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Archived: English Roadsters







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:Eatons Bikes posted by: Tom on 1/30/2003 at 11:37:37 PM
Warren here is a few pictures you may like to see. They are scans of Eatons catalogues through the years. The 1924 has the bikes made in Canada and using the finest English steel. Later they are made in England. Even a Rollfast balloon tire bike in 1946. Later they sold some CCM bikes. 1969 there is a Fastback 100 made by Raleigh.
I think at one time you had a posting of an Eatons bike, big whitewalls in a shop in Toronto that was hanging from the rafters. Email me about white tires. I don't have your email address anymore.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:Eatons Bikes posted by Tom on 1/30/2003 at 11:48:14 PM
Here is the page.
http://ca.photos.yahoo.com/bc/oldy57bikes/lst?&.dir=/Eatons+Bikes&.src=ph&.view=t






AGE / VALUE:Old Alloy Wing Nut Set 1950's posted by: Chris on 1/30/2003 at 8:16:44 PM
E- bay item #2156453752 Old Alloy Wingnut set 1950's
not my auction no relation to seller
Way cool set of alloy vintage British bicycle wingnuts for front and rear wheels.
These are a neat pair that I have never seen before!
The variety of wing nuts for vintage bicycles has been exhaustive. I keep seeing more diffrent pairs of wing nuts.

I was poking through a drawer full of modern junk and I uncovered a chrome Sturmey- Archer wing nut only one but it has the business end that the indicator chain goes through. Not expecting it but being pleasently surprised I kinda went "Gaaaa, whot's this?"
I'll stay with this stuff as long as it keeps being interesting.
The alloy wing nut set is being offered by that 'Old Cycle Bits' fellow and I would keep an eye out for the tasty and interesting things he offers.







AGE / VALUE:New Hudson ladies Roadster rod brake bicycle posted by: Matt Devlin on 1/30/2003 at 3:50:47 PM
I recently acquired a pretty neat old New Hudson rod brake girls bike. It is in good condition and very ridable. It is very similar to Raleigh Rod brake bike I have seen but I would like to find out more information about it. It has a completely enclosed metal chainguard, Olympia leather saddle, Westrick style 28" chrome rims and black paint. It has great lines and style, but I have a hunch it is not as old as it looks. I can email pictures... is anybody familiar with this bike?? Thanks for your response. Matt


   RE:AGE / VALUE:New Hudson ladies Roadster rod brake bicycle posted by Mucus on 1/30/2003 at 5:09:25 PM
New Hudson was part of BSA until sometime in the late 50's, so it is probably pretty old. Send a photo!

   RE:AGE / VALUE: New Hudson ladies Roadster rod brake bicycle posted by P.C. Kohler on 1/30/2003 at 6:19:56 PM
Well, if it has 28" wheels, it's pretty old! The only New Hudson catalogue I have (UK home market) is dated Aug. 1955 and there isn't a single 28" wheel machine in the bunch. Rod-brakeds yes but not in the large roadsters.

They had a nice range, even Club bikes: "Silver Streak" and "Silver Arrow".

I am guessing that New Hudson was dropped when Raleigh bought out BSA c. 1958.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:Chasing the wind, Cycle history and vintage parts astride a cycle posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 1/30/2003 at 8:52:00 PM
B.S.A. ceased in 1955 but was bought up by Raleigh in 1958. What happened in between?
I have never heard from somebody who was there when this or that company folded and when things were sold, auctioned or disposed of. No stories like "Oh I was there and this is what happened and this and that person bought this and that."
What they had, what went where.
We always hear that Raleigh bought the name but never hear what happened to all the vast collection of antique cycles any one company (and there were many) held in archive. The historical collection of past back merchandise, paper corespondence, files with photos. There were years ago, and still are today people and companies that handle this stuff. They call it a liquidator. Perhaps, yes maybe certainly I ask the wrong crowd here looking for answers not to be found here.
I think there must be many big time collector dudes who lurk silently and never post here or anyplace. They swallow up this stuff when the chance presents itself. A company goes under, a liquidator is called and then a building is slated for demolition. Still the leave a wooden desk filled with papers!
So the question is: What exact liquidator, Who was there to cart away the 60 year collection of bicycles this or that company had when they went under?
Looking for more collections, more dark basements filled with crates and boxes to pick through, more boxes of paper literature to look through. People to ask questions of, leads to dig up and chase down. I ask: Tell me a story, tell me what you've seen, the wildest, craziest, incredible stories. The neat finds, the ones that have gotten away.
Did collector types get in there and drag home truckloads full or did it just go headlong into landfil? Scrap? You would think that a ton more things would be being offered on e- bay that what is there. Or are there vast treasure rooms underground filled with cycle goodies. Boxes and boxes and boxes filling the place floor to ceiling.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:Chasing the wind, Cycle history and vintage parts astride a cycle posted by P.C. Kohler on 1/31/2003 at 12:33:21 AM
Are sure BSA "ceased" in 1955? The single best resource for the British cycle industry I have found is "British Motorcycle & Bicycle Export News" which, thank goodness, the Library of Congress have a full set of from 1947-1963. I seem to recall article that Raleigh had taken over BSA (which also made Sunbeams since 1943) but as a going concern. And I am pretty sure they were advertising past 1955. My New Hudson catalogue is for August 1955. I'll do some research and see what I can find out. I suspect it they were active until 1958.

I'd sure LOVE to a set of this magazine of my own; it is chocked full of information and some simply wonderful advertisements and photos from what I, at least, think of as the Golden Age of British Bicycles.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:Chasing the wind, Cycle history and vintage parts astride a cycle posted by Chris on 1/31/2003 at 1:20:07 AM
I'll double check and get back on this tomorow.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:New Hudson ladies Roadster rod brake bicycle posted by Matt Devlin on 1/31/2003 at 11:44:00 PM
Thanks for helping to identify the New Hudson. I am surprised to hear it may be pre to early 1950's. I checked the tires they are definately 28 x1 1/2" and they are Dunlop Roadsters. The haedbadge does not mention BSA at all it just has a great graphic of a flexing arm smashing a brick wall with the name New Hudson underneath. It is just a single speed.
I took a few pictures if any one has any interest. I tried to send them to "Mucus"? but his email was not attached to his request.
Any idea of value on bike would be greatly appreciated. I am more of an American bike collector this one is a little out of the ordinary for me. Thanks in advance. Matt

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:New Hudson ladies Roadster rod brake bicycle posted by Mucus on 2/1/2003 at 7:55:45 PM
Hi, there you go, try to send the photo if you can. THANKS!






WANTED:RALEIGH OR HERCULES ROADSTER 50'S posted by: ron on 1/30/2003 at 11:55:41 AM
MUST HAVE AN ENCLOSED CHAIN GUARD, 28 INCH WHEELS AND ROD BRAKES, THANK YOU.







AGE / VALUE:26" frame raleigh rod brake on ebay!!! posted by: sam on 1/28/2003 at 11:39:46 PM
With a buy now! and the seller is a good guy to deal with---sam


   RE:AGE / VALUE: 26 posted by P.C. Kohler on 1/29/2003 at 4:24:20 AM
Now Sam, look again! This is that now infamous "1911" Raleigh (well close, it's 1969 or 1970 but who's counting?) and I know we guys always exaggerate inches here and there.. but this is no 26". Make it 23", sell it for $125 and be done with it.

P.C. Kohler, thinking of mutton dressed as lamb

   RE:AGE / VALUE:26 posted by Mucus on 1/29/2003 at 5:39:27 PM
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2704811784&category=7298
Here's the URL
It's a nice, much older bike, with the remains of a cloth, or leather chaincase frame. A very nice bike if somewhat well used, and over priced. I like it, but it would be way too dear for the likes of me!

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:26 posted by Mucus on 1/29/2003 at 5:43:12 PM
OOOOOOOOO! All the normally chrome bits are BLACK! Could this be a First World War model?????? I like it!

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:26 posted by David Poston on 1/29/2003 at 6:22:57 PM
PC--This is the bike for you. You're tall. If I was more than my 5'7", I'd grab it in a heartbeat.

David

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: 26 posted by P.C. Kohler on 1/29/2003 at 7:28:29 PM
There was no url or eBay auction number on the original posting so the only thing that came up for a 26" Raleigh was this one.

My apologies.

And... NO more bikes for me..... I just got the repair bill for my '48 Raleigh Dawn and have two Lentons about to enter even more expensive restorations in England.

Enough!!

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: 26 posted by P.C. Kohler on 1/29/2003 at 7:28:55 PM
There was no url or eBay auction number on the original posting so the only thing that came up for a 26" Raleigh was this one.

My apologies.

And... NO more bikes for me..... I just got the repair bill for my '48 Raleigh Dawn and have two Lentons about to enter even more expensive restorations in England.

Enough!!

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: 26 posted by Warren on 1/30/2003 at 12:18:52 AM
Blackout bikes are WWII...no bombing raids back in the Great War (or was it the War to end all wars?)...just a few dogfights.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: 26 posted by P.C. Kohler on 1/30/2003 at 12:35:07 AM
Warren.. so I thought until I started spending more money on catalogues than on bikes (well lately maybe an equal amount!)..

Most of the major firms offered what were called "All Weather" models which had all of the brightwork enamelled black. The idea being this utilitarian finish was easier to maintain. The result was actually a tremendously elegant looking mount.

Ironically, the Second World War blackout didn't result in black cycles (although yes chrome disappeared for the duration) but rather WHITE ones. Some time ago I posted information on the BSA 1940 all-white roadster designed to be seen in the blackout, not by the Luftwaffe but by tram drivers and motorists who were making hash out of pedestrians and cyclists. Traffic fatalities during the first few months of the war exceeded combat deaths!

The Raleigh "All Weather" was model no. 5, essentially the standard 28" roadster with full gearcase, single-speed and 24" and 26" frame sizes. Circa 1939.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: 26 posted by Warren on 1/30/2003 at 1:47:05 PM
I can understand the rationale for the white paint jobs. It's just that I've examined at least three Brit bikes ...all blacked out and all period early 40's. Maybe people did it themselves or are the bikes from the early war period before they realized their lives were at stake on the dark streets and they then went to white. Odd...






AGE / VALUE: Ohh, it weighs 300 pounds/ Lift it with your legs/not your back!!!!! posted by: Chris on 1/28/2003 at 9:41:25 PM
It weighs 300 pounds, that bicycle repair stand! It's not one of these tippy/wobbly stands that will need being bolted to the flooring.
Up the stairs we go!


   RE:AGE / VALUE: Ohh, it weighs 300 pounds/ Lift it with your legs/not your back!!!!! posted by Chris on 1/29/2003 at 8:01:17 PM
Dispite: "It being here when we got the place, and it's very old" the voice of reason prevails! I don't have to move anything now!
It can sit there!

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Ohh, it weighs 300 pounds/ Lift it with your legs/not your back!!!!! posted by Oscar on 1/31/2003 at 2:51:29 AM
I work in a 115 year old building. We have empty safes all around. Not too decorative and no one has the combinations, but better than lifting them down to the alley.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Ohh, it weighs 300 pounds/ Lift it with your legs/not your back!!!!! posted by Chris on 1/31/2003 at 6:23:49 PM
Now imagine Laurel and Hardy letting the piano slide way down the stairs and out into the street.






AGE / VALUE: Please re- read J.M.'s reply about spoke nipples posted by: Chris on 1/28/2003 at 9:33:14 PM
I wanted to call attention to J.M. Vernoy's answer post about spoke nipples, and breakage and proper spoke/wheel building.
He's good! That thread is worth saving, really! Print it and cut it out and slap some paste on the back and keep it stuck in view!
It should be permanently saved at a web page about wheelbuilding. Threads pass on in couple of days, this ones needs to be kept in mind.
Wow!


   RE:AGE / VALUE: Please re- read J.M.'s reply about spoke nipples posted by a friend on 1/29/2003 at 1:03:13 AM
Chris,
You need to tell your wheel builder, before he starts the work, how you want the wheel done. If you don't tell him, he will just use whatever spokes and whatever nipples he usually uses in wheels, whatever he likes. The typical wheel today is built with short nipples because it makes a lighter wheel. The difference in weight will usually be only be an ounce or less, but the perception is making short spokes much more popular. But the reason that I am writing here is to draw your attention to a more important possible problem. Many wheel builders do not use spokes that are long enough. Even with short nipples the threading on the spoke should be mostly if not completely hidden by the nipple. What is critical is that the spoke needs to be long enough to be nearly flush with the bottom of the spoke nipple. Of course, the spoke can not protrude beyond the bottom of the spoke nipple or the rim strap that protects the tube could be punctured allowing the tube to be punctured by the end of the spoke. If the spoke does not fill the nipple at least into the rim there would be a part of the nipple that is taking all the stress from the spoke because the spoke does not go that far. Most spoke nipples are brass and are not as strong as the spoke. The nipple is designed to be strong only if the spoke fills the length of the spoke nipple. Your wheel may be built properly even with a long treading showing if the wheel builder threads the spokes himslf and threads them longer than factory threading would be. Anyone who has a wheel that is newly built should look at the side of the nipple facing the tube before they use the wheel. If you can't see the end of the spoke very near the end of the nipple, the wheel could be weak and prone to spoke nipple breakage.


   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Please re- read J.M.'s reply about spoke nipples posted by Mark R. on 1/29/2003 at 1:16:17 AM
I think it bears mentioning here that spokes have a precise number of threads from the factory which is neccessary for the home builder to properly "do" a wheel. If you, or your wheel boy cut their own threads on the spokes, they need to be very precise about making sure that they start the threads, and finish threading at the same place on EVERY spoke, and the spokes must be cut at exactly the same length!!!!! It's a real art, and very hard to do right, and although you can build a wheel with the spokes all at different lengths, and different number of threads, it is MUCH harder to do so for the home duffer. Also the threads are rolled onto a spoke at the factory, CUTTING them onto a spoke can actually weaken it. I do not like cut spokes! I have bought them from shops who didn't have the right length from time to time, and I always come up with a crappy job. If you take a set of "cut" spokes and lay them down together, you will often find that they are all slightly different in length. It is a genuine BITCH to build a wheel with spokes like that! If you do so with factory spokes you will see that they are all precisely the same length, and with the same number of threads. And yes, as was stated above, the spokes threads must all be in the nipple for a proper job. If the spoke tip is flush with the end of the nipple inside the wheel, but a thread or two show that's ok, but usually if you have the right length, they will be all inside the nipple.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Please re- read J.M.'s reply about spoke nipples posted by Mark R,. again on 1/29/2003 at 1:25:13 AM
I forgot to mention that it is possible to use spokes that would protrude into the rim strip/tube. You can easily file, cut, or precision grind off the end of the spoke sticking out of the nipple, you just have to be careful.
As a matter of fact, if you look at the end of the nipples on your Raleigh wheels, where the screw driver slot is, you will often see where they were ground down a little at the factory when the wheel was built because the spokes were too long.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Please re- read J.M.'s reply about spoke nipples posted by J. M. Vernooy on 1/31/2003 at 1:50:18 PM
Thank you. And be sure to add what Mark added in his posts above, that I forgot to mention. A bicyclist needs to know all that, even if he is not going to build his own wheels, because he can't be sure of all wheel builders knowing it. Did I mention that it might help, when getting a wheel built, to tell your wheel buider what kind and model of bicycle it is for? If his eyes show no emotion and if he doesn't start telling you about his English bicycles, or the ones he wishes he had, it may be better for you to find another wheel builder.






MISC:ONE LEGGED CYCLISTS posted by: Ian on 1/28/2003 at 8:23:29 AM
Went today to visit an older cyclist who competed at the 1952 Olympics in Helsinki. He showed me some beatiful memorabilia of a lifetime involvement in the cycle industry and sport (see my posting on the lightweight board) but also told me of many interesting things he had done including develope a method by which people with leg injuries can still ride. It involves cutting down a crank and fitting a small bearing into it and then bolting on the rest of the crank so that the crank articulates in the centre. By varying the position of the bearing and the overall length of each part of the crank it can be tailored to varying degrees of disability and has already been used as a rehabilitation aid. Apparently people with very limited knee or ankle movement have been able to ride again. If anybody wants to know more feel free to email me. regards, Ian.


   Another approach posted by Ray on 1/28/2003 at 3:23:45 PM
I did something similar for a child of 9 who has damaged knee joints that do not bend much at all. I worked with my LBS to take a 20 inch bike and bend the cranks so they are in the shape of a U with both pedals in the same position. I then took a BMX freewheel and used it in place of a standard coaster brake. Now I took a bungie cord and linked it to the crank so it would return the crank after every down stroke. Added hand brakes and the child now has a bike that she can propel by just pushing on the pedals and allowing them to return to original position. Great for a starter bike but I am interested in your model. Can you send me more details on it. I am also holding an Alenax bike for her when she grows. You know the one with the two long crank arms that you can pedal like a stairmaster.






FOR SALE:Roadster tires on ebay posted by: Warren on 1/28/2003 at 2:26:06 AM
Ok this guy has stuff on ebay all the time and he's too hard-sell IMHO. He doesn't mention the make of the tires...is that too much to ask? Maybe someone wants to write him a email and ask him. He says they are 635 mm at least. Go to...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2156121207&category=420

He's also got an NOS locking fork with key for sale with a Buy-it-now of $35.


   RE:FOR SALE:Roadster tires on ebay posted by Ben on 1/28/2003 at 3:44:14 AM
Well, you can order Kenda tires for $12.00 from most shops, and I can get gum colored ones from Benotto for this price.

   RE:FOR SALE:   Roadster tires on ebay posted by Dick on 1/28/2003 at 5:30:20 AM
That NOS locking fork offering puzzled me. Of what use or interest would this item be to anyone without the complementary frame that has the female sector piece with the 3 holes?

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Roadster tires on ebay posted by Warren on 1/28/2003 at 1:35:17 PM
Dick, I think you've just made the point. Superbes get their forks tweaked as often as other bikes...although this one is in that copper brown Sports colour. Where did they sell this model? I've never seen one.

   RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Roadster tires on ebay posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 1/28/2003 at 9:15:49 PM
Please tell me what it means when people write in capital letters: IMHO ?
I never have understoood what they mean.
Thanks a lot

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Roadster tires on ebay posted by Dennis on 1/29/2003 at 12:48:46 AM
A few weeks ago i posted about a Superbe that i bought. I asked what that piece with the 3 holes was for, because my bike had a replacement Rampar fork without the lock. And it is that same color. I called it root beer and Chris said that Raleigh called it coffee. So with that fork and a Dynohub and a light, i could have a real Superb. If mine was a male i might do it, but i have enough bikes to fool around with as it is. The thread was "Male vs female frame size" posted 12-11-02

   RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Roadster tires on ebay posted by Edward in Vancouver on 1/29/2003 at 2:11:55 AM
Dennis, the bike store where I like to hang out dissected a female superbe (mid 70's)and has the locking fork just hanging around. If you're interested, just give me a shout. Oh, the fork is green.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE: Roadster tires on ebay posted by P.C. Kohler on 1/29/2003 at 4:47:15 AM
IMHO= "In My Honest Opinion"

IMHO if I see this same darned coffee locking fork offered one more time on eBay I am going to hurl...

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE: Roadster tires on ebay posted by Dennis on 1/29/2003 at 7:57:38 AM
IMHO= In my humble opinion. Or on this site: in my Humber opinion, or Hercules opinion, on the vintage lightweight area: in my Huret opinion. Or; in my Humberchristopher opinion. They keep offering that same fork but forget to lower the price. I am the customer they are looking for (because i have the bike that is missing that part), but i'm not going to cough up that much money for it cuz i know the market, and i can wait. And thank you Ed for the offer or the green fork but if i get one it will be black and go on my Phillips or hercules. I'm going to get one bike out of those two bikes. It might not be factory correct, but it will be one fine bike. You should see the beautifull light holder thingy on the Phillips. Way better looking then the clunky Raleigh one. I think it is a Miller. I will post pictures when my friend visits with her digital camera.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE: Roadster tires on ebay posted by Chris on 1/29/2003 at 4:36:50 PM
Thanks, Now I understand.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE: Roadster tires on ebay posted by Oscar on 1/31/2003 at 2:55:21 AM
It took me years to get LOL.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:FOR SALE: Roadster tires on ebay posted by Chris on 1/31/2003 at 6:27:44 PM
lots of luck? lost or looney?
lemme see... LOL...

What does that mean?






WANTED:RALEIGH ROADSTER 40'S/50'S posted by: ron on 1/27/2003 at 12:22:34 PM
any leads or help in finding this bike.
http://sheldonbrown.org/english-3.html
any condition, thank you.







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:1948 Raleigh Lenton Clubman posted by: P.C. Kohler on 1/26/2003 at 6:07:50 PM
OK... I promise I'll start cycle collector rehab tomorrow...

I bought on eBay (a Buy it Now opportunity too good to miss) a 1948 Raleigh "Lenton Clubman". Four-speed FW hub. GH6 dynohub. Wing-nuts. Replacement Bluemel black mudguards. Looks in very good shape. £130.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=420&item=2155679265&rd=1

But it has been repainted. Colour actually looks somewhat close to original but it needs a professional repaint and new transfers (which Lloyds thankfully sells as a set) which I intend to have done in England before she's shipped to the USA.

So.. a few questions for all you Club bike chaps out there:

Has anyone repainted a Lenton Clubman in what was called "Polychromatic Green" c. 1948-55 and latter referred to as "Lenton Green" post 1955? If so, what brand of paint was used, colour numbers etc.? I have been told that this is the same colour as used in the 1970s as "Flamboyant Green" on Raleigh Choppers. I have a British automobile paint match for that from a Chopper site.

Did these early Clubmans have white lining? Examples I've seen of the early ones (this dates from the first year) do not. Was the head painted a different colour i.e. darker green or black? The catalogue shows something to this effect.

Many thanks for any assistance...

P.C. Kohler, suffering from Lentonitis

[cross-posted on the Vintage Lightweight Discussion list]


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:1948 Raleigh Lenton Clubman posted by David on 1/26/2003 at 8:23:55 PM
Excellent bike. How much will UK to DC shipping cost? Do you know yet? (Or is this a great excuse for a London weekend?)

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:1948 Raleigh Lenton Clubman posted by Jeff R on 1/27/2003 at 12:57:59 PM
My 1948 Lenton/Clubman is polychromic green and has a faded gold lining around the steering head. The head is a slightly darker or richer green than the rest of the bike. Mine came with cream color Britiania fenders.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:1948 Raleigh Lenton Clubman posted by karl on 1/28/2003 at 11:29:11 PM
I am in a similar boat, trying to color match a 1949 Clubman w/ the correct green. Mine has some paint remaining but not a large enough section of quality paint to scan. Any help on this matter would be much appreciated. are there color chips in old catalogs or anything of that nature?






AGE / VALUE:Spoke nipple madness fixed! (I think) posted by: Chris on 1/25/2003 at 9:31:24 PM
I had a wheel done and they left long threadings on the spokes and they put in short nipples and the job did not come out to my satisfaction. I asked and they said they did not have long nipples and I don't remember what they said about ordering them.
Anyways I went across town and bought a whole large drawer of like 6000 nipples. Now I have Italian spoke nipples and French spoke nipples in little yellow boxes with French writing on it. Fuji spoke nipples and Sulky spoke nipples. long and short, new and some used in there too. I have gathered up all the spoke nipples I have ever gathered over the last 20 odd years.
They're in metal tins and if I ever have this happen again I'll just bring in the whole tin full for the guy to root through while I'm there.
There seems to be diffrent lengths and brands and to my horror diffrent threadings? I have double butted spokes, weird kind of type and also they're stainless steel spokes in my R.R.A. wheel that will have to be re- done as they're cracked and mismatched. I look very selectively for spokes and leave a lot of what I see so I don't slip into collecting all sorts of spokes like I do with the other parts.
Still, this is a manufactuer and time related specific part of a restoration job. If you want to do it right, it gets very picky.
I'm on to finding spoke washers now.I have used up all I had recently found and want more. I have whole wheels that I don't know what they are to and I'll put this tin with the mystery wheels and close the door and not think about it. Driven nuts over spoke nipples ever again, I doubt it but it's possible. How often do any of us ever stumble across boxes of very old, never used spokes in boxes complete with nipples?
I have a Torrington cabinet with all sorts of lengths of spokes. Chrome plated, rustless, stainless, diffrent gauges, diffrent lengths, double butted, and all sorts of others. I'll put it in with the mystery wheels and forget about it.


   RE:AGE / VALUE: Spoke nipple madness fixed! (I think) posted by J. M. Vernooy on 1/26/2003 at 9:24:05 PM
Chris,
You need to tell your wheel builder, before he starts the work, how you want the wheel done. If you don't tell him, he will just use whatever spokes and whatever nipples he usually uses in wheels, whatever he likes. The typical wheel today is built with short nipples because it makes a lighter wheel. The difference in weight will usually be only be an ounce or less, but the perception is making short spokes much more popular. But the reason that I am writing here is to draw your attention to a more important possible problem. Many wheel builders do not use spokes that are long enough. Even with short nipples the threading on the spoke should be mostly if not completely hidden by the nipple. What is critical is that the spoke needs to be long enough to be nearly flush with the bottom of the spoke nipple. Of course, the spoke can not protrude beyond the bottom of the spoke nipple or the rim strap that protects the tube could be punctured allowing the tube to be punctured by the end of the spoke. If the spoke does not fill the nipple at least into the rim there would be a part of the nipple that is taking all the stress from the spoke because the spoke does not go that far. Most spoke nipples are brass and are not as strong as the spoke. The nipple is designed to be strong only if the spoke fills the length of the spoke nipple. Your wheel may be built properly even with a long treading showing if the wheel builder threads the spokes himslf and threads them longer than factory threading would be. Anyone who has a wheel that is newly built should look at the side of the nipple facing the tube before they use the wheel. If you can't see the end of the spoke very near the end of the nipple, the wheel could be weak and prone to spoke nipple breakage.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Spoke nipple madness fixed! (I think) posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 1/28/2003 at 9:31:48 PM
Wow! How true and right you are with what you said!
Most of my wheels will now need a look over and perhaps/probably re- doing!

What you said should be added to a bike web site,it is one of the best pieces written on the technique and importance of correct wheelbuilding I have seen in a good while.
You hit the nail right on the head. A lot of mechanics do exactly what you said! Many will anyways despite what you may say to them. When I see original wheels, the spoke threading goes clear up into and past the head of the spoks nipple and then so many times it has been ground off on top. None of mine are ground and just like the man said here, the amount of spoke threading comming into contact with the nipple may not be enough or something may be off. Spoke nipple breakage? Wow!
Thanks, Oh and please post here more often! It is clear you are exactly the smart, experienced, intelligent, right- minded bike repair person we need to be reading here! Don't be shy, you're too good!






AGE / VALUE:OOOHH, A new Sturmey- hub posted by: Chris on 1/25/2003 at 9:04:04 PM
I picked through the wheels and grabed the 24 inch rim with the Sturmey- Archer A.W. hub. No big deal.
I took it home and 5 days later I took a look. Actually I opened it to check the inside condition.
I finally pull out the innards and Surprise! It's a new, never used hub! Clean and not worn.It's a longer axle version too which was the reason why I grabbed it.
I stuck it into one of my alloy shell model hubs.
Now I have a highly polished, re-born alloy hub ready to go into one of my rims.
The hub is from 1974 and is a 28 hole drilling so it's saved for a muscle bike project that takes 28 hole rims.
Not bad! Now the 28 hole 24 inch narrow rim I don't have the foggiest idea what to do with.I want to toss it out but I'll relunctently keep it.







AGE / VALUE:twist shift posted by: Alonzo on 1/25/2003 at 6:18:05 PM
Anyone out there have a working one? I found a '66 Phillips with the white handlebar twist shift, missing its gear cable. So I made a new cable by filing down the metal end to fit the shifter. So far so good. Still, I can't figure out how the cable was routed. Do I need a fulcrum clip and a pulley? The bike is missing both. If so, where do I mount them on a woman's frame? Please fill me in.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:twist shift posted by Warren on 1/25/2003 at 8:22:34 PM
The pulley usually goes on the drive side of the bottom of the seat tube...just above the intersection with the lower downtube. Route the cable and housing to top side of the lower downtube so the the fulcrum clip has a clear sight line to the pulley. If your cable has slack, you may be able to route under the down tube to the left side. Either should work...under may look better. Personally I've had a hard time with the twist grips. Of three bikes, only one really shifted well.

Good luck

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:twist shift posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 1/25/2003 at 9:00:06 PM
Go to the used book store in your area, find the bicycle or cycling section and get aquainted with a wide variety of bicycle repair books. Really!
These books (the older ones from the 1960's and 1970's) have pictures and diagrams and they teach more stuff and do it better than I do. For like $7.00 you can buy a whole book.
I have books that show this and I have cable but personally I twisted away from trist grips long ago.
Someplace on the net there should be instructions and pictures on this but I don't know where.
Good Luck

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:twist shift posted by Jeff R on 1/26/2003 at 4:44:47 AM
I belive that the twist grip shifter does not use a pulley. It uses a long cable housing that extends from the shifter all the way to the middle of the chain stay via the lower down tube. A small fulcrum clip attaches the end of the housing to the middle of the chain stay.The cable then attaches to the indicator chain.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:twist shift posted by Alonzo on 1/26/2003 at 10:05:43 PM
Thanks for the replies. I ended up fitting a fulcrum clip on the downtube. Bike shifts great. The smaller fulcrum clip on the chainstay (now missing) would explain why the bike had no pulley. Intact paint on the seat tube backs this up. I guess this was another way for Raleigh to save some money on the less expensive Phillips line.

Sure is great to solve these mysteries! Thanks.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:28"British rims posted by: Tom on 1/25/2003 at 6:06:36 AM
Is there a difference in British rims size 28 x 1 1/2, 28 x 1 3/4 and 28 x 1 3/8. Will they take the same British tire. I have some 28 x 1 1/2" tires British size. I have not seen the rims but a guy offered me the rims.


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:28 posted by David on 1/25/2003 at 1:34:52 PM
28 x 1 1/2 is the usual big roadster size and 26 x 1 3/8 is the usual Sports size. Are you sure about the other two 28 sizes? See http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire_sizing.html