AGE / VALUE:   Bike Shipping posted by: Beth on 10/6/2003 at 7:45:25 PM
I am thinking of purchasing a bike through ebay. Does anyone have a way to calculate shipping costs? Either FedEX or Amtrak? What sizes can you get a bike down to to help estimate shipping? Any help is appreciated.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bike Shipping posted by Drew on 10/7/2003 at 1:09:39 AM
All of the major shippers have info on their websites. The way I've used is get a bike box from any bike shop, remove peddles & front wheel, turn handle bars 90 degrees then ship it UPS ground for $18. to $27. depending on weight. Some people selling bikes really over charge on shipping, $40, $50 or more! A seller sent the mother ship of bikes to me for less then $30., a loaded '51 Schwinn balloon tire cruiser, UPS guy had to drag the thing to My front door!

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bike Shipping posted by Jeff bikeguy on 10/7/2003 at 1:33:00 AM
If you use UPS be sure to watch your box size. Avoid boxes for large frame bikes or you'll have to ship it as oversized which runs a lot more. Use plenty of packing material. If you get a box from your local bike shop, see if they still have the packing material and the little plastic doo-dads that go on the ends of the hubs and fork ends. You may even want to get a second box and double-box the bike for added protection.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bike Shipping posted by Beth on 10/7/2003 at 6:01:53 AM
Thanks everyone. I think I'm going to go after that bike. Thanks for the help.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bike Shipping posted by Joe on 10/7/2003 at 7:58:34 AM
FedEx is by far the cheapest, Coast to Coast for a bike box up to 52x26x9" and as much as 50 lbs. for $34. I tried UPS and they considered the same sixe box oversized and required it go by freight at over $220. The least I've been charged by UPS even for a smaller bike box is $79., and that was a small frame bike in a much smaller box. Distance and size is more a contributor to the price than is the weight.






WANTED:   Raleigh Book posted by: Rob Probelski on 10/5/2003 at 6:55:06 PM
I am looking for a book that lists colors, features, etc of Raleigh 3 speeds. A collector guide would be nice, but I am looking for practically anything. Thanks.


   RE:WANTED:   Raleigh Book posted by David Poston on 10/8/2003 at 4:11:38 PM
I'm not aware that such a book exists, apart from period catalogues, but I think we need to get together and publish one an authoritative and exhaustive book on this entire subject: history, production line from various manufacturers, collecting, restoration, cycling, etc. With the numbers of things "Raleigh" which sell on e-bay everyday, I would think (or, at least hope) that our forum here is just the tip of the iceberg. If that is the case, then such a book would sell like mad on Amazon.com. There are plenty of books on American ballooners, no doubt, but hardly anything dedicated solely to English 3-speeds.

David






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Question posted by: Mike on 10/5/2003 at 5:19:31 AM
A question: I have a '74 Raleigh Sport 3 Speed I bought from ebay. The saddle on it is a black mattress (vinyl surface I would say) with a little tag on the back that says "comfort". It looks similar to an old persons I saw awhile back. Anyone know if such a saddle is stock for the bike, and anyone have any information on the thing? I couldn't find anything. It is similar in appearance to the black vinyl saddle that VVVintage sells.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Question posted by David on 10/5/2003 at 12:14:53 PM
I doubt very much this is original. By '74, a Brooks would have been standard (probably a plastic mattress saddle similar to what you have now). You'll be much happier with your bike's looks if you install a Brooks B72 or B66. I think you'll find it more comfortable, too. They're both available new (from www.permaco.com among other places) or used.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Saddle Question posted by P.C. Kohler on 10/5/2003 at 6:45:13 PM
In 1974 Raleigh were still fitting the classic Brooks B-72 saddle to Sports. Only the Sprite and the LTD-3 came with mattresss saddles. I think it around 1977-78 that mattress saddles came to be standard for the Sports.

If you want a B-72, eBay is your best source, there are at least one or two on offer every week.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Question posted by Mike on 10/5/2003 at 9:36:32 PM
I recently purchased a B66 from ebay, I'm assuming it's more comfortable than the 72, is there a great degree of difference?

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Question posted by David on 10/5/2003 at 10:38:16 PM
All in all, I think I prefer my supple B72. The seat is soft enough for comfort, but it doesn't wiggle around like the B66 does.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Question posted by Brian on 10/6/2003 at 12:33:48 PM
Both the B-72 & the B-66 seats are appropriate. I suppose a heavy rider would notice some saddle "wiggle" on the B-66 more than a light rider such as myself. I really like the springs as they add an touch of comfort to my Sports models. My fast fixie has a B-72 which works out quite well, but I could have just as well used a B-17 or Professional on it. For high mileage bikes I highly recommend the B-17. I know there has been endless talk about using only Proofhide on the Brooks, and being cautious about tweaking the tensioning nut. I wholeheartedly agree with this advice, but I have found you can safely apply subtle color changes to your Brooks Honey saddle with Kiwi shoe polish (the tin Kiwi only!) - the tan/brown Kiwi in moderation will work like a charm, and in four years of doing this I've had no negative outcomes. Black Kiwi on those old, black, durable Raleigh frames is a godsend too - wipe on & polish to a shine.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Saddle Question posted by Warren on 10/9/2003 at 2:46:44 AM
Leather saddles may have been standard for english and US models in the early 70's but not in Canada. I've had at least 10 Superbes and Sports models pass through my hands from this period and only a couple had B72s. The leather saddle was an option here...unfortunately.

I too prefer the fit of a B72 to a B66.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Saddle Question posted by Edward in Vancouver on 10/10/2003 at 12:04:35 AM
Just my two cents worth here, but isn't the leather upper for the B66 the exact same as for the B 72?

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Saddle Question posted by P.C. Kohler on 10/10/2003 at 3:25:55 AM
Darned close Edward:

B-72 10 1/2" x 8 1/2" x 2 1/4", weighs 1 lb 11 oz
B-66 10 1/2" x 8 1/2" x 2 7/8, weighs 2 lb 5 oz

The biggest advantage of the B-72 is that it's far more efficient: any sprung saddle like the B-66 absorbs a measure of the energy you're putting into the stroke; that "bouncing" is just wasted energy!

By the way, all these lovely Brooks saddles were standard only after the war. Pre-1939 most of the machines came with mattress saddles, even higher end clib bikes. Remarkable. I'd rather walk than ride on anything but a good quality British leather cycle saddle.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Question posted by Mike on 10/16/2003 at 9:35:49 PM
Follow up: The B66 arrived today, I think the general sentiment here was pretty much on target, it's a wonderful saddle. As comfortable as, if not more comfortable than a 30s Leather Sprung I have my Schwinn Henderson. It's used and has a few small scuffs on it, but I'm not sure about shoe polish to darken these areas, anyone use that? I used some Kiwi saddle soap on it to clean it up and soften it some. I've had good success with that in the past, and this time was no exception. Thanks for the tips all!

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Question posted by Mike on 10/16/2003 at 9:38:22 PM
Follow up: The B66 arrived today, I think the general sentiment here was pretty much on target, it's a wonderful saddle. As comfortable as, if not more comfortable than a 30s Leather Sprung I have my Schwinn Henderson. It's used and has a few small scuffs on it, but I'm not sure about shoe polish to darken these areas, anyone use that? I used some Kiwi saddle soap on it to clean it up and soften it some. I've had good success with that in the past, and this time was no exception. Thanks for the tips all!






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Saddle Question posted by: Mike on 10/5/2003 at 5:19:31 AM
A question: I have a '74 Raleigh Sport 3 Speed I bought from ebay. The saddle on it is a black mattress (vinyl surface I would say) with a little tag on the back that says "comfort". It looks similar to an old persons I saw awhile back. Anyone know if such a saddle is stock for the bike, and anyone have any information on the thing? I couldn't find anything. It is similar in appearance to the black vinyl saddle that VVVintage sells.







AGE / VALUE:   claude butler cordon bleu racer posted by: stephen fuller on 10/4/2003 at 5:50:10 PM
i have just purchased a claude butler racer which i am told is about thirty years old the model is called a cordon bleu i would be very grateful if you could supplt me with some informatiom about this bike.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   claude butler cordon bleu racer posted by Ken on 10/6/2003 at 6:14:40 PM
stephen, does the bike have derailleurs? If so, post on vintage lightweights page. More description, please.






AGE / VALUE:   another interesting ebay posted by: sam on 10/4/2003 at 5:39:30 PM
Interesting bicycle? horn made in england.Wonder if they chased foxes on bicycles? http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2561591718&category=12







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Answer to the paint (of sorts) another question though posted by: Mike on 10/4/2003 at 1:06:45 AM
Alright, I have recently come across a difficult but cheap solution to the bronze green paint issue. I simply got art/hobby paints that were similar in color to the bronze green (I used mixture of olive green, gold green and black) and I obtained a reasonable mixture that is relatively seamless. Now touch up areas can be noticed very close up but without actually looking for the areas I couldn't tell.

I have another question though: my brakes squeal like there's no tomorrow. I've toed them in, filed the surface to obtain fresh material, but they still sound awful. They work but the sound is horrid. Anyone know what to do next?


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Answer to the paint (of sorts) another question though posted by Dick in FL on 10/4/2003 at 2:31:55 AM
You might want to post the precise codes for those hobby shop paints. I have had success with Model Master 1910 Dark Green (spray) FS34079. (It also comes in a brush-on "nail-polish" bottle for wimps.) The finish dries somewhat flat and needs to be brightened up with a couple coats of clear.
The very last Superbes manufactured for the home market with full chaincases (up to about 1983) used an altogether different green which can matched perfectly with Model Master 2916 British Green.

Your brake squeal problem is a wonderful (or not-so-wonderful) example of a class of vibrations designated as "self-excited" or, more pedanticly, self-induced. So you are in the same class as Jascha Heifetz drawing his rosined bow across a violin string. Also ..... the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge before WWII. In a nutshell, a static coefficient of friction that is higher than the kinetic coefficient of friction allows the pad to be dragged to the point where the restorative springiness of the brake arms pops it loose and it tries to return to a neutral position this occurring over and over at the natural frequency of the structure. It seems like you have taken the expected corrective measures. Did you set the toe-in on the "exit" end of the shoes and keep it under a mm? Also, if the mounting bolt is not secure it will induce a shudder and cause "grabby" braking. A final suggestion: Disassemble the brake so that you can bend the spring into a shape that provides a higher pre-load. Unfortunately, this will not alter it's natural frequency; for this you need to try a different (stiffer) spring. Keep us posted.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Answer to the paint (of sorts) another question though posted by Mike on 10/4/2003 at 3:46:18 AM
I set the toe in (in this case) for the front of the front brake pads. The mounting bolt is pretty tight, it's tight enough so that the caliper arms don't flex much but loose enough to let the brakes open and close. They are the phillips model brakes, the bike is a 74 sport. Does that make much difference? I'll try another set of pads next, I hope that works out.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Answer to the paint (of sorts) another question though posted by Bryan on 10/5/2003 at 6:13:06 PM
I've had on and off brake problems like you mentioned. I've done everything, but finally gave up. I've found that the noise sometimes goes away unexpectedly, sometimes not.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Answer to the paint (of sorts) another question though posted by jack on 10/7/2003 at 3:58:18 AM
As in car disks, oftentimes the cure is to change pads. I find those 30 yo pads pretty hard and softer coumpound might help, both braking and squeel. A problem would be getting a new pad to fit the holders w/o tedious cutting and filing. Of course you could go w/new shoes entirely at the risk of authenticity.






AGE / VALUE:   WHERE DO I LIST MY PARTS ON EBAY posted by: PAUL V on 10/3/2003 at 9:53:49 AM
I HAVE SOME PARTS THAT I WOULD LIKE TO LIST BUT AM NOT TOO SURE WHERE IN EBAY I SHOULD LIST. IT IS MAINLY VINTAGE CAMPAGNOLO PARTS.THIS SHOULD HELP FUND MY SONS UNI FUND AND MY 1948 RALEIGH LADIES RESTORATION


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   WHERE DO I LIST MY PARTS ON EBAY posted by Bryan on 10/4/2003 at 2:38:16 PM
You might also try just posting here on Old Roadsin the "for sale" or "vintage lightweights" section and see if anyone makes you an offer you think is fair. I know you don't get the thrill of seeing an auction price climb, but if you have an idea of how much you want it might be easier.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   WHERE DO I LIST MY PARTS ON EBAY posted by David on 10/3/2003 at 10:01:09 PM
Unfortunately, ebay has two main bike areas; collectibles/transportation/bicycles and /sporting goods/bicycles I suspect "collectibles" is more appropriate for your items, but you can pay a bit more and list 'em in both areas.






MISC:   spoke length? posted by: red on 10/3/2003 at 8:23:18 AM
I know there is an insanely difficult mathematical formula out there for calculating spoke lengths, but I thought asking would be easier than attempting to figure it out. I have a 40 hole S/A AG hub that I want to lace on to a standard ridged-middle rim (westrick?). I have a Supurbe with this set up but I'd rather not take spokes out to measure unless I have to. It is a lot of work to take the chain case apart and the sprocket off, and then put it back together. However the setup on the Supurbe is cross 4 on both sides; and oddly enough, after crude (on the wheel) measurements, the spokes appear to be the same length (is that possible?). Does anyone know what that length is, or more specifically, what length(s) I need to lace up my AG and rim?


   RE:MISC:   spoke length? posted by red on 10/3/2003 at 8:37:35 AM
PS. 26 x 1 3/8 of course.

   RE:MISC:   spoke length? posted by P.C. Kohler on 10/3/2003 at 11:02:22 PM
Roll Britannia has spoke charts in the Files Section of both Roll Britannia and Roll Britannia 2 with specific references to rims and S/A hubs.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:MISC:   spoke length? posted by Edward in Vancouver on 10/4/2003 at 1:17:06 AM
I think P.C. has the original Raleigh wheelbuilding instructions on his website, very usefull and includes a spoke chart. Two years ago I built my first (and so far only) wheel with these instructions, 40 spk, cross four, with a FG hub and a Raleigh wheel. All 40 spokes are the same length

   RE:MISC:   spoke length? posted by Joe on 10/4/2003 at 9:41:23 AM
I've got one apart here, it's got 11 1/8" (283 mm) spokes in a cross 3 pattern. They looked a tad bit short, but all of the threads where hidden in each nipple, there was room for a size or two longer.
The Westrick rims usually use the same spokes as a comparable Schwinn S-5 rim (26 x 1 3/8"), they are very similar in design. I believe a Schwinn calls for a 11 3/16" spoke for a cross 3 pattern.
Also, the link to the Spokecalc download is: http://www.damonrinard.com/spocalc.htm

   RE:MISC:   spoke length? posted by David on 10/3/2003 at 10:04:51 PM
Check at www.sheldonbrown.com. I think he has a spoke length calculator and, probably, a link to spocalc, an excel spreadsheet that does a good job.

   RE:RE:MISC:   spoke length? posted by red on 10/4/2003 at 9:36:56 PM
Thanks to you all.






MISC:   Raleigh All Steel? posted by: jack on 10/3/2003 at 7:20:15 AM
On '69 Superbe, was the factory pump made of steel? I have 2 pumps, one is chrome-plated steel and not marked (suspect Asian). The other is aluminum and marked Made in England.

Similarly, what is the "correct" kickstand for this bike? I currently have Pletscher ESGE on this as well as an '80 Tourist.


   RE:MISC:   Raleigh All Steel? posted by Jeff Bikeguy on 10/3/2003 at 11:18:42 PM
My 67 Surpurbe has an aluminum pump on it. Both of my early Phillips bikes have plastic Apex pumps on them.

   RE:MISC:   Raleigh All Steel? posted by Dewane on 10/3/2003 at 11:20:44 PM
The original pump was probably made of steel and the same color as the bike. At least it was on my '72 coffee Sports (with original matching coffee pump).

   RE:RE:MISC:   Raleigh All Steel? posted by Dick in FL on 10/4/2003 at 2:39:26 AM
Did your '72 come with brazed-on pump pegs? Mine did not. Are there some historians out there who can pin down the appearance of this "cost-improvement"?






MISC:   S-A Cable Routing posted by: jack on 10/3/2003 at 3:13:41 AM
As the 69?Superbe refurb is almost complete and while admiring the lines, I notice I don't like the S-A cable routing running along to slightly below the toptube. The toptube is already busy w/rr brake cable. Is it possible to relocate the pulley to above BB and cable stop to downtube a la Womens model w/o running into problems? Besides not being as conspicuous, it is a more direct routing. Has anyone done this? Is it hare-brained? Is it sacrilage?


   RE:MISC:   S-A Cable Routing posted by Dick in FL on 10/3/2003 at 5:05:32 AM
Apparently the Raleigh designers of 30 years ago anticipated your aesthetic preference and made a cable routing change between 1969 and 1972. Both my 1971 Superbe and 1977 Colt have the little fulcrum pulley on the bottom of the seat tube just above the BB. My 1969 Robin Hood is set up like your 1969 Superbe.

   RE:RE:MISC: S-A Cable Routing posted by jack on 10/3/2003 at 7:19:34 AM
Thanks for the info Dick. I went ahead and re-routed and am pleased with the results. Only ran into two snags. The top tube is smaller in diameter than the seat and bottom tubes. A longer screw for the cable stop clamp was needed since it was re-located from the top to bottom tube. The other snag is that the re-rout is more direct and therefore the cable is a little long so I have no adjustment left. Still works but may need to cut and re-ferrule if cable stretches further.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:MISC: S-A Cable Routing posted by Edward in Vancouver on 10/4/2003 at 1:30:15 AM
Nah, the only "Sacrilage" you can commit is to spray paint the whole bike, including tires, cables, and chain...
If you're concerned with aesthetics, and don't want a clumsy cable eye-bolt clamp spoiling the look, do the brass tube trick. If you look at the original S/A cable, there's a 1/2'' piece of brass crimped on the end of the cable. If you go to a hobby store that has a selection of brass tubing ($1 per foot) find the diameter that just slides over the cable, cut a piece of it off, slide the adjusting barrel over the cable, then crimp on the piece of tubing. I've done this with several bikes now, including two 4 spd hubs which put the cable under considerable more stress than 3 speeds, and have had nothing but smooth shifts.

   RE:RE:RE:MISC: S-A Cable Routing posted by Dick in FL on 10/3/2003 at 9:24:34 PM
What you need is an SA cable from a more recent setup. My 1987 lady's Schwinn Collegiate has has a cable pinch-clamp where it joins the indicator chain. The hub is the 3-speed with coaster brake.

   RE:MISC:   S-A Cable Routing posted by Steve on 10/6/2003 at 3:17:48 PM
I've done a variation on this - using the bottom-bracket derailleur-cable guide shoe (heavily greased) to route a S-A cable. The only trouble is that the resulting run to the hub left the cable alarmingly close to my heel, particularly in high gear with the cable slack. So I took a chain-stay derailleur cable stop and mounted it sideways in order to hold the cable in closer to the chainstay. It works well, though the installation isn't quite as neat as I'd hoped.
A few months back I noticed a Raleigh "Competition" frame for sale on eBay that had a chainstay stop mounted in the same way, and thought "Someone used this bike with a Sturmeyhub."






MISC:   Blue Star '58 posted by: ero on 10/3/2003 at 3:04:28 AM
I've been trying to find info on one Blue Star (London) bicycle I found recently with a Sturmey Archer SW 3 Speed hub dated 2/58. IRC bow pedals, Lycett saddle, Dunlop rims, British Hub Co. Ltd front hub, Monitor Sheerline brakes, Miller generator + lights. Nice chrome caps at the top of the front fork, nice rusty black paint but saveable. Three tapered "H"s alternating with "V"s in the chainring design. I've never heard of this marque, save as a BSA motorcycle model from the 30's. I'm curious not so much about value as origin, who built these, etc. Thanks for any help!!!
Ero


   RE:MISC:   Blue Star '58 posted by Ero on 10/3/2003 at 3:55:25 AM
Whoops, I forgot the serial #BC736 on left drop-out. Headbadge is cheesy tin silver star with rays expanding ever outward.....






AGE / VALUE:   1970 Sunbeam 3 speed value please posted by: Mark on 10/3/2003 at 2:44:25 AM
I have a 1970 Sunbeam 3 speed, black with gold pinstriping. It is in very good condition. No rust! Only a couple of slight dings. It appears the original owner bought it and never road it. Rides great! Does anyone have a bluebook value on it? Thanks for your help.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1970 Sunbeam 3 speed value please posted by David on 10/5/2003 at 12:23:22 PM
I'll bet it's actually Raleigh-built. If the fender eyelets are behind the dropouts, it's Raleigh. I assume it has 26x 1 3/8 tires and cable brakes and a hockey stick chainguard. Probably a base value of no more than $100. Add 20 to 50 each for the Sunbeam name, enclosed chainguard, Dynohub lighting, interesting chainwheel design. If it has rod brakes, it's somewhat more valuable. A men's 23" frame is worth more than 21" which is worth more than a women's frame. If it has 28" wheels it's probably worth double all the above. If it's rusty and dented up, subtract a lot. Finally, it's worth exactly what someone is willing to pay!






AGE / VALUE:   I could not remember the magic words and my book was at home posted by: annoyed Chris who got major bargains anyways! on 10/3/2003 at 12:37:07 AM
The lady would not stop it. She kept on and on and got louder. It was bad!

"He's a collector! make him pay more! Hey collector, dealer, guy! Over here! Our old toys are over here?
Oh, that's a Schwinn, that Peugot! it's worth more than 3.00! SDchwinns are always worth more, She tried to take it away from me. Tried.
"Raise that price!" She took glee in the first day markup!
Thats too cheap! Oh Schwinn, Schwinn!
Don't let him buy that!
and on and on.

If I had not forgotten the spell and left the black book at home I could have done something!
kidding!
What fun is making out like a bandit if you go home needing a drink? I sat and looked over everything.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   I could not remember the magic words and my book was at home posted by Chris on 10/3/2003 at 12:44:45 AM
I feel like removing the bow pedals and tossing them into the trash!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   I could not remember the magic words and my book was at home posted by Rif on 10/4/2003 at 3:20:23 PM
Chris,
I always enjoy reading your posts! You have a very keen and witty perception of life and the world around. Please don't lose that!
Rif

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   I could not remember the magic words and my book was at home posted by Mucus on 10/7/2003 at 6:27:05 PM
You should'a clocked the bitch!!!!

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   I could not remember the magic words and my book was at home posted by Chris on 10/8/2003 at 12:46:10 AM
Clocked? No. No can do. But it was annoying.
Invarably, this happens a lot of the time.
I can recognize the other folks lookin about who are dealers also. I suppose this happens to others but I just walk away and I guess that's all you can do.

When they run about and get the staff of the whole thing in an uproar then it gets bad.

Also have seen the old bikes put in the trash because it is too old.
This is a numbers game, you hit enought of these and you'll do fine. The sharper and more experienced you are the more productive you can be on each one.
Beware the old ladies in sneakers!
It's what I'm there for and they refuse to put it out for the sale!






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Needed - propstand piece posted by: Brian on 10/2/2003 at 6:53:45 PM
I just had the top bracket piece to my kickstand/propstand split in half. This is the alloy piece that fits in between the chainstays, and a bolt passes through it from the top to afix the stand. Anyone got an extra?


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Needed - propstand piece posted by Edward in Vancouver on 10/3/2003 at 3:33:02 AM
Yeah, got one, small enough to fit in an airmail envelope. Same address?

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Needed - propstand piece posted by Brian on 10/3/2003 at 11:47:22 AM
Thanks Ed - yes, same address.