OldRoads.com

This is an archive of Vintage Bicycle Information.
For current Discussions, go to our main site: OldRoads.com

If you are trying to determine the genealogy of your bicycle by it's features, go to our Vintage Bicycle Price Guide
which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, brake types, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your old bicycle.

If you are trying to determine the make and model of your bicycle, go to our Vintage Bicycle Picture Database
which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your vintage bicycle.

Archived: Vintage Lightweights







WANTED:   Trek 600 series posted by: Marty Eison on 12/11/2001 at 10:56:53 AM
I have a trek 600 series (670) which is equiped with Campy N. Record throughout except for Modolo brakes.
Does anyone know what the bike was equiped with originally?
Also I'm looking for replacement Decals, any ideas?

thanks,
Marty


   components posted by John E on 12/11/2001 at 12:09:48 PM
I am not a Trek expert, but my 1982 Bianchi Campione d'Italia came with Campy NR derailleurs, seatpost, and pedals; Ofmega cranks and hubs; and Modolo "Speedy" brakes, so there is precedent for a Campy/Modolo mix as an all-Italian cost-effective alternative to full Campy. By the way, the Modolo brake calipers are at least as good as the first-generation Campys with which I replaced them.

   RE:WANTED:   Trek 600 series posted by schwinnderella on 12/11/2001 at 8:40:09 PM
Try http://www.vintage-trek.com/

   RE:WANTED:   Trek 600 series posted by MC on 12/11/2001 at 8:43:25 PM
It would be prudent to check out the Vintage Trek website to assist in the needed research . Try this link: http://www.skipechert.com/vintage-trek.htm
Good luck!

   RE:WANTED:   Trek 600 series posted by marty on 12/12/2001 at 2:09:08 PM
Thanks for the responses.
www.vintage-trek.com had all the info I was looking for.
Now, where did I put that crank puller?


Marty






WANTED:   Schwinn Stainless Steel Front Wheel posted by: Jim Bolivar on 12/10/2001 at 10:39:40 PM
Does anyone have a front wheel for sale?


   RE:WANTED:   Schwinn Stainless Steel Front Wheel posted by Jim on 12/14/2001 at 1:03:18 PM
What size ?






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old Peugeot Road Bike posted by: Rob on 12/10/2001 at 7:26:38 PM
I just acquired an old Peugeot 10 speed, which I took apart yesterday...It appears to be almost all original except for a Shimano Eagle rear derailleur. It has Simplex shifters, with a right side braze-on and a clamp for the left side,(that was something new to me!!), a Simplex front derailleur which has a very smooth operation and a somewhat built in Simplex alloy short chainring guard. The chainrings are steel and cottered with the smaller cotters...one cotter came out with a light tap, the other would not budge and is now rather damaged...I still have to fiqure out what to do. I couldn't find a brand name, but it looks alot liket old cranks I've seen on Raleighs...Nervar? The seat is leather and the make is very hard to discern....it has 'ovals' on the side...Ideale?. THe seat post is very thin with an insert...original? Rims are Rigida 'Chromage Superieur'; hubs, Normandy; Free-wheel, 'Atom'. It has Simplex QR's in very nice shape, with the black plastic wing nuts. The brakes are MAFAC with rather deteriorated half hoods. Stem AVA; bars appear to be chromed,...brand? The paint has a thin look to it but looks fairly nice, lots of light scratches (I compared it to the paint on the protected headset part of the fork. Color is blue with gold or yellow highlights around the lugs, etc. top of the seat stays are black. There are rather ugly looking pump pegs on the downtube, plus cable type braze-ons all over the place, some of which I don't what they were for...including some 'foldover' braze-ons along the left seat stay. It also has a generator (Soubitez?, which I haven't tested, mounted on the left seat stay. I think I've covered it all...

Can anyone tell me what I have exactly...model and year? It sat in a 'consignment' shop for a couple of months (with the price dropping every week or so..I forget what you call that sales process)...so it can't a hot item, no one else apparently was interested, but it seems like a decent old bike....



   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old Peugeot Road Bike posted by Mike on 12/11/2001 at 11:36:14 AM
I once parted out a similar Peugeot with the right shifter braze, and the left clamp shifter. Like yours, it had Mafac centerpull brakes (not Racer, though), and a braze on for a generator on the left fork. The saddle was a leather Brooks Champion, which had an oval stamp in the side of the saddle.

The crank might be Stronglite or Nervar, depending on quality. Don't worry about deforming the cotter pin, as they are replacable at better bike shops.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old Peugeot Road Bike posted by Lenny Dintenfass on 12/11/2001 at 12:04:54 PM
Hello Rob:

I am not very familiar with French bikes, but if soaking the cotter in penetrating solvent overnight doesn't help, then my method of choice for dealing with a badly-stuck cotter pin (as I don't have a fancy cotter pin removal tool) is to remove most of the cotter pin in place using a drill bit just a bit smaller (perhaps 2 mm smaller) than the diameter of upper part of the cotter pin (opposite the end with the nut). Before attempting this, support the crank arm (where it joins the axle)with a piece of sturdy wood (a 1" by 2" ash works well) cut to the distance between the crank arm/axle joint and the floor, with a "V" notch cut so that there is a space for the lower end of the cotter pin to rest within the wood. The idea is to immobilize the cotter pin for the drilling operation and to support the axle (to avoid axle and BB bearing damage) for the pounding that will follow.

Before drilling, use a prick punch to make a slight depression in the center of the upper part of the cotter pin so that you can start the drill bit centered on the top of the cotter pin. Drill slowly (cordless variable speed drill is nice), clearing away the waste often. If you are carefull, you will be able to avoid the flat part of the axle as you drill through the cotter (the axle is a lot harder than the soft steel of the cotter, so if you feel increased resistance to drilling, stop and switch to a smaller diameter drill bit). After drilling through most or all the length of the cotter pin, turn the crank arm 180 degrees so that the lower end of the pin is facing up. Using a punch with a flat end, attempt to drive the remains of the cotter pin free from the crank arm and the axle. You may have to turn the crank over 180 degrees again and try to pound the edges of the hollowed-out cotter towards the center (to break the hold of the cotter against the crank arm); for this it helps to use a pretty small diameter punch. It may take quite a while to free the cotter, but eventually it will come out.

This method isn't very elegant, but it works. I've used it often, and haven't wrecked an axle or crank arm yet. The key is to support the axle in the process so all of the pounding won't destroy it (or the bearings and cups).


   UO-8 posted by John E on 12/11/2001 at 12:23:59 PM
You almost definitely have a Peugeot UO-8, which sold for about $120 in the early 1970s. (Yours is pre-1974, when they converted to stem-mounted shifters and replaced the single shifter boss with a pair of brazed-on cable guides.) The original derailleur would have been a Simplex Prestige, and the single downtube shifter boss allowed Peugeot to build up the frame as either a 5-speed (mostly for the European market) or a 10-speed (for U.S. and European markets). The crankset is a Nervar, and the saddle may be Adga, or, if you are lucky, Ideale or Brooks. Read Sheldon's extensive articles on French bicycles and learn why you need to replace that "stem of death" ASAP. (By the way, old French stems are 22mm in diameter; much of the rest of the world is 22.2. With a little light sanding, I was able to put a modern Salsa stem on my 1980 PKN-10.)

If you want to disassemble the bottom bracket, remember that BOTH cups unscrew anticlockwise, as on most Italian bikes. I strongly recommend using Loctite on the fixed cup during reassembly, unless a big set of channel-lock pliers is part of your standard toolkit.

I equipped a 1974 UO-8 with Campy downtube levers and derailleur, aluminum rims, Weinmann brake handles (for my size-8 hands), and cotterless aluminum cranks, and happily commuted on it four four years until the right chainstay cracked between the tyre and chainring clearance dimples.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old Peugeot Road Bike posted by smg on 12/11/2001 at 1:02:28 PM
The Shimano Eagle was the first derailleur I ever used. It worked very well on a 14-32 freewheel, despite being pre-slant-parallelogram. Granted, it is a heavy hunk of chromed steel, but it has an integral guard plate--with lightening holes--that gives it a surprisingly graceful look. Certainly sturdy!

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old Peugeot Road Bike posted by Oscar on 12/11/2001 at 2:26:54 PM
Oh, no! The Stem of Death (AVA)! I have a replacement French stem to give to you if you are interested. Email me.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old Peugeot Road Bike posted by Rob on 12/11/2001 at 5:32:34 PM
Thanks Lenny,

Actually, last night I was able to get the stubborn cotter out...with all the parts off, except the BB components and right side crank, I oriented the frame on to my vise. I then placed a 'socket' over the exit end of the cotter and closed the vise on to the threaded end of the cotter. (I had sprayed that end of the cotter with WD-40 the night before.) About 20 seconds after closing the vise as tightly as I could by hand, the cotter 'popped', and that was that. Except the end was mushroomed and bend. I tried to straighten it with a view to possibly re-threading the end, but it snapped off...so now I'll be looking around for a replacement cotter. I have English/American type cotters but, of course, not French. The joys of fooling around with old bikes...:)

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old Peugeot Road Bike posted by Lenny Dintenfass on 12/12/2001 at 8:21:12 AM
Hello Rob:

Glad you were able to get the cotter out without having to drill. As you mentioned, if you are so lucky as to get the chainring side crank arm removed, you can use a vise and expand your "menu" of removal method options. You have a nice bike...enjoy!

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old Peugeot Road Bike posted by Rob on 12/13/2001 at 12:21:31 AM
Thanks to all for the information...I now know a lot more about old Peugeots than I did a week ago!! The stubborn cotter is now out...By holding it up a bright light and letting the shadows play across it, I was able to determine that the saddle is an 'AGDA', which I guess is not so great...but I assume it is the original. Does anyone know the serial number sequencing for the UO-8's?

I do have a couple of old Simplex derailleurs, one with a black logo; the other, red. I'm not sure what the significance is? I've read or heard before that the AVA stems are not great...I'll be looking for replacment MAFAC half-hoods, which I don't imagine will be too difficult...and I have to find a French cotter for the crank...So we'll see how it goes. For anyone who's interested, I put up an personal website for a couple of old Raleigh Super Course bikes, I bought this past summer.
http://quicksitebuilder.cnet.com/rwa_bby/raleighbikes/

The site has descriptions and a bunch of photos, nothing elaborate...

If the Peugeot turns into an interesting adventure, and I get sufficiently attached to it...and I can write up a nice story...I might give it a site, too.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old Peugeot Road Bike posted by Rob on 12/13/2001 at 12:21:53 AM
Thanks to all for the information...I now know a lot more about old Peugeots than I did a week ago!! The stubborn cotter is now out...By holding it up a bright light and letting the shadows play across it, I was able to determine that the saddle is an 'AGDA', which I guess is not so great...but I assume it is the original. Does anyone know the serial number sequencing for the UO-8's?

I do have a couple of old Simplex derailleurs, one with a black logo; the other, red. I'm not sure what the significance is? I've read or heard before that the AVA stems are not great...I'll be looking for replacment MAFAC half-hoods, which I don't imagine will be too difficult...and I have to find a French cotter for the crank...So we'll see how it goes. For anyone who's interested, I put up an personal website for a couple of old Raleigh Super Course bikes, I bought this past summer.
http://quicksitebuilder.cnet.com/rwa_bby/raleighbikes/

The site has descriptions and a bunch of photos, nothing elaborate...

If the Peugeot turns into an interesting adventure, and I get sufficiently attached to it...and I can write up a nice story...I might give it a site, too.

   Peugeot Road Bike posted by John E on 12/13/2001 at 6:08:23 PM
The only inconsistency between your frame and a U.S. version UO-8 is the left seatstay braze-on, which was perhaps for a lighting system, indicating a European model which has been stripped of its mudguards, etc.

After my American Eagle Semi-Pro / Nishiki Competition frame broke, I transferred most of the components to the UO-8. Even though the Nishiki was double-butted Ishiwata CrMo and the Peugeot was straight carbon steel, the Peugeot was a slightly superior frame -- the same weight, a bit more resilient and a bit faster on climbs, although the long fork rake did make it frustratingly slow-steering. I'll be interested to hear how you compare it to your Super Course, which cost only about $15 more in 1972.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old Peugeot Road Bike posted by Jonathan on 12/14/2001 at 1:26:53 AM
Nice to know that you found a way to punch that pin out. The "high impulse" (hammer method) works
in a last resort, even with a wooden block! The bike-in-vise method is the right approach, but I've found
an easy way. You need a 1/2 or 7/16 socket (or similar size metrics) and a really good C-Clamp; the kind you get a flea markets, not the new stuff!
The trick is to get it going straight. After some trial and error, you'll have the secret. The nut is a good platform if it is attachable, or you can file the threaded end flush with a few strokes with a mill file (smooth). Oh, and lots of penetrating lube helps if you can stand the mess and smell.
I think the Peugeot UO-8's are a secret. They are under-rated and under-priced, which is great for me. Eventually, they will be sought after as great riding bikes. NOT racing, just good ole ridin'; day in, day out. Of course they'll last indefinitely, because they can ALWAYS be repaired; unlike aluminum and graphites.
Just had to get that in, sorry. I just got another bargain Peugeot at my local Salvation Army store. The cranks are Nervar alloy cotterless with Shimano gear shifts; Weinmann 999's! The wheels are Maillard "heliocentric" and very nice rims. I'd pay more for the wheel at a bike shop (if they even have one) than I paid for the whole bike.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old Peugeot Road Bike posted by glen on 12/15/2001 at 12:04:00 AM
Sounds like we had very similar experiences. A few weeks ago I bought a '71 or '72 UO8 from its original owner: it was completely original and in very good condition, having been used for well less than one year total. Anyway, I too ended up using a suitably-sized socket and a bench vise to remove the stubborn cotter pins, having first suspended the frame from the garage roof to allow for easy positioning. It really couldn't have worked better.



   RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Old Peugeot Road Bike posted by Clyde on 12/15/2001 at 10:46:45 AM
The frame sounds like a Chromed one I obtained at the local recycling facility. One brazed-on shifter boss, flat "arrow-shaped" pump pegs, flat cable stops requiring step down casing ferrules, and stair-step shaped cutouts in front lugs. Serial number - 546647 - on rear left dropout. What's the diameter of your seat tube? Mine appears to have been bored out to 25.4 for a couple of inches. I suspect the chrome job was done after original purchase. U-08 or not? Completion of project way down on list, but thanks to Oscar for Tipo rear hub spacer/nut dimensions a while back.

If you need the Mafac lever rubber tops e-mail me.
Cheers






AGE / VALUE:   1973 Schwinn World Voyager posted by: MC on 12/10/2001 at 8:09:15 AM
I would like an opinion or two on a 1973 Schwinn World Voyager. It appears to be more like a Paramount than any other model. I had never heard of it until I saw one for sale. This particular specimen is mostly chrome with only an orange seat & head tube, Suntour dropouts, Shimano Crane R/D and Titleist F/D, (old embossed) D/A cranks and D/A hubs, Weinmann 610 c-pull brakes and a Brooks saddle. The lugs are not Nervex, but well-constructed nonetheless.
The headbadge is a globe design that says "World" across it. It is in very good (restorable) condition with no missing parts. To those who know about it, what is it worth? Or is this just more garage sale material?

Thanks


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1973 Schwinn World Voyager posted by Eric Amlie on 12/10/2001 at 10:54:23 AM
A one year only model built for Schwinn by Panasonic. In mid '74 it became the Schwinn Voyageur II. Nice bike but not on the same level as the Paramounts. I have seen one real nice one sell on Ebay for a little over $300.

For more info go to

http://www.geocities.com/sldbdealer/1973/73dlsbv1.html

Click on the thumbnails to expand the images then expand them again by clicking on the "big" button.






AGE / VALUE:   Info on Carlton (club?) bike posted by: dafydd_williams@yahoo.com on 12/9/2001 at 1:08:45 PM
I picked up a Carlton the other day that I think is a clubman bike. I know little about either Carltons or club bicycles, so any information would be welcome.

What I do know: Very nice lugwork. It has chromed forks and stays. "C2777" is stamped into rear dropouts. Headbadge reads "Carlton, Worksop, England," with picture of a cyclist. The front hub is Brampton; The rear is a 68 SA AW. Rims are 1 X 1 1/4 Dunlop lightweights. The shift cable runs down the down tube rather than with the top tube, pulley is a plastic clamp on (reads "Sturmey Archer England"). Spindle has Carlton clubman stamped into it. Bars are low rise, maybe 15" to 16" wide. Brakes are Weinman centerpulls. Aluminum (I think) fenders.

Provenance bonus: has a sticker from The Bicycle Exchange, Harvard Square, MA.

Again, any information is welcome. I have some ideas for souping it up (namely a close- or medium-ratio hub) but I'd like to keep it somewhat correct.

Thanks,
david


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Info on Carlton (club?) bike posted by Warren on 12/9/2001 at 4:11:24 PM
Too cool...Carlton was a custom frame maker of quality bikes that were eventually merged with Raleigh. Yours may be such a bike. If your bike has rear fender eyelets and they are positioned behind the axle rather than above it, then your bike is very likely from the Raleigh period. I've never seen a Carlton club bike but I think it is very desireable. The Dunlop rims are nice...if you find a source for good lightweight tires buy a bunch. Michelin was one of the last manufacturers of good high pressure EA3 tires. There is a 597 mm bead Schwinn tire in the US that can be subbed but is wider than what should be on it. The fenders are likely Bluemels. I'm suprised that it has an AW on it. I would also look for a close ratio hub...or go with a period fixed hub.

Is it Robins egg blue? What kind of cranks? 531 tubing? So many questions...

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Info on Carlton (club?) bike posted by dafydd_williams@yahoo.com on 12/9/2001 at 9:08:55 PM
Hi Warren,

Thanks for the info on the tires. It has the eyelets above the axle, and came with a Raleigh chainguard (which seems a little suspect, but not impossible I suppose), so I imagine it's post 1960. The AW seems off to me also, but like I said I don't know much about them.

I don't think it's 531 because it's only slightly lighter than a roadster, which is easily accounted for with the lighter rims, fenders, etc. Perhaps it's a lower-end machine, which could account for the AW, although '68 seems late in my mind for this style of bicycle. Weren't they popular in the 50s?

The cranks have NB stamped in them, with what looks like Carlton chainring, at least the few I've seen. The pedals most likely aren't the originals, as they seem to be generic black plastic (definitely not even rubber). Ditto on the seat, as it's a mattress saddle.

The color is black with three metallic red stripes on the seat tube and on the head tube around the badge and lugs. There's also remnants of pinstriping where the chrome meets paint. Unfortunately, the paint is not in very good shape; very torn as to what to do. The black is easily remedied, but finding a match for the red is another matter.

I've taken it apart already but haven't done any serious cleaning or rebuilding. I'll see if I can get my hands on a digital camera or a scanner and post pictures up somewhere.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Info on Carlton (club?) bike posted by smg on 12/10/2001 at 1:27:31 PM
Go to a site called "ninesprings" for pix/info on a number of club-type bikes of various ages. Highlight is a beautiful 1949 Raleigh "Record-Ace" that inspired me to try to build a replica. Just completed, it mates what appears to be a much-modified early-70's Raleigh Gran Sport frame with a Sturmey S5/1 five-speed hub and a Sugino BMX (?) single crankset taking 110mm chainrings. I think of it as what the clubman-style bike might have evolved into had the virtues of internal gearing for some applications not been forgotten. Besides nostalgia appeal, it promises to be a very good commuter/utility mount. I hope you have good luck finding one of the medium/close ratio hubs; my fantasy favorite would be the AM medium-ratio 3-speed.

   here's the Ninesprings URL posted by John E on 12/10/2001 at 5:39:36 PM
Thanks for the reference. Very interesting website!
http://www.the-richardsons.fsnet.co.uk/

   club bike gear changer posted by John E on 12/10/2001 at 5:54:38 PM
I noticed that the Ninesprings 1949 Raleigh has the S/A trigger just inboard of the right brake handle. I did the same thing in 1969, but on the left, so that I could double-shift my 12-speed derailleur/hub hybrid gear. There is really nothing very new about today's integrated shifter-brake levers.

   I like "Club" bikes posted by Walter on 12/11/2001 at 10:32:04 AM
I'm not English nor am I old enough to have partaken in the club racing scene of the 1950s and earlier. Despite that these bikes make me nostalgic......Strange.

From what I've learned 1968 would be too recent a year for that style bike, though perhaps not as it may have a hi-ten frame as you've mentioned. It's possible the wheel is a later add-on. After derailleur bikes replaced internal geared racers someone looking to keep the bike on the road might not have been picky if s/he had to replace a wheel?

Neat site. I enoyed it. I too would like to make a replica someday but I might just commit the "heresy" of using one of the Shimano 7 speeds. "Sheldon Brown did it" would be my defense as the torch carrying mob approaches.

   I dislike posted by Oscar on 12/11/2001 at 5:22:57 PM
I dislike AW hubs. The direct drive is nice, but the high gear is too high for most situations, and the low gear is too low for this flatlander. A medium range hub would be ideal for me. However, I was once stuck going against the wind for 15 miles in first gear. Longest, coldest ride of my life.

   RE: AWs posted by dafydd_williams@yahoo.com on 12/11/2001 at 5:48:55 PM
I tend to agree, although I found I like it more after switching from a 17t to 19t sprocket on my Sports. I find the underdrive works quite well on hills. Still, I don't see why more medium- and close-ratio hubs weren't built.

   RE:I like em too posted by Warren on 12/11/2001 at 11:13:20 PM
It would be no heresy to use an internal 7. I have a two vintage club bikes with derailleurs...one a '53 Hercules Falcon with proprietary 3 speed "Herailleur" (I need the shifter) and the other a '51 CCM with a 3 cog Cyclo. Both have fenders with Dunlop 26 X 1 1/4 wheels. Internal SA hubs and fixed hubs were of course also common on clubbers. So anything goes... I built my own repro with a fixed hub, alloy EA1 rims and components and use it as a daily rider. It's a kick building something unique and personal.

   derailleur-hub hybrids posted by John E on 12/12/2001 at 8:21:01 AM
You guys are making me wish I had not given my old Hercules, which I had converted to a 12-speed hybrid transmission (14-16-18-20 on an AW), to a friend. That was a fun bike to ride, particularly after I replaced the Benelux clockspring derailleur (yuck!) with a Campy Gran Sport, and the 40-to-100 gear range was roughly what I still use today. Maybe a Sachs 3x7 hub for a new project someday ...

   RE:derailleur-hub hybrids posted by david on 12/13/2001 at 11:27:17 AM
Heck, I'm thinking about adding a cyclo converter onto the Carlton, so you're not exactly alone. But again, I don't know a thing about them! Anyone?

   RE:RE: AWs posted by smg on 12/13/2001 at 12:25:30 PM
With my S5, I geared 36-22, giving a range of 29-35-44-56-66. The two high gears exactly bracket my "normal" gear, which is in the low sixties, and are adapted to grades slightly better and worse than level. The low is sufficient to get this fat old man up the Seattle hills, while going down those same hills I don't feel any need to use any gear higher than a 66. At the bottom of the hill, I'll just have to go up another one, so I enjoy the ride down, courtesy of Sir Isaac.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Info on Carlton (club?) bike posted by dafydd_williams@yahoo on 12/18/2001 at 11:23:06 AM
Not that anyone's reading this string anymore, but I peeled off the bike shop sticker (it was in horrible shape), and there it was, part of a 531 decal! If I'm interpreting it correct, it's 60s, with butted main triangle (but necessarily the rest). Oh well, hopes of a really cool find partially blown.






FOR SALE:   80's NOS/SH parts mainly Italian posted by: Wayne Davidson on 12/8/2001 at 10:24:51 PM
Hi all, again I offer my list of items. I have a few trades done. But not getting I need for the Rigi. So I offer them for sale so that I can use the money for buying the parts I require. What does not sell will be on eBay next year. The list is an email and not an attachment. Will have the list priced tomorrow. So I will wait untill then and send to all that reply.....regards wayne....







WANTED:   Dunlop wheel (rear) posted by: Gralyn on 12/8/2001 at 5:46:50 PM
I have a Dunlop wheel on the front. The previous owner said the rear used to be a fixed gear (currently coaster brake). So, of course, the rear wheel doesn't match the front. I'm not even sure the front is original. But anyway, the rim is stamped "26 X 1 3/8 Dunlop 26 X 1 3/8 Made in England". The hub has something like "HR Pattern" stamped on it. The headbadge on the bike is Hercules, Birmingham, England. I would like to find a Dunlop rear fixed gear wheel - but I don't know if there ever was such an animal. Any ideas? I think I would rather have a matching Dunlop on the rear - I know it didn't originally have a coaster brake.


   RE:WANTED:   Dunlop wheel (rear) posted by sam on 12/8/2001 at 9:40:38 PM
First count your spokes.front should be 32 rear should be 40.And yes some hercules did come with a coster brake.Also please tell if the head badge is brass or alm.

   RE:WANTED:   Dunlop wheel (rear) posted by Warren on 12/8/2001 at 10:26:21 PM
I have a 32 hole Hercules with the same front hub FWIW...

   RE:RE:WANTED:   Dunlop wheel (rear) posted by Gralyn on 12/9/2001 at 7:03:31 AM
The front wheel (Dunlop) has 32 spokes. The rear wheel (non-Dunlop) has 36 spokes. The head badge is brass.

   RE:WANTED:   Dunlop wheel (rear) posted by sam on 12/9/2001 at 12:24:02 PM
The rear wheel is incorrect as you said.The brass headbadge would put the bike 1960 or earler.(my best guess)Raleigh took over hercules in 1960 and started using alm. badges soon after.And FYI wards imported hercules in 1950,when AMF started selling them I'm not sure but most likely late 1950s---sam

   RE:RE:WANTED:   Dunlop wheel (rear) posted by Gralyn on 12/10/2001 at 12:04:20 PM
I had previously thought that the bike was 1960 or later - i didn't know AMF started selling them in 1950. It is a Hercules - AMF (I had cut though layers of paint - and got down to "AMF" lettering. I'm no metalurgist - but the head badge looks brass to me. I will be looking out for a Dunlop rear wheel, though.
It has an Ideale leather saddle, cottered cranks, the chain ring looks identical to those from Hercules from the 30's into the 50's






AGE / VALUE:   Univega "viva sport" posted by: Jonathan on 12/8/2001 at 3:38:15 AM
This bike was a thrift store splurge at $40, a bit more than I usually pay for bikes. The bike is practically new. A brief test ride in the lot convinced me it was a pretty tight machine. I know it's not a big mover in the collectors' ring, but who needs a better bike? I don't have much on it, except it is made in Japan. The friction shifters are secured with an hex screw on the downtube. Never seen that, before. Campy drops; upper level SunTour; Dia-Comp sides; SR stem and Italia leather seat. A guy could have won the Tour de France on this bike 2 decades back. Well, maybe not, but the quality is there. Any notes on this model?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Univega posted by Warren on 12/8/2001 at 7:41:41 AM
You've covered most of it...any tubing sticker? Ishwata 022 would be a premium frame...024 or tange are more midrange. Are the diacompes NDG 400's? Great campy knock-offs that work better than the originals. Suntour Sprint or Superbe components? All of these add up to a nice rider.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Univega posted by Warren on 12/8/2001 at 11:37:41 AM
Oops...NGC 400's...

   Univega posted by John E on 12/8/2001 at 11:10:06 PM
Sounds good to me. If it's a 12-speed, it sounds like early 1980s vintage. If it's a 10-speed, perhaps mid-to-late 1970s. I do not think you overpaid.

   RE:Univega posted by Jonathan on 12/10/2001 at 1:50:16 AM
Thanks for the kindly input. The cranks are stamped "super Custom" with bolt covers stamped "Univega cotterless" and the rear derailer looks like a top quality model. It is SunTour BL, which I have not much info about. It looks and shifts real good.
The frame is double-butted Cro/Mo both triangles and forks. The lugs are solid, but with curved edges and long pointed extensions. Nice looking enough, to convince me that the guys who built the bike had quality on their minds. It's so brand new looking that I probably won't expose it to the brutality of commute service or beater duty.
I'd like to mount it on a blank wall in the house as an art object. If a piano that never gets played can be allowed to take up space...I got to work on it. Oh, the brakes are not those you mention. I know what you are saying, though. They are super fine stoppers. No, these are the next rung downward of those NCG's, too bad for me. I guess they had to draw the line somewhere.
I'd guess it went for under $300; maybe under $250. Hard to believe it, when you see what you get for $500 nowadays.

   RE:Univega posted by Jonathan on 12/10/2001 at 1:53:38 AM
Thanks for the kindly input. I grasp at any justification for support for my obsession. The cranks are stamped "super Custom" with bolt covers stamped "Univega cotterless" and the rear derailer looks like a top quality model. It is SunTour BL, which I have not much info about. It looks and shifts real good.
The frame is double-butted Cro/Mo both triangles and forks. The lugs are solid, but with curved edges and long pointed extensions. Nice looking enough, to convince me that the guys who built the bike had quality on their minds. It's so brand new looking that I probably won't expose it to the brutality of commute service or beater duty.
I'd like to mount it on a blank wall in the house as an art object. If a piano that never gets played can be allowed to take up space...I got to work on it. Oh, the brakes are not those you mention. I know what you are saying, though. They are super fine stoppers. No, these are the next rung downward of those NCG's, too bad for me. I guess they had to draw the line somewhere.
I'd guess it went for under $300; maybe under $250. Hard to believe it, when you see what you get for $500 nowadays.






WANTED:   looking for parts for a light weight posted by: capitol4zero on 12/7/2001 at 5:37:48 AM
i have a light weight 1950 schwinn im looking for the front flange wheel is big like a drum brake but is not a drum brake is a free wheel using a .80 gauge spokes also im looking a s-5 steeinless schwinn rim this rim doesn't have no knurls any body how has this parts i would paid good money thank you if you know some body can call me.







AGE / VALUE:   Panasonic Pro Touring Frameset posted by: Fred A on 12/7/2001 at 3:49:34 AM
I just acquired a Panasonic bike frame and fork. Incredibly lightweight, I can pick it up with my pinky and throw it up in the air. The top tube says PRO TOURING, and beneath it HANDMADE. Frame and fork both have decals saying Tange 2 and both dropouts are Suntour. Bike is set up for touring with enough brazed on fittings to hold three water bottles and rear rack. The headset is a Tange Falcon as is the bottom bracket.
Anybody know if this was one of Panasonic's higher end bikes and about what year it was made?
Thanks in advance.........







AGE / VALUE:   Panasonic Pro Touring Frameset posted by: Fred A on 12/7/2001 at 3:49:34 AM
I just acquired a Panasonic bike frame and fork. Incredibly lightweight, I can pick it up with my pinky and throw it up in the air. The top tube says PRO TOURING, and beneath it HANDMADE. Frame and fork both have decals saying Tange 2 and both dropouts are Suntour. Bike is set up for touring with enough brazed on fittings to hold three water bottles and rear rack.
Anybody know if this was one of Panasonic's higher end bikes and about what year it was made?
Thanks in advance.........







AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Competition posted by: brewboy on 12/7/2001 at 2:31:29 AM
Just aquired a Raleigh Competition(mid 70's?). Here are the specs: Reynold's 531 frame(black, lugged w/gold pin striping, chrome fork tips),Ta cranks, Huret jub. der.,Brooks saddle, weinmann rims and brakes. It has a Carlton sticker on the bottom of the seat tube. Bike is in great shape with average nicks and slight scratches and no surface rust. Any idea of value or history? thanks for the help!


     Raleigh Competition posted by John E on 12/8/2001 at 4:50:06 PM
Nice bike! Try the vintage Raleighs page (www.google.com can find it pretty readily) and sheldonbrown.com.






AGE / VALUE:   rare LH drive NNIWHCS on eBay posted by: John E on 12/6/2001 at 12:09:52 AM
eBay item #1043659604
LH drive and mirror-image decals --> collectibility!

All seriousness aside, note that even as late as 1967, some fairly high-end bikes sported steel cranksets.







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Bike Science Question: Frame Stiffness posted by: Keith on 12/5/2001 at 6:21:36 PM
Sheldon Brown states as follows in his article on frame materials:
Torsional/lateral stiffness
This is mainly related to the stresses generated by the forces you create from pedaling. Any
frame will flex around the bottom bracket a bit in response to pedaling loads. This flex can be
felt, and many riders assume that it is consuming (wasting) pedaling effort. Actually, that's not
the case, because the metals used in bicycle frames are very efficient springs, and the energy
gets returned at the end of the power stroke, so little or nothing is actually lost. While there is
no actual loss of efficiency from a "flexy" frame, most cyclists find the sensation unpleasant, and
prefer a frame that is fairly stiff in the drive-train area.

I think he's mistaken. From the standpoint of thermodynamics, Sheldon is right -- the energy isn't lost. From the standpoint of mechanical efficiency, however, I think he's incorrect. Yes, the frame springs back. But does the frame springing back propel the bike forward. No.

To test this, you could build a bike on which the bottom bracket is attached to each frame member by 6" coil springs. I'd bet the bike would barely be rideable, if at all. Yet the energy going into the springs isn't lost. Nonetheless, the mechanical efficiency would be nil.

Comments from engineers and others?


   Frame Stiffness posted by John E on 12/5/2001 at 10:24:07 PM
I claim to be able to sprint or to climb faster with my stiff Bianchi than with my much softer Capo, but there are several other factors, including differences in tyre width and bike weight. What happens at the bottom bracket, and what is the basis of Sheldon's argument? The frame deflects to the left as the right pedal descends toward and through its midpoint; it then rebounds through the bottom of the stroke, and begins to deflect to the right as the left pedal descends. Each time the frame rebounds, the pivot point of the descending pedal rises, and this translates directly into torque on the crank and, to some extent, energy recovery. However, consider the effects of trigonometry -- I can deflect the frame very effectively mid-stroke, but how well can the frame kick back near the bottom of the stroke?

Experience tells me that frame flex is a far more significant factor when I pedal jerkily than when I try to pedal as smoothly as possible. Jerky pedaling not only accentuates frame flex, but it also alters the timing of the application of the rebound force.

Another thought -- in the real world, even so-called elastic deflection entails at least some generation of heat and simultaneous small loss of mechanical energy. For the average cyclist, this is probably not enough to worry about, but it could perhaps make that critical tenths-of-seconds difference at the finish line.

Keith -- my only objection to your thought experiment with 6" springs is that real-world frame flex is not great enough to perturb the cyclist's pedaling rhythm or geometry significantly enough to reduce his/her efficiency.

   oops -- correction posted by John E on 12/5/2001 at 10:29:46 PM
"Each time the frame rebounds, the pivot point of the descending pedal rises ..."

should read:

"Each time the frame rebounds, the pivot point of the descending crank rises ..."


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Bike Science Question: Frame Stiffness posted by Keith on 12/6/2001 at 2:46:43 AM
I don't understand how it would be possible to predict at what point in the pedal stroke the rebound would occur. For example, it would come later in the stroke if you're doing 40 rpm up a hill, but sooner if you're doing a 90 rpm mash in a sprint. In addition, I doubt the rebound could even propel the bike forward anyway. In a sense, if the rebound would occur at precisely the right moment, it would raise and have the same effect as a longer crank arm, by pushing it upward when the arm is in the 12:00 position -- i.e., the path of the pedel's revolution would be larger because of the rebound upward. In this sense, it would change the gain ratio, but don't see how it would transform lateral movement into crank rotation at all.

An experiment could be done to test whether lateral rebound would propel a bike forward. Put the bike on a wind trainer. Remove all load. Flex the bottom bracket without touching the crank. Does the rear wheel spin forward?

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Bike Science Question: Frame Stiffness posted by Keith on 12/6/2001 at 2:55:45 AM
P.S. I agree with John that for most riders, frame stiffness doesn't matter all that much. But if you race or do Ultra riding, or want to beat your buddy to the top of hill # 79 after 100 or more miles, it would, along with lots of other factors.

The spring test would not be to show that the flex perturbs the rider, it would be to show that the energy isn't returned in a way that moves the bike forward. Sustitute flat springs that would only flex 2-3 inches and I'd bet you'd feel it on a hilly ride.

    Frame Stiffness posted by John E on 12/6/2001 at 3:08:49 PM
I agree with Keith that one can reconcile the two positions (stiffer is better versus stiffness does not matter) by putting Sheldon in his context as a transportation and recreation cyclist and the racers in their "every little bit counts" context. For me, the main point is that racing technology, such as a super-stiff, super-light, close-coupled frame, has reached the point that it is no longer automatically appropriate for the rest of us. For the average transportation or recreation cyclist, many factors, such as tyre design, affect efficiency far more than frame stiffness or bicycle weight. Having said that, I still would rather climb a tough hill on my Bianchi than on my Capo, but the Capo is very comfortable on a rough road or a long ride. Interestingly, the two frames reflect typical 1960 and 1980 Tour de France geometries, which evolved as asphalt replaced cobblestones on European roads.

I still argue that some of the frame rebound force will help to propel the bike forward, although the efficiency will vary with pedaling cadence and style. As the pedal moves past top dead center, the bottom bracket begins to deflect toward the opposite side, and the crank spindle tilts downward on the driven side. As the same pedal approaches bottom dead center, the frame returns to its neutral position and the crank spindle "untilts." During untilting, the driven side of the crank spindle rises, creating a torque moment with the still-descending pedal. Unless I have missed something, this is the only mechanism available for kinetic energy recovery.

   RE: Frame Stiffness posted by Jonathan on 12/8/2001 at 3:34:25 AM
I defer to experts on the physics of rotational motion applied to frame geometry. I know one thing about stiff vs. soft (flexible) frames: when you want to accelerate, the stiff frame dusts the waffle frame everytime. Where it all happens is when rubber meets the pavement. The impulse (forcextime) is what makes the difference. What makes my stiff road bike (Bridgestone) punch out also serves to fatigue the body faster; especially the knee joints.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   BSA for 2 grand... posted by: Warren on 12/5/2001 at 1:32:26 AM
Have a look at http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1043667034. This is the kind of bike I like but you'd think the guy would give more pics and details about it. It also looks like the standard cyclo derailleur of the 50's. Am I missing something? Cool handlebars...