OldRoads.com

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Archived: English Roadsters







WANTED:   Hercules Front Wheel posted by: jack on 4/9/2004 at 5:50:52 AM
This late-50's Hercules Tourist cleaned-up beautifully. All I'm lacking is a front wheel...26x1-3/8, 32-hole, Dunlop rim. Searching my local sources I have found two 40-spoke Dunlop 3sp rear wheels yet no fronts. Anyone have a spare, a bare 32-hole Dunlop rim would do? Buy, sell, trade?

jack
N. Calif







MISC:   B.S.A Three Speed Hubs posted by: Ian on 4/9/2004 at 5:29:23 AM
Hi there, Hopefully some of you will be familiar with these and be able to clear up what appears to be a puzzle. I have what I believe is an early 50's Rudge sports fitted with a B.S.A. hub. If it is not original then it has been there for at least 30 years according to the people I got it from. It is the type that has an indicator chain on one side and a rod that screws through from the other side of the axle to connect with it. The bike is not yet mobile so I cannot ride it to check but I am sure from trying it in the bike stand that the hub works the opposite way to a Sturmey Archer, that is as the chain is pulled out of the axle the hub changes up to a higher gear. The shifter was missing so I put a S.A. one on but as I said I am sure it is working back to front. Can anybody confirm this and if it is so describe the B.S.A. shifter? Thanks, Ian.


   RE:MISC:   B.S.A Three Speed Hubs posted by sam on 4/10/2004 at 1:47:20 AM
http://www.toehead.demon.co.uk/bsahub.htm

   RE:MISC:   B.S.A Three Speed Hubs posted by sam on 4/10/2004 at 2:11:33 AM
A little more detail,appears you are correct
http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/'hadland/sa/bsa.pdf






AGE / VALUE:   hercules posted by: don on 4/9/2004 at 2:36:12 AM
can anybody help me i have a old hercules bike and know nothing of it it has been sitting in my barn for over 10 years it is green and it says the jeep on the downtube it is made by hercules and i have been told that it was brought over from ww2 if anybody can help me out, it would be greatly appreciated i hope someone can help me







MISC:   1933 raleigh posted by: jimmy on 4/8/2004 at 11:26:36 AM
KB 4 type 3 speed hubs with drum brakes, I have never seen this type of HUB before any info will do.


   RE:MISC:   1933 raleigh posted by sam on 4/8/2004 at 1:22:33 PM
Sheldon's web site shows the KBC(cable)and says the KB is rod controled.KB4 would be 1934.
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/sa-1935-8.html
Sheldon also gives links to other sites with early info.
sam--(thanks Capt.Bike,Sheldon Brown, for all the help!)

   RE:MISC:   1933 raleigh posted by Matthew on 4/11/2004 at 9:40:32 PM
As I understand things, and I'm happy to be wrong, The K-series hub was built from '31 to '37 my Hercules was fitted with a KB-4 1934 K-series with hub brake, cable operated, sorry Shledon but I can only speak of what I know. The front hub was an FB, hub brake. The K-series hubs are not as robust as the AW or later hubs but you can be cheeky and employ later internals if you are riding the machine often and can put your purist traits to one side.

On another slightly different point. Post war Britain was absolutely desparate for materials and steel was at a premium. Chromium would have be at least equally sought after and we still had rationing of clothing and food into the 1950's. All production in engineering was geared towards exports as we needed the income to rebiuld our bombed cities and infrastructure. The English export cycles you come across will be different to our home models. We certainly had all black 'All-steel' cycles and customers would have needed to place an order and be patient before receiving their awaited purchase. the situation for cars was worse. The noble Landrover was born from the need of the Rover Car Company to build exportable vehicels into a growing market, where the elderly pre-war models would not sell. 55 yrs later the export model is still a world beater!

History lecture over, apologies, Matthew.

   RE:RE:MISC:   1933 raleigh posted by jimmy on 4/9/2004 at 11:16:10 AM
would these HUBS be concidered rare, I have never seen them in person or for that matter on a bike before?????

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   1933 raleigh posted by sam on 4/10/2004 at 1:39:16 AM
K hubs were(mostly) a 30s model so I guess it's fare to say they are rare.And the drum brake a little more rare than the plain K....When did they stop making the K model? Anyone know?---sam






AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by: James on 4/8/2004 at 8:29:22 AM
I just got my 1940s Rudge Whitworth Sports, bicycle number 7 ( bicycle number 8 a dutch roadster arrives tomorrow.)
The Rudge has an undated hub, what years were these made, or did undated hubs appear at random? I was under the impression that early AWs were undated.
other interesting features: War Grade Dunlops, early dynohub, black headlamp, John Bull grips, dunlop saddle on 3 coil springs, unique fork, Rudge Whitworth transter on head tube, early black thumb shifter. and of course it has a full chain cover and BB oil port.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by Peter on 4/8/2004 at 12:20:47 PM
I have a hub stamped AW7 which I have been told on very good authority is 1937. I think the AW was introduced in 1936 or 37.I also have a K7 hub, the last year of the K series, so SA were certainly date stamping pre WWII.
Is it possible you have a wartime machine? The next hub I have is 48 8 - can anyone fill the gap between 37 and 48?

Peter.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by James on 4/8/2004 at 10:50:50 PM
On the other site, I was told that 1940-41 hubs were undated. This bike does have the war grade tyres, but it is also a Nottingham built bike, a sports and the transfer on the headtube reads Rudge Whitworth Nottingham. I believe Raleigh bought Rudge in 1943. This bike does have chrome parts. Can anyone date Rudge serial numbers? I could post those.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by Scott Ebersole on 4/9/2004 at 1:43:58 AM
I have a Raleigh Sports that is similar to your Rudge in regard to having a head tube transfer instead of a badge. There also is no date on the AW hub. Another stand out feature is round rather than oval fork blades and a wider fork crown to accommodate them. It does have a date stamped on the front Dynohub, 46 11. It might be safe to assume that things were done a little differently during the War and shortly after due to various shortages along with a focus on more urgent matters.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by James on 4/9/2004 at 2:34:44 AM
Silly me I had forgotten to check the dynohub, under the layer of dirt was 46 11, the same as your bike.
Unfortunatley the nice Rudge pedals on my bike are designed for small feet, there are triangular protrusions on either side of the pedals that force me to use the center of my food to pedal, or is that how people did it back then.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by Scott Ebersole on 4/9/2004 at 2:56:37 AM
James, that is very useful information that you discovered on your dated Dynohub. That strongly suggests our bikes are from the exact same year and that they were probably sold as 1947 machines.

In regard to the pedals, measure the length of the rubber blocks. If they are 4 inches they are the men’s version and the widest that were made. However if they measure 3 ½ inches they are the women’s version and somewhere in time the pedals got changed.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by Scott Ebersole on 4/9/2004 at 3:11:29 AM
I realize now that I assumed you Rudge Sports is a man’s frame. Older Raleigh/Rudge men’s bicycles had 4 inch block pedals and older Raleigh/Rudge women’s bicycles had 3 ½ inch block pedals.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by James on 4/9/2004 at 3:56:45 AM
It is a women's frame. Too bad about the smaller pedals, now I'll have to find 4" period pedals.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by James on 4/9/2004 at 7:37:24 AM
Scott does your Raleigh have chromed parts? I was under the impression early post-war bikes were all black, but then again Rudge was a top brand.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by Scott Ebersole on 4/9/2004 at 1:34:15 PM
Yes, the parts are chrome with the one exception being the pedals. They are a dull plated finish that is silver in color. It is the same finish that was often used on the chain ring if the bicycle came with an enclosed gearcase. It has been my belief that early post war bikes were not as restricted in materials used as actual wartime but still were not up to peacetime production standards. There was with good reason a transition period. We know that Raleigh’s first post war catalogue was not until the 1947/1948 season.

Raleigh, Rudge and Humber were all considered to be equal top brands.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by P.C Kohler on 4/9/2004 at 2:34:34 PM
Glad to see this machine got a worthy owner... an eBay "sleeper" since it's a ladies frame machine.

I assume this has another characteristic to date it properly: it appears to have the rare Rudge-Whitworth (Nottingham) head TRANSFER instead of the later (1949 onwards metal badge with the hand and the triangle.

War grade tyres are common even on post-war machines.. my former 1948 Raleigh Dawn had Dunlop war grades on it.

Blacked-out bits for these era machines include the S/A axle nut indicator. You'll probably note the pedals and the chainwheel are of the same dull nickel finish instead of bright chrome.

A lovely and rare machine that should clean up beautifully... do post some pix!

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by James on 4/9/2004 at 5:27:41 PM
It has a Bates Dunlop saddle, sitting on 3 coil springs, made out of some sort of thick plastic. has anyone used one of these? are they as uncomfortable as they feel?

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by James on 4/9/2004 at 5:28:13 PM
It has a Bates Dunlop saddle, sitting on 3 coil springs, made out of some sort of thick plastic. has anyone used one of these? are they as uncomfortable as they feel?

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by P.C. Kohler on 4/9/2004 at 6:43:39 PM
This machine sounds a near match to my former '48 Raleigh Dawn... it, too, had a Dunlop "Bates" saddle which is made of rubber not plastic. It's OK... not suggested for long rides in summer and I found it to be rather bouncy due to the springs not being stiff enough. These were obviously a stock fit even if the catalogue mentions the various Brooks models instead.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by john w seage on 9/21/2004 at 5:39:58 PM
has this machine any value ?.
Details Rudge whitworth bicycle serial No 9083a, can send you picture.
by: 213.122.175.18

   RE:AGE / VALUE: Rudge Whitworth posted by John Faulkner on 6/21/2006 at 9:11:12 AM
Hi James,
I came across the Old Roads 2004 thread on this subject just now and since I have a similar machine thought I may be able to add some details, and possibly compare notes with you.

My machine is a hub-dated 47 10 Ladies Superbe Sports Tourist and has the transfer on the head tube and the narrower pedals. It appears to be all original except for a later gear trigger, but had Michelin Zig zags in a poor state when I got it (3 months ago) and I have replaced them.
It also has the three position steering lock which is, I believe, a Superbe feature, along with the rear dynohub.
I've found it difficult to find much info about Rudges of this period on the web and have only discovered recently that the serial numbers are, in effect, Raleigh numbers. Logical, but the numbers on mine do not match any of the published Raleigh sequences of the 40s period....
Mine has 99866 R on the seat post, and 61760 Z on the BB.
Be interesting to know what your numbers are, and if you'd like to know anything else about my machine I'll be glad to provide them.

John Faulkner.
(In Worcester, UK.)
by: 82.19.11.120






AGE / VALUE:   Rudge Whitworth posted by: James on 4/8/2004 at 8:29:22 AM
I just got my 1940s Rudge Whitworth Sports, bicycle number 7 ( bicycle number 8 a dutch roadster arrives tomorrow.)
The Rudge has an undated hub, what years were these made, or did undated hubs appear at random? I was under the impression that early AWs were undated.
other interesting features: War Grade Dunlops, early dynohub, black headlamp, John Bull grips, dunlop saddle on 3 coil springs, unique fork, Rudge Whitworth transter on head tube, early black thumb shifter. and of course it has a full chain cover and BB oil port.







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   I bought her today posted by: Pete on 4/7/2004 at 11:00:31 PM
Well I went back for the Hercules.. put some air in tyres and click click click she road like a champ,shifts great. needs a good cleaning & chrome is great!! saddle great. will need the whitewall dunlop? BTW, am I in the right message board for this? oh and i have digital pics if anyone wants to see? Pardon my ignorance in these matters. I bet this is the way the vintage bike disease starts
Pete


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   I bought her today posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/8/2004 at 1:16:55 AM
Good man! Whitewall Dunlop... yeah, good luck finding THAT sir! Not to worry, you can get tyres for the bike relatively easy. As to the right message board, you've got yourself an "English Roadster" cycle there and yes you're in the right place. You may wanna check out the Yahoo! rollbrittania group as well. Lots of excellent referenece material here as well as there and if you've not checked out http://www.retroraleighs.com yet... by all means, do so.

As to the "vintage bike disease", those of us afflicted prefer to live in a state of denial about it. I mean really. I personally don't see anything wrong with having 12 or so Roadsters in the basement. (^_^)

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   I bought her today posted by Ward Davis on 4/8/2004 at 1:32:07 AM
Hey.To paraphrase the Virginia lottery winner who said," I think I'll invest in some dirt, because they don't make that anymore". Why not have fun with as many damn roadsters as we can find(at a reasonable price)? They don't make'em like they used to, or anymore for that matter. Never again will such a piece of ART be rendered for the human race!

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: I bought her today posted by Rif Addams on 4/8/2004 at 1:46:06 AM
Only twelve Larry?
I know how it is. I have not yet found my perfect roadster, but with my mid-weights, motor bicycles, and ballooners, welll, I've got a few and then some, and boxes of parts and stuff. Boy, I've got to build an actual shop soon...
I will say, however, that this is the first disease I've ever thanked anyone for passing along! LOL
Take care,
Rif

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   I bought her today posted by pete on 4/8/2004 at 7:19:13 PM
This is an awesome message baord and the members are super helpful. I appreciate all the help and pointers.On another note, while I mentioned my new acquisition to the local and possibly last full service filling station proprieter in Wisconsin, he has offered me his 2 speed Schwinn which is nested nicely in his barn. This ought to get interesting.
Just so you know I have other afflictions including a 1969 airstream , 1967 honda scrambler , various tube radios. And My Lovely Wife plays along with all of it.
Pete TLMA...The luckiest man alive






AGE / VALUE:   hercules bicycle help posted by: don on 4/7/2004 at 7:33:03 AM
can anybody please help me i have been trying to find information about a bike i have had in my possession for many years and no nothing of it and noboddy can help me. it is made by hercules and it is green with a leather seat on the frame it says the jeep, i have been told it was brough here from england in ww2 but i am not sure of that info, if anybody can help me out it is greatly appreciated and will help put a end to a long search


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   hercules bicycle help posted by roger [in UK] on 4/27/2004 at 1:31:48 PM
I seem to recall that the Hercules was produced for the British army in WW2.
Maybe it was in case of Jeep breakdown!






MISC:   What did I see? posted by: Pete on 4/7/2004 at 1:33:28 AM
I has a vintage Sears Higgins stolen while camping last year. So im looking for a nice old campground cruiser. AT a 2nd hand store I saw a made in england 3 speed with Sturmy archer. But it also said Amf. The wnated $30.00 and it is in good shape. but it had another mfg name and I didnt write it down and I would like to know if anyone can Identify by this info. cable brakes, chrome chain guard.
Thanks Pete


   RE:MISC:   What did I see? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/7/2004 at 1:42:39 AM
Pete, sounds to me like in all probabilty, the bike in question is an AMF Hercules. And $30 is not at all a bad price. It wouldl have rolled home with me at that price I assure you.

Go GET it!

Regards,

Larry "Boneman" Bone

   RE:RE:MISC:   What did I see? posted by Pete on 4/7/2004 at 1:56:47 AM
by jove, I think youve got it.
I should have and will return tomorrow..Thanks. This classic bike think started with a friend fishing a Typhoon out of a dumpster. I was jealous and did the same with the Higgins. It was in tough shape but always won the downhill coasting contest. Then it went missing. I had a columbia(same flavor) when I was a kid and like most kids, didnt give the greatest care. I will with this one. Should I post a picure as found? And thanks for the help. great site






AGE / VALUE:   Drooling Towel Required: AWESOME TRIKE posted by: Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/7/2004 at 1:00:31 AM
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=420&item=2236680257&rd=1

Wow.... is this not WILD!

Regards,

Larry "Boneman" Bone


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Drooling Towel Required: AWESOME TRIKE posted by David on 4/7/2004 at 9:36:18 PM
Is this the result of some trike conversion kit? It's a normal Sports frame that has a two-wheel axle bolted in where the rear wheel would normally be. The 3rd picture doesn't quite extend far enough to show a differential, if it has one. (I would doubt it, though, since the builder didn't bother with rear brakes.)

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Drooling Towel Required: AWESOME TRIKE posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/7/2004 at 10:55:58 PM
David, your guess is as good as mine. Conversion kit quite possibly. I defer to those more knowledgeable as to the availability of such a kit. My thoughts are it was maybe a custom job and if so, it sure looks like it was done properly. As to a differential, well, a real simple diff would be to allow one of the rear wheels to freewheel.

Pretty cool though. At least I like it.

Regards!

Larry "Boneman" Bone

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Drooling Towel Required: AWESOME TRIKE posted by Edward in Vancouver on 4/8/2004 at 3:26:07 AM
This one is unique. Can't be a Sports because of the lock on the front forks, although I can't see the brazed-on tab on the frame to accept the lock bolt. Those are racing bars and brake levers, A lightweight(no 3 Herons)chainring, but with (heavy) rubber 4" pedals, and the standard brake caliper made for double lugged cables. The front drum brake has to be '49 or earlier because of the cast aluminum brake plate face. My money is on a conversion kit, since the frame looks "stock" and because the supports bolt onto the rear brake bridge. Don't see any custom brazing or different seatpost angles.
Wonder who it was made for, someone who had difficulty keeping balance, or a stroke/accident survivor?

I've been accessing this site less and less frequently. My "other life", the one that pays the bills, has been consuming enormous quantities of time, and I don't think I can spend as much time as I'd like to discussing unique bikes like the one above--for the time being.

Regards,
Edward in Vancouver

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Drooling Towel Required: AWESOME TRIKE posted by Joe on 4/8/2004 at 7:55:56 AM
ken Rodgers had a kit like that, made in England too, back in the 70's. The last know address I have is:
Ken G. Rogers
71 Berkeley Ave.
Cranford, Hounslow,
Middlesex, England, TW46LF

I have a few pics in an old publication of a similar conversion and the kit looks about the same as the one on eBay as far as I can tell. There were several kits available then. I think there main use was for winter riding. I don't remember ever seeing these with a rear brake, but i have seen a few odd custom brake setups that grabbed either the rear sprocket or an added on rear disk.
The kit was supplied with the rear axle assembly, 2 rear hubs, and rear down braces. If I remember correctly it sold for around $90. You had to use the supplied hubs because they were taper fit to the new rear axle. There was also a multi-speed conversion which allowed the use of a freewheel and derailleur. The entire set up was very similar to the rear end of a Schwinn Town and Country trike from the 70's. There were several manufacturers making kits at that time, but I have no info on those.






AGE / VALUE:   I do NOT believe this!!!!!!! posted by: Larry "Boneman" Bone on 4/6/2004 at 10:50:21 PM
I was going to post this ebay link for a Flying Pigeon fer a feller here that was looking for an "economical" rod brake bike.... but I simply am aghast at what it's been bid up to!!!!!

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=42312&item=3670070007&rd=1

Maybe I'm a little misguided... but I just don't get this at all!

Is that bike really worth that much?

Regards,

Larry "Boneman" Bone


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   I do NOT believe this!!!!!!! posted by David on 4/7/2004 at 11:23:54 AM
Perhaps there's a shill involved...
If you look at the pictures of this bike, one is a closeup of the chrome strut doodads with springs at the top fastened to the stem. This is meant to look like a springer fork; is it simply decorative or is the axle actually mounted in it (I can't see from the other pix)?

   RE:AGE / VALUE: I do NOT believe this!!!!!!! posted by Mike on 4/7/2004 at 2:28:20 PM
I read somewhere that those springs are decorative, by the way its fastened it looks like it wouldn't do much. As for the money, that's not worth the price on it. It's a nice bike but for that much you can search and find a DL1 in decent shape. In China those bikes are cheap, but here they're apparently collectors' items. Steel quality probably isn't great.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   I do NOT believe this!!!!!!! posted by Mike on 4/7/2004 at 6:15:28 PM
There's also a Pashley Roadster on ebay now starting at $300, rod brakes I'd be willing to sacrifice if I had to choose the Pigeon over the Pashley in order to get them. The Pashley is a quality cycle, too bad I don't have that kind of cash.






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rod Brake Conversion posted by: Mike on 4/5/2004 at 6:12:46 PM
Has anyone tried to convert a regular Raleigh Sports or similar light roadster to Rod Brake usage? I've been wondering if it might be possible to switch a Raleigh-made 3 speed sports from stock cables to Roadster style rod front with rear drum brakes. Has anyone tried it?


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Rod Brake Conversion posted by jack on 4/6/2004 at 1:06:40 AM
Mike, comparing both brake types, conversion is possible and would increase cool factor but probably isn't practical. The brake shoe holders look like they would fit but there are needed two pivots on the downtube for rear brakes. An expedient would be to drill a hole thru downtube as opposed to brazing bosses as factory. The front rod brake should be easy by comparison. Also, the rod brake rims have a wider surface for shoes to bear on but Sports rims may also work though not as much adjustment available.

A 12inch crescent wrench for headset nuts works fine for me.

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Rod Brake Conversion posted by GMS on 4/6/2004 at 9:32:20 PM
Id say its not that hard to convert a bike to rod brakes, the hitch is you will probally need a donor bike with all the parts....then it goes to the point....why not just keep the bike with the rod brakes intact??? Swapping brake types on a bike that didn't come stock on the bike is usually always possable, but usally very expensive as well. Same goes for MTB, people want disk brakes, but the pros tell them its cheaper to get a new bike that already has them. Im thinkin that same is true for roadsters






WANTED:   Wrenches posted by: Mike on 4/5/2004 at 5:58:34 PM
Anyone know where I could get a set of tools made to work on Raleigh 3 speeds? I'm most interested in headset wrenches especially since my current wrenches won't go that big.







WANTED:    posted by: Bob Nelson on 4/5/2004 at 4:01:16 PM
Hello; Does anyone know where I can get a set of Fibrax 269 brake pads in good shape???

Thanks Bob


   RE:WANTED:    posted by David on 4/6/2004 at 2:14:40 AM
I have Fibrax 70 "Raleigh Roadster" and 285 "GB Brake" NOS black rubber blocks. These are rubber only, no steel mounts. The 70 are for rod brakes and have a cylindrical portion that fits into the steel mount. The 285 are for cable operated Sports brakes. $10 for four, US post paid.
Paypal to beandk@comcast.net

   RE:WANTED:    posted by David on 4/6/2004 at 2:14:40 AM
I have Fibrax 70 "Raleigh Roadster" and 285 "GB Brake" NOS black rubber blocks. These are rubber only, no steel mounts. The 70 are for rod brakes and have a cylindrical portion that fits into the steel mount. The 285 are for cable operated Sports brakes. $10 for four, US post paid.
Paypal to beandk@comcast.net

   RE:WANTED: posted by John on 4/6/2004 at 5:14:24 AM
The last time I checked Fibrax was still making that model along with some other models that are not obsolete. Even in the US there are bicycle shops that stock them. The Fibrax website at www.fibrax.com still has them listed. If you want to see what Fibrax shoes are still current as well as many new models select "Braking Solutions" from their site's left menu then select "Road Caliper Pads" from the next menu to the right of it. The 269 brake shoes are listed as SH269 and as DSH269 for the box of 40 pairs. They are just below the three models for various rod brakes. You cannot order direct from Fibrax but a bicycle shop can get them from one of their parts distributors.

John

   RE:RE:WANTED:    posted by Bob on 4/10/2004 at 2:38:26 PM
Hello; Will those pads replace the 269's can you get me the measurements??

Thank you very much Bob






WANTED:    posted by: Bob Nelson on 4/5/2004 at 4:01:16 PM
Hello; Does anyone know where I can get a set of Fibrax 269 brake pads in good shape???

Thanks Bob