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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







MISC:   Decal Removal posted by: Steve Cox on 1/7/2001 at 12:28:24 PM
Any help from forum readers would be greatly appreciated regarding ways to remove decals from frames without damaging the paint. Some of the decals on my bike are in sad shape, but the paint is in generally good condition. I have a set of replacement decals and would like to replace the damaged ones. What is the best way to remove the decals, and what should I do to keep the replacements in great condition?


   RE:MISC:   Decal Removal posted by Kevin K on 1/7/2001 at 3:12:11 PM
Hi. Decal removal 101 1) Go to an auto supply store. They sell a decal removal solvent for the vinyl, adhesive type. 2) Use a heat gun/blow drier. This works well also. If it's your wife's blow dryer, don't forget to put it back or you will get in trouble like I do. 3) If they are the older water application style, I go to the car wash and use the high pressure water to remove. Discovered this by accident on a nice Raleigh Gran Prix. Blew them right off. Good luck, hope one of these help. Kevin

   RE:MISC:   Decal Removal posted by Wings on 1/8/2001 at 12:55:38 AM
1. I try to peal a corner up with finger nails or a raiser blade tool (Painters tool for cleaning paint off windows).
The painters tool will do an excellent job on chrome.
Sometimes it can be used to remove the entire decal on paint if held at the correct angle (near horizontal).
2. The heat gun is a great help and will soften the decal to pull off as heat is applied -- it takes practice.
3. After trying all kinds of stuff.
I only use Motsenbocker's Lift Off #2. It will remove all glue residue easily. It will also help soften the glue when applied on the decal itself. I put a small amount on a rag and rub the area and quickly wipe with a dry rag to remove the loosened glue. This is repeaded again or until all glue is removed.

   Easy and Obvious posted by Ray on 1/8/2001 at 8:06:05 AM
If you paint is strong and these are a real decal and not a sticker then put some Scotch or other tape over them and rip it off. Do it over a few times and zip no decal. You can also use a fine rubbing compount to clean up any loose stuff left but do not rub too hard and remove too much paint. Good luck.

   RE:MISC:   Decal Removal posted by Steve on 1/9/2001 at 4:32:24 AM
Thanks to all of you who replied to my question!






AGE / VALUE:   SCHWINN VOLARE posted by: KEVIN K on 1/7/2001 at 7:19:03 AM
Hi. Last summer I decided that my bike collecting/ collection was going to be limited to Schwinn bikes. Schwinn offered more than enough models to satisfy the number I would want to collect. So before I've collected one to many Continentals, I would like some facts on the model, the Volare. Looks like a nice piece of work, and it came with 700's, Dura Ace................... My info shows the 1977 Volare in 2 colors, 3 frame sizes. Ok, fine. Questions 1) how many years was this bike produced and 2) by whom ? Was it Panasonic ? Anyone ever owned or ridden one? Thanks, Kevin (P.S.) The info you guys supplied me with on the leather racing helmet helped me locate a buyer, a serviceman stationed in Japan. I remembered how kind and helpful you bike giys have been, so I passed the helmet on to him . Thanks again !


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   SCHWINN VOLARE posted by Eric Amlie on 1/8/2001 at 8:09:22 AM
According to the catalogs it was only offered for '77 & '78. Looks to be a very nice bike positioned just under the Paramounts with a double butted "531" frame and chromed head lugs. Catalog doesn't say who made it.






AGE / VALUE:   Miyata -- Three Twelve posted by: Tim P. on 1/6/2001 at 9:17:29 PM
Can someone give a year on my Miyata Three Twelve road bike? Serial niumbers are QC***** ? Any help appreciated. Thanks, Tim P.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Miyata -- Three Twelve posted by Warren on 1/8/2001 at 8:56:00 PM
I had one...a kind of teal green with white accents. I was the second owner but I think it was bought in the early eighties. Mine had a six speed hub and I think it just preceeded indexed shifting. Watch out for stress cracks around the holes that accomodate the internal cable routing.

   right date posted by John E on 1/9/2001 at 6:28:51 AM
Yes, a nonindexed 12-speed road bike is probably '1979-83 or so. Interesting comment about stress cracks, a potential problem on any older frame.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Miyata -- Three Twelve posted by Tim P. on 1/9/2001 at 10:08:33 AM
Thanks for the replies so far, however, the bike I have is, what I would call black/metal flake paint. It is a 12-speed, but IS index shifting. Again, interesting note about the frame cracks around the internal routing of the cable housing. Still would be interested in the year. Thanks, Tim P.






MISC:   And now for something completely different... posted by: Oscar on 1/6/2001 at 8:52:40 PM
Up for grabs to anyone who wants it. Lance Armstrong's "It's Not About the Bike". I finished it over a year ago and enjoyed it. I'll never re-read it and would like to give it to someone else to enjoy. Send me an e-mail with your address and I'll mail it straight away. (Postage is nominal, so don't sweat it.)

Also, I've finished John Le Carre's "The Night Manager". Top notch undercover operative stuff without the high-tech gizmos. Same deal.







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   identifying meridian cycle posted by: mick on 1/6/2001 at 6:04:58 PM
Does anybody know how you can identify an old mercian, I own one that claims to be a mercian (stickers ect..) but I have my doubts, can you perhaps tell from the serial number or maybe the lugwork?? any advice would be much appreciated

Mick


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   identifying meridian cycle posted by Keith on 1/8/2001 at 6:48:24 AM
I have a 70s Professional and have seen numerous other models over the years. I don't know about the serial numbers, but I'll check mine and maybe it will give you an idea (location, number of digets, etc.). Go to cyclesdeoro.com and see the models there, and link to the official Mercian site. Two models have distinctive lugs -- the Vincitore has fancy cut outs, which you'll see on the site. Also, the Professional has very long pinpoint lugs made by welding extensions onto plain Prugnats. The Pro also has distinctive wraparound stays, and I believe other models do as well. The brazing on every Mercian I've ever seen is uniformly crisp and clean. Some models have plainish lugs, and may be more difficult to distinguish from other marks. The decals are available, so it is possible to fake one with a lesser quality frame.






AGE / VALUE:   NOS REPAIR PARTS FOR SALE posted by: Brian on 1/6/2001 at 1:13:45 PM
Selling a complete BICYCLE REPAIR SHOP PARTS INVENTORY.
http://communities.msn.com/KunzogBicycles&naventryid=109
Check out that web site or email me for list. Much more not inventoried yet. From my late father's shop, closed in 1992. Offers around $3500. or interesting trades considered.
Lots of vintage lightweight 10 speed parts from 70-80's. Located near Charleston, S.C.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   NOS REPAIR PARTS FOR SALE posted by Allen Jennings on 1/9/2001 at 11:28:08 AM
Brian

If you have not sold the bike parts and have an inventory list or specific item listings or good photos, i would be interested. Also tools etc. might be of interest.

thank You

Allen Jennings
1249 S. Garrison
Carthage MO 64836

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   NOS REPAIR PARTS FOR SALE posted by Allen Jennings on 1/10/2001 at 10:30:12 AM
got the web site with the list to open today. i looked through the inventory.

thanks!






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   manufrance posted by: jimbo on 1/6/2001 at 12:11:33 PM
HAS ANYONE HEARD OF A MANUFRANCE, MADE IN FRANCE. ITS A 70,S BIKE WITH THE USUAL FRENCH COMPONENTS, MAFAC, SIMPLEX, RIDGIDA ETC. WERE BIKES LIKE THIS WERE COMMOM 25 YEARS AGO. I REMEMBER CLUBMANS, FLANDRIAS AND MERCIERS BUT RARELY EVER SEE THEM. I KNOW THIS BIKE DOSESN'T HAVE A COLLECTORS VALUE BUT IT STOOD OUT FROM THE OTHER HUFFYS AND CHEAP MOUNTAIN BIKES AT THE SECOND HAND STORE.


   Peugeot U0-8 clone? posted by John E on 1/6/2001 at 1:55:05 PM
It sounds very similar to the Peugeot U0-8, which was extremely popular in So. California in the 1970s. Steyr (Austro-Daimler) Clubmans were less common, and Flandrias and Merciers were fairly rare around here. I had a 1973 U0-8 until the chainstay cracked a year ago -- with upgraded cranks, rims, and derailleurs, it made a great commuter. Yes, the old European classics do make the Huffies and Murrays of the day look sick. Why are they rarely seen on the streets? The ones that got ridden seriously have finally reached the point of metal fatigue and frame/component failure, whereas the ones that never got ridden are probably still sitting around in attics, garages, basements, and landfills. In San Diego, the casual riders want beach cruisers or mountain bikes, whereas the club cyclists want to be seen on expensive new, high-end road racing bikes. Only a small percentage of us appreciate (and prefer) the touring or distance racing bikes of the 1960s-80s.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   manufrance posted by jiimbo on 1/6/2001 at 6:57:19 PM
THANK'S FOR AN ANSWER ABOUT THE MANUFRANCE ITS VERY SIMILAR TO THE PEUGEOT UO-8. YOURE RIGHT ABOUT THE BIKES SITTING AROUND FOR THE LAST 10 YEARS IN A GARAGE COLLECTING RUST AND DUST. I REMMEBER STELLAS, PUCHS AND ATALAS, NOTHING TOP OF THE LINE RACING BIKES, BUT FUN TO RIDE.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   manufrance posted by jiimbo on 1/6/2001 at 6:57:20 PM
THANK'S FOR AN ANSWER ABOUT THE MANUFRANCE ITS VERY SIMILAR TO THE PEUGEOT UO-8. YOURE RIGHT ABOUT THE BIKES SITTING AROUND FOR THE LAST 10 YEARS IN A GARAGE COLLECTING RUST AND DUST. I REMMEBER STELLAS, PUCHS AND ATALAS, NOTHING TOP OF THE LINE RACING BIKES, BUT FUN TO RIDE.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   for sale: 2 women Jack Talor touring bikes. good condition! posted by: lori mendel on 1/6/2001 at 8:57:23 AM
Would love to sell my adorable Jack Taylors to someone who really knows what they are all about.
One red, one yellow, Reynolds 531 26 and 27 frame. one with campy deraileur, one with shimano.
Contact me and we will figure out how to ship!







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Fuji Feather posted by: george sibbald on 1/4/2001 at 8:14:16 PM
Can anyone give me the value of a (Rare) 1978 Fuji Feather knock down light weight touring bicycle?
It used to be legal to as carry-on baggage that fit in the garment bag locker.
Still ideal for appartment dweller.







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   MUST SEE: ALENAX posted by: Keith on 1/4/2001 at 10:11:28 AM
You guys absolutely positively must look at the Alenax on Ebay, item # 1107033502. You will NOT be disappointed. Then please post some comments, especially if you've ever ridden one.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   MUST SEE: ALENAX posted by Keith on 1/4/2001 at 1:39:39 PM
P.S. The cover of Pryor Dodge's The Bicycle depicts a similar drivetrain on a 1905 Terrot, and I believe the Dancing Chain has some pics of similar early drivetrans.

   Terrot 10-speed posted by John E on 1/5/2001 at 6:57:24 AM
Yes, the Alenax drivetrain is somewhat less unique than the eBay hype would indicate, although this is certainly the most refined implementation of the concept. Pryor Dodge's outstanding traveling museum display, which I saw two years ago in San Diego, included a 1930 Terrot with similar lever-action cranks and ten speeds, selected by moving the linkages to different detents. It does look like an attractive alternative to slogging the stairmaster or thighmaster equipment at the YMCA, and it would fun to adapt the concept to a recumbent, whose weak climbing capability it just might enhance.

   Sorry to disappoint you all but... posted by Ray on 1/8/2001 at 8:17:36 AM
I have owned 3 of these and still have one in nearly mint condition. I love unusual drive train bikes but this one should have stayed on the drawing board a little more. It does work but is horrible for hill climbing. It loses a lot of efficiency for some reason. Perhaps the pushing down to drive forward expends energy in a downward motion that comes to an abrupt stop when you depress the other side. Spinning does not cause you to do this as it maintains pressure on the chain consistantly. The rear hub has two sprockets and sounds like a fishing reel when you spin it. Shifting is also jerky because there are no gears you are just changing the position of the chain with relationship to the extension bar opposite of the pedal. I rode one for about 10 miles and that was enough for me. They also made a mountain bike version but I'll bet it would not make it up one mogul let alone bombing on a downhill. Nice construction and paint job but just not quite there from a mechanical perspective. BTW, the guy who re-invented these (I also saw the Prior Dodge bike) is from my home state of NJ. He has been trying to make a go of this for some time now. I wish him luck and a design miracle.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   MUST SEE: ALENAX posted by Peter Naiman on 1/12/2001 at 8:50:22 PM
One of these could have been had at the Copake Auction last year for $55.00






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Varsity Bicentennial question posted by: Mike Stone on 1/3/2001 at 9:36:43 AM
Does anybody have some 1976 literature with a photo of a bicentennial Varsity?
I am reconditioning a men's bicentennial Varsity and am trying to find out what kind of saddle and handle-bar tape they had.

Thanks,

Mike


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Varsity Bicentennial question posted by jack on 1/3/2001 at 3:02:25 PM
i have two. same saddle as any 70 varsity. red tape






AGE / VALUE:   how much posted by: nick on 1/2/2001 at 2:21:26 PM
how much would the first model of dura ace cranks be worth. in nice condition of course


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   how much posted by Tul on 1/3/2001 at 12:37:19 AM
About $25 if E-Bay is any indication unless it's NOS New, Campy stuff generally sells for more than it cost twenty years ago...

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   how much posted by John Runjavac on 1/5/2001 at 5:45:20 PM
If you are looking for an early Dura Ace Crankset, I happen to have a nice one that is not in use and I would sell it for $25. Let me know if you would like an image.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Jeunet posted by: M. Engelhardt on 1/1/2001 at 11:29:37 PM
Mid 60's Jeunet for sale- not many specifics- orginal paint and stickers, nervex lugs, cottered crank, beauty. Best offer.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Jeunet posted by Cecilio Felix on 1/3/2001 at 4:22:05 PM
Could you describe the condition of frame, paint, chrome, parts? Is it original? What is the size from center of BB to top of top tube? Is it possible to e-mail me a picture?

Any info would be appreciated. Cecilio






AGE / VALUE:   Hey Kevin Pics needed posted by: guido on 1/1/2001 at 5:37:54 PM
O.K. I`ll try this again, I think I`ve got it narrowed down some. I`m looking for 1930`s to 49 Schwinn lightweight pictures for a Pictures database project to be used and shared to identify era,color,accessories. But the 1948 World Traveler and New World pics I can Use to ID the one I have. I don`t have that book you refer to, Any help would be most exellent. Thanks for your time


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hey Keith Pics needed posted by guido on 1/1/2001 at 5:48:06 PM
oops, I meant Keith

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Hey Kevin Pics needed posted by Keith on 1/2/2001 at 6:34:57 AM
The book I refered to is Pridmore and Hurd, Schwinn Bicycles (Motorbooks 1996). I'd think many public libraries would have it, and any book store vould get it for you. Catalogs would be even better, of course. I think Eric and Ray who frequent this site have a far greater depth of knowledge on this subject than I do -- perhaps they could help. Also, try the Schwinn Forum.






AGE / VALUE:   Have you heard of? posted by: Walter on 1/1/2001 at 3:01:59 PM
I'd like some info on 1 of my current projects. It's a Harding which I got from a guy in Cal. According to old decals it was made in Cork, Ireland. 531 thruout and complete Campy NR with a Brooks saddle and sew-ups. It came with early Time clipless pedals but I'd guess they're not OEM. It was in truly horrible shape so much so that it had to be blasted and repainted. It was originally black, now a nice Irish green. Nice bike, clean lugs, Campy dropouts and pretty tight geometry for what I feel is a late 70's road bike. Guy I got it from said they were marketed thru a SoCal bikeshop. Found nothing on the net and am curious. I'd love original decals and am working with a local printer but this promises to be expensive.


   C. Harding's For Bicycles, West Los Angeles posted by John E on 1/1/2001 at 6:50:00 PM
Yours sounds like a nice machine. The only new Hardings I ever saw were in the early 1970s at Charlie Harding's bike shop ("C. Hardings for Bikes") on Westwood Bl. between Wilshire Bl. and Santa Monica Bl., i.e., about a mile south of the UCLA campus. Another customer told me the frames were made by Charlie's brother in Ireland, but I was never able to substantiate that. They may have been private-labeled Raleighs or another British marque. (Almost every frame in the shop was from the British Isles -- Charlie cautioned customers against those "continental [European] bikes.") He sold alot of Harding-branded machines in the Peugeot U0-8 and Raleigh Super Course class, plus a few higher-end ones, such as yours.

I moved out of Los Angeles 20 years ago and have lost track of many of my contacts, including his shop. Considering that the shop was already well-established (and well-regarded) by the early 1960s, he has probably retired by now.