OldRoads.com

This is an archive of Vintage Bicycle Information.
For current Discussions, go to our main site: OldRoads.com

If you are trying to determine the genealogy of your bicycle by it's features, go to our Vintage Bicycle Price Guide
which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, brake types, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your old bicycle.

If you are trying to determine the make and model of your bicycle, go to our Vintage Bicycle Picture Database
which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your vintage bicycle.

Archived: Customs, Lowriders, HPV, Recumbent, etc.







MISC:   Circus! posted by: Charlie on 5/6/2000 at 8:40:30 AM
Thought I'd mention that I brought my kids to the Ringling Brothers, Barnum & Bailey circus last night. I was surprised to see several innovative bikes in their acts. If you're going, it should hold your interest!


   RE:MISC:   Circus! posted by ChristopherRobin on 6/8/2000 at 12:25:44 PM
Check out the book on P.T.Barnum. I love the circus.






CUSTOMS:   Chain tensioner on a coaster brake? posted by: brent on 5/1/2000 at 7:13:09 AM
I'm working on taking an old Pugeot road bike and turning it into a single speed mountain-ish cruiser. If I use an old derailleur as a chain tensioner, will my coaster brake still work? I don't really want to make drop bolts for it since I'm putting 26 inch wheels on it to replace the 27's. I would also like it to be a little cleaner looking without the cables run everywhere. Thanks.


   RE:CUSTOMS:   Chain tensioner on a coaster brake? posted by ART on 5/2/2000 at 8:18:15 AM
Here's what I've done. I just cut the chain with a chain tool. I estimate it on the long side, cut it, and then temporarily join it and put it on the rear wheel. I pull the wheel into the dropouts to get the right tension. If it's too loose, I re-cut the chain. I don't use the derailleur for tension. I tighten the wheel down as tight as possile and I've never had a wheel slip If you think you need drop bolts to keep if from slipping, I've seen metal inserts that slide in between the rear axle and the back of the dropout that keep the axle from sliding. I like the no cable look, I don't even want braze-ons or cable guides interfering with the clean look, so I'm always on the look out for older bikes or track frames that are clean.






CUSTOMS:   Custom Choppers & Others posted by: David on 4/28/2000 at 1:11:14 PM
See my custom chopper made from a 1961 Heavy Duty Schwinn and others at http://angelfire.com/mi/antiquebikes. I love to create custom bikes. These are unfortunately more popular in Canada than the US.
Have a great day!!! David


   RE:CUSTOMS:   Custom Choppers & Others posted by JimW. on 5/3/2000 at 5:40:17 PM
That's pretty kool! I imagine you can pop a pretty mean wheelie on that, eh?

   RE:CUSTOMS:   Custom Choppers & Others posted by LARRY on 5/4/2000 at 8:59:24 AM
ITS GOOD TO SEE OTHERS DOING THE SAME WORK. I INJOY LOOKING THREW EASYRIDER ISSUES AND APPLYING IDEAS TO MY PRODJECTS FOR PEOPLE WHO JUST WANT TO BE A LITTLE DIFFERENT.AND FOR THE OG STUFF THEY ARE GREAT TO. ENJOY YOUR PAGE.THE BEST TO YOU AND YOUR PRODJECTS. KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK.

   RE:CUSTOMS:   Custom Choppers & Others posted by LARRY on 5/4/2000 at 8:59:28 AM
ITS GOOD TO SEE OTHERS DOING THE SAME WORK. I INJOY LOOKING THREW EASYRIDER ISSUES AND APPLYING IDEAS TO MY PRODJECTS FOR PEOPLE WHO JUST WANT TO BE A LITTLE DIFFERENT.AND FOR THE OG STUFF THEY ARE GREAT TO. ENJOY YOUR PAGE.THE BEST TO YOU AND YOUR PRODJECTS. KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK.

   RE:RE:CUSTOMS:   Custom Choppers & Others posted by CURLEY BILL on 5/15/2000 at 6:43:44 PM
HEY LARRY, I AGREE WITH YOU AND BIKERDUDE ABOUT CUSTOM BIKES.WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN YOUR BUILDING A ORGINAL BIKE AND PARTS ARE HARD TO COME BY.I WANT TO BIULD A BIKE FOR MY SON AND BE DIFFERENT ABOUT IT TO.I WOULD LIKE TO SEE ONE OF YOUR PRODJECTS TO GET AN IDEA OF WHAT YOU DO.

   RE:RE:CUSTOMS:   Custom Choppers & Others posted by CURLEY BILL on 5/15/2000 at 6:43:49 PM
HEY LARRY, I AGREE WITH YOU AND BIKERDUDE ABOUT CUSTOM BIKES.WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN YOUR BUILDING A ORGINAL BIKE AND PARTS ARE HARD TO COME BY.I WANT TO BIULD A BIKE FOR MY SON AND BE DIFFERENT ABOUT IT TO.I WOULD LIKE TO SEE ONE OF YOUR PRODJECTS TO GET AN IDEA OF WHAT YOU DO.

   RE:RE:RE:CUSTOMS:   Custom Choppers & Others posted by Larry Lujan on 7/28/2000 at 2:04:49 PM
Say Curly, Its me Larry letting you know you can see one of my bikes on BIKEROD&KUSTOM BR&K GALLERY. A 5-speed 20" kustom schwinn,with a black over all color & orange & yellow flames. Oh by the way, how's it going Jim. Not only does Jim helps us guys out with good solid information when it comes to bikes, but he also takes the time to help out, with problems with my computor. Thanks Jim Wilson of BIKEROD&KUSTOM.






CUSTOMS:   Custom Projects posted by: ART on 4/27/2000 at 1:02:24 PM
Here are some of my custom bikes. I'm not sure they are full out customs, but more like bikes that I have modified to give me a different kind of ride. I found an interesting road bike made by a Califonia builder named Lyndsey (I believe he went on to build Mountain Goat bikes). The frame was in really good shape and it had a complete Campy record groupo on it. The stem and bars were low end junk. The bike was a little small for me but I wanted to make it a rider. I had a pair of bmx bars--the stem, two strut supports, and long straight bars are all one piece. The stem fit, the bars, raised because of the struts, got me in a more upright position. I trimmed the bars on each end about five inches because my hands were just to far apart for a road feel. I put a pair of small mountain bike brake levers on it. I snapped a Brooks professional on it and I've got a quick city bike that is fast but I'm not bent down like a traditional roadie. I did the opposite on a schwinn professional mountain bike...I put a set of Cinelli drop bars on it and I have a cool bike for riding on the dirt canal banks that are prevalent in the Phoenix area. I've got a Swedish Crescent that I'm playing with now. My biggest disaster was when I tried to recreate building a Repack style mountain bike using a dx frame with springer, drum brakes, Schwinn derailleurs and bike heavy spokes s-2 rims. It cost me a bunch of money to get what I needed and I ended up with a heavy, uncomfortable, junker that took half a block to stop. I scrapped it and got some of my money back but it was a real bust. I don't know if I have anything that anyone would want to trade for, but I'm looking for an interesting safety style frame or ad old track frame...really anything from the 40's or earlier to play with.


   RE:CUSTOMS:   Custom Projects posted by ART on 4/28/2000 at 12:00:07 PM
In the above post I said Schwinn professional, I meant Schwinn paramount.

   RE:RE:CUSTOMS:   Custom Projects posted by Oscar on 4/29/2000 at 5:07:22 PM
Even the original Repackers knew they had heavy bikes that couldn't make it up the hill, and coasters that fried on the way down the hill. The difference between them and us is that they didn't know any different.

Also, drop bars on a trail bike are awesome. They angle your elbows to take all the shocks. They are best for steep climbs because they allow you to keep your weight low, and you can easily shift your weight fore and aft on technical summits. I swear by them.






CUSTOMS:   I *prefer* customs posted by: Bikerdude on 4/7/2000 at 5:56:43 AM
I'm surprised there is so little activity in the Custom Bicycle area. What do you all do with your bikes that are not 100% original and "correct"? Do you just toss them out? Doesn't anyone take these things and create works of art out of them like custom motorcycle builders and Street Rodders? Fat tires, fancy paint? I see the lowrider people doing this, but doesn't any one else do it with 26" bikes?


   RE:CUSTOMS:   I *prefer* customs posted by JimW. on 4/12/2000 at 9:45:02 AM
You're right, it's been amazingly quiet on this list lately.
If you're new here, check out the archived discussions on the
site. There's a lot of good stuff in there. Or, check out the
other lists; I always do, even though I find customs more
interesting. Why don't you tell us about your own custom projects?
That's the best way to get a new thread going. If you've come
up with a solution to a custom-oriented problem, let us know about
that, and you'll be seeing responses to it. Or, just ask a question.
You could always go to http://bikerodnkustom.homestead.com, and
comment on something interesting you saw there. We're here.

   RE:CUSTOMS:   I *prefer* customs posted by Oscar on 4/13/2000 at 6:42:31 PM
The most customizing I see on the street are homemade fixed gear bikes. These are seldom art, but true workhorses. My Schwinn Speedster was a single speed coaster brake dorkbike, now a tough and able city machine. I tossed off the gentlemanly 26 x 1 3/8 tires for skinny mountain bike tires. They are slick for the streets, and cushy on the potholes. Mountiain riser bars are there for an aggressive position. It's a small frame for a 26, and now the wheels are smaller, so it handles somewhere between a mountain bike and BMX.

Maybe the next bike will be an art bike, but I'm too right-brained. I'm glad that bikerodnkustom is there for us.






AGE / VALUE:   Need info on my Buzz Bike posted by: Josh on 4/1/2000 at 11:42:09 PM
hey...i just bought a Western Flyer Buzz Bike Eliminator. This is the second Eliminator i've owned, the first being an Eliminator III. The one i have now was Lime Gold, and has a gold sparkle seat. I need some info on these bikes. How rare is the bike, is it collectible? It looks totally different than a Stingray, and maybe that's why i have only seen the two i've got. If anyone has any info or especially pictures, because i need to know where the stripes go on the tubes and the fork, please email me. Thanks


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Need info on my Buzz Bike posted by Jeff on 4/6/2000 at 7:57:42 AM
That is a rare and unique looking bike. And valuable.
Check the picture database for pictures.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Need info on my Buzz Bike posted by Trace Killough on 11/10/2000 at 4:41:58 PM
My first bike was a blue/purple buzz bike around 1968. It was stolen years ago. I would like to find one now. Are you selling?






AGE / VALUE:   painting my lowrider posted by: bradley on 3/28/2000 at 11:47:17 AM
how many coats of paint on primer do i need and how many coats of paint for the best results? do i need a gloss finish?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   painting my lowrider posted by Jeff on 3/29/2000 at 6:08:07 AM
Check the "Restoration Tips" section of this site for some great painting discussions.






MISC:   springer spring posted by: Dave on 3/19/2000 at 7:43:37 PM
I have a restored Western Flyer tandem and put a springer on it.The problem Ihave is-the spring bottoms out as soon as I get on, any ideas on a stronger spring or a way to add spacers or something to keep it from bottoming?


   RE:MISC:   springer spring posted by BillG on 3/20/2000 at 6:14:56 AM
You adjusted the springer to it's max tension, right?
What style springer is it?

   RE:MISC:   springer spring posted by Patrick on 5/3/2000 at 6:01:39 AM
I've had the same problem and someone finally clued me in to a secret that may help you too. I put a generic brand of springer on my 62 Schwinn and had the same problem. A guy at a swap meet sold me a different top mount where the spring bolt screws into. It had a diffent angle and he said that he knows of 3 different angled top mounts available. Maybe that will solve your problem too. The problem occurs because the fork may not have been designed to fit the length of head tube on your bike as was my problem. Hope this helps. Let me know. The cost of the new bracket was $5, which is a cheap test even if you have to try a few different ones to get it right.






CUSTOMS:   New BikeRod&Kustom posted by: JimW. on 3/19/2000 at 1:20:28 PM
Volume Two'Issue Two’s Cover Feature is an amazing bike which looks very
much like what the Schwinn Styling Studio would have produced, had they
been asked to design a full-suspension recumbent bike in 1935. Designed
by the legendary Carl Hoots, it’s the Chartres Cathedral of bike
architecture. We also have other of Carl’s masterpieces on view, as well
as an in-depth, tech-filled interview with Mr. Hoots by the
also-amazing, Michael (TallBike) Watson.

We have other new wild rides in the BR&K Gallery by Gary Boivin,
Fredrick Trippler, Hal Paquin, and Larry Lauderback. You’ll also find a
piece on Taliah Lempert, an artist who specializes in paintings of
classic bicycles. Our Off-Topic feature covers Basic Cycles'
custom cruisers based on the Brazilian Caloi Dolphin aluminum frame, the
Worksman Cycles Pizza Delivery Bike, Artist Eric Staller's Conference
Bike, which seats eight riders in a circular array, and the
incredibly-slick recumbents of Flevobike, of the Netherlands.

Josh Merrow is the first recipient of the BR&K BIKE HERO Award. Josh
designed a high school course which teaches math-challenged kids math
and science through the design and construction of KustomBikes and other
projects. Read the interview to see how he did it, and see the pictures
to see how it worked out. Our Award Sponsor, PhatCycles, Huntingdon
Beach, USA, donated a phat Silva Chopper Bike as Josh’s prize.

Unfortunately, we also have bad news about, and a Eulogy for, Bruce
Bursford, gifted designer of the world’s fastest bicycle, our cover
subject last issue. Bruce was killed by a truck during road training
about a month after our interview with him was completed.

You will find it all at:
http://bikerodnkustom.homestead.com

Bone Appetite!
Jim Wilson
Sous-Chef, Le Bicycles Krazee








LOWRIDERS:   Wanted chrome 20" rims posted by: James Ditch on 3/16/2000 at 1:46:06 AM
I'm looking for some 20" chrome lowrider rims for a first time project


   RE:LOWRIDERS:   Wanted chrome 20 posted by VVVintage Vintage Bicycles at OldRoads.com on 3/17/2000 at 8:07:12 AM
We've got a set of brand new 20" Lowrider wheelsets, front and rear, radial laced, 68 spokes, rear coaster brake, with whitewall tires and tubes (20 x 1.175).

$35 for the set, plus $20 shipping (they are heavy).
US funds only, US shipping only. This is the only set we have.

Vin - VVVintage Vintage Bicycles
http://oldroads.com

   RE:LOWRIDERS:   Wanted chrome 20 posted by mike on 6/30/2000 at 10:11:36 AM
Hey, depending on where ur located hopefully in ny, i got a ton of 20' *stingray* (lowrider) rims, look up SIDS MEATS on route 25a in Northport Ny and ask 4 SID thats my boss we restore TONS of old, vintage stingray and can sell u a pair cheep!






FOR SALE:   1948 Whizzer posted by: Fred on 2/19/2000 at 8:02:00 AM
1948 Whizzer, Schwinn WZ frame, restored to new condition, fully accessorized with luggage rack, 43 miles since restoration, $4250. or best offer, if interested I can send pictures.







LOWRIDERS:   In need of some info. posted by: Shane on 2/16/2000 at 10:31:43 PM
Does anyone know of a place in Northern California (Bay Area) where I can get some custom lowrider parts made for my trike?


   RE:LOWRIDERS:   In need of some info. posted by jay on 3/21/2000 at 6:20:24 PM
go to D.T.E.lowriders, he does it...he did stuff for me...he's really good.

   RE:RE:LOWRIDERS:   In need of some info. posted by joe on 9/10/2000 at 8:42:37 AM
hey whats the website to detlowrider






MISC:   high wheeler posted by: Hayes on 2/14/2000 at 9:38:51 AM
The High Wheeler was built in 1873. This bike
had a front wheel 4 feet to 6 feet tall. I'm
looking for anyone who still makes or can make
a tire of this size. If you know of anyone
please E-mail me. Thanks :)







FOR SALE:   Brand New Lowriders and a 16 x 20 Musclebike posted by: Stu on 1/24/2000 at 8:02:27 AM
We're waiting for VVVintage to build our new site: RetroSpokes.com.

On the site we'll be carrying 3 brand new bikes: A 5-speed
Cruiser, a Musclebike and a Lowrider. And we'll have a
whole line of reproduction parts.

We should be up before the first week of February, but in
the meantime you can see a preview of the bikes. We've set
up a little web site in the "Reader's Web Pages" section of
OldRoads.com.


   Ok, the site is up! posted by VVVintage Vintage Bicycles and RetroSpokes.com on 2/4/2000 at 6:18:45 AM
We've got retail space and great storage space now, so we're
starting to build up inventory again.

The $199.95 lowriders (with great standard equipment) are
up on RetroSpokes.com. What other lowrider parts do you
want us to carry?

Our inventory will be displayed on RetroSpokes.com
(see ad above) and can be purchased over the web through
them, or in person at Cambridge Bicycle in Cambridge, Mass.
(see ad above).

As we build up our inventory and get e-commerce running
on RetroSpokes.com, let us know what useful bits and pieces
you'd like us to stock.

Thanks,
Vin - VVVintage Vintage Bicycles at OldRoads.com

   RE:Ok, the site is up! posted by Bob P. on 2/8/2000 at 6:25:08 AM
You should carry chrome springers, lowrider style and 26"

   BikeRod&Kustom Wish List posted by JimW. on 3/3/2000 at 7:36:52 AM
Since you asked: Nexus7 in a 26.125"alloy rim, Alloy cruiser bars,
Alloy MTB bars with 5" rise. Aero wheel discs. Chrome MTB forks in 20,24,26" sizes.

   RE:FOR SALE:   Brand New Lowriders and a 16 x 20 Musclebike posted by Manuel on 3/8/2000 at 6:48:04 PM
I want a good lookin lowrider bike that's new for about $150. If yall carry one please e-mail me.

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Brand New Lowriders and a 16 x 20 Musclebike posted by cAL on 3/9/2000 at 5:49:39 AM
There is one on E-bay right now






AGE / VALUE:   Custom Chopper posted by: Patrick on 1/21/2000 at 3:17:55 PM
I am in the process of gathering parts and advice and ideas to make a custom chopper style bike. I just aquired an RST DH Elite suspension fork with dual clamps but it has a broken brake bridge. If I remove the lower end (the suspension part) I am left with a really good start to build a rigid long chopper fork. Anyone know where I can get some good long chrome tubes or mild steel and some dropouts to make a fork? Also, has anyone had experience stripping paint from an aluminum alloy frame. I would like to put this fork on a Royce Union alloy Mt. Bike frame and strip and polish this instead of painting it. Does zip strip tarnish the metal, or is there a better way? The handlebars will be a set from a Schwinn XR-7 exercise bike as will the seat to give it that wide and fat look. I would like to use the front sprocket from the exerciser as well, but the frame does not have enough clearance. Any ideas? Also, what about using an old Schwinn drilled front sprocket from an early Stingray adapted to use as a REAR sprocket on a Bendix hub? Any tips or ideas are greatly appreciated.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Custom Chopper posted by Gf on 1/24/2000 at 7:12:15 AM
You can make some excellent extended forks using chrome piping
from a publing supply shop. You can cut dropouts off of an old frame and weld those n (assuming you've got access to
welding equipment).

I don't think paint stripper will harm the AL frame.

   Custom Chopper posted by JimW. on 1/26/2000 at 8:29:55 AM
I would be careful in my choice of materials for front fork fabrication. Always bear in mind that the fork is the difference between your face and the pavement. Plumbing supply stores sell two kinds of pipe-too heavy, in the case of water pipe, and too weak, in the case of chrome plated brass lavatory drain tubing. Bike-grade tubing and dropouts should be got from specialist builder-oriented outfits like Gaerlan.
http://members.aol.com/Gaerlan123/bike.html

Regarding stripping an aluminum frame: Chemical strippers are the way to go, I've never had any damage from the stuff.
Be careful with abrasives, though. I wouldn't recommend steel brushing; I'd just give it more stripper in the stubborn areas. A toothbrush is okay, though. I would recommend using bronze wool in very fine grades for polishing the surface of the metal. This can be followed by
a cloth polishing wheel with a suitable polishing compound,
if you want it chrome-like. A treated metal-polishing towel
like Cape Cod will keep it looking that way.

Concerning the use of a front sprocket on the rear hub: Presuming that you also use a front sprocket at the crank location, you will have an extremely low gear ratio, with consequent slow speed. Visually, it's nice to have a big disc back there. Maybe you should consider something like
the Hayes hydraulic disc brake, as seen at
http://bikerodnkustom.homestead.com/wheels.html
I'm afraid it would get kind of crowded back there, but it
might be possible to do it. Just for visual effect, it seems
possible to graft one of those chrome pieplate-like "chain protector" discs (as seen on my Schwinn Continental 10-speed)to the hub. It would look pretty cool and you would
have protected spokes, too.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Custom Chopper posted by Patrick on 2/21/2000 at 7:55:53 PM
Thanks for the tips to all who responded. I had a computer crash and just got back up and running so now I can respond. I am still looking for fork tubes and BMX style flat blade dropouts. I found a good source of chromoly thru Aircraft Spruce but did not buy it until I can find dropouts of like material. Any help? Does anyone make custom BMX frames, forks, and dropouts? All of the web sites I have found for custom bike builders are for road, track and mt. bikes.

   RE:Custom Chopper posted by roy on 4/11/2000 at 9:37:54 PM
i need info on a mini chopper raleigh if they excist

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Custom Chopper posted by Mike Watson on 6/10/2000 at 6:32:55 AM
Hi Patrick, for chrome plated mild steel tubing check out
shops that specialize in retail diplays and shelving. Get
your self a calipier for measuring wall thickness, inside
and outside diameter so you know what you're buying is
right to sleeve over the fork leg stubs. Beware chrome
tubing is around 4 times as expensive as bare mild steel
tube bought from a structural steel supplier, which brings
me to another source. Structural steel suppliers have tubing
as well as solid rod which comes in three common grades
hot rolled, cold rolled, stress proof 2 1/2 times stronger
than mild steel but only costs 50% more; the same strength
as grade five bolts. Solid rod sounds heavy( it is ) 7/8
inch rod is 2 pounds per foot, but something to keep in
mind: chopper forks can't be made too strong! About fork
dropouts the easiest way is to cut the ends off of a pair
of BMX forks and sleeve them internally or externally with
the extensions. Your front sprocket on the back idea well
work OK, hire a small machine shop to hole saw out the
center of the front sprocket and have it MIG welded to the
coaster brake sprocket, make sure there's room to install
the locking ring. A three speed hub with it's 33 percent
overdrive in third gear will yield a ratio that is not too
low. As for front sprocket clearance; a hammer always works
good applied to chainstays in the problem area. For stripping
the frame contract a furniture refinishing company for them
to tank dip it. Happy chopping, Mike