ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   NICE! posted by: Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/12/2006 at 9:45:35 AM
Someone PLEASE snap this up before I do! ;-)

http://cgi.ebay.com/50s-Raleigh-Tall-Frame-Deluxe-DL-1-Bicycle-Orig-NR_W0QQitemZ6637106425QQcategoryZ420QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
by: 69.39.168.55


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   NICE! posted by Matthew on 6/14/2006 at 4:21:18 PM
Did you buy it Larry?

My legs wouldn't reach the pedals!

Nice one!

Matthew - little frames are best!
by: 82.3.94.206

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   NICE! posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/14/2006 at 11:13:58 PM
No.. I went to look again... and... gone.

Probably for the best... I did get the Armstrong. See above.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
by: 69.39.169.48






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by: Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/12/2006 at 9:33:05 AM
http://cgi.ebay.com/VINTAGE-ARMSTRONG-3-SPEED-BICYCLE-MADE-IN-SCOTLAND_W0QQitemZ6635745392QQcategoryZ420QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

NMA, etc. I find it interesting... if you read the "questions" at the bottom of the listing, the fellow claims the bike is clearly marked "Made In Scotland".

I could pick this up on my way home from work if I wanted... but am unsure as to if it would be worth the trouble.

Thoughts?

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone

by: 69.39.168.55


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by David on 6/12/2006 at 5:05:40 PM
Nice chainring and pedals, if nothing else.
by: 65.78.2.207

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/12/2006 at 8:21:40 PM
Agreed. Since the chainguard seems to have gone missing and it has the funky chrome fenders, if I were to abscond with it the seat would have to go and I just might invert the bars and make a "feaux" clubber out of it.

;-)

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
by: 193.38.171.31

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/13/2006 at 1:04:33 AM
Well.. I've got a bid on it... let's see what happens. I'm sorely tempted to ask the sellor to check the hub for a date code... but I'd rather be surprised should I actually win the auction.

Stay tuned.... ;-)

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
by: 69.39.168.135

   RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by Chris on 6/13/2006 at 4:20:04 AM
The neatest thing about the bike is that it has this: Made in Scotland decal. I liked the pedals on this.
by: 68.41.206.53

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/13/2006 at 9:21:43 AM
Yes, that's what has me intrigued as well. Made in Scotland. Tulach Ard!!!!

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
by: 69.39.171.193

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by David on 6/13/2006 at 1:31:29 PM
My wife's Rudge was made in Ireland. Not sure if it's the Republic or Ulster.
by: 65.78.2.207

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by Matthew on 6/13/2006 at 4:05:18 PM
Rudge Ulster or am I being too obvious?

Matthew - its a Rudge thing.
by: 82.3.84.58

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/13/2006 at 5:30:53 PM
Upon further and closer perusal... I find it odd that the machine has what appears to be a Raleigh fork... yet the affixing eye for the rear mudguard is most certainly ABOVE... and not behind the dropouts.

I suppose... the fork could have been replaced... or was that construction somewhat common...?

Irish Rudge, eh? I wonder if it can roll straight past a pub or do you have to lean it away to hold the line. ;-)

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
by: 193.38.171.31

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by Jeff R on 6/13/2006 at 8:54:32 PM
That front fork style was also used by Dunelt in the early 50's when they were associated with or part of Phillips. My early Dunelt had those forks with the round thimble and a Phillips bottom bracket and head set. Later on Dunelt changed to the D shape thimble.
by: 152.163.100.136

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by Bryan on 6/13/2006 at 9:37:42 PM
I have a Humber made in Ireland.....cool sticker, but thats the only difference that I can see.
by: 146.145.49.238

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/13/2006 at 10:48:34 PM
Actually, I have a Raleigh LTD 3 that was made in Holland... and yes... only difference is in the transfer graphics.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
by: 69.39.170.75

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 6/14/2006 at 12:34:55 AM
GOT IT!

$52. Not a bad deal methinks... for what I think is a unique piece.

Hopefully, I can pick it up tomorrow.

I'll advise as to my findings. I'm going to guess it's a 60's vintage machine.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
by: 69.39.171.66

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by Chris on 6/14/2006 at 12:50:43 AM
The Irish made Humber, what size is the frame and wheels?
by: 68.41.206.53

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Armstrong... made in SCOTLAND? posted by Bryan on 6/15/2006 at 11:06:27 PM
Chris,

The Irish Humber is a standard '70's Sports model, the smaller frame and the 26" wheels.

Absolutely identical to every other early '70's Sports model I own except for the sticker, and maybe the paint (green) is a tinge lighter than normal.

Regards,
Bryan

by: 146.145.49.238






MISC:   Sorta on topic posted by: brent on 6/11/2006 at 3:15:55 AM
I'm fixing up my Moulton to ride more and have a question about S/A shifting. Is it OK to use a normal friction shifter to shift? I'm fitting drop bars and would like to be able to run a barcon to operate the 4 spd hub. Thanks,

brent
by: 12.74.74.225


   RE:MISC:   Sorta on topic posted by paul on 6/11/2006 at 6:28:12 PM
I believe Sturmey Archer hubs, be they 3 speed, 4 speed or 5 speed need the appropriate Sturmey Archer shifter(s) to avoid painful injury to the rider should the transmission suddenly "freewheel" causing gears to be caught between meshing and rider to land on the crossbar!!! Use of any other type shifter would IMHO invite disaster....paul
by: 4.156.168.145

   RE:RE:MISC:   Sorta on topic posted by Edward in Vancouver on 6/11/2006 at 10:10:15 PM
The S.A. hubs are all based on each shift moving the cable a certain length, if memory serves me, a 1/4". With a normal gear cluster and friction shifting, if you overshift, the chain jumps to the next cog and only makes alot of noise. With a S/A hub, if the clutch moves more than it should, you'll slip into neutral and do some serious damage to your, um, inseam...
by: 207.6.239.56

   RE:MISC: Sorta on topic posted by Mark Stonich on 6/13/2006 at 2:04:07 AM
For FW, FG, FC and FM 4 speeds
1st to 2nd 7/32" of cable travel
2nd to 3rd 3/16" of cable travel
3rd to 4th 9/32" of cable travel
Lotsa luck doing this reliably with a friction shifter. Missed shifts will quickly damage the internals.

As for the damage to your "externals" the others have alluded to; The top tube of an F frame Moulton is a long way down there. At 32 ft/sec/sec there's plenty of time to pick up momentum before impact.

Some of the earliest shifters were tubular afairs with ramps and detents. Really very simple. See the middle one in http://www.sturmey-archerheritage.com/detail.php?id=29

IIRC, the very 1st Grip Shift shifters used the same principal

If you are feeling ambitious, it shouldn't be too hard to make a 4 position version that sockets into the end of the bars. The very high cable tension needed to shift into low might be a problem.
by: 69.81.161.17

   RE:MISC:   Sorta on topic posted by Matthew on 6/14/2006 at 8:50:22 PM
Now if you want a real challenge how about an SRAM shifter to do your dirty work? that would give you the indexed shift you require but probably not the precise movement you need. However could you use a sturmey twist shift, from a later model bike not the late sixties twist shift. i had twist shift on my 1984 Marlboro and it was excellent.

Matthew - twist and go!
by: 82.3.94.206






ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Rudge maroon paint code posted by: Bill on 6/10/2006 at 11:14:36 PM
Hi there,

Great website !

Just starting to reassemble my late 1954 Rudge De-Luxe Super Safety 113 (I think)...

The maroon finish on the frame is 99% complete on the large tubes, but needs touch-up on the smaller tubes around the rear wheel.

Otherwise exactly as per 1954 catalogue (4 speed FG dynohub, lighting set, Brooks B83 saddle). The wheels are being upgraded to stainless steel (same size). The only missing part is the battery holder (but I have acquired one in a nice Raleigh green from a recycling depot), and have a good digital photo of the transfer to recreate one).

Has anyone colour-matched to 1950s Rudge maroon ?

The gold pinstriping is only faintly visible, is it best to ignore it rather than try to recreate ?

Regards

Bill, UK
by: 84.65.65.33


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS: Rudge maroon paint code posted by Mark UK on 6/13/2006 at 8:49:25 PM
Hi Bill,
I don't know about the Rudge Maroon colour matching, but I have tried pinstriping a black Raleigh Superbe Dawn Tourist that I resprayed. I only got as far as the front forks and gave up, so I would say ignore the pinstriping unless you are really good at it. I know you can get pinstriping as a transfer/decal, but the ones I have seen look far too thick vs the original. The bike will still look good without the pinstripes.

Good luck
Mark UK
by: 81.132.107.204






AGE / VALUE:   Amazing new product: Alumaloy posted by: Chris on 6/10/2006 at 9:32:03 PM
Alumaloy 1- 800- 917-WELD
You use a propane torch with no flux needed to heat up the aluminum and melt sticks of aluminum to repair things like broken transmission housings. Ideal for repairing aluminum, pot metal, e.t.c.
Saw this thing on t.v. and thought I would pass it on to the group here.
by: 68.41.206.53


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Amazing new product: Alumaloy posted by Matthew on 6/11/2006 at 12:11:33 PM
Hi Folks,

This works but you need the hand of God to get it right. Fractions of a second to long with the heat and 'splat' you have a pile of molten mush where you once had a broken fitting. The best way of fixing broken aluminium is to replace it or failing that mig welding with argon as the sheild gas.

Buy it and try it by all means but be steady with that torch!

Matthew - melting in the heat as East Anglia shrivels.
by: 82.3.65.206

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Amazing new product: Alumaloy posted by Chris on 6/11/2006 at 2:52:14 PM
I'm glad Mathew commented on this I was hoping to learn more about this. Anybody else see this on t.v. and care to comment?
by: 68.41.206.53

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Amazing new product: Alumaloy posted by Chris on 6/11/2006 at 3:02:49 PM
I never tried to see if they have a web page. I did not see a web page mentioned on the t.v. comercial and thought that was odd in this day and age.
by: 68.41.206.53

   RE:AGE / VALUE: Amazing new product: Alumaloy posted by sam on 6/11/2006 at 10:02:59 PM
Saw a guy at a gun show doing a demo of the stuff.That was over 5 years ago and I haven't see any sence.I think the rod was flux coated.---sam
by: 69.148.175.146

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Amazing new product: Alumaloy posted by Matthew on 6/12/2006 at 5:47:00 PM
Hi Folks,

I think the British version was called something like Lumi-weld. It was around in the late 1970s, the makers claim you culd repair Madzak with it. Madzak is the diecast metal toy cars are made from. We always called it 'Muccite 32', show it anything warmer than a light bulb and it was a runaway. It is also known coloquially as s*** metal forthe same reason. It you can weld that then you can darn holes in the clouds!

Matthew - muccite through and threw.
by: 62.252.0.6