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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







WANTED:Old derrailuers and multi speed bikes posted by: Ray on 1/20/2000 at 7:05:43 AM
I am looking for old racing bikes with old 2 and 3 speed derrailuer setups. Will even look at above 3 speed but must be unusual. Condition not important if I like the bike. E-mail me with what you have. I have many bikes and parts for trade or will buy outright Also looking for the older derrailuers by themselves. Thanks


   RE:WANTED:Old derrailuers and multi speed bikes posted by Oscar on 1/20/2000 at 5:55:34 PM
I don't have what you're looking for, but I'm curious. What years of bikes to you collect? Are they American or European?

   RE:RE:WANTED:Old derrailuers and multi speed bikes posted by Ray on 1/21/2000 at 7:34:48 AM
The year of these bikes range from the 50s all the way back to the turn of the century. I go for all types, American, Eurpoean, Asian you name it, if it is interesting then I go for it.

   RE:WANTED:Old derrailuers and multi speed bikes posted by 2NU A. L. F. houston on 1/24/2000 at 9:58:31 PM
'ATALA' MARCA DEPOSITATA OFFICINE MECCANICHE. frame is in original condition,with riveted badge,white head tube,and mint green frame tubes. all components have been overhauled,bike is rideable. 56cm C/T,41in weelbase,72deg parallel tubes,fiamme red label sewups,simplex suicide front shifter(made in italy,w/'cyclo'cage made in england), benelux 60 rear deurailleur,campy clampon rear shifter w/ internally routed cable. virtually all other parts are marked ATALA. parts replaced include: tires,spokes,bearings,cables,housing,brake pads,chain,handlebar tape,cotters,seat. interested? no email at present but will pursue positive response.

   RE:WANTED:Old derrailuers and multi speed bikes posted by 2NU A. L. F. houston on 1/24/2000 at 9:58:34 PM
'ATALA' MARCA DEPOSITATA OFFICINE MECCANICHE. frame is in original condition,with riveted badge,white head tube,and mint green frame tubes. all components have been overhauled,bike is rideable. 56cm C/T,41in weelbase,72deg parallel tubes,fiamme red label sewups,simplex suicide front shifter(made in italy,w/'cyclo'cage made in england), benelux 60 rear deurailleur,campy clampon rear shifter w/ internally routed cable. virtually all other parts are marked ATALA. parts replaced include: tires,spokes,bearings,cables,housing,brake pads,chain,handlebar tape,cotters,seat. interested? no email at present but will pursue positive response.

   RE:WANTED:Old derrailuers and multi speed bikes posted by 2NU A. L. F. houston on 1/24/2000 at 9:58:42 PM
'ATALA' MARCA DEPOSITATA OFFICINE MECCANICHE. frame is in original condition,with riveted badge,white head tube,and mint green frame tubes. all components have been overhauled,bike is rideable. 56cm C/T,41in weelbase,72deg parallel tubes,fiamme red label sewups,simplex suicide front shifter(made in italy,w/'cyclo'cage made in england), benelux 60 rear deurailleur,campy clampon rear shifter w/ internally routed cable. virtually all other parts are marked ATALA. parts replaced include: tires,spokes,bearings,cables,housing,brake pads,chain,handlebar tape,cotters,seat. interested? no email at present but will pursue positive response.

   RE:RE:WANTED:Old derrailuers and multi speed bikes posted by Joe B-Z on 1/26/2000 at 8:54:29 PM
Let me know about the Atala. E-mail jfbender@umich.edu or 734-769-5626

   I am interested please call me 908-355-2978 posted by Ray on 2/8/2000 at 6:22:31 AM
Please contact me as I am interested in this bike.






AGE / VALUE:Motobecane Grand Touring posted by: Wings on 1/19/2000 at 8:34:06 PM
I am a Schwinn fat tire guy. I ride recumbents, fat tire cruiser, and recumbents. I found a great looking bike:
Motobecame Grand Touring
888 Vitu Tubing
12 Speed, with a 6 speed freewheel with a wide range of cogs
Black, with red head tube and red stripes, gold lettering.
Down tube shifters.
Motobecane Crank and handle bars.
Very lightweigt.
But, as I look for Schwinns I now also notice old road bikes -- because of what you guys have written. I have never sold a bike on EBAY. I checked EBAY archives and they don't even list Motobecane. Does this bike have value as an old bike or did my eyes like the colors too much?????


   RE:AGE / VALUE:Motobecane Grand Touring posted by Dan on 1/24/2000 at 2:22:48 PM
Wings,
I don't think the bike has much collectible value, as compared to
Motobecane's racing bikes (This does not mean of course that
it is not a nice bike).

A warning: If you intend on working on it (or having a shop
work on it), keep in mind that the bottom bracket, at least
on my bike, is Swiss threaded, meaning that the fixed cup unscrews,
clockwise, the same as standard English threaded bikes. This
is opposite of the typical French bike with right hand threads
on the fixed cup.
I have one of these myself and have set it up as a commuter,
with 700x32c tires. If it is the same as mine, it will have
Vitus double butted main tubes. Very comfortable bike, worth
keeping as a rider, but I would not expect to make lots of
money from it.

I think it basically fell in the middle of the range in
Motobecane's lineup. Mine seems to be built pretty good, with
attractive lugs, contrasting paint in the headtube and seat
tube.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:Motobecane Grand Touring posted by Dan on 1/24/2000 at 2:25:32 PM
Wings,
I don't think the bike has much collectible value, as compared to
Motobecane's racing bikes (This does not mean of course that
it is not a nice bike).

A warning: If you intend on working on it (or having a shop
work on it), keep in mind that the bottom bracket, at least
on my bike, is Swiss threaded, meaning that the fixed cup unscrews,
clockwise, the same as standard English threaded bikes. This
is opposite of the typical French bike with right hand threads
on the fixed cup.
I have one of these myself and have set it up as a commuter,
with 700x32c tires. If it is the same as mine, it will have
Vitus double butted main tubes. Very comfortable bike, worth
keeping as a rider, but I would not expect to make lots of
money from it.

I think it basically fell in the middle of the range in
Motobecane's lineup. Mine seems to be built pretty good, with
attractive lugs, contrasting paint in the headtube and seat
tube.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:Motobecane Grand Touring posted by francois from France on 1/28/2000 at 9:43:25 AM
These MOTOBECANES were a good buy some 15 to 20 years ago for cycle touring as we say in France.

But most of them had only 3 good quality tubes for the frame
(ie reynolds 531 ?)

Enjoy it. In France, I would not think that they are not worth much more than some US $100 to 200 at the most in VG condition.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:Motobecane Grand Touring posted by Francois again on 1/28/2000 at 9:45:30 AM
Sorry, I meant Vitus tubing (ggod quality tubing but less looked after than reynolds)

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:Motobecane Grand Touring posted by Wings on 1/28/2000 at 10:58:34 PM
Thanks for your messages regarding that nice looking Motobecane that I have in my living room! I appreceate your knowledge regarding this bike.
Wings






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:prima info please posted by: bigE on 1/19/2000 at 7:01:23 PM
A number of years ago I picked up a nos Italian road bike labelled "prima". The frame is cromo with long point lugs, a half chrome fork and rear triangle, and campy touring drops and fork tips. Components; campy "velox" chrome/steel rear derailleur, campy pushrod f. derailleur, campy tipo hiflange hubs/nisi sewup rims, campy headset/BB, and a 3bolt campy steel crank, TTTbar/stem. anyone have ideas of age or value on a pristine bike? oh yeah, probably about a 52cm. frame. Sorry Ive got no photos to post, but I'm not looking for a buyer.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:prima info please posted by bigE on 1/24/2000 at 6:16:06 PM
O.K., do any of you campyphiles know when campy started supplying dropouts? I am guessing that this bike is early sixties?...................






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:braze-ons posted by: Mark P on 1/19/2000 at 9:42:00 AM
I was a Schwinn guy for years until I switched to Raleigh as my favorite bike. In my transition I ended up with a Univega that has a nice light frame with lots of braze-ons. My poblem is I want to change to bar-end shifters. What do I do with the downtube shifter braze-ons? Where should I anchor the cable housings for the bar-end shifters? Is there a fitting for this and what is it called? It's a Suntour Cyclone non-index drivetrain that I've got here. Thanks


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:braze-ons posted by Martin on 1/19/2000 at 3:21:10 PM
Well, I'm not sure it's really a vintage lightweight kind of question, but I know the answer. You need the clumsily named "downtube shifter boss cable-stop adaptors". When you ask for these at your local retailer( who will know all about them) you must use the voice of the Martian in Bugs Bunny to be understood. These screw on to the existing braze-ons. Look at any bike equipped with STI/Ergo parts (more common these days than bar-cons). They come with barrel adjusters as an integral feature (necessary for indexed systems), but have been made without as well-don't know if these are still available. The cheapest, ugliest way would be to clamp on an old cable-stop bracket near the braze-ons, but whatever you do don't cut them off! Where to wrap the cable to on the bar? About 6" forward of the shifter usually, just before the curve on drop bars, which I assume you have. Are you aware of and have you considered the "Moustache bar"? A beautiful thing; see Drew Saunders' moustache bar page: http://www.stanford.edu/'dru/moustache.html I have them and love them. Email me if you want more set-up opinions. Take care of that Superbe stuff.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:braze-ons posted by Martin on 1/19/2000 at 3:26:22 PM
Uh, I mean Cyclone.






WANTED:Harrison bicycles, ENGLISH, 1950's posted by: Martin on 1/18/2000 at 12:54:01 PM
I forget something every time (I'm new at this) That's supposed to say WANTED. Thanks for your patience... See below.







AGE / VALUE:Harrison bicycles, ENGLISH, 1950's posted by: Martin on 1/18/2000 at 12:41:57 PM


First of all, hello. This is my first time on the site and most enjoyable it has been! I am not a "collector" though I am a bit of a packrat. I have five different sorts of bicycle and enjoy riding them all. The next one will be an English roadster. However, the reason for my writing concerns my father. Before he and his bride escaped England in 1959 he raced bicycles, both cyclocross and track. Then, in a fit of practicality and in preparation for the serious business of starting a new family and career in the new world, he sold his bike. Recently, he has mused how nice it would be to ride his old bike again, so my brother and I have begun scratching at the surface to find more information. My father's Harrison track bike was bought new in, he thinks, 1956, in, I think, Coventry or very near by, where it was also manufactured (and ridden). He is about 5'5"-5'6" so a 49-50 cm frame (by todays standards, but bikes tend to be smaller these days, don't they). We would be very interested in and appreciative of any information leading directly to or towards this bicycle: (in order of significance, in any reasonable, ie; repairable to riding, condition) 1) A Harrison track bike 2) Any Harrison bike (on the street, at the age of 64,though fit, gears and/or brakes might be more practical, though he would never consider adding either to a proper track frame) 3) Any English track (or road racing) bicycle of the late 1950's Thank you for your consideration (and great web page), oh, and I know about e-bay. RSVP or email me, Cheers, Martin







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Schwinn Continental Handlebar Tape posted by: JimW. on 1/14/2000 at 12:52:41 PM
My Continental is in the opaque sky blue color. The bars were
bare when I got it, but I found a fragment of tape remaining,
which suggests that it originally came with tape which matched
the bike's paint color. Does anyone know of a source for original
color-matched tape?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Schwinn Continental Handlebar Tape posted by Oscar on 1/15/2000 at 1:38:14 PM
I found that older Schwinn shops still have some funny little nos items like bar tape. If this idea strikes out, you can try the Buy, Sell, Trade Forum at www.schwinn.com. Good Luck.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Schwinn Continental Handlebar Tape posted by JR on 1/20/2000 at 12:03:26 PM
Hunt Wilde made the tape for Schwinn. You will see both brands advertised on the Schwinn forum.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Master link? posted by: Howard on 1/14/2000 at 7:27:18 AM
I know 1971 is not vintage yet, but I'm stripping a 1971 Schwinn Varsity for parts and the confounded chain has no master link.
I can get it off, but I prefer to treat old bicycles as gently as possible. I don't work on 10-speeds very much - hardly at all - but I
was wondering if this is common practice. I've found a few kiddie bikes from the Walmart that don't have master links, but I expected
better of Schwinn. I know 10-speeds have a flexable chain, but are they a different size from the single-speed, coaster-brake bikes that I
usually work on? They look the same, but I haven't held them up to the light side by side yet. The nuts and bolts on the Schwinn derailer
don't seem to be SAE or metric. Maybe they're CWKB size. (Crescent Wrench Knuckle Busters) OK, some of them might be 8mm. That's the wrench I
couldn't find.
What's the deal on master links? Howard


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:We don't need no steenkin' master link! posted by Morgan on 1/14/2000 at 9:30:55 AM
Generally speaking, 3/32" chains don't use master links. There are some manufacturers who offer them, but it's nearly impossible to make a master link that isn't wider than the standard links. What you do is get a chain tool, available at any bike shop, and learn to use it. Incidentally, in this day of 8 to 10 speed rear clusters, I suspect that chains are becoming even thinner than 3/32".

Nearly all bike parts have been metric for the last 30-40 years. The derailleur nuts you encountered are probably 8mm, but here's a neat little secret: a 5/16" fractional wrench is practically a perfect match for the 8mm. Furthermore, a 5/8" fractional is a good substitute for a 16mm. But don't rely on these crutches: get yourself a good set of metric wrenches NOW.

Morgan

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   We don't need no steenkin' master link! posted by BillG on 1/14/2000 at 11:38:31 AM
Department stores that carry bikes also usually stock
chain tools. Shouldn't cost even $5.00

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Master link? posted by JimW. on 1/14/2000 at 12:14:28 PM
The principal reason behind the lack of master links on bikes
with derailleur shifters is clearance. A master link will get
caught in the derailleur. You can add more clearance with a Dremel
grinder, but that would weaken the assembly. Best get a chain
tool. It will pay you to shop around, though. The last one I bought
was from a local bike shop and it cost $14.99! Wasn't made out
of titanium, either, and was barely adequate to the job.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Master link? posted by Mark P on 1/19/2000 at 9:33:51 AM
I lost the bit that goes in my chaintool. It is a part that cannot be bought seperatly anywhere. Until I get a new one I use a common nail punch and lay the whole bike on my bench to where I can get the chain to lay over my vice. I then position the chain so a pin will be over the little square hole that is there when the vice jaws are closed. I then punch the pin until it allows the links to come apart. It works okay except when you punch to much and the pin falls completely out of the chain. You don't want that to happen. Be careful, hope this helps.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   We don't need no steenkin' master link! posted by Francois... on 1/28/2000 at 9:50:00 AM
Just be careful when buying the tool: formely, they only had one type of tool, but now with extra narrow chains, they have at least two or three different size of tools to do the job. So make sure to order the right one for you...






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Austro-Daimler? posted by: Dennis V. on 1/12/2000 at 3:32:44 PM
Hi all! I recently had a chance to buy a bike with a Puch headbadge, but on the top tube, it said Austro-Daimler. Suntour components all over. It was insanely cheap, but I passed anyway. Was this a collector of any value or just an old junker? Does anybody remember these?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Austro-Daimler? posted by Morgan on 1/14/2000 at 7:10:11 AM
Puch & Austro Daimler bikes came from Steyr-Daimler-Puch, and were marketed in the US from sometime in the 70s until the early 80s. Their products ranged from entry-level to top of the line. I owned a bike shop from 1980-87, and sold the Puch/AD line until about 1983. The low-line ADs began with Reynolds straight-gauge tubing and went up from there. I sold a couple of Campagnolo Super Record equipped ADs to triathletes in 1981.

The Puch bikes tended towar the lower and middle ends of the range, although I've seen some full-boat Campy racing bikes with a Puch nameplate. The main Puch line seemed to be mopeds. I inherited a half-dozen Puch mopeds from the previous owner of the shop, but never ordered any more. As mopeds go, I think they were supposed to be pretty good.

Puch also supplied three-speed bikes to Sears in the 60s: the first bike I bought as an adult was a Sears three-speed in 1963. In retrospect, it was a very well-made bike. The hub was a Steyr ripoff of the Sturmey-Archer, so similar that ALL the parts were interchangeable.

I still have a 1980 Austro-Daimler Vent Noir 2, a neat chrome plated all-531 with the full Campy Gran Sport gruppo.

Morgan

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Austro-Daimler? posted by Fred on 1/14/2000 at 8:22:17 PM
Morgan: I believe I have an bike such as you describe as made by Puch for Sears. Take a look at the Various bikes gallery of my website and click on the Austrian graphic. The text describes the bike in detail. It is a very well made bike in its price class.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Austro-Daimler? posted by Fred on 1/14/2000 at 8:26:06 PM
It would help to have the URL wouldn't it? It is:
fredhaj.tripod.com






WANTED:Old multi speed derrailuer bikes posted by: Ray on 1/12/2000 at 12:42:11 PM
I am looking for old racing bikes with old 2 and 3 speed derrailuer setups. Will even look at above 3 speed but must be unusual. Condition not important if I like the bike. E-mail me with what you have. I have many bikes and parts for trade or will buy outright.







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Cinelli Old Logo posted by: Bruce VR on 1/12/2000 at 1:32:39 AM
Anyone have a good date when Cinelli went to the dreaded "Flying C" logo on the bars and stems? I really like the older stuff. Also how about the year they bailed out on the cable guides on NR downtube shifters?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Cinelli Old Logo posted by Chuck on 1/13/2000 at 11:34:35 PM
Cino Cinelli & C was bought by Antonio Columbo in 1978 and the logo was changed at that time. Also backing plates without the cable guides appeared on the downtube shifters around the late 1970s.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Cinelli Old Logo posted by Bruce VR on 1/17/2000 at 1:16:15 AM
Thanks Chuck, I have your two Cinelli catalogs, just never heard a good date...

Anyone know how to preserve Campy gum brake hoods? Seal out the elements or let 'em air out???

   Gum Hoods posted by Oscar on 1/18/2000 at 6:41:02 PM
Protect them in the off season by rapping them in Saran Wrap. Keep them out of the sun as much as possible.






AGE / VALUE:Gazelle bicycles posted by: Aaron Collier on 1/11/2000 at 3:57:25 PM
I have a Gazelle Impala.Wandering AGE/VALUE.Where can i get some information in english.
Thanks for any help.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:Gazelle bicycles posted by santos on 5/25/2000 at 9:14:32 PM
Gazzelle frames are rare. I paid six hundred bucks for a frameset in 89. They are of good quality but not popular.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Clement Campionissimo tubies posted by: Aldo Ross on 1/11/2000 at 12:54:36 PM
When were Clement "Campionissimo Seta Extra" tires produced, and where do they fit into the Clement line-up? These tires have green labels.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Clement Campionissimo tubies posted by Paul MN on 1/12/2000 at 1:24:19 AM
This may sound a bit too vauge but, they were around when I was racing in the late sixties and early seventies. I'll bet Eddy Meryx was a fan of them. 'Seta Extra' would be a step to the light side of the 'Seta'. Perhaps 20 grams lighter. I had a pair that came on a used Colnago I'd bought. I was suprised how long they lasted, a tough tyre for it's light weight. They had orange tread, if you could call it tread. To replace them in 75' would have cost at least $35.00 and I was more of a Pirreli man. I don't know why, I kept those old blown sew ups around for years. Finaly threw them out in the last move.






MISC:Vintage Lightweight discussions here. posted by: Vin - VVVintage Vintage Bicycles on 1/11/2000 at 7:31:19 AM
We're breaking out the Vintage Lightweight and English
Roadster Discussion Areas. If you are looking for Vintage
Lightweight information, please check here, and the English
Roadster Discussion Area, and our Discussion Area Archives.

All future Vintage Lightweight discussions should take place here.



   RE:MISC:Vintage Lightweight discussions here. posted by alinfun on 1/13/2000 at 6:46:11 PM
Have an alan italian racing 12 speed 1972 bicycle what do I have?