AGE / VALUE:   Dynohub magnet/armature posted by: James on 12/4/2003 at 2:04:05 AM
Does anyone have a good dynohub magnet and armature including magnet cover plate they are willing to sell?

thanks, James







AGE / VALUE:   Dynohub magnet/armature posted by: James on 12/4/2003 at 2:04:05 AM
Does anyone have a good dynohub magnet and armature including magnet cover plate they are willing to sell?

thanks, James


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Dynohub magnet/armature posted by Edward in Vancouver on 12/4/2003 at 5:17:19 AM
Yup, couple of em, you'll probably need the bolts, nuts, and teensy serrated washers too. Where do you live?

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Dynohub magnet/armature posted by james biffin on 12/4/2003 at 7:27:26 AM
I live in Portland, OR, I only need the magnet,armature and cover plate, I have all the other bits. I guess I could use the tiny washers as well I probably lost at least one by now.






AGE / VALUE:   Proper cotter tool usage posted by: David Poston on 12/3/2003 at 9:52:38 PM
I received my long-awaited cotter pin tool yesterday (e-bay find). Unfortunately, the seller forgot to include the lever for cranking the thing, but hopefully he can find it and send it to me. At any rate, does anyone have suggestions for proper usage? Hints regarding proper placement to avoid cotter pin damage are welcome.

David


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Proper cotter tool usage posted by Stephen on 12/4/2003 at 12:36:56 AM
David,

Installing cotter pins is straight forward; I do have 2 suggestions to make removing pins easier and avoid excessive damage to the pins.

(1) Lubricate the cotter pin before you start to remove it.
This is obvious with hindsight. Don't ask me how I know bent pins are very difficult to remove if you forget this.

(2) Leave the nut on the cotter pin when you start to loosen it.
If you move the nut out to the end of the cotter pin, this gives the tool a larger area to distribute the pressure, and is less likely to damage the pin. Once the cotter pin is loose, you can remove the nut and the cotter pin will come out easily.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Proper cotter tool usage posted by David on 12/4/2003 at 3:45:25 AM
I doubt that the nut business makes much diff; if the nut is too far on, you're pressing only the bolt portion anyway. If it's off too far, you're pressing only on the threads. I doubt you can do both. But use a little penetrating oil before you loosen up old ones and get it as tight as possible with the original lever when putting them back in.

   RE:AGE / VALUE: Proper cotter tool usage posted by Warren on 12/4/2003 at 4:16:49 AM
I have a Park model that didn't come with the "tommy bar" either. I think it's better to use a large screwdriver anyway. You always end up having to remove it as everything gets in the way every half turn.

I've removed scores of cotters without any lubrication...maybe just lucky but older bikes generally have good steel pins that don't distort...they just pop.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Proper cotter tool usage posted by Edward in Vancouver on 12/4/2003 at 5:24:06 AM
Hey did I ever tell you about the time I attempted to remove the frozen crank from a Raleigh RSW, ended up dragging the whole thing to a neighbor's tree stump because it was just the right hight to rest the crank on? Pins were so siezed I finally ended up taking a hacksaw to the %^&**thing after a half an hour of whacking away with a 16 oz framers hammer and home made pedal axle drift. Neighbor still grins at me an calls me "the bike mechanic"...

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Proper cotter tool usage posted by Dick in FL on 12/4/2003 at 6:02:24 AM
David,
After the vicissitudes of your quest for a cotter press, you may not want to hear this. Barnett recommends having two (2) separate cotter presses; viz., one for removals and one for installations. The one for removals will have to be prepped on a grinding wheel to achieve a smaller diameter so that its pin can chase a stubborn (broken/bent?) cotter pin into the hole in the crank. He furnishes a diagram with optimum dimensions. I remember that you recently passed on an ebay offering that seemed a good candidate for such a modification.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Proper cotter tool usage posted by paul viner on 12/4/2003 at 7:31:34 AM
when installing a cotter pin first grease the pin ,install and give it one hard sharp blow with a wooden mallet or a rubber mallet.thats it,obviously it had to be set in the right position,and then it will go the right distance through.dont keep bashing it as all you are doing is spreading the metal inside,not a good idea.removal should be the reverse,quick and painless.i speak from bike shop experience .in the land of steve irwin we only ever had cottered cranks,only experiencing one piece cranks when bmx came along,you yanks always have it easy. hahahaha

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Proper cotter tool usage posted by GMS on 12/4/2003 at 12:34:20 PM
A BFH is the best tool for removing cotters. Just slack the nut all the bay wach so you dont damage the threads. I had one that was stuck so bad a 1 lb maul wouldn't even budge it. After lots of (good) penetrating oil and a torch to warm it up. It fell right out with a little tap. When all else fails use fire. But be careful! While its still warm give it a spray with the lube. It will then seap down real deep as it thins out. It worked for me! I lube my pins now every time but they still need a little tap to fall out. I have taken them out alot lately. I had to fix up my BB in the crank. Loose berrings+me=trouble. I swaped them for some caged ones.Work Perfect! And theres no visual difference either. You will need a late model donor bike for this tho. So cottered cranks....good deal i'd say! I had to literally beat a 3 piece bolted crank apart off a scrap bike! A big crowbar finally got the arms off! On my old Phillips that sat out side for many winters the arms simply fell off when i got the cotters off! They dont make em like the used to!






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Cyclo 2 speed conversion on eBay posted by: Sheldon Brown on 12/3/2003 at 9:09:13 PM
Selling a NOS Cyclo 19-22 tooth conversion sprocket set, see:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3643012883

Sheldon Brown







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Blue Robin Hood paint posted by: James on 12/3/2003 at 9:52:57 AM
I got another raleigh bike bringing the number of bikes in my fleet to 5 in this the 103th year of the Anglo-french bicycle war, it's one of those metallic blue women's Robin Hoods - yet another bike I don't need. Does anyone have any touch up paint for the bike or have any ideas where i might find a suitable colour? any similar automotive paints? I think I'll clean this up and sell it.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Blue Robin Hood paint posted by P.C. Kohler on 12/3/2003 at 9:49:22 PM
I kinda think this may be the same colour as my '51 Clubman which was called Polychromatic Electric Blue and later was called Sky Blue. This is merely "eyeballing" however. I have yet to actually find an exact match but the present VW bug has a South Seas Island Blue which, again by "eyeballing", looks very close to me. As does the Honda Electric Blue. This blue shade was used on the LTD-3 after Robin Hood ended production, Choppers etc.

P.C. Kohler






AGE / VALUE:   Blue Robin Hood paint posted by: James on 12/3/2003 at 9:52:57 AM
I got another raleigh bike bringing the number of bikes in my fleet to 5 in this the 103th year of the Anglo-french bicycle war, it's one of those metallic blue women's Robin Hoods - yet another bike I don't need. Does anyone have any touch up paint for the bike or have any ideas where i might find a suitable colour? any similar automotive paints? I think I'll clean this up and sell it.







AGE / VALUE:   Hercules Saftey Modle posted by: Marty Mullins on 12/3/2003 at 4:24:40 AM
Hey Roadster Guys!
I just bought some bikes from a local collector,included in this lot is a Hercules Saftey Model Rod brake bike.Every thing on the bike says Hercules on it seat,pedals,grips H in the chain ring.
It has a 1969 strumey archer 3spd hub and shifter,he told me he replaced original w/ the SA why I don't know he also said and he laced an SA dynamo front hub into wheel.
Is this bike made by Raleigh? Head badge says Hercules made in Birmingham England,Raleigh's are Notingham England Correct?
Serial numbers are on frame under seat (SE 8683).
In nice script writing on down tube is written Saftey Model.
Bike seems to be all original except for the switching of the hubs.
It has a 2 peice rear mud guard. Stays are the wire type.
Any ideas,opinions,facts about this roadster?
Thanks For your Help! Marty Mullins mart6159@wowway.com







AGE / VALUE:   Speaking of English lightweights... posted by: WArren on 12/1/2003 at 10:44:38 PM
This is a rare one...not my auction, I'd keep it.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=420&item=2207405691


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Speaking of English lightweights... posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 12/2/2003 at 2:08:15 AM
Doggone it.... I just KNEW I should have grabbed myself a DROOLING TOWEL before I looked at that!

All kidding aside... that is one CLASSY machine! And I concur, I would KEEP it.

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Speaking of English lightweights... posted by Edward in Vancouver on 12/2/2003 at 3:09:09 PM
Hey Warren, that would be a "triple triangle" design? Yet another "ultra-modern c.a.d.style that was borrowed from earlier times? Are those grease nipples on the BB or spring loaded oil ports? And the design itself--the BB resting ontop of seat tube/downtube junction, is that for strength or just plain looks?
Wonder how hard it would be to locate new cables for those canti brakes....

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Speaking of English lightweights... posted by Warren on 12/2/2003 at 7:33:10 PM
Hi Edward, I think it was GT who tried to patent that frame design in the late 80's. Those are indeed spring-loaded ball bearing oil ports...I have the same ones on a pair of BH hubs from the 50's. The bottom bracket design would seem to give you a high pedal clearance from the ground. I wish Hilary had provided a weight for the bike...I believe these were the lightest bikes ever made for at least a decade. I love the swallow saddle.

And it's funny you asked about the cables...I had a local CCM collector give me a set...I had no idea what brakeset they came from. I gave them back to him but I know where they are.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Speaking of English lightweights... posted by sam on 12/3/2003 at 2:21:03 AM
How did he get that bike to stand in the full view photo?---sam

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Speaking of English lightweights... posted by Stacey on 12/3/2003 at 2:43:57 AM
Speaks volumes for the perfect balance of this machine.

Seriously... look at the clips on the left pedal. It's holding the bike up.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Speaking of English lightweights... posted by Tom on 12/3/2003 at 3:14:52 AM
Stacey/Sam it's not the clips holding it up. Have a good look through the rear wheel there is a darker line going from the rear hub to the ground crossing the spokes.It looks like a mudguard stay that is holding it up. He used a spare stay to attach to the rear hub or eyelet. Any comments from Hilary.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Speaking of English lightweights... posted by Stacey on 12/3/2003 at 12:10:11 PM
Right you are Tom... I'll be dipped

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Speaking of English lightweights... posted by MR on 12/4/2003 at 12:45:45 PM
OH MY GOD! That is one fine piece of bicycle!!!!! Jesus! I always wanted one of those, in fact I bought my Shogun because it has a similar frame design...DAMN!






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   FS: Raleigh Space Rider, AMF Hercules posted by: Tom on 12/1/2003 at 2:26:20 PM
Two bikes for sale
1. 15.5" Raleigh 1976 3 speed "space cruiser". 24" wheels, good for a girl or shorter woman -- but this is no toy! Solid and good to ride or restore to full shine.

2. AMF Hercules 1973. 3 Speed. 19.5" womens frame. Full Chrome fenders and chainguard, front fender mounted luggage rack. Needs new tires and transmission cable. Otherwise in good shape.

$100 obo takes both. For pickup (or possible delivery) in boston area. Shipping by UPS possible







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   3 speed hubs with drum brakes posted by: James on 12/1/2003 at 10:41:38 AM
I'm looking for a 3 speed drum brake hub with 40 holes, or do these actually exist? Anyone want to share their experiences with SA drum brake hubs?


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   3 speed hubs with drum brakes posted by Tim on 12/2/2003 at 10:03:36 AM
I needed one of these but could only find brake hubs in 28 and 36 hole. So I got an AG hub with a duff dynamo in 40 hole, pulled the armature and magnet assembly and fitted the brake assembly in its place. A minor amount of twiddling and it works fine. I got the idea from studying the exploded drawings on Hadlands Sturmey Archer site.

Regards,

Tim

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   3 speed hubs with drum brakes posted by Edward in Vancouver on 12/2/2003 at 3:00:04 PM
I did it to a 40 spk FG hub on a Sports--cable routing was a bit of a challange, and to a 28 spk GH6 for my daughter's RSW 16. Now that is one sweet brake, on a 16" wheel even I can lock it doing 25 kms/hr.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   3 speed hubs with drum brakes posted by Stephen on 12/4/2003 at 12:55:27 AM
James,

These hubs do exist - I have 2 Rudges with 40 spoke AB hubs (3 speed with rod activated drum brakes; I think the Rudges with 40 spokes are 1964 hubs and the Dutch Gazelles with 36 spoke AB hubs are dated 1960).

I haven't wanted to do lots of maintenance deferred for at least 20 years before I got these bikes. I find the performance acceptable in Delaware where it is flat but not so good in hilly parts of Pennsylvania (think of the wall in the bicycle races in the Manayunk section of Philadelphia).






MISC:   You all have bikes but do you ride them? posted by: GMS on 12/1/2003 at 12:26:58 AM
yesterday was wet...not raining, but if you really wanted to ride like i did that was no big deal. Well my $1000 Haro MTB was in the shop...so i had a choice between my IronHorse MTB and my old Phillips roadster. A worn out MTB bike or the 30+ year old British masterpiece that i had spent hours restoring to a rideable state. Now the old Phillips is not 100% and i had only rode her up and down the road a bit in the dry...she needed a test. Sooooo i took her..she still had a bit of rust on her chrome so i wasn't worried about that for the most part...i can clean it again. Well that ride...i tested her...but not hardcore mind you...this is a road bike and i normally ride a Haro Escape 8.1! So on the Phillips i had to set my self some rules. No bumps and of course no FLYING!!:P and stay on a good terrain. On the road she is a dream..smooth ride and handles on rails. Cuts through water and the fenders kept me bone dry. I took her a good 20km for sure...some of that on a gravel trail. Perfection. Sure she got a bit dirty..but actually it wasn't all that bad. There are still a few issues with the bike...loose fork...BADD brakes(need to get my v-Brakes on!) one of the crank cotter pins was a little loose(tightened afterwards)but overall i wouldn't hesitate to take her anywhere. By the way...it is slightly customized mainly because the bike was not complete when i found it and i had a hard time finding roadster parts where i live...but i brought her back to life in a good way. I am totally for restoring the best you can...when you can that is. So how many of you ride your classics...i know some are too rare and in such good shape to risk riding...but they ARE meant to be ridden aren;t they??


   RE:MISC:   You all have bikes but do you ride them? posted by sam on 12/1/2003 at 2:02:42 AM
I've only know one English bike on this fourm that was too rare to be ridden,but many that are ridden but with due care.Riding these bikes is what our collecting is all about.Show is good....show&go is better---sam

   RE:MISC:   You all have bikes but do you ride them? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 12/1/2003 at 3:10:10 AM
Well, I have in excess of 12 Roadsters here. All shapes and sizes and my recently acquired DL-1 would be the cream of the crop. I don't hesitate to ride any of them! Of course, none of them are "rare" in any sense of the word, but the young "velo-heads" think they are all "antiques"!

Ride them! They ARE meant for it most certainly. And they are built TOUGH as well!

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone

   RE:MISC: You all have bikes but do you ride them? posted by jack on 12/1/2003 at 4:40:51 AM
Congratulations Larry and shame on you too! Why didn't you tell us about your "new" DL-1?

Riding bikes and collecting bikes, although related, are not necessarily the same. When one has close to a dozen cool bikes, and some are pristine 30yr+ originals, the thought of damage and more cleaning is too much. Maybe it would be better to get rid of the ones that aren't ridden but who can do that? I try and ride as many as I can but some I consider industrial art suitable for framing only.

   RE:MISC:   You all have bikes but do you ride them? posted by paul viner on 12/1/2003 at 9:37:13 AM
vintage bikes are like vintage cars they must be used ,if you dont they deteriate faster, and can cost you more in repairs in the long run.reason being is when you use them you get a feel as to how they are running.most of these bikes you will never wear out because the big miles are never done. but if you just like looking at them through glass cases there is absolutely nothing wrong with that,the bike has been saved thats the most important thing.

   RE:MISC:   You all have bikes but do you ride them? posted by Bryan on 12/2/2003 at 12:58:10 AM
Congratulations on taking the Phillips for a ride. Here in Connecticut I still commute 12-15 miles EACH way through the chill air on whichever vintage bike in my collection is most able to make the trip. Whats the point of collecting if you don't ride 'em? I think you are going too easy on the old Phillips. I regularly ride my Phillips on the same off road trails I mountain bike on. Just a little slower.

   RE:RE:MISC:   You all have bikes but do you ride them? posted by GMS on 12/2/2003 at 1:36:23 AM
Thats all good people! I dont think i could take my roadster off road tho..it has 26 1 3/8 tires compared to 2.35 maxxis tires on double walled rims....if i wasn't "too careful" with my phillips i would have the rims bent(like my MTB!) I am 220 pounds so...i gotta be careful! Rock On people!

   RE:RE:MISC: You all have bikes but do you ride them? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 12/2/2003 at 2:25:00 AM
>Congratulations Larry and shame on you too! Why didn't you tell us about your "new" DL-1?

Oops.. Most humble apologies... anyhow, ifya wanna check it out, it's a 74 and cleaned up rather nicely. THANKS ROBERT!

http://f1.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/bonemanrides/detail?.dir=/My+Photos&.dnm=74_DL1.jpg

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone

   RE:RE:RE:MISC: You all have bikes but do you ride them? posted by Robert on 12/3/2003 at 12:55:38 PM
You are welcome Larry. Hairpin seat looks pretty neat there.

   RE:MISC:   You all have bikes but do you ride them? posted by Jeff bikeguy on 12/4/2003 at 3:14:48 AM
I rode my mint, original, unmolested 54' Phillips to work one afternoon. On the return trip at 11:30 at night I even flipped on the Dynohub powered light. Good fun!






AGE / VALUE:   churchill deluxe posted by: Shawn on 11/30/2003 at 8:25:02 PM
I recently picked up a Churchill deluxe bicycle w/rod brakes, and I was wondering if someone could tell me how to date it? Any and all help would be appreciated.
Thanks Shawn







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Discussion Area? posted by: jack on 11/30/2003 at 12:30:20 AM
How useful would a new Discussion Area entitled "English Lightweights" be? My passion for English lightweights often has me torn between postings in the English Roadsters area and the Vintage Lightweights area. For example, what area would be best to post this proposal? Most enthusiasts with similar tastes probably post in both areas as I do. Is a more focused site warranted?


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Discussion Area? posted by Fred on 11/30/2003 at 1:38:32 AM
I have often thought along the same line. As one who has a fair number of Raleigh 3 speed roadster types, as well as later lightweight models, I would like to see the idea discussed.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Discussion Area? posted by Joe on 11/30/2003 at 6:40:26 AM
I agree, another forum dedicated to English lightweights could be a welcome addition here. I also own several 60's and 70's English lightweights as well as a few English 3 speeds. I often find myself going back and forth between here and the Vintage Lightweight forum.
However, some thought should be given to the fact that many of the English lightweights share the same components with many other bikes which would still be left being discussed in the Vintage LW forum. I often see posts which would fit here as well as in Vintage LW's. I browse through both for postings of interest.
I think it would be hard in some cases to decide where to post a particular topic, should it be determined by the type of gearing or the type of handlebar, etc. Having another forum may make it harder to determine where to post about say an early club racer, or an early Sprite? Posibly dividing the English forums into two time periods would also work, say before and after 1960? But this would not be proper for say a DL-1, which I believe was built up to 1980. Perhaps a forum dedicated to just Raleigh and Raleigh built brands? Myself, I usually determine where to post by the type of gearing, those with an internal rear hub get posted here, and those with a derailleur I would post at Vintage LW's. On some, at times, I post on both to get a wider variety of opinions. Having a third choice could either narrow down the question of where to post, or simply be again another forum to consider.
It does seem that most of us who have English bicycles, often have an assortment of both types, or are at least very open to the posibility of owning anything British, while most who are into the vintage road bikes are less likely to have as great an interest in say an English 3 speed? Perhaps, separate forums for say British, French, Japanese, or Italian bikes would also be an option? (Covering all lightweights or multispeed bikes).
Anyhow, these are just a few ideas, no matter how or what a forum is called, there will always be some overlap.
Posibly the folks here at OldRoads have an opinion as well?

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: New Discussion Area? posted by P.C. Kohler on 11/30/2003 at 4:10:38 PM
Interesting idea.

I am struck by the fact the queries regarding bona fide lightweight machines made in England are often referred to this site when, by rights, they belong in the Lightweight site.

Many of us like both the roadsters and the classic English club and lightweight bikes. Yet I get the feeling the folks on the Vintage Lightweight site don't have a lot of time or interest in the club bikes or the classic 60s and 70s English made racing bikes. Yet these have about as much in common with a DL-1 or a Sports as a Schwinn balloon tyred bike has with a Schwinn Paramount.

Roll Britannia caters to both roadsters and lightweights with a sort glass ceiling at post 1970 machines. But it's easier since we deal only with British (and Empire/Commonwealth) made machines.

P.C. Kohler, back from a frigid early am run on his Clubman

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Discussion Area? posted by sam on 12/1/2003 at 1:55:37 AM
I think the posts here on the roadsters group tend to run toward bikes with hub gears no matter there kind.English given,but others are talked about too.The L/W group tend to follow derailer type bikes.I find this forum to be just right as it is ---always interesting--always something a little different than the last post---sam

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: New Discussion Area? posted by jack on 12/1/2003 at 5:19:05 AM
In my short time on this forum, it seems that the Roadster area has a greater population of those who are knowledgeable re English bikes in general. But maybe an English Lightweights area would be too narrowly focused as well as have problems others have mentioned. An alternative could be English Roadsters and Lightweights. Although this also has the drawback of diluting the roadster area as well as splitting the lightweight area. One could also argue that English Roadsters and Lightweights is redundant since a English roadster cannot be considered a heavywt, maybe not even a middlewt, therefore by default its a lightwt.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: New Discussion Area? posted by VVVintage Vintage Bicycles, Inc. at OldRoads.com on 12/2/2003 at 1:24:52 PM
Sounds like one of the typical conversations downstairs in the shop...

-Vin






AGE / VALUE:   1962 ladies Dunelt 3-speed, blue posted by: Julie on 11/29/2003 at 5:29:45 PM
I bought this bike on eBay for 75 bucks, and spent 200 more on getting it cleaned up and rideable. Does anyone know where I can get an estmated value for her? (Her name is Daisy, btw--now you know I am a bike freak.) Thanks!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1962 ladies Dunelt 3-speed, blue posted by Ed on 12/5/2003 at 11:50:36 PM
Just my opinion Julie,but I think you answered your own question. Your bike has got to be worth $275.00.Good luck with it and enjoy it.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1962 ladies Dunelt 3-speed, blue posted by Julie on 1/7/2004 at 11:57:33 PM
Thanks, Ed. Like the old saying goes, anything is worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it! I have since bought 2 more bikes, and although I am not a mechanic, I have decided to learn how to do whatever restoration I can. Yeah, I got another Dunelt ladies one speed and a ladies JC Higgins. Anyone know of a good book or website on restoration for beginners? Thanks everyone, I am really enjoying reading on this message board.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   DL-1 Racks posted by: jack on 11/28/2003 at 4:48:57 AM
Well, picked up another DL-1 Tourist. 1978 in salvageable shape but in 24" which was what I needed. It has what looks like an original rear rack, black, steel, with sprung hold-down. I can't find any markings on it and the stays are long and connected to the axle. The Midland rack I bought on ebay has short stays that connect half-way down the seatstay. Are either of these racks correct for the period?


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: DL-1 Racks posted by jack on 11/28/2003 at 8:23:14 AM
In answer to my own question, I found markings and its a Prestube "Ashby". Since the rack on the Superbe is also a Prestube, I'm sure this is original and the short-stay Midland racks are aftermarket.