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Archived: English Roadsters







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lots Of Ebay Roadsters posted by: Tom on 8/29/2003 at 1:10:47 AM
Here is a lot of old roadsters and stuff on ebay in UK. They sure go cheap there. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2188502672&category=420&rd=1
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2188682811&category=420&rd=1
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2189069792&category=420&rd=1
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2189071802&category=420&rd=1
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2189115563&category=420&rd=1
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3623941932&category=16170&rd=1
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2188859132&category=420&rd=1
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2189675017&category=420&rd=1
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2189495768&category=420&rd=1


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Lots Of Ebay Roadsters posted by Demarest on 8/29/2003 at 3:49:28 AM
Some real gems in there, http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2188859132 ... Thx for the list.






AGE / VALUE:   BSA's on e-bay posted by: David Poston on 8/28/2003 at 6:31:46 AM
Some wonderful BSA's abounding on e-bay:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2189251220&category=420

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3623454298&category=7298

A pre-war ladies club bike, and a wartime gents roadster! I'm curious to know more about the latter. The seller says it was bought "used" in Singapore in 1946, does that mean it was made in the UK and shipped there, or did BSA have factories in the Far East?

David


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   BSA's on e-bay posted by Ric Sona on 8/28/2003 at 3:51:27 PM
Hi David, maybe I might be able to help you a little bit, I live in Singapore. There were no bicycle factories in Singapore, but at that time, Singapore was under British Rule and there were many of them here,especially soldiers and airmen.So we can safely say that it was made in the UK and shipped there(here).
Presently you still see quite a few roadsters here,but upon taking a closer look you'll see that out of ten,nine are in in China. Maybe it's because these old folks came from China or is it the chinese bikes are cheaper here.
When I manage to discover a Raleigh,take a look at the rear hub and I'll see a single speed.I wonder did they export them in single speed, i've yet to take a look at their hub, but did Raleigh make any single speed??
Do any of you want a single speed??ha...Ric

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   BSA's on e-bay posted by sam on 8/29/2003 at 2:20:32 AM
On one of the links was a story on B S A parts(lugs,sprockets,head sets,etc)seems BAS was the "campy" of days gone by.Due to shipping cost it was cheaper to buy "bits" and get tubing local to build frames. The best frames used B S A parts.So not all bikes that "look" BSA were built in England.I'd check this out with Michael and PC on roll.........sam






AGE / VALUE:   Hercules handlebars, never seen this style before posted by: Chris on 8/27/2003 at 10:45:39 PM
E- bay item # 2553379557 Hercules Short model 1930's
Strange, but wonderful handlebar bend.
Not my auction, no relation to seller


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules handlebars, never seen this style before posted by Demarest on 8/28/2003 at 2:43:50 PM
I believe, if you look at some of the books, chronicling the history of the bicycle with pictures, you will see like handlebars.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules handlebars, never seen this style before posted by Tom on 8/28/2003 at 2:46:34 PM
Those look like Torrington war time bars. The seat is USA made as is the light. Maybe a bike someone added these pieces when the originals were gone. The brakes don't look 1930's. Bike looks 60's to me. Any comments.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules handlebars, never seen this style before posted by Chris on 8/28/2003 at 5:27:48 PM
Well, I should have said never seen before on e- bay just yet.
The history books have all sorts of neat stuff it is finding it on e- bay or in some old, funky bike shop that is the thrill.
Perhaps the handlebars are not original, good point.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hercules handlebars, never seen this style before posted by Matthew on 8/29/2003 at 11:50:59 AM
Without any wish to detract from the sale of a pleasant bicycle I have to say that just about everything on this cycle shouts 1960's to me. The brakes, the frame the mudguards are all much newer in appearance than the 1930's. I have two Hercs, 30's & 40's, and neither have mixte frames (diamond pattern) both are loop framed with the curved upper tube sweeping down from the headstock to the seat tube. Cable brakes of the type fitted to this cycle would have been late fifties early sixties fitments as rod brakes ruled from early safeties through to the sixties on evryday rides and children's cycles came into cable brakes very late. With 26" wheels this is more of a Young Lady's cycle than a girl's.
PC will probably now produce photographs and catalogue references to prove me wrong which is the beauty of this discussion board.
Matthew, going on a gut feeling, riding in the remains of an English summer.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Indian made DL-1's posted by: Wes K on 8/27/2003 at 8:09:55 PM
Wow! I didn't know there was anyone still importing these.
http://www.yellowjersey.org/EASTMAN.HTML

I still have my Chinese made DL1 "Forever", stripped out bottom bracket and all. My guess is that the Indian made ones are a little sturdier.

Cheers,
WK


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Indian made DL-1's posted by MR on 8/28/2003 at 12:48:47 PM
WRONG!!!! The Chinese bike are far superiour to the Indian. That should give you some idea of their quality! AVOID at all hazards!!!!

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Indian made DL-1's posted by MR again on 8/28/2003 at 12:59:09 PM
By the way, if you mean to say that the threads are stripped, you can have it reamed and tapped for italian threading, and then use cups from an italian bike with your spindle, or better yet a Raleigh spindle which is what I did. I have done so on several bike over the years and it works fine. There should be plenty of material left to do so.
I can't understand why the Chinese don't make those bikes to the same standards as most other Chinese mounts. God knows they could. My guess is it is to keep the price at a ridiculously low level in China(they sell for $15 there.)
The Indian bikes are almost not even road worthy. Some are made out of tubes that really resemble conduit. And in fact in many brochures the Indians refer to it as "pipe". Semantics or no, it really seems to be "pipe".
They certainly are NOT worth hundreds of dollars.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Indian made DL-1's posted by Demarest on 8/28/2003 at 2:42:30 PM
single speed, "work bike", this one caught my eye, on Ebay, on the subject, 3623453054 ; probably will let it slide, I don't need much more.

I think, the bikes, Chinese sell, maybe have a name like Pigeon flight. In regards to above remarks.

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Indian made DL-1's posted by Demarest on 8/28/2003 at 2:45:47 PM
Re: item number 3623453054

Why the picture, of an advertisement? Still has my curiosities up.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Indian made DL-1's posted by Wes K on 8/28/2003 at 7:09:30 PM
MR, wher can I get this Italian thread? Brand? I am currently exploring two option to make the bike ridable again:
1. find a "frame only" from an English made bike, and transfer all the parts (wheels, fenders, fork, handle bars chaincase, brakes, but not the crappy crankset) to it.
2. Replace the crank spindle and braze the bearing cup into place.

I am having similar trouble with a 1972 Raleigh Sports. The trouble with it started to occur a few months after I had the BB overhauled by a local shop. The 72's frame is Taiwanese or Malaysian made, but it shouldn't be constantly working itself loose or stripping out.

All of my older bicycles (1959 and earlier) do not have any BB illnesses.

The BB of the '72 Sports has made creaking noises ever since i bought it in 1997 to today.

Cheers,
WK

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Indian made DL-1's posted by Demarest on 8/28/2003 at 9:52:16 PM
sorry about WK's BB ills.

on to other things, I see, that bike from India, sat idle, I made my little post this morning, and rather quickly, it finally got some bids. Just appreciate if someone is informed, to tell us this is a decent bicycle or not.

demarest

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Indian made DL-1's posted by Wes K on 8/28/2003 at 10:29:41 PM
Demarest,
As you might be able to tell from this thread, when buying Asian made copies of the old bikes, it is at your own risk. I checked out the auction, and it doesn't seem too bad a price for a double top tube roadster. But after the trouble I've had with mine (and look in the forum archieves to see other's troubles), I don't think I'd buy another.

It is strange that they didn't use an actual photo for the auction picture. It must be an importer selling the bike.

My idea for getting an Asian made copy was not having to worry so much about it like I might an original, leaving it chained up outside. If it starting looking a little rough, it wouldn't matter. I keep all my old ones under a roof.

Cheers, WK

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Indian made DL-1's posted by Chris on 8/29/2003 at 12:47:27 AM

The new, undented, 28 inch wheel enclosed chaincase.
It has undented fenders. It has new Westwood 28 X 1 1/2 wheels.
New 28 inch tires and tubes.
A rear rack the proper style and size and right color.
Handlebars and rod linkage equipment
a replacement rear backstay.

All that is a well worth the 66.00 plus shipping.
This went for 66.00 and that's cheap!
I would stop there and carry it back to my table where my other bikes that need parts are.
The other good usuable things are:
The bell, the tool kit. The saddle, if you are not too heavy, will be just fine.
Leaving the frame and bracket fittings and hubs (minus axles and cones) ( I would take the front fork too)
The bike is an Hero brand and I think that they (the seller) thought that the picture would convey the romance and grace of the machine better than an actual picture would and well, I don't know if they succeeded with that approach if that was their angle.

66.00 plus shipping is a little cheap.
Doesn't the Yellow Jersey sell these for 200.00 or so?
I have to re- check the Yellow Jersey web site.

I have no actual experience with the aftermarket bikes as a whole bike.
I have said before that I loved the way my old Raleigh handled with aftermarket Made in India. Rims. They were very cheap money- wise but excellent, excellent quality and they were true and marvelous!

My opinion on these is mixed.
Have I said how happy I am to see these anyways and how I wish that somebody would get their act together and re- capture the way that these used to be and how I would love to work under their banner and sell these!

Millions of folks ride these around the planet but from the sound of things they must be having bottombracket problems and parts must be falling off of it due to poor machining or fitting problems.
Also, the problem of getting a container filled and packed up and getting all that done without damaged product has been told before.
Then again the prices are cheap.

Have all of you noticed how nobody is comming here trying to hawk aftermarket 28 inch chaincases and other parts like the ones I said I would want?
Why not?
Why has this not solved so much of our parts problem?
I thought an 28 inch chaincase was a hens teeth item that you jump the guy for and wrestle to the floor to take it away from them?

They should be here selling 28 inch tires.
I want these tires, yes.


   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Indian made DL-1's posted by MR on 8/29/2003 at 11:44:26 AM
Wes,
You should be able to find an Italian BB at any good shop, however check on eBay. I think I have a spare BB cup set around somewhere. I'll check, and if I can find them, just let me know your address and I'll send them to you.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   New Indian made DL-1's posted by MR on 8/29/2003 at 11:56:12 AM
HEY! That's the guy I mentioned a couple of months ago! He told me I could pick one up and save the shipping and it would only be $70
I understand that they are typical India bicycles: that is to say pretty crappy:-)






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Classy Robin Hood posted by: P.C. Kohler on 8/27/2003 at 3:43:37 PM
Remember when we discussing how Robin Hood back in the early 1950s made some rather up-market machines with dynohubs, DBUs etc. etc.

Well, here's your chance to get one (from the UK via eBay).

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2189495271&category=420

P.C. Kohler


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Classy Robin Hood posted by Chris on 8/27/2003 at 6:22:57 PM
I like the color!
Is that original?
Full chaincase and I love the light painted in the same color scheme.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Classy Robin Hood posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/27/2003 at 7:13:05 PM
Yes.. I think it is. Robin Hood De Luxe models were painted green, so for that matter were Triumphs under Raleigh. A lovely machine that would clean up. Don't be bashful about buying bikes in England... often they are cheaper and that makes up the difference in shipping. You sure aren't going to find a de luxe Robin Hood roadster on this side of the pond.

P.C. Kohler


PS: pity Robin Hood never made a club bike or did they?? Maybe call it the Robin Hood "Longbow", "Archer" or.... with club bikes, you gotta have a sporty name! As long as it wasn't "Sir Guy"

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Classy Robin Hood posted by jim on 8/27/2003 at 11:05:58 PM
what is the wheel size is it 26 or 28

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Classy Robin Hood posted by P.C. Kohler on 8/28/2003 at 1:38:13 AM
Looks 26" wheel and a 21" frame to me...

Me, I love these eBay descriptions... I mean this is a pretty rough bike, by no means beyond hope, but she needs a lot of TLC. Yet they always tell us that the "tubes and tyres" need replacement!! Hmmmm... I think that's but the start of it!!

P.C. Kohler, whose '51 Clubman rides well on her original tyres and tubes

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Classy Robin Hood posted by demarest on 8/28/2003 at 9:55:19 PM
I appreciate the pointers here. Wished to thank you all.

demarest






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help Identify this odd bike, Please posted by: Lenny on 8/26/2003 at 11:59:24 PM
I have been trying to identify my very odd framed English bicycle. Please have a look at the pictures at

http://www.magma.ca/'agb/Mystery%20Bicycle.htm

to see if you can identify the manufacturer / age.

Any info would be much appreciated.

Many thanks



Lenny



   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help Identify this odd bike, Please posted by Lenny on 8/27/2003 at 12:20:20 AM
Please note: The apostrophe in the web address above should be a tilde. '

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help Identify this odd bike, Please posted by Warren on 8/27/2003 at 1:19:50 AM
The link still doesn't work for me

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help Identify this odd bike, Please posted by Ed on 8/27/2003 at 12:40:33 PM
The link doesn't work for me either Lenny.Maybe you should double check for spelling etc.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help Identify this odd bike, Please posted by Mark R. on 8/27/2003 at 1:51:38 PM
I think it is a Phillips, or possibly a Dunelt. The odd angles are because the frame is bent. Someone has been using it for a jumper( not as a sweater, I mean jumping through the air).

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help Identify this odd bike, Please posted by David on 8/27/2003 at 1:53:02 PM
The link's ok - substitute tilde for apostrophe preceding agb. The pedals, grips, and chainguard are all obvious replacements. The crank seems a bit new, too. The bike looks like a prewar roadster (with the legally-required English white panel on the mudguard) but its design is highly generic! It could be just about anything.

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help Identify this odd bike, Please posted by Ed on 8/27/2003 at 7:25:40 PM
Came up with the pictures on this try.My guess is single speed ladies Hercules dating from late forties through the fifties.Built prior to Raleigh's acquisition. I base my guess(and it's only a guess)on the frame design, pedals,BB oil port and rear hub,and fenders,however I still have questions which will be hard to answer as long as we don't know what's original and what has been replaced over the years.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help Identify this odd bike, Please posted by Lenny on 8/28/2003 at 10:42:46 PM
I don't see any signs that the frame was bent. Would it be obvious?

Ed, you mention your guess of manufacturer was based partially on frame design. Are you familiar with frames with this type of raked angle of the front fork? Have you seen it before?

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Help Identify this odd bike, Please posted by MR on 8/29/2003 at 12:30:15 PM
I'm pretty sure the frame is bent, you just can't really see it because of the angle of the shot. These ladies frames get bent into exactly the kind of angles shown in the fork tube of this bike. I've seen it and done it meself.
If it ISN'T bent, then it is a very old frame from before more modern angles were adopted(around 1910 or so).






AGE / VALUE:    Phillips bicycle:The older the cotter pin the better! posted by: Chris on 8/26/2003 at 11:38:15 PM
I decided to not wait until winter to overhaul the Phillips.
I removed everything off of the bike and held the bike over the vise. The threaded part against the jaw of the vise and the other part over the top of the jaw so the whole thing is leaning sideways. This way the pin can come out, backwards, the opposite of how it goes in. I held it and with the other arm steady-ing the bike. I aligned it up just right. I turned the handle, crank thing in the vise. It tightened up and I put a bit more pressure on it and
POP! it moved.
The only bike I saw out for trash was a 24 inch childs Columbia ten speed and I stoped, looked it over, decided to leave it. On way back from dinner it was.... gone!
Somebody wanted it!
I can re- use these cotter pins with the original Phillips domed cap nuts!
That is always great, keeping the original parts on it.
I cheered Yes!
Always go after the chainwheel side, the right side or the bikes cranks. First. This way you can remove the whole spindle and the cups in one piece if you get into a problem with the other cotter pin. That can be removed from the bike, the spindle, the left crank arm, the cup and bearings. All that can be chucked into a vise and drilled out.
So I then did the left crank side and it came out. With threads intact. I tell you, these older, harder steel, old school, original cotter pins are the best as they do not bend or deform and they take the blows of a hammer or Park tool press or the bench vise without breaking or bending over or sticking in there.
The newer cotter pins the 1960- 80's stuff sticks too!
I tried the other side and it came out with the threads intact!
I stood there stunned and thought about it. That means I can remove the bottombracket and clean it up, ispect the races and spindle and re-grease and get it back together. I could proced without going mad!
No wear!
It was a lucky day, an easy going project. The Phillips bottombracket is easy to remove. A lock ring pliars (spanner) and a hole spanner and out it came. Then the large wrench for the fixed gear side and I was good to go.
It's all done!
I can see the blue on the: "The Coventry chain"
Everything is done except the wheels.
Found pitted front hub cones. replaced them.replaced cables with new ones.
Will drop in a new 3 speed innard assemble with a 22 tooth cog and a longer axle. I matched up the chain and lengthened it.
The Behr concrete cleaner made the chrome on the bike brilliant and it gets in the crevices of the chain crank. I brushed out the hardened, shellacked grease out because it was now jellified. One must be careful not to get this stuff on the paint or leave it on the chain or metal parts more than a few minutes. The alloy part will dissolve so don't use it on brakes or kickstands.
Still, I love de- gumping with this stuff and it shines chrome like nothing else.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:    Phillips bicycle:The older the cotter pin the better! posted by Chris on 8/27/2003 at 6:24:14 PM
Should be:"Then a large wrench for the fixed cup side"
Sorry.






AGE / VALUE:   humber bike with dynohub posted by: Gary Main on 8/26/2003 at 4:07:20 PM
guy wants me to take a humber male with a dyonhub for some money owed, anyone want it? whats it worth?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   humber bike with dynohub posted by Bryan Masone on 8/26/2003 at 8:27:56 PM
A Humber with dynohub definitely has value, how much depends on lots of variables--the model, how old, condition etc. And condition is subjective, those of us who are into these old bikes don't expect it to be show-room new of course. It can be worth anywhere from $20 to a few hundred. I for one, and many others here, would be interested. If you could just tell us a little more about it, and also where you are located.






AGE / VALUE:   AMF Conqueror Made in India posted by: Brett Blacketer on 8/26/2003 at 3:36:57 PM
Hi all. I am entirely new to this bicycle thing (where's the motor?) as I am a motor-sickle guy. Just picked up an AMF Conqueror with some Brampton componentry and a S-A hub with 68 on it - but the bike says made in India all over it. Any information would be appreciated concerning the history. Also, the front fork has one "side" loose - the flat part that has the slot for the axle to rest in is pinned but floating on the actual fork leg itself. Is this as it should be? The crank says Brampton and made in india on it and the arms bolt on - after removing the nuts I have no idea how to remove the pins/studs and the crank arms themselves.

Thanks in advance.

Brett


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   AMF Conqueror Made in India posted by Demarest on 8/27/2003 at 3:11:25 PM
For the cotter pins, I spray a good lubricant; Sea Foam now has Deep Creep, too, PB, is some fine lubricant; can hurt the grass, be careful. One of these two, lubricate the pins, soft hammer may knock out the pins. I had a cotter pin wear out on me.

That fork problem, sounds like something to deal with cautiously. Something, the LBS should not ask to much for just to look at, may be a simple matter; or if your town, has one of those Bike Non Profit Organizations, Co-Ops, go for that.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Raleigh Professional Transfers posted by: Tom on 8/26/2003 at 2:14:12 AM
Hello,

Can anyone give me the name to contact for decals for my 1971 Raleigh Professional? I have heard that there is a contact in England who may be able to help.

Thanks in advance,

Tom







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Pashley on Ebay... posted by: Zimo on 8/25/2003 at 1:24:07 PM
Nice lookin' Pashley on Ebay:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dllViewItem&item=2189149894&category=420


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Pashley on Ebay... posted by Marko on 8/26/2003 at 11:47:52 AM
Here's another:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2189112081&category=420






AGE / VALUE:   Champion Bikes posted by: Demarest on 8/25/2003 at 3:22:35 AM
http://www.yellowjersey.org/champ.html

Takes forever for the page to load, so key it up, then brew yourself a cup of tea or coffee. They are looking for information on the bike company; were unaware of it.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Champion Bikes posted by Jeff R on 8/26/2003 at 2:05:26 AM
Thats a Phillips made bike. The pedals are Phillips style,the chrome piece that covers the top of the fork is Phillips,so is the chainguard. The fenders are attached to the stays the way Phillips did it with the oval chrome plate, and the rear stays are attached to the frame over the axel the way Phillips did it not behind the axel the way Raleigh did it.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Champion Bikes posted by Demarest on 8/26/2003 at 4:09:51 AM
Thanks, to bad, there's no reward money, I hope you told them. Thanks for illuminating us.






MISC:   Shorties posted by: Demarest on 8/25/2003 at 2:42:08 AM
You know, I first saw Shorties on a Road Bike, er, Short Chrome Fenders ... mebbe this is not the place, to mention them. I think, they look okay, in fact, shorties on a beige tan colored bike, brown tape on the bars, it looked pretty sharp, but to me, I wondered, if it might defeat the purpose of fenders, heck, some people extend your regular size fenders, with mudguards.

Maybe, when I said Road Bike is what I saw short fenders on, maybe that is the key, maybe they are less wind resistant. Possible.







MISC:   Gazelle posted by: Wes K on 8/24/2003 at 4:54:36 PM
Well, after much work in cleaning of rust, rebuilding wheel hubs, and installing new tyres and a chain, I am the proud owner of a ridable 1960 Gazelle 3 speed. This machine has a roadster style frame, but with 26 x 1-3/8" wheels and westwood pattern rims. The brakes are rod-operated internal expanding drum brakes, a SA AB on the back, and an unidentified make front hub. The front and rear brakes cannot be worked seperately, a continous rod is used for both left and right brake lever, and a single lever arm is used to actuate the brakes. I am positive that his set-up is all original, but seems a little strange. Was this common on Gazelles?

On another note, I need new springs for the brake part of the SA AB hub. Does anybody have any parts for this hub? The brake parts are very rusty, and with a lot of oil and a hammer, I was able to get it to work again. I am thinking I should just hunt down a whole brake assembly to relpace it.

Cheers, Wes K.


   RE:MISC:   Gazelle posted by Edward in Vancouver on 8/24/2003 at 11:12:26 PM
For brake springs, pull out your yellow pages and look under "Brake specialists". These are the guys who supply most garages with brake parts, and they are usually well stocked. Most of them have the equipment to bond new shoes onto your brake, as the 90 mm just makes it on the machine. Check them out, and if this fails, check out large motorcycle dealers. This may seem out of the way and/ or time consuming, but I find it's best to scrounge for wear-out parts locally, so you're not waiting 3 months for some part from Greater Swaziland just to get your bike running again. Then again if you want to go all-original, there are a few guys on this website who will have the parts, but they may be "across the pond".

I've never heard of both brakes being operated by only one lever, and it doesn't make good sense. The most effecient braking power is with the front wheel, and then with the rear. Then again, I've never seen a true Dutch roadster in the flesh either.

   RE:MISC:   Gazelle posted by David on 8/25/2003 at 3:01:54 PM
Check with the Sturmey-Archer importer (www.permaco.com in the USA, Charlie Persons) to see if parts for newer models will do the job for you.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Gazelle posted by Chris on 8/25/2003 at 8:26:25 PM
Bike sounds tasty and cool!

   RE:MISC:   Gazelle posted by Wes K on 8/26/2003 at 12:21:03 AM
Thank you all for the comments. I was lurking on the net and found a picture of another Dutch bike that has the same rod-brake configuration mine has.

As for the AB, apparently the new AB hubs being made now use a brake mechanism that can replace the old one, but is different in design only slightly. I am going to try that first.

Cheers, WK

   RE:RE:MISC:   Gazelle posted by Jacob on 8/27/2003 at 1:49:18 PM
Wes,
the other dutch bike with the doubleworking rod-system have probably been a Batavus.

Jacob






WANTED:   info on small-wheeled or folding bike posted by: Elvis on 8/24/2003 at 3:24:35 PM
Hi. A while ago i asked a friend of mine to sell me his Raleigh 20-incher but he sold it already by the time he got the message. No one else i talk to knows what I'm talking about when I ask where the heck i can get one, and all the new folding bikes i've seen cost a fortune. My idea was to put semi-knobby tires on it and use it for basic off-road stuff so if i go on vacation i can have a bike to ride. ANY IDEA IF THERE IS A PARTICULAR WEBSITE DEVOTED TO THESE BIKES OR OTHERS LIKE THEM? Any info on such bikes appreciated.


   RE:WANTED:   info on small-wheeled or folding bike posted by Nick on 8/24/2003 at 11:05:51 PM
www.google.com SEARCH for Raleigh Folding Twenty

   RE:WANTED:   info on small-wheeled or folding bike posted by Max M. on 8/26/2003 at 10:07:52 PM
Yes the folding bikes are always a thing of intrigue. I have had two myself and sold them off very shortly. My neighbour has a Bike Friday and there is a world of difference in the weight of these bikes. Portable should not equal 40 lbs and poor braking. The current Moulton and some of the latest Japanese titanium versions are a different story.
I am still using my 1954 Rudge Sports and will rent a bike when I travel.

   RE:WANTED:   info on small-wheeled or folding bike posted by Max M. on 8/26/2003 at 10:10:34 PM
Yes the folding bikes are always a thing of intrigue. I have had two myself and sold them off very shortly. My neighbour has a Bike Friday and there is a world of difference in the weight of these bikes. Portable should not equal 40 lbs and poor braking. The current Moulton and some of the latest Japanese titanium versions are a different story.
I am still using my 1954 Rudge Sports and will rent a bike when I travel.

   RE:WANTED:   info on small-wheeled or folding bike posted by Max M. on 8/26/2003 at 10:11:59 PM
Yes the folding bikes are always a thing of intrigue. I have had two myself and sold them off very shortly. My neighbour has a Bike Friday and there is a world of difference in the weight of these bikes. Portable should not equal 40 lbs and poor braking. The current Moulton and some of the latest Japanese titanium versions are a different story.
I am still using my 1954 Rudge Sports and will rent a bike when I travel.

   RE:RE:RE:WANTED:   info on small-wheeled or folding bike posted by Demarest on 8/27/2003 at 3:42:12 AM
Those Barbarettas are Folders. Cleared that up today.

   RE:WANTED:   info on small-wheeled or folding bike posted by David on 8/25/2003 at 3:05:10 PM
They're frequently on Ebay, usually selling for 100-150. Do a search for: raleigh (folder,folding,twenty,20)

There are at least 2 at auction now.

   RE:WANTED:   info on small-wheeled or folding bike posted by Tim on 8/25/2003 at 8:02:53 PM
Be carefull. I was given one of these a few years back. Now I have six of them. Sheldon Brown has a very good web page showing how you can 'Hop up' a Twenty. I copied some of the ideas on my second Twenty with alloy wheels alloy bars and bar ends. One I fitted a Sinclair electric motor to for my youngest daughter to ride. Another I respaced the rear end and fitted a deuraileur gear set with a cotterless crank and a double chain wheel. I have one left now in original rusty condition and am wondering what I will do with it. They are good fun to play around with and easy to come by in the UK. I take one with me in the boot of my car when traveling around for my company. It is great to be able to take off after work and explore a new area. They make a nice change from my usual pre war roadsters.

Tim.

   RE:RE:WANTED:   info on small-wheeled or folding bike posted by Demarest on 8/26/2003 at 4:20:16 AM
Well, I'm not going to start up a whole thread for this bike, but it seemed to remind me of a folding bike, in size, it was called a Barbaretta. Kind of cool, I can't readily find any references to it, had a rack on the back, and I would guess, about 20 inch wheels, little bike though. Folks, if these are really something of a rarity, please tell me, here, on in email, I may grab one. Thanks.