OldRoads.com

This is an archive of Vintage Bicycle Information.
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which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, brake types, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your old bicycle.

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which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your vintage bicycle.

Archived: Vintage Lightweights







AGE / VALUE:   Prugnant sheet posted by: ChristopherRobin@starmail.com on 1/18/2001 at 4:27:08 PM
Where did I see mention of Prugnant dropouts? Not here at least not recently. Anyway.... I have a photo from a catalog and there is some part information about Prugnant I can send to anyone who is interested.







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   is this a great hobby, or what? posted by: John E on 1/18/2001 at 3:40:18 PM
I just received the following response from Harald Cap, son of Capo founder Otto Cap, and current head of the company (www.capo.at):

"Dear John,

"I am grateful for receiving Your interesting mail. Owning a Capo bike of the early 1960s means that You are supposed to be an experienced rider. Unfortunately all specifications & other details of my father's production
line, which ended in 1970, are missing.

"The frame tubing certainly belongs to Reynold's famous 531. As far as I remember we exported only such frames to California equipped with Campagnolo top components.

"The goodies You mentioned were manufactured by ourselves like the slim forged Capo fork crown as well as the particular high effort catching lugwork. Our production volume amounted around 5.000 sets per year, compared
to Puch's 100.000 a tiny number. Yet Capo always set the pace in Austria with Puch trying to match up.

"I'd really appreciate Your transmitting pictures of Your vintage Capo in order to start a www proud Capo bike owner directory.

"Sincerely, Hary"

Exchanging cordial emails with the president of the company makes owning a Capo all the more special. Now I know why the lugs and dropouts look so unique: Capo made their own. (How's that for hard-core frame building?) I need to get a digital camera so that I can post some pictures.

I have received useful, detailed information on my other bikes from Utah Cyclist's Classic Corner (Bianchi), Russ Fitzgerald's PX-10 website (Peugeot), and Schwinn.com / heritage / collector's forum (Schwinn KOM-10).







AGE / VALUE:   20s raceing bikes(ebay) posted by: sam on 1/18/2001 at 9:41:33 AM
Whild lookin for other parts I came across two raceing bikes on ebay.Don't usualy post under this group because of limited knolage of L/ws.but one has a neat lever operated front derailer the other is a single speed.ya'll might like to look while there up . #541829825 and 541833671--sam


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   20s raceing bikes(ebay) posted by Oscar on 1/18/2001 at 4:06:08 PM
I'd be interested in the yellow one, but a married man can get away with so much. Besides, I'd ride it if I had it.

   road bike is 1940s or 50s posted by John E on 1/18/2001 at 7:35:26 PM
The Italian road bike looks to me like something from the early 1950s, rather than the 1920s. The crankset looks exactly like the Agrati that came with my first ca. 1962 Capo, and the Campy Gran Sport rear derailleur is an early 50s to early 60s item. Nice bike, but the frame is a bit big for me, and I am running out of bike-hanging space among the garage rafters.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   20s raceing bikes(ebay) posted by Walter on 1/19/2001 at 7:40:42 PM
I like that fixed gear. Wife probably won't allow a bid but I'm curious what some of you guys think would be a good price. I hope none of you are the seller as I don't want you to feel like I'm trying to weasel "inside" info. I'm just curious in cae of the (very) off-chance I get permission to make a run at it.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   20s raceing bikes(ebay) posted by Oscar on 1/19/2001 at 8:03:12 PM
Great piece of history there, Walter, but my back hurts just looking at the track bar. My butt hurts looking at the saddle.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   20s raceing bikes(ebay) posted by Art on 1/19/2001 at 10:04:00 PM
The fixed gear is older to my eye. I agree with John that the Donaselli looks to be a late forties, fifty vintage. The fixed gear is a good lugged frame, but judging from the top tube it seems small to me. You have to remember guys really bent over these bikes. The Major Taylor stem and very cool handlebars are a draw but are you going to ride this or hang it up? If it is a twenties track bike the rims are probably wood, probaly shot, so you're going to have deal with that as a rider (and maybe the rear hub and chain. I'm curious as to what the suicide drerailleur is on the Donaselli.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   20s raceing bikes(ebay) posted by Art on 1/19/2001 at 10:08:23 PM
Look how low your hands would be on the track bike.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   20s raceing bikes(ebay) posted by Walter on 1/20/2001 at 5:49:11 AM
The temptation to ride it would be strong but you guys are right it's probably not ridable w/o new wheels and then it's not the same thing anymore. I personally think it'd look good hanging esp. if that paint can be restored. Wife might differ though. On a related note while looking thru my tattered copy of the Bicycle Manual by Rob't Whiter he mentions that the Major Taylor stems can be used with the bars mounted on top. That'd relax the riding position some. Whiter's book is quirky and fascinating at the same time, maybe worth a thread by itself?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   20s raceing bikes(ebay) posted by Walter on 1/20/2001 at 9:41:56 AM
http://www.rydjor.com/1956don.htm

I found a picture of a restored Doniselli at the above URL. Looks very similar though I can't quite see the front derailleur. States that it is a 1956. Very nicely done and gives a good impression of what the ebay one could be.






AGE / VALUE:   Eisentraut Pictures??? posted by: Bruce VR on 1/18/2001 at 2:00:06 AM
For those of you in the market for a new frame I'd highly encourage you to check out the longest building American frame builder--Albert Eisentraut (If there's someone else that started before 1959 and is still doing it, my mistake!). I just received my third frame from him (spread over twenty five years: "A" Frame, Limited, and this one).

It was $2200 and I provided the Nervex Pros.

He can do it all, I just wanted to give him a plug after receiving his latest creation. I know there's a lot of nice stuff out there but... Growing up in the SJ/SF Bay Area make it even better to recall my rides as a teen, hanging out at Spence Wolf's Cupertino Bike Shop (really his private home's garage, but legendary!), watching Phil Wood develop what I believe are the world's best hubs, etc, etc...

Here's some pics (web page) if you'd like to check it out:

http://www.pixhost.com/pixv/vrnr1976/eisentraut-34.jpg

http://www.pixhost.com/pixv/vrnr1976/eisentraut-4.jpg

http://www.pixhost.com/pixv/vrnr1976/eisentraut-5.jpg

http://www.pixhost.com/pixv/vrnr1976/eisentraut-7.jpg

Thanks VBDA masters!

Bruce VR




   Eisentraut is an artist and a craftsman! posted by John E on 1/18/2001 at 7:44:19 PM
I have never owned an Eisentraut frame, but have always admired and respected them greatly. In the early 1970s, I used to invoke Eisentraut's name whenever anyone complained that "the U.S. can't build a decent bicycle." [Alot of the old Schwinn Paramounts weren't bad, either.]






AGE / VALUE:   bicycle identification posted by: robbie on 1/17/2001 at 1:20:19 PM
I have a "Road King" bicycle that I would like to know more about. I bought it from a neighbor in Toronto, and he didn't know much about it. Since then, I have been told it is a 1957 model, and that "Road King" was a Sears model. The bike has a "Made in Hungary" stamp just below the seat, on the frame. If anyone has any info on this, or could help me out in any way, please email me. Thanks.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   bicycle identification posted by Warren on 1/18/2001 at 1:39:02 PM
Is one of those baby blue or copper gold bikes with the curved top tube and bent wire carrier? I think they were carried by Eatons as well. Be careful, the forks are a little soft and will bend in most front end collisions. Beautiful bikes though. The fenders are very heavy guage and are quite stylish with their longish circumference.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   World of Schwinns posted by: Keith on 1/17/2001 at 7:27:57 AM
World Schwinns have come up several times lately. From what I've gleaned, there were at least four different uses of "World" by Schwinn over the years: (1) beginning in about 1896, as the brand name of bikes made by Arnold, Schwinn & Co.; (2) in the 1940s until the 1950s (or 60s?) for lightweight filet brazed 3-speed models like the New World and the World Traveler; (3) in the early 1970s for Japanese-built bikes like the World Voyager and World Traverler; and (4)in the late 1970s through the 80s for Taiwanese (Giant) made bikes like the World Sport and the World Tourist. I'm sure Eric, Ray and others can refine the dates and maybe add other models.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   World of Schwinns posted by Bill Putnam on 1/17/2001 at 9:28:26 AM
I have a 1950 New World fillet brazed 3 speed,
but it does not have the Chrome Moly tubing
as described at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/schwinn-braze.html
but the standard smaller tubes. Be nice if it
did though!

Did some New Worlds in the early 50's have the larger
chrome moly tubing?

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   World of Schwinns posted by Keith on 1/17/2001 at 11:21:29 AM
I'm really unsure about when Giant got into the picture -- it might well have been later than the late 1970s, but I recall this was discussed in the "No Hands" book. I don't own this book (got it at the library), but if one of you does, please check this.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   World of Schwinns posted by Eric Amlie on 1/17/2001 at 12:03:51 PM
I can't really elaborate on the dates. I'm trying to learn about this myself. Here is some info that was posted on the Classic Rendevouz discussion page in response to Bob Hufford's question. Sorry about the length.

When WV roled in to our shop for repair, our owner was calling foul.
He thought someone knocked off a Schwinn, as so many of the desogn styling,
and graphic elements of the American legend.

He was getting ready to write them a long letter and poursue the issue.
After all, Schwinn had long been and might remain today one of the only
household words our sport or industry has ever known.

Copywright, patent, and litigation ideas were abounding within this
reactionary individual, our unesteemed leader, and one of the only people in
the world I'd ever known to fail Schwinn factory school.

I'm not sure which of us cracked the mystery, but by the owner's manual shown
us by the customer or a small emblem somewhere on the frame (check yours)
there was an indication that it was made for or by the Schwinn Bicycle Co.

It was a product of Matsushita (National) Electric Company, better known as
Panasonic.
We picked up the Panasonic line during those days and some extremely fine
bicycles, from the basic sport 500 to the professional, a very coveted
machine, especially today.

Back to the Voyageur/ Traveler.
The Voyageur was a favorite among sport and touring enthusiasts
It sold for about $279 and featured the Shimano spring-loaded bar end
'pinkie' shifters, super wide range gearing, the new 130mm poattern cranks,
and Paramount-inspired chrome fork and stay treatment.
Mine aren't here at the moment, but they might have had chrome lugs and crown

The Traveler was vanilla by comparison, similar to the later
Panasonic-produced LeTour by Schwinn.

The World Voyageur came in Orange (Kool Orange, same as the Krate) as well as
a couple of opaque colors, possibly powder blue, questionable green, maybe
yellow.

There are brochures, dealer catalogs, and owner's manuals around
here somewhere, which I'll get out eventually as soon as I can get help with
the excavation.

One of my WV's is all chrome but I'm sure it was stripped of paint by it's
owner.
The base chrome is much more polished and prepared than most frasmes with
chrome accents (most of the time for a chrome tip or lug, the entire frame is
treated to the embrittling process, but most only polish the areas to be
exposed)

Enjoy the voyage

Larry Black









MISC:   Allegro posted by: Art on 1/16/2001 at 7:35:04 AM
If you haven't already, you might want to check out this site dedicated to Allegro bikes......www.allegrobikes.com Lot of photos, history.....very cool 1930's Allegro in the gallery.


   RE:MISC:   Allegro posted by ChristopherRobin on 1/16/2001 at 4:44:28 PM
Awesome! I loved the site and all the photographs!

   RE:MISC:   Allegro posted by Oscar on 1/17/2001 at 1:29:03 PM
Here's something you don't ever see on the web - committment to accuracy. Found on the "Racing" page:

The information on this page must be omitted until its accuracy and authenticity can be verified . PLEASE CHECK BACK - it should be posted by no later than mid-September, 2000.

Hey, man, how about some internet rumors?






AGE / VALUE:   531 on '70 Cinelli Speciale Corsa? posted by: desmo on 1/16/2001 at 12:39:34 AM
I've got a 1970 Cinelli Speciale Corsa (appears similar to a Super Corsa with fender braze-ons on the stay bridges and eyelets on the drop outs) made of a 531 tubeset. No decals on the fork. Is this unusual or were they made with 531 then? Thanks in advance.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   531 on '70 Cinelli Speciale Corsa? posted by Bruce VR on 1/18/2001 at 2:09:45 AM
Both the 60's and 70's Cinelli catalog show 531 as an option for the top-of-the-line road frame. But, it's gotta be rare. Most wanted Columbus I'd think on a Cinelli. Cool! VeloRetro (??? I think) sell the catalogs...

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   531 on '70 Cinelli Speciale Corsa? posted by desmo on 1/18/2001 at 12:20:00 PM
Thanks, I hadn't seen any other Cinellis of similar vintage with 531 decals on them, but again I haven't seen that many Cinellis of that vintage period.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Zeus 2000 on ebay posted by: desmo on 1/16/2001 at 12:35:47 AM
Pretty nice original looking Zeus 2000 on ebay.

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=541351431







AGE / VALUE:   Info needed on Schwinn World Voyageur and Traveler posted by: Bob Hufford on 1/15/2001 at 9:44:12 PM
I need all the info I can round up on the late-'72 to early-'74 World Traveler and World Voyageur models imported by Schwinn prior to introducing the Schwinn Le Tour and Volare models. Access to any literature would be great!

Pics at:

http://www.geocities.com/deluxe64/73wrltrv01.jpg
http://www.geocities.com/deluxe64/73wrltrv02.jpg
http://www.geocities.com/deluxe64/73wrltrv03.jpg
http://www.geocities.com/deluxe64/73wrltrv04.jpg
http://www.geocities.com/deluxe64/73wrltrv05.jpg
http://www.geocities.com/deluxe64/73wvoya001.jpg

Thanks!

Bob Hufford
Springfield, MO
bhufford@mail.orion.org


   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Info needed on Schwinn World Voyageur and Traveler posted by Keith on 1/16/2001 at 6:34:51 AM
P.S. The women's Traveler is an oddball -- the groupo from a Varsinental hung on a semi-lugged frame. This was really an economy model. The Voyager, on the other hand, is a nice bike -- the triple, barcons, and reliable Japanese components made it better suited for touring than most of the European bikes in the U.S. market in the early 70s.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Schwinn Traveler front fenders posted by ChristopherRobin@starmail.com on 1/16/2001 at 7:08:37 AM
I have some N.O.S. front aluminum fenders with the flat front fin on top. These go to the 1954 Schwinn Traveler. These are unpainted but I also have some that are painted. 4 are available e -mail if interested. ChristopherRobin@starmail.com

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Info needed on Schwinn World Voyageur and Traveler / now '50s Catalog posted by Bob Hufford on 1/16/2001 at 1:24:37 PM
Oscar -- here are the pics from the '53 catalog (not all inclusive as other models were available that I haven't scanned. Sorry for the large image sizes -- I submitted these to the Classic Rendezvous lightweight site and left room for Dale to resize as needed).

http://www.geocities.com/deluxe64/50scat.html

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Info needed on Schwinn World Voyageur and Traveler posted by Oscar on 1/16/2001 at 6:15:46 AM
Ashtabula crank! I thought even the early Japanese Schwinns used three-piece cranks.

Bob, if I'm remembering the right guy, do you have catalogue pictures of 1950's Schwinn lightweight three-speed touring bikes?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Info needed on Schwinn World Voyageur and Traveler posted by Keith on 1/16/2001 at 6:21:18 AM
Since Eric jogged my memory I now recall the unique headbadge of the early World models. These were Schwinn's attempt to compete with European lightweights in the early 70s bike boom. These bikes were made in Japan by Panasonic or Bridgestone. The frames were 4130 chromoly. As riders I would rate them on par with other Japanese bikes -- well made but not outstanding. I wonder about collectability. Several years ago I posed the question whether Japanese lightweights are underappreciated, and most responses indicated that while they are well made, they tend to be "unispired," and lack the European "mystique", whatever that is. (Possible translation: no Japanese bikes won big races in the European peloton.) Personally, I've been very impressed with high end Japanese bikes, like Miyata, whose history goes back as far as Schwinn, Raleigh, or Peugeot. Anyway, I suppose if Schwinn folks are looking seriously at old Continentals and Varsities at this point, it's not too much of a leap to move onto other, and better, derailleur equiped lightweights with the Schwinn name, even if they weren't made in Chicago.






MISC:   AMF Roadmasteer Moped posted by: Bud on 1/14/2001 at 11:53:33 AM
I have a 1976 AMF Roadmaster Moped, Model # 001469. believe it was manufactured 3-76, maybe at Olney, IL. Need a carburator for it. Can't find any info on this bike, any help would be appreciated. The color of this bike is orange and red, the fenders are orange plastic. Don't know what company it was sold by, Sears, ? Again, any help greatly appreciated.







AGE / VALUE:   WANTED : GITANO FRAME posted by: Kevin K on 1/13/2001 at 7:31:16 PM
Hi. I'm looking for a Gitano road bike frame. I know nothing of the bike. I'm looking for a 23"-25" frame (?-cm )I've got a full set of decals, so I thought I'd see if someone had a frame they wanted to part with. I'm looking for a frame only. Condition of the paint is not important. Thanks. Kevin


   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   WANTED : GITANO FRAME posted by Kevin K on 1/16/2001 at 4:40:56 PM
Hi Keith, no , it is GITANO. Really nice looking decals too! It's made in Canada (decals say so anyway)

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   WANTED : GITANO FRAME posted by Keith on 1/15/2001 at 11:23:57 AM
Are you sure it's not "Gitane"?






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Single clamp-on Campy dt shift lever, eBay posted by: John E on 1/13/2001 at 6:37:12 PM
I think Art wanted one of these for that Paramount. Seller is Wandering Wheels Cyclery, a reputable dealer from whom I have bought two items on eBay. Item #1108028998


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Single clamp-on Campy dt shift lever, eBay posted by Art on 1/14/2001 at 10:46:27 AM
Thanks John, I just bought it with -buy it now-on e-bay thanks to you for $15...gotta like that. Thanks again. Hope I can return the favor. Art

   returning the favour posted by John E on 1/14/2001 at 1:08:15 PM
I was pleased to bring the shifter to your attention, Art. If you have access to a digital camera or a scanner, perhaps you can post a photo or two of the completed bike for all of us forum regulars to enjoy.






MISC:   ODDBALL BRAKES posted by: Art on 1/13/2001 at 5:45:17 PM
I found an odd bicycle book the other day. It is a compilation of line drawings of bikes and bike parts (deraileur, stems, fenders, brazes, racks, handlebars,etc) dating from the 1880's to 1959. The book is organized by years, showing different parts, there is some writing in Fr and once in English, with different sizes and styles of type on different pages. Most images are just drawings with no id. (I'll see how much it costs to reproduce this thing..and take orders if anyone is interested) It seems like they might b3 images that would be used in adds...maybe. Anyway here are 4 things that I'd not seen before.
1.1900 Pivot brakes attached to the seat tube (and also the fork) activated by pulling a chain that runs from the brake and loops around the handlebars. Kind of like the siren I had on a bike when I was little.
2.1950 A set of traditional drop bars that have steel brake levers often found on English roadsters. The deal is that the levers are moved in close to the stem. There are 2 grips on top of the bar and 2 on the bottom of the drops.
3.1955 A bar that if you are looking down into the stem, the bar curves away from you (sort of like a reverse arc bar) and then each end takes a 90 degree bend straightens out like a straight mountain bike bar where there are attached brake levers (welded to the bar) and grips.


   RE:MISC:   ODDBALL BRAKES posted by Art on 1/13/2001 at 6:21:55 PM
4, 1949 bar end grip and brake lever combo where the lever opens away from you rather than tradionally toward the rider. These look like bar consonly the lever is a longer brake lever. It's show on tourist bars.

   RE:MISC:   ODDBALL BRAKES posted by Keith on 1/15/2001 at 11:26:02 AM
Sounds like the Data Book. Any Japanese characters in it? I understand there are xeroxed copies of the original version floating around.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   VISCOUNT posted by: JIIMBO on 1/13/2001 at 10:55:48 AM
I HAVE TWO 70'S VISCOUNTS, ONE WITH A LUGLESS FRAME, JAPANESE PARTS (SR, SHIMMANO ETC) AND THE OTHER WITH NICE LUGS AND CAMPAGNOLO GRAN SPORT DRIVETRAIN AND OTHERWISE JAPANESE COMPONENTS. THESE ARE PROBABLY POST LAMBERT-VISCOUNT BRITISH BIKES, BUT THE DEACLS SAY MADE IN BIRMINHAM ENGLAND. WERE THE FRAMES MADE IN JAPAN AND SHIPPED TO THE UK FOR ASSEMBLY. NEITHER HAS ANY DECALS TELLING WHAT THE FRAME TUBING IS. ALSO IN THE LATEST PERFORMANCE BICYCLE CATALOG HAS BROOKS B-!7 NARROW SADDLES ON CLEARANCE FOR 39.99. LASTLY I HAV BEEN TRYING TO REVIVE TWO BONE DRY BROOKS SADDLES USING KIWI NEATSFOOT OIL AND LEATHER LOTION AND A PRODUCT I BOUGHT AT AN HORSE SADDLE AND SHOE REPAR STORE CALLED LEXOL. ANYONE ONE ELSE HAVE ANY MYSTERY MAGIC TOP SECRET METHODS FOR BREAKING IN COCOANUT HARD SADDLES.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   VISCOUNT posted by Schwinnderella on 1/13/2001 at 12:15:22 PM
There were directions for mixing a concoction to bring back to life leather seats posted several months ago I believe in the english roadster section. Happy Collecting

   fork safety posted by John E on 1/13/2001 at 2:07:34 PM
Interesting, Jimbo! Please make sure you do not have the infamous original weak-crowned forks (you probably don't, but check to be sure), which bankrupted the original Viscount company by causing numerous tragic deaths and serious injuries.

   RE:fork safety posted by jiimbo on 1/13/2001 at 11:26:53 PM
I DONT THINK I HAVE THE VISCOUNTS THAT HAVE THE DANGEROUS FORKS. MINE ARE LATER ONES WITH NORMAL LOOKING FORK CROWNS, BUT IF YOU SEE A PERSON RIDING WHAT LOOKS LIKE A TEN SPEED UNICYCLE, ANYWAY WHAT WAS THE SCHWINN 10 SPEED MADE ALONGSIDE THE PARAMOUNTS, I FOUND A SCHWINN THAT HAS A CHROME FORK CROWN AND CHROME FORK ENDS. IT DOESNT HAVE A MODEL NAME BUT HAS SCHWINN XTRA LITE 1020 TUBING. SOMETIMES I FIND BIKES THAT HAVE INTERESTING PARTS AND ARE WORTH MORE IN PARTS THAN A WHOLE. THIS ONE HAD A BLACKBURN REAR RACK, AN AVOCET TOURING 11 SADDLE AND A METAL SUPPORT FOR A FRONT BAG.

   RE:RE:fork safety posted by Oscar on 1/14/2001 at 2:46:51 PM
X-tra Lite 1020 is ordinary low carbon steel with a great name. The stuff of early Le Tours and Voyageurs, etc. Maybe Voyageur since I've seen them with Chrome throughout under the paint. Supersports, Sports Tourers, and Superiors were made along-side the Paramounts in Chicago. They were cro-moly.