AGE / VALUE:   Estate sale posted by: Chris on 4/4/2006 at 6:26:28 PM
(Off topic)
The last estate sale was fun but I had a surprise. We had a customer at the service station. A 86 years old lady who drove this mint 64 dodge with the push button gear shift on the dash. Never would sell it. Tiny old lady with a small pill box hat. It's been awhile, until the other day..... We roamed thru the house buying up silver and glassware and I opened the door to go into the garage and there the car sat. It hit me!
Who's house this was, who owned the car! Oh my!
I remember her! Some lawyer is in charge of the estate and if I wanted the car to call him.
Further freakyness becaue I paid 2.00 for a scrap book full of pictures and photographs and many shots are 100 years old with victorian ladies astride ancient bicycles. Seeing the car, it was like freaky man. freaky.
by: 68.41.206.53







AGE / VALUE:   DEATH OF FAUSTO COPPI posted by: ckokkinis@comcast.net on 4/4/2006 at 6:23:44 PM
I'm sitting here reading a back issue of Cycling and it shows Fausto Coppi's funeral and it has pix and an article and I'd like to share this article with the folks here.
Don't know how to do that though.
e- mail a postal address for a free photocopy
thanks

by: 68.41.206.53







MISC:   Vista 3 speed posted by: Spike on 4/3/2006 at 6:00:39 PM
I've been touring the garage sales found 5 interesting bikes.4 I posted in lightweights.
Also this very nice Vista womens 3 speed with a S/A hub.
Frame decal says by N.I.D.A. Anyone know about Vista or NIDA?Bike looks a little Schwinn like.
by: 24.58.64.136


   RE:MISC:   Vista 3 speed posted by joe cole on 4/15/2006 at 4:31:25 PM
Am really interested in the above item posted for sale and i will like to know the asking price for it and the pic..Looking forward to mail
by: 81.199.83.163






AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh folder posted by: Ed on 4/3/2006 at 3:40:16 AM
Does anyone out there have any folding Raleigh bicycle? I just bought one and was wondering if any one had a folder that they rode? Any tips or modifications? I am going stock now but maybe I should go to alloy rims. I am so lucky to have Rick cycle in my home town. This shop had an original folding lever!!! If you are in the Buffalo area go to Rick cycle. This shop is over 100 years old!!!!!
by: 64.136.27.226


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh folder posted by Matthew on 4/3/2006 at 6:00:14 PM
The Veteran Cycle Club have a section for folders - The Origami Section - no kidding!

Matthew - folding it's an art!
by: 62.253.64.14

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh folder posted by Lawrence on 4/4/2006 at 12:23:13 AM
I have a Raleigh Twenty folder. At present it needs a considerable amount of work; fun bike though. The design is to bikes as the mini was to cars--very Swinging Sixties! I bought mine from a colleague who had purchased it in Kensington London when she was there in the late 70's. The bike--and I now live in Tacoma, WA.
You mention alloy rims. Is that because of braking in the wet? There are some great newer compound brake blocks that will help. Harris Cyclery and Bike Friday are good twenty inch resources. I believe that the RSW 16 also came as a folder. I have no experience of the folding variety but can attest that the conventional RSW 16 was no match for the Moulton. The Raleigh Twenty is a delightful ride especially with some decent tyres and brake blocks. Sheldon has a section on the Twenty.
by: 4.179.46.154

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh folder posted by Matthew on 4/4/2006 at 4:05:04 PM
There are some dedicated officionados of the Origami trend out there. Alloy rims, 5 or 10 speeds, alloy handlebars, lots of trick kit. If you can make one of these babies fly you can certainly make a DL-1 shift, they are so heavy! The folders are heavier than the standard models.

Matthew - Non folding; occasionally creased.
by: 62.253.64.14

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh folder posted by nat on 4/5/2006 at 2:06:48 AM
I've got a 70's folder with an SA AW - but it's Italian - A 'safari' - & weight-wise - yep - it'd give a DL-1 a run for its money
by: 155.144.251.120

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh folder posted by Ed on 4/6/2006 at 3:06:36 AM
Well, I have modified about 5 Italian 3 speed folding bicycles and Yes they accelrate much faster than any large steel rim bicycle. The next phase is to thread the headset all the way down to 44mm. Rick Cycle of Buffalo has the die for this. Threading will allow me to add a Raleigh race and real ball bearings not the nylon original bushing. The head tube has to be cut down a little at the top. This will look like Raleigh should have done. I got this idea from my Italian folding bicycles. I want this to look mostly stock. Alloy parts are tough to fit into my plan but vintage road bicycle parts may work out. Good tires are a must 20 x 1.75 high pressure tires can boost performance. I think the light weight wheels would make the most differance. I like fenders but plastic or alloy are a rare find in this size. I think the price of gas will give this and all bicycles a new era.
by: 64.136.27.226

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh folder posted by Ed on 4/6/2006 at 3:10:33 AM
Well, I have modified about 5 Italian 3 speed folding bicycles and Yes they accelrate much faster than any large steel rim bicycle. The next phase is to thread the headset all the way down to 44mm. Rick Cycle of Buffalo has the die for this. Threading will allow me to add a Raleigh race and real ball bearings not the nylon original bushing. The head tube has to be cut down a little at the top. This will look like Raleigh should have done. I got this idea from my Italian folding bicycles. I want this to look mostly stock. Alloy parts are tough to fit into my plan but vintage road bicycle parts may work out. Good tires are a must 20 x 1.75 high pressure tires can boost performance. I think the light weight wheels would make the most differance. I like fenders but plastic or alloy are a rare find in this size. I think the price of gas will give this and all bicycles a new era.
by: 64.136.27.226

   RE:AGE / VALUE: Raleigh folder posted by Ed on 4/8/2006 at 2:11:42 AM
The Raleigh folder has a 77mm bottom bracket shell! It will be hard to find a spindle for cotterless. I am not shure if 57mm centers will work this would be a 7 series.
by: 152.163.100.136






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Bottom Brcket Adjustment posted by: sciencemonster on 4/2/2006 at 11:36:26 PM
I have an old WW2 Rudge that I don't want to mess with the pins holding the pedals on - they are blackout and I don't want to replace them - but the pedals seem a little rattlely at times. Can I unscrew that outside cover with the notches in it on the left, then tighten the inner cup a little bit? Is that how you adjust the bottom bracket?
by: 70.231.234.80


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Bottom Brcket Adjustment posted by Neal on 4/3/2006 at 2:03:57 AM
Try this first: put one hand on each crank/pedal arm and try to move them in opposite directions. If you have any give there, then you do have loose cotter pins. If you're lucky, it might just be a matter of tightening the nut on the threaded side of the cotter. If that doesn't work, you're likely faced with replacing at least one of those pins.

If the play you're finding is in the bottom bracket, you should get movement when you stand on one side of the bike and pull the crank arm towards you. You can tighten the BB without taking off the crank arm. The bearing retainer is on the left-hand side as the bike faces forward. There are two pieces usually: a notched lock ring and then a bearing retainer (that's what the bottom bracket axle is coming out of). You can try tightening that bearing retainer with a thin 15mm wrench (I think that's the size); it tightens clockwise. If things are loose enough, turning the retainer will also turn the lock ring and you can avoid using a specialized lock-ring tool (which needs to be held in place while you turn the bearing retainer). Good luck!

Neal
by: 209.6.26.141

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Bottom Brcket Adjustment posted by Dickin FL on 4/3/2006 at 4:50:45 AM
I'm going to take *strong* issue with Neal's suggested technique of tightening the nut on the threaded end of the cotter. This may have seemed intuitive to early 50's paper boys, but it doesn't work and leads to ruined parts. There are two good tools for dealing with cotters; viz., the Park and the VAR. Unfortunately both are now virtually unobtainable. You can improvise the Park tool with a 4" steel screw clamp and a socket. Loosen the cotter lock nut, slip the appropriate socket over it, and tighten the clamp against the socket and the cotter. Re-secure the cotter lock nut.
Some more lore from the 50's ..... paper boys who attempted to use hammers on the cotters without supporting the bottom bracket precipitated even more massive damage.
by: 172.130.179.58

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Bottom Brcket Adjustment posted by sciencemonster on 4/3/2006 at 11:43:07 PM
No, the pedals are fine. It's the bottom bracket bearings that are a touch loose or worn. You can't feel it all the time, but they do feel squirrely. I will take off the outer notched nut and see what I can do. Thanks.
by: 70.231.234.80

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Bottom Brcket Adjustment posted by sciencemonster on 4/3/2006 at 11:43:38 PM
No, the pedals are fine. It's the bottom bracket bearings that are a touch loose or worn. You can't feel it all the time, but they do feel squirrely. I will take off the outer notched nut and see what I can do. Thanks.
by: 70.231.234.80

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Bottom Brcket Adjustment posted by Neal on 4/4/2006 at 12:59:45 PM
Well, I have a momentary break from my paper route to post a response. If it's something you're not feeling all of the time, it's very likely you have a bad bearing. However, I've also gotten that feeling from a bad cotter pin, too! I say try the solution first that avoids buying specialized tools. Once you have a clear idea of what you might need, you can always ask at your local bike shop.

Neal (50 papers delivered and 50 to go)
by: 209.6.26.141

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Bottom Brcket Adjustment posted by MnHPVA Guy on 4/6/2006 at 2:24:11 AM
You would twist the threaded part off the pin before you could apply enough force with the nut to seat it properly.

If the bearings need adjustment, and the bike is that old, the grease is probably gone, and a BB overhaul is in order.

Dickie in FL Wrote
There are two good tools for dealing with cotters; viz., the Park and the VAR. Unfortunately both are now virtually unobtainable.

They've been out of production for years and bring big bucks on EBay. But there's this one, currently available. http://bikesmithdesign.com/CotterPress/index.html

by: 69.81.161.17