AGE / VALUE:   Age? posted by: Melissa Smothers on 9/4/2007 at 5:06:15 PM
I recently bought a Hercules bicycle. The head badge reads Birmingham, England and not Nottingham (which would indicate it was made before 1960 when Raleigh took over). However, lettering on the frame reads AMF Hercules (which means that it was distributed in the USA by AMF for Raleigh after 1960). It is a one speed with a coaster brake. The hubs read "made in America" and I assume they are not the originals. The serial number on the frame is 82086, but that corresponds to the Raleigh serial number/year 1901. Any input you could provide would be extremely helpful. Thanks!

by: 69.129.46.19







ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Acetylene headlamps posted by: David Poston on 9/3/2007 at 7:46:05 PM
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/BICYCLE-ACETYLENE-LAMP_W0QQitemZ220145293424QQihZ012QQcategoryZ9946QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

I'm curious about these acetylene/carbide lamps. Up until when were they fitted, and to what types/makes of cycles? How do they work? Is there fuel still available for them? I am wondering how one of these might look on my 1932 All-Black Royal Sunbeam.

If anyone has info or links on these lamps, please advise.

Thanks
David
by: 98.195.47.72


   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Acetylene headlamps posted by Pete on 9/4/2007 at 4:06:30 AM
Take a look here http://www.websolutionswa.com/pwc/oil.asp and browse to the carbide lamp section to fill you with info on the subject.The fuel for them (calcium carbide) is available in caving/potholing type shops and is still used by cavers in areas where batteries are unavailable.The process works by having water in the tank on top of the lamp which by means of an adjustable dripper drips water into a chamber below which contains the calcium carbide.The chemical reaction between the water and the carbide produces acetylene gas which under pressure is forced through a jet and lit to produce a very bright white light.I have several I regularly use and they are great fun items and were in use I believe up to the forties.They can usually be made to work by replacing the seals which perish (welly boot rubber works well) and soldering any splits in the chamber(s) and by making sure the jet is clear.(a primus pricker is handy for this)They do produce a good light and when working are reliable.A word of warning though they can explode if blocked so light it outside and be ready for it just in case.Also the sludge that is left is very unpleasant and should be disposed of properly.Be warned though one is never enough and you will end up with a shed full like me!
Hope you found this illuminating.......
I see the light now Pete.
by: 195.137.87.130

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Acetylene headlamps posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 9/4/2007 at 8:55:02 AM
Go here:

http://www.hiwheel.com/

Click on the LIGHTING tab on the LH side... They sell replicas....

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
by: 193.38.170.65

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Acetylene headlamps posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 9/4/2007 at 8:56:36 AM
My mistake... "Accessories" then "Lighting"... and it seems they sell replicas of OIL lamp lighting... :-S

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
by: 193.38.170.65

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Acetylene headlamps posted by Matthew on 9/4/2007 at 10:32:50 AM
Hi David, Pete, Larry & all,

Acetylene lamps would look greta on your Sunbeam, I know an eminent cycle shop owner who rides a 1930s Baines Flying Gate lit in this manner. There are good if soemwhat exciting lamps to have.

Matthew - a bright spark?
by: 82.2.52.6

   RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Acetylene headlamps posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 9/4/2007 at 4:56:20 PM
Yes... they're very interesting devices as Matthew said. Sorry for the slightly off-topic with the oil powered units. I should have known better.

12 years ago, a dear friend bestowed upon me... a carbide miners cap light. His dad had passed away the year prior... and it was the fathers lamp.

Dave Smith Senior, MUCH to his chagrin... as he deplored the job... worked in the Sterling Hill Zinc Mine in Ogdensburg, NJ. Once owned and opertated back in the day by Thomas A. Edison.

It is this carbide cap light that is one of my most precious possessions.

http://sterlinghillminingmuseum.org/

Thanks for visiting upon the subject... it prompted me to once again take the light out of the display case and examine it. As bright as they were... I've been in that mine... and I can't imagine.... having only that wee light to work by.

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone...
I see the light from the past....
by: 4.154.222.33

   RE:RE:RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Acetylene headlamps posted by Chris on 9/6/2007 at 9:40:28 AM
MAGICAL THINGS!
WONDEROUS!
FORGOTTEN, BUT FOR A FEW......
by: 65.31.73.73

   RE:ENGLISH ROADSTERS:   Acetylene headlamps posted by David Poston on 9/9/2007 at 9:53:43 AM
Thanks for the links. Is it really true that these were produced until the 1930s-40s? It seems odd, given the availability of electric lamps by this time. If it will look right on my Sunbeam, I want one!

OK, I am tempted to bid on this one. What do you guys think?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=330161332143&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT&ih=014

Pete, do you have any in good condition you might be interested in selling?

Thanks all,
David
by: 98.195.47.72






WANTED:   Front fork for Triumpn posted by: Taylor on 9/3/2007 at 3:02:14 PM
Does anyone have a front fork for a 1950s Triumph? 26 inch wheels, 23 inch frame,6 and 5/8ths head tube, and rod brakes. Thanks.
by: 68.85.158.198







MISC:   Something completely different. posted by: Larry "Boneman" Bone on 9/2/2007 at 4:25:45 AM
Check out the MOTOBECANE(?) / Royce Union Roadster

3 speed... with chaincase even.

Ebay item: 120157201362

Cheers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone
by: 4.154.221.92


   RE:MISC: Something completely different. posted by Warren on 9/3/2007 at 6:09:56 AM
Even with the rod operated brakes, I'm thinking late 1980's...Europe was littered with these bikes at that time. Holland and Denmark still are.
by: 24.224.141.224

   RE:RE:MISC: Something completely different. posted by Larry "Boneman" Bone on 9/4/2007 at 4:59:35 PM
Could very well be 80's vintage. That's still... possibly 20 years old. Hard to imagine. :-S

Either way... yes... Holland... other areas across the pond are littered as you say... with velocipedes of this type. Scant few over there ship to the US... and if so... it's not very economical.

I have a friend who jets back and forth as he had family in Holland... one of these days... I'm going to have him do a little research and one never knows. ;-)

CHeers!

Larry "Boneman" Bone

by: 4.154.222.33






AGE / VALUE:    posted by: Riley on 9/1/2007 at 4:55:34 PM
Need new tires for my ea1-597 wheels. I would rather not do the ebay thing where and what type tires would be best for my Armstrong?
by: 71.81.249.206


   RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by David on 9/2/2007 at 7:35:50 AM
Harris Cyclery appears to stock a Kenda 597 tire. Probably other shops do as well.
by: 216.15.114.27

   RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Jeff R on 9/2/2007 at 6:30:23 PM
The EA1 26 X 1 1/4 597 tire is very hard to find. Most bike shops sell a combination EA1 Schwinn S6 which is 26 X 1 3/8 597. They will fit but the profile is fatter and taller than a true EA1 26 X 1 1/4. The true EA1 looks like a 27 X 1 1/4. Narrow and low profile, where as the S6 - 597 looks like the old English 3 speed 26 X 1 3/8 - 590 dia. I just installed a pair of Kendas combination EA1 - S6 on my 48 Raleigh Clubman yesterday as the old pair of EA1's rotted and split and I wanted to ride this weekend. They work ok but they look funny to me because they look fatter than the origionals. If you ever locate some true EA1 - 597 tires with out the Schwinn S6 markings on the tire let me know as I would like a couple of pair.
by: 205.188.116.199