unseen!

A must see.

Both of these are also in my Yahoo Group "Roll Britannia" under Posters and Dealer Signs.

P.C. Kohler, marvelling that this sign is up to $550 and the reserve is still unmet!


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh African Advertising posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 9/13/2002 at 4:32:12 PM
I have a framed poster from 1971 and in it the lion is depicted chasing the rider who is wearing kahki colored pants and is wearing a gold watch. The lion is a bit ferocious looking with mouth open and teeth and all. Not the friendly grinning version we see in the original tin sign. This was a wildly popular and long running ad campaign. At one point it was discontinued but the C.T.C. Gazette reported that people wrote in and Raleigh responded bringing it back.
This poster is one of my favorites. Bicycle poster in general are neat. Thanks for showing it to us and keep up the great work with the web site!
These are still out there, these metal signs and keep in mind the nice prices paid when you go looking about.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh African Advertising posted by Mike on 9/13/2002 at 4:44:07 PM
Hmmmm. Authentic original or reproduction? Looks pretty new to me. If repop, it can be bought in far east street markets for about $5 U.S.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh African Advertising posted by Chris on 9/13/2002 at 5:15:09 PM
I'd rather have the bicycle given the amount of money involved.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh African Advertising posted by P.C. Kohler on 9/13/2002 at 5:33:23 PM
I am always a bit wary of these tin signs, too, especially if the seller is in Thailand, quite possibly over the tinsmith who is pounding the things out. Still, I've never seen this offered before.

I have other tin signs in Roll Britannia under Dealer Signs; all of these were proferred as being original when first offered on eBay.

But you gotta love this Raleigh African ad series... in the 50s the African "boy" had khaki shorts, knee socks to match (of course!), canvas oxfords and shirtless. For those of you keen on "period" cycling costume...

P.C. Kohler

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh African Advertising posted by Mark R. on 9/13/2002 at 7:21:38 PM
And people thought I was nuts when I bought my N.O.S. DL-1 for $450!
That looks like an original sign to me. I can't imagine anyone would spend that kind of bread on it!

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh African Advertising posted by Jeff R on 9/14/2002 at 2:27:41 AM
I have two pre war Raleigh porcelain signs that are not as nice as this one. I have been offered over $600.00 each for them. They look nice on my garage wall and I enjoy looking at them too much to sell them.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke Lengths redux posted by: P.C. Kohler on 9/13/2002 at 2:03:23 PM
Sorry to revisit this topic but a simple question:

When determining spoke length, the charts recently posted mentioned only Westwood and Endrick rims. What about Westrick rims (Raleigh pattern)? I am guessing these use the Westwood length because of the raised centre section.

P.C. Kohler


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke Lengths redux posted by Chris on 9/13/2002 at 4:35:10 PM
My book did not mention that version of rim.Perhaps it was not out and available yet.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke Lengths redux posted by Ken on 9/13/2002 at 8:07:11 PM
I was sorry to find that the link to "Damon Rinard's spoke length calculator", on Sheldon Brown's bike links, is broken. It was/is an Excel spreadsheet including a huge list of hubs and rims with their effective dimensions. Of over four hundred rims, only 5 are 26x1-3/8 and none are 28". It does include the hub dimensions for S-A, though.
For a laugh, click on the Wheelpro spokecalc link on Sheldon's links. This calculator works but doesn't have the accompanying database- you have to know your components' dimensions.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke Lengths redux posted by Ken on 9/13/2002 at 8:13:33 PM
P.S. to David: Wheelbuilding is worth trying. If you have the right spokes it's extremely satisfying (if you don't, it's impossible). It pleased me to discover that after you place the first spoke correctly, the rest can have only one correct placement.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Spoke Lengths redux posted by Jeff R. on 9/14/2002 at 2:16:10 AM
I have two old pre war Raleigh porcelian signs that are not as nice as this one. I have been offered over $600.00 each for them. They look nice on my garage wall and I like looking at them too much to sell them.






AGE / VALUE:   Amazing Humber catalogue (costly though) posted by: David Poston on 9/13/2002 at 12:12:59 AM
This is about the most delightful bicycle catalogue I have ever seen (and the oldest too). The seller even includes a personal, handwritten letter to the individual who was interested in purchasing a Humber bicycle. The bidding really got out of hand, though.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2138810388&rd=1


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Amazing Humber catalogue (costly though) posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 9/13/2002 at 4:37:34 PM
Oh that lovely chaincase! I wonder who has one of those. A nice treat. Don't think any paper literature you may have to be worthless. I'm surprised it went this high.






AGE / VALUE:   Still looking for 28" Westwood rims...And someone to build my wheel posted by: David Poston on 9/12/2002 at 7:43:57 PM
I am still searching for a source of NOS or good repro 28" x 1.5" Westwood chromed rims, as well as a qualified wheelbuilder who knows how to lace up a dynothree AG hub properly. I've had success locating the Raleigh wheelbuilding page on the internet, but I don't think it's a project I'm going to undertake myself.

David







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Scads of old English bikes and parts posted by: Geoff Rogers on 9/12/2002 at 1:52:48 AM
I just came back from England, where I attended the largest automotive swap meet in Europe. It's Beaulieu, on the south coast of Hampshire, and I went to buy Jaguar and MG parts, but the bicycle stuff was absolutely amazing!
There must have been over 100 rod-braked bikes for sale, mostly pretty nasty and rough, but a lot of decent ones, and mostly pretty cheap. Many were rare makes I had never heard of, although there were lots of Raleighs, Humbers, BSAs and the like. There was also a lot of NOS and rare parts. I bought some very early cables for a pound each, but passed on a near-perfect green gearcase for 4 pounds. To my great sadness, I also had to pass on the correct Dyno Three back wheel for my '50 Superbe, complete with the stainless rim I need for it, for 10 pounds (about $16). No room in the baggage.
Although this event is ostensibly for cars and motorcycles, there are lots of pedal cars, bicycles, antiques, housewares, you name it! I also picked up a pump, a nice Dyno headlamp, and a set of nice old rubber grips, all for a pound or two.
I can't wait to go back next year!


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Scads of old English bikes and parts posted by Peter on 9/12/2002 at 7:54:22 AM
Thanks for the info Geoff - I live here and did not know about it. Could you you tell us the name and dates of the event? Thanks, Peter.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Scads of old English bikes and parts posted by Mucus on 9/12/2002 at 11:52:29 AM
You should have sent it home via UPS.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Scads of old English bikes and parts posted by michael on 9/12/2002 at 10:19:07 PM
I concur...I would've sent it home FedEx or UPS...anything to get it home...

Can you supply name, location, dates?

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Scads of old English bikes and parts posted by Geoff on 9/12/2002 at 10:22:03 PM
The event is the Beaulieu Autojumble, held annually at the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu, Hants. It's the second weekend in September; next year it is the 13th and 14th, I think. Beaulieu is on the eastern boundary of the New Forest, about an hour southwest of London, more or less, and pretty close to Southampton. And a hell of a long way from Massachusetts, unfortunately!
I forgot to mention the mopeds and predecessors on display at the Baeulieu. there were at least a couple of tandem bikes with small motors attached. One was quite nice, original cream and dark blue paint, and asking price was 200 pounds. others were scurvy and cheaper. There was also several motors that lace into the rear wheel of a conventional bike, and one Raleigh with the motor so attached. I want one......
Geoff

And yes, Mucus, I should have sent it UPS, but where do I stop? I "should" have sent boxes and boxes of things home that way, but there's only so much time a fellow has to spend on this stuff, sadly.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Scads of old English bikes and parts posted by Geoff on 9/12/2002 at 10:22:14 PM
The event is the Beaulieu Autojumble, held annually at the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu, Hants. It's the second weekend in September; next year it is the 13th and 14th, I think. Beaulieu is on the eastern boundary of the New Forest, about an hour southwest of London, more or less, and pretty close to Southampton. And a hell of a long way from Massachusetts, unfortunately!
I forgot to mention the mopeds and predecessors on display at the Baeulieu. there were at least a couple of tandem bikes with small motors attached. One was quite nice, original cream and dark blue paint, and asking price was 200 pounds. others were scurvy and cheaper. There was also several motors that lace into the rear wheel of a conventional bike, and one Raleigh with the motor so attached. I want one......
Geoff

And yes, Mucus, I should have sent it UPS, but where do I stop? I "should" have sent boxes and boxes of things home that way, but there's only so much time a fellow has to spend on this stuff, sadly.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Scads of old English bikes and parts posted by Ian on 9/13/2002 at 9:44:01 AM
The English have a nationwide club for Powercycles, Autocycles and Mopeds called "The National Auto Cycle Club (NACC)" who put out a delightful magazine alled "Buzzing" all about vehicles that require "L.P.A." on hills (Light Pedal Assistance). I believe they have a web site these days although it is some years since I was a member. I think that if you do a search for "Buzzing" you will find it. Basically the difference is that Powercycles were pushbikes with motors added, autocycles were mini motorcycles with tubular steel frames and often with small Villiers engines with two speed gears, and Mopeds were pressed steel frames with motors usually made by the frame maker (although some bought their motors from firms such as Sachs) and with two or three gears. All were started by pedalling them. These types of thing were very popular just after WW2 because of the petrol shortages and some very famous companies such as B.S.A. made them. Ducati began in the two wheel business after the war by making the "Cucciolo" (meaning Little Pup) as a clip-on motor for bikes. I have a 1913 Wall Auto Wheel which is a third wheel like a small sidecar with the motor on it for a bike. This was later manufactured in the U.S.A. as the Smiths Motor Wheel and the engine was also used in the front wheel of a bike as the Dayton Motor Wheel. A whole new very interesting adjunct to cycling that opens up another dimension to spend time and dollars on!! Cheers, Ian.






AGE / VALUE:   english huffy posted by: freddie on 9/11/2002 at 10:53:44 PM
I hope somebody can tell me something about an older bike I got in trade yesterday. A 26" roadster. The tube that runs from the head tube to the crank says Made in England. The tube from the seat down has a multy color crest with lion crossed union jacks and a sheild ,a banner over it say guaranteed english lightweight. under this is a standing lion in gold with (constructed in england )in a circle around it. along each side of the top tube is Sportsman. On the chain guard it says huffy sportsman. full fenders with a ridge along the top.Three piece cranks. stermy archer 3 speed hub the date stamping is 63.coaster brake on rear and hand brake on front. It has a metal huffy head badge like those used in the 60s. A nice rear carrier that matches the bike exactly. It is a deep gloss red and in very good condition with no rust except on the thumb shifter.How many bikes did huffy make in england? Is it rare? This is a new one on me. Thanks for any info anybody can give me.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   english huffy posted by Geoff Rogers on 9/12/2002 at 2:04:01 AM
I think those old Huffy Sportsmen are cool, especially with those beautiful decals intact. Do you want another one for parts or whatever? I have a '64 that is complete, sort of, with good chrome but it has been brush painted green. I'd take $25 for it.
I am in Massachusetts.
Geoff Rogers

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   english huffy posted by english huffy on 9/12/2002 at 9:17:01 AM
P.S. also it has a wrights saddle. Is the chain guard in good condition on you bike? MIne has a large dent or more like a ripple right where the pedal comes around.It could be fixed but I don,t want to mess up the paint.If anybody has one in red I would be interested. thanks

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   english huffy posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 9/11/2002 at 11:40:43 PM
Huffy had a number of bikes made by Raleigh. The Genuine English Lightweight decal you describe is on a number of various Raleigh made bikes.

Rare, well I suppose they arer getting more rare. You don't see to many of them. I would fix it up and ride it and enjoy. You won't sell it and get rich, Not with this one.
Raleigh eventually put a stop to all the non Raleigh bikes and they concentrated on Raleigh mainly.

Mine is blue you have the Flamenco red color.
They are far nicer than the Huffy made Huffy's.






MISC:   Spit Shined Roadsters posted by: P.C. Kohler on 9/11/2002 at 3:09:54 PM
Not too long ago a kind soul on this Board suggested using black shoe polish on paintwork after using polishing compound.

Well...

IT WORKS!!

Amazing results on my Rudge. I mean amazing. A deep lustrious shine but not that icky "wet" look one gets from silcone sprays and such. Seriously, a good going over with Kiwi black shoe polish and this machine looks almost like she's rolling off the assembly line in Nottingham, April '49.

Next, I'm going to try brown polish on my maroon '51 Rudge.

So thanks for the tip.... even if my apartment smells like an army barracks before kit inspection.

P.C. Kohler


   RE:RE:RE:RE:MISC:   Spit Shined Roadsters posted by Peter on 9/12/2002 at 7:57:40 AM
I use it too. Its great on rust patches where touch in paint would look too obvious, it is wax based therefor protective, and presumably non-invasive - I guess it could be removed later with some solvent or other, if required.
Peter.

   RE:MISC:   Spit Shined Roadsters posted by David Poston on 9/11/2002 at 9:31:05 PM
P.C.,

I'll have to try that one, though I'm a bit leery about spit shining my roadster like a leather shoe. Does the polish leave a sticky residue on the surface? Seems the metal wouldn't absorb it like leather would.

I've been following up 3M rubbing compound with Meguair's auto polish, and it does give it a wet glossy look, although it doesn't really cover up scratches.

David

   RE:RE:MISC:   Spit Shined Roadsters posted by P.C. Kohler on 9/11/2002 at 11:14:44 PM
Nope... no sticky, smeary residue. Of course you need to buff the polish like a midshipman but ah, the results are worth it. And no spit required... just kidding. I would never spit on my Rudge.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   Spit Shined Roadsters posted by Mark R. (Mucus) on 9/12/2002 at 12:28:58 AM
You're welcome! I love the way it works. It'll even cover a lot of defects like you can't imagine.






FOR SALE:   Misc Raleigh Sprite 27 Parts posted by: Bryant on 9/11/2002 at 10:24:55 AM
am parting out a Raleigh Sprite 27 that had a hole in the frame. The bike was coffee brown and many if not all the parts have the Raleigh stamp on them. Wheels are in okay shape, both have the oiler hole in the hub covered by a sliding metal sleeve. There are some big rust spots on the rims that I touched up with chrome paint. The back wheel is in better condition and comes with Maillard freewheel and Sturmey Archer spoke protector. The front is probably good for only the hub. The cranks are in excellent shape, but I only have one pin remaining, the other died in removal. I also have the bottom bracket with the adjustable cup. Fenders are complete with some rust and scratches but look pretty good. The Huret derailleurs are okay, with some rust on the rear, shifters and cable stops are fine. Brakes, levers, handlebars stem and butterfly kickstand are on Ebay already. E-mail me if you want anything.


   RE:FOR SALE:   Misc Raleigh Sprite 27 Parts posted by Bryant on 9/11/2002 at 10:30:58 AM
Forgot to mention the Brooks Mattress saddle with a small split in the seam on the right hand side. Pictures are available.

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Misc Raleigh Sprite 27 Parts posted by Albert on 9/11/2002 at 4:20:16 PM
Please advise the group of the selling price of anything sold --- if anything is sold. The shipping costs of these item far exceeds any economic value.

I really think that these types of items are best given away in the spirit of the commraderie that exists between those of similar arcane interests.

Cheers from Philadelphia, Albert






AGE / VALUE:   another interesting idem posted by: sam on 9/11/2002 at 1:22:55 AM
I have one but didn't know how it mounted till now.http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2139800514


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   another interesting idem posted by Ian on 9/12/2002 at 9:40:39 AM
Sam, quite a few English lightweights such as my 1949 Knights of Harrow had a brazed on boss low down on the front fork for a lamp bracket like this. I have never seen any literature that showed them fitted on the axle but that is not to say it wasn't done and anyway if it works why not do it! Regards, Ian.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   another interesting idem posted by Jacob on 9/12/2002 at 11:58:51 AM
This kind of lamp brackets is still widely used on (also modern) commuter bikes here in Denmark, where august/september have been unusual warm and sunny. But days are getting shorter now, and soon the darkness of winter will be here again. So I'm gonna check on my generators and battery lights!
Personally I don't like these axle-bracket - I think the light is to low.

Take care
Jacob

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   another interesting idem posted by Ed on 9/11/2002 at 12:04:52 PM
Sam can you share your knowledge,as to how and where that bracket mounts with the rest of us?
Thanks, Ed.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   another interesting idem posted by Mucus on 9/11/2002 at 12:57:09 PM
Oh yeah! I had one of those! It mounts on the axle. Your light mounts low that way. It's very old.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Not that Blinking Rudge Again.. posted by: P.C. Kohler on 9/11/2002 at 12:57:42 AM
At the considerable risk of boring all and sundry, the second phase of my restoration of my Rudge 1949 Super Safety is complete. All the lining has been restored and the paintwork and chrome as restored as possible without repainting or rechroming.

I have posted a few pix taken earlier today in my Yahoo Group "Roll Britannia"

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/rollbritannia/

P.C. Kohler


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Not that Blinking Rudge Again.. posted by Peter on 9/12/2002 at 8:00:46 AM
I agree - super job. Inspiring. You can't bore us with a 1949 Rudge.
Peter.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Not that Blinking Rudge Again.. posted by Ed on 9/11/2002 at 3:20:49 AM
Great job P.C. Thanks for sharing the photo.






AGE / VALUE:   address for Randy's wheel site posted by: Chris on 9/10/2002 at 6:13:22 PM
Go to Randy's site for the Raleigh wheel building instructions.
http://www.rickadee.net/'zephyrus/ad4935/ad4935.html


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   address for Randy's wheel site posted by David Poston on 9/11/2002 at 5:06:18 AM
Chris,

Bad link. Says, "page not found."

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   address for Randy's wheel site posted by David Poston on 9/11/2002 at 5:13:26 AM
Chris,

Bad link. Says, "page not found."

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   address for Randy's wheel site posted by Chris on 9/11/2002 at 5:02:43 PM
Do a Google or netscape or whatever you want but do a web search under Raleigh wheel building instructions. It came right up for me.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   address for Randy's wheel site posted by Dewane on 9/11/2002 at 7:30:45 PM
It's there, just replace the single-quote with a tilde.

I found a way to fix this:

Hold down the Alt key on your keyboard, press 1 2 6, and release the Alt key. Presto! A tilde that shows up on oldroads. (Works on Windows anyhow)

Now to see if it really works:

http://www.rickadee.net/'zephyrus/ad4935/ad4935.html

- Dewane

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   address for Randy's wheel site posted by Dewane on 9/11/2002 at 7:36:14 PM
I'm a liar.

Actually, replace the tilde with an ampersand, a pound sign, the numbers 126, and a semicolon.

http://www.rickadee.net/~zephyrus/ad4935/ad4935.html



I will be quiet now. Keep the rubber side down, as motorcyclists say.






AGE / VALUE:   Spoke lengths for A.G. and F.G posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 9/10/2002 at 3:32:24 PM
WHEEL BUILDING
Spoke lengths may vary from other hubs and the following chart gives the lengths recommended for the normal types and sizes of rims.
G.H.6 Dynohub
Rim Type and Size Small Large
Flange Flange
Westwood 28 X 1 1/2" 12 3/32" 11 11/16"


Westwood 26 X 1 1/2" 11 3/32" 10"

Westwood 26 X 1 3/8" 11 5/32" 10 1/8"


Endrick 26 X 1 3/8" 11 9/32" 10 1/8"

Endrick 26 X 1 1/4" 11 3/8" 10 5/16"

Lacing: 3 cross both sides for 28" front

3 cross on small flange and two cross on large
flange for 26" front.

Manufacturers recommend the use of 14 G
spokes when building.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Spoke lengths for A.G. and F.G posted by Chris on 9/10/2002 at 3:58:21 PM
The words, small flange come before the words large flange. Read it straight across

Also this table is from 1956 and is in inches.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:  A.G. AND F.G. SPOKE LENGHTS posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 9/10/2002 at 4:12:54 PM
Correction:

Well, that's just wonderful!

It appears the book has a printng error in it!

It says the small and large flange measurements are the same sizes for the A.G. and the F.G. dynohubs and I doubt that is correct so I won't post it at all.


Now I am not certain that the right measurements for spokes for the above post about the G.H.6. dynohub either.

Please dis-regard. Sorry.
Chris
We'll need to get spoke lengths from another source.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:  A.G. AND F.G. SPOKE LENGHTS posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 9/10/2002 at 4:27:42 PM
Edward says the spoke lengths are the same for the A.G. and the F.G. so the book must be correct after all.

Here goes.

Westwood 28 X 1 1/2 11 5/16" 11 5/16"


Westwood 26 X 1 1/2 11" 11"


Westwood 26 X 1 3/8 11 1/32" 11 1/ 32"


Endrick 26 X 1 3/8" 11 3/32" 11 3/32"


Endrick 26 X 1 3/8" 11 3/32" 11 3/32"

Endrick 26 X 1 1/4" 11 3/16" 11 3/16


Lacing: All rears 4 cross both sides
Manufacturers recommend the use of 14 G spokes when building

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:  A.G. AND F.G. SPOKE LENGHTS posted by Chris on 9/10/2002 at 4:30:56 PM
The first table is for when building the G.H.6 dynohub into rims.

The second table a bit down the page here is for the rear 3 speed A.G. and the four speed F.G. dynohubs.
I hope I was helpful.






AGE / VALUE:    posted by: Mucus on 9/10/2002 at 2:01:49 PM
I just found out that "DL-1" means De Lux model #1 Is that true?







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Phillips Roadsters posted by: Max M. on 9/10/2002 at 3:39:59 AM
I am the latest owner of a 1961 Phillips Roadmaster bicycle. My friend P.C. Kohler has mentioned this new acquisition in one of his posts.
It is British Racing Green, has rod brakes, bolt-on rear stays, mattress saddle, SA front and rear lights and rear rack. The wheels are Sturmey AW and GH6 Dynohub with Westwood rims. It also came with an extra pound of rust and several coats of hand brushed latex paint on the wheels and rear triangle.
I would like to request any pics or information regarding the different models that were available back then. If you are the lucky fellow who has a Phillips catalog then please do contact me.
I will get some pics of the progress posted soon and will provide a link.

Regards
Max M.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Phillips Roadsters posted by Edward in Vancouver on 9/10/2002 at 2:49:12 PM
Ooh boy, lots of luck with the restoration, Latex paint is a lot harder than spray paint to remove. I'm a big fan of Oxalic acid to remove rust, Marine mechanics use it on salt water outboards, and you can usually find it in a store that carries wood finishing products. I wonder what the cones are like in the GH6, for some reason they take alot of abuse, and are usually scored or pitted. I've got one LH cone available, if you need it, shout. L.O.L.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Phillips Roadsters posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 9/10/2002 at 3:19:36 PM
Hand brushed paint,it was painted by somebody ??? AIIEEEEEAAHHHH!!! THUD!

When I bought up the personal bikes belonging to the Debatyes( of Red Devil racing fame) family and Mrs. Steiger showed me the homepaint over the once wonderful hand done box lining I cried out like I was injured. She like that I shared her anger over the loss of originality and thus sold me the whole kit and kaboodle. Somebody sloped up the bikes against theft when these were brought over on the boat to the U.S.A.

My terrible sin was that I sold the personal bike of the man himself instead of keeping it. It fell into my 16 year old unenlightened hands. If I ever score like this again and I likely won't it will go into the vault to be kept until I die and I'll pay storage every month.

I have pictures someplace and I'll send them in when I find them.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Phillips Roadsters posted by P.C. Kohler on 9/10/2002 at 5:03:52 PM
It's kinda frightening folks... Max is just down the hall from my apartment. Two British bike nuts that close... yikes. Who borrows a cup of sugar? With us, it's Sturmey Archer oil and polishing compound.

This is a really interesting cycle. GH6 dated 7 61. AW hub 61 too. Literally a smaller version of the DL-1: 26" wheels, 21" frame (or is it 22?), rounded section mudguards, bolted backstay and roadster geometry. Gorgeous British racing green. Wonderful brass Phillips badges on the headtube and rear mudguard. Well once Max wetsanded off the latex crud and the rust. Beware of college town bikes! This looks like the ones you used to see in Oxford. So old and battered, no one locks them. But amazing progress to date....

I still don't think I'll let this Phillips get anywhere near my Rudge... she's leary of those 24 tpi bikes let alone ones whose previous owner painted the hub and even the spokes (!) with black latex.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Phillips Roadsters posted by Mucus on 9/10/2002 at 6:29:46 PM
In my experience whenever there is pait hand painted all over a bike it means it was stollen, and the jackass who stole it thought painting everything will fool everybody. I saw a guy in my home town here riding a Klein mtn. bike with everything slopped all up with silver paint (even the tires!), except you could clearly read the name "Klein" on the down tube. So you just knew it was stollen. But the cops never seem to figure that out, you know?
Anyway, maybe your Phillips was hot at one time during it's life.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Phillips Roadsters posted by Mucus on 9/10/2002 at 6:29:58 PM
In my experience whenever there is paint hand painted all over a bike it means it was stollen, and the jackass who stole it thought painting everything will fool everybody. I saw a guy in my home town here riding a Klein mtn. bike with everything slopped all up with silver paint (even the tires!), except you could clearly read the name "Klein" on the down tube. So you just knew it was stollen. But the cops never seem to figure that out, you know?
Anyway, maybe your Phillips was hot at one time during it's life.