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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







MISC:   noisy rear deraileur posted by: yogi on 6/14/2001 at 3:03:49 PM
As I pedal my 10 speed I get a lot of clicking noise from the rear,even thogh the rear deraileur is adjusted right . As I pedal I can also watch the deraileur jump back and forth as the chain runs thru it. Is this because some of the links in the chain are tight and do not want to turn around the pully smoothly? or what else.


   sticky chain links? posted by John E on 6/14/2001 at 3:43:32 PM
Start by checking that chain. If it jumps around the derailleur pulleys as you hold the bike and spin the cranks backward, it has one or more stiff links. If 24 links exceed 12-1/16" in length (0.5 percent stretch), or if you cannot loosen the tight links with a little penetrating oil, replace the chain.

   RE:sticky chain links? posted by Oscar on 6/14/2001 at 9:17:42 PM
Or the freewheel might be worn. If the chain is worn, your favorite cog on the freewheel is probably, too.

   RE:RE:sticky chain links? posted by Wings on 6/15/2001 at 1:19:03 AM
I also would say chain!
You can also loosen links by grabbing the chain in both hands and bending it gently back and forth.

   RE:MISC:   noisy rear deraileur posted by Warren on 6/15/2001 at 8:22:45 AM
One last thing, although chain/freewheel replacement is likely, check the derailleur angle. They get bent often...look at the vertical line of the derailleur from the rear. If it is not perfectly straight up and down, grab it and bend it until it is.






AGE / VALUE:   Normandy hubs posted by: dave on 6/14/2001 at 3:05:04 PM
Can the list members weigh in on Normandy hubs in terms of quality, durability, etc. I saw a Stella recently, fairly cheap bike but it had Rigida alloy rims on Normandy high flange hubs and I was tempted to get the bike as a beater. All opinions welcome ... thanks


   Normandy hubs posted by John E on 6/14/2001 at 4:00:08 PM
I have two thirty-year-old sets of Normandy Luxe Competition (their top-of-the-line model) high-flange hubs which still get regular use. They do seem to be more susceptible to bent axles and cone wear than my low-flange Campy Records of the same vintage, but the flanges have been reliable. (I recently scrapped a 25-year-old Shimano high-flange front hub when I discovered cracks radiating outward from two of the spoke eyes.)

   Stella posted by John E on 6/14/2001 at 4:05:01 PM
P.S. -- I know the marque. I think an old Stella would be a really fun beater!

   RE:Stella posted by ChritopherRobin2@starmail.com on 6/14/2001 at 5:37:10 PM
This is why it is smart to take a good look at the bike before you set off on a ride. Who would have thought of this cracking like this?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Normandy hubs posted by Pete on 6/15/2001 at 3:54:49 AM
I have a 1957 Dawes Debonaire (near the top of the large Dawes range when new) with original Normandy high flange alloy hubs. All I can say is they still run smoothly and I regard them as one of the plus points of the bike. I would say a good quality hub at the top end of the mass market,
Possibly better than that. regards, Pete.






AGE / VALUE:   early 1970s Raleigh International, NOS! posted by: John E on 6/14/2001 at 7:18:40 AM
Check out the "buy it now" price. This is one of the nicest road touring bikes ever made, 30 years old and unused! Too bad it's oversize and over budget for me.

eBay item #1155786560


   Where does a person find these? posted by Walter on 6/14/2001 at 1:48:47 PM
I understand your emotion. For anyone who loves the old bikes to, today, be able to pull one out of its manufacturers box would be a thrill. Maybe even more thrilling than 20-30 years ago. Back then it would have been our new bike----pretty cool but today it's our new bike, it's nostalgia and it's something that's not made anymore to boot.

His website mentioned some Motobecanes. If anything I like vintage Motos more than Raleighs. They weren't actually listed and I'll keep an eye on his website.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   early 1970s Raleigh International, NOS! posted by yogi on 6/14/2001 at 3:02:26 PM
You would think that a bike with a $1500.00 buy it now price would rate more than one fuzzy ,poor picture.

   RE:Where does a person find these? posted by Bob on 6/14/2001 at 3:21:22 PM
I think finding a bike like this would be frustrating. I would feel guilty about riding it, but I am not wealthy enough to start my own museum. I have a decent Motobecane Grand Record that I ride every day. The decals are shot and the paint is chipped, but aside from that it is a great bike and a pleasure to ride.
On the other hand, after I finding out that my Sutter is "collectable" I agonize over every new paint chip and find that I ride it much less -- in fact, I bought the Moto to replace it as my daily rider.
So if I saw something like this bike at a yard sale for $20 would I buy it? You bet your life! Would I buy one for $2K to hang on the wall? I doubt it.

   beaters vs. museum pieces posted by John E on 6/14/2001 at 3:52:40 PM
I am with you, Bob. A pristine original paint/decal job makes all the difference, and I guess I am relieved that my frames long ago got their first of many nicks, scratches, and rust spots. With every ride, my old classics accumulate metal fatigue and wear, and we lose a little bit of history, but these are also simultaneously the most satisfying and the most economical bikes I can imagine. My house is not big enough to turn into a museum!

   I'd ride it posted by Walter on 6/14/2001 at 5:03:12 PM
That's what they're made for. When I see 1 in a museum my first question to myself is "how does that baby ride?" Well for $1500 I could find out. Not a bad price for time-travel. Opening that box would make me a 14 year old kid again looking at the bike I lusted after but couldn't afford. When I rode motorcycles I felt the same way about pristine older bikes, I wanted to ride them.

Having said all that I have no intention of bidding on this Raleigh. It's at the very edge of my income envelope and I didn't lust after Raleighs as a kid. If he does pull a Motobecane out of a hat (or box in this case) I'll be mightily tempted. And yes I would ride it. Not every day and not as my #1 but it'd get on the road. A beautiful bike is at least as beautiful in function as it is in form.

I'll cry when it scratches too.

   RE:I'd ride it posted by desmo on 6/14/2001 at 7:38:46 PM
I thought I was going to restore my old Cinelli one day, but I keep putting it off. It really could use a repaint and some of the components are a bit tatty now. I went out and got a correct nearly NOS Nuovo Record gruppo, NOS Unicanitor suede saddle, NOS bars/stem etc, everything I need to make it "as good as new." I can't bring myself to do it though. I don't mind riding it at all anytime since it has already long since lost it's pristine luster, and I'm not sure I would enjoy riding it as much if it was brought back to gleaming perfection.

I restored another bike, an old Bartali I have to as-new or frankly better than as-new, and it has become mostly a wall hanger as a result. It's just too perfect to risk out on the street. I used to ride it daily and it's fun to look at but I enjoyed it more when it was a semi-beater I'm afraid.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   early 1970s Raleigh International, NOS! posted by TEK on 6/15/2001 at 12:03:25 AM
LOOK AT ITEM #1155482839 85 SCHWINN SUPER SPORT FOR SOMEONE WHO HAS EXCELLENT PICTURES, 22 IN ALL. WHO COULD ASK FOR MORE.

   RE:Where does a person find these? posted by dave (old rider) on 6/15/2001 at 10:48:23 AM
I just got an older VELOSPORT AERO as a gift, my wife says my Motobecane record is scrappy looking:)
ok it looks like poop , but darn what a nice ride.
Anyway this velosport aero is a pretty trick machine and I cannot find anything about the model.
any help out there?
Thanks old rider






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What do you think? posted by: Walter on 6/13/2001 at 2:36:16 PM
Ebay #1154987042. I like it alot. Lifts my skirts so to speak. Unfortunately a few cm too tall or I'd risk the spousal fury and make a run at it.


   we gents of Scots descent say "kilt," not "skirt" posted by John E on 6/13/2001 at 6:20:22 PM
If I see John Howard around town, I'll ask him about it. I think it's worth more than the current price, but it's way too big for me. Meanwhile, I am tempted to go for that Lygie, which could be the same one I almost bought in west Los Angeles in 1971.

   Scotsman, eh? posted by Oscar on 6/13/2001 at 6:41:16 PM
I usually have a bit of scotch in me, too.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What do you think? posted by Walter on 6/19/2001 at 4:28:28 PM
It sold for something like $540. In my estimation someone got themselves a nice ride even if it wasn't the ubiquitous 20$ garage sale find. Moulton frame with Campy S. Record drivetrain. This should be rolling for many more years.






AGE / VALUE:   Italian Bike posted by: Jonathan on 6/13/2001 at 12:40:31 AM
Here's my wonder bike...make is Bottechia; cottered cranks; beefed chrome steel
chainwheels/52 teeth on the larger wheel; tiny decal on seat
tube, that's it; head badge is fancy; chromed forks and stays; fork crown is square and chromed; lugged frame with the head
tube lugs chromed out big. Gear train is a mutt (not original) so I won't describe. The interesting thing is that the exposed
regions of the frame where paint has come off looks real shiny; a zone6 gray/silvery tone. The frame is real big; could handle 28"
wheels, but is now 27". Universal rear brake is original most likely, the front has been replaced with
weinmann type, I put it on as the original was busted up pretty bad. This bike has seen some road, but it has not lost
it's raw good looks. I'm trying to find it's age. Is there a page for dating
Bottechias? The frame is very light and very strong or it wouldn't have made it this far judging from
the component wear factor. It doesn't have the dropout "ear" for the rear derailer, but maybe it predates that
feature. It isn't a "boomer" bike, too old a beast, but it doesn't seem ancient...
not before 1950. Oh, it rides real "stiff" and the stays are exceptional rigid.
Any advice or guess welcome. Thanks.
Jonathan


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Italian Bike posted by Jonathan on 6/13/2001 at 1:21:50 AM
Forgot to add this info: The handlebar stem is Carnielli and it has a big drop; also it has molded
pattern intaglio features...very striking appearance.

   Bottechia posted by John E on 6/13/2001 at 7:24:13 AM
from Sheldon:
"Bottechia
"Pretty much the same quality level and pricing issues as Atala. One exception is some pretty interesting early-to-mid 80's Super Record bikes that were based on
European team bikes. These are pretty neat. Figure such an S.R. equipped model at about $800. There are many relatively early Bottechia bikes in the U.S. One model in particular has Universal brakes, Nervar crank, and Record derailers Such a bike is worth perhap $375."


This would make it a third-tier Italian bike, where Cinelli and Bianchi represent the first and second tiers, respectively. What brand is the crank? I am guessing the frame is early 1960s. (Check out the Lygie and the 1963 Bianchi Specialissima on eBay -- is yours somewhat similar in overall appearance and style?) The chromed lugs and particularly the chromed stays generally indicate, but do not prove, at least a main triangle of Columbus CrMo, although the lack of an integral derailleur hanger indicates an Italian frame designed to accomodate a (much cheaper) Simplex or Huret rear derailleur, instead of a Campy. (In those days, Campy and Simplex derailleur mounts, and therefore frame dropouts, were incompatible without some clever milling and rethreading.)

   RE:AGE / VALUE: Italian Bike posted by Bob on 6/13/2001 at 10:27:31 AM
One key to dating old bikes is the components. For example, a cottered crank on a high quality frame indicates 50s or early 60s. A cottered crank on a later bike would indicate low quality. If this bike has original components then they can help date it.

The lack of a rear deraileur hanger suggests the bike came with the older style rear deraileur. On a late 50s early 60s bike this might be compatible with good quality, but the further into the 60s you get the less likely that is.

I have been given to understand that in the late 50s and early 60s the highest quality bikes would have likely been equipped with Campy components. You can look at the Campy timeline to see what would have been contemporary.

Given your supposition that the drive train is not original you would have to rely on components that that less likely to have been changed out; BB, headset, stem and handlebars. Are there any marks on the BB or rear dropouts? Are the lugs plain or fancy. If they are plain are the "points" long or short?

A lot of wheel clearance suggests a bike that could have had fenders ? or at least clearance for fenders. If the bike came originally with 27" clinchers that would suggest a bit lower quality.

Do you know any history of the bike? Where did it come from? Who owned it before? If it is a "local" bike which bike shop probably sold it?

   Italian Bike posted by John E on 6/13/2001 at 2:06:56 PM
> A lot of wheel clearance suggests a bike that could have had fenders ? or at least clearance for fenders. If the bike came originally with 27" clinchers that would suggest a bit lower quality.

... or a good-quality touring, as opposed to racing, frame






AGE / VALUE:   REAL Italian road bike posted by: John E on 6/11/2001 at 7:52:51 PM
Check out eBay item # 1153924108 -- a 1969 Cinelli with a SunTour(!) cogset and a mediocre repaint job for $1700+, so far. (Looks alot like a Windsor Pro to me!)


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   REAL Italian road bike posted by desmo on 6/11/2001 at 11:54:20 PM
I saw that. Question: I've got a '71 Cinelli Speciale Corsa with fender braze-ons on both stay bridges. Is this normal for a Speciale Corsa?

   mudguard mountings posted by John E on 6/12/2001 at 6:50:08 AM
> Cinelli Speciale Corsa with fender braze-ons on both stay bridges

Those could be authentic/original, as some traditional road races and organized tours, particularly in the U.K. and in northern Europe, actually required mudguards.

   RE:mudguard mountings posted by desmo on 6/12/2001 at 12:24:28 PM
I know they're original, they obviously have the original paint over them. What I wondered is whether they were unusual or common to Speciale Corsas of the period.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   REAL Italian road bike posted by Walter on 6/12/2001 at 5:07:31 PM
That bike sets off some serious warning bells, at least for me. The bidding is up to 1800 so I guess some are convinced. I find it curious the auction was started w/o a reserve. A real contrast to the NOS Cinelli we saw a few weeks ago. The high bidder is experienced but I'd have to say that my wallet would stay in my pocket on this one.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   REAL Italian road bike posted by desmo on 6/13/2001 at 1:48:49 AM
The same thought (Windsor Pro???) crossed my mind. I worked at a bike shop that sold both Cinellis and Windsors. A Super Corsa was $800 and A Windsor Pro, identically speced right down to the Columbus tubes and Cinelli lugs was $450! I thought the Cinelli was the better deal.

     REAL Italian road bike posted by John E on 6/13/2001 at 7:27:51 AM
> I thought the Cinelli was the better deal

... and you were right. Now, years later, that 2:1 price difference has grown to 10:1 or more.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian Road Bike posted by: Fred on 6/10/2001 at 11:19:06 AM
I picked up an old 10-SPEED bike yesterday at a garage sale which looks completely original. The name is CHIORDA, and it says made in Italy. The brakes (center pull) and brake levers are BALILLA, front & rear derailleurs and shift levers are SIMPLEX, tires are PIRELLI and still hold air, both wheels are quick release with the levers that say GNUTTI, chrome wheels are MACCARI-TORINO, front and rear forks are chrome tipped, handlebars are light alloy. The crank is neither cottered nor can you use a puller on it. It's completely smooth and flat. Decals are almost perfect and the yellow paint is cleaning up beautufully. Minor paint chips and get this... it came with a water bottle that says CHIORDA on it! One last thing. There's a decal that says Tour de France 1956 on the top tube.

So, all of you Italian bike mavens... is it trash or is it treasure? Components alone look great and I paid a whopping......$8.
Thanks in advance for any light you can shed on this.
Fred


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian Road Bike posted by Fred on 6/10/2001 at 1:32:03 PM
Tour de France date on decal is 1965....... sorry!

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian Road Bike posted by Mike Slater on 6/10/2001 at 8:00:37 PM
Nice find Fred!! Rank it a treasure!!! Especially for the whopping sum of $8!! Are the brakes BALILLA also? Is there a frame material sticker (Columbus tubing?) anywhere on it? The Gnutti quick release levers possibly mean the hubs are gnutti also.I have never seen a crank like you describe...would love to see a photo. I am always amazed what can be bought for $10 or less. I would of picked it up in a heartbeat.

   Sheldon sez: posted by John E on 6/10/2001 at 8:10:17 PM
"Chiorda
"Most of these were OK, but nothing terribly special. Such bikes in guideline condition about $ 600.
[Felice Gimondi won a Tour de France on a Chiorda.

"In the mid 70's the Chiorda name was put on some spectacicularly junky bikes, with Valentino derailers, Balilla brakes, steel rims and cottered cranks.]"


Please tell us more about those cranks, and look carefully for any remnants of a tubing pedigree decal. I agree with Mike that it's probably a good deal at that price, but I need to know more before I pass overall judgment on it.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian Road Bike posted by Fred on 6/10/2001 at 8:25:46 PM
Thanks, Mike and John, for replying...

Yes, the brakes are BALILLA and no, there aren't any decals to indicate type of tubing. I just checked the bike again and the left crankarm IS cottered, while the right isn't. Wierd.

BUT....... the most important thing I forgot to mention originally are the CHROME LUGS on the headtube!!! This is what got me excited in the first place! I really believe that this is a mid 60's bike.

Thanks again, guys!
Fred

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian Road Bike posted by Fred on 6/10/2001 at 8:39:23 PM
ALSO...... the stem is alloy, says "Made In Italy" on one side and "ttt" on the other.

Fred

   RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian Road Bike posted by Oscar on 6/10/2001 at 9:22:14 PM
Your bike has some familiar features that my Torpado has. Balilla center pulls work as well as Weinmanns. The levers had some gum hoods which were too disintegrated to keep. They also have nice cable adjusters, too.

Chrome lugs are always drool-worthy. The stem, like yours is "ttt" and "Made in Italy". I think my bike dates from the early 60's, due to the half step cottered crank.

I believe that I'm the only guy at the races with a 40 year old bike.

   2-piece cottered crank posted by John E on 6/11/2001 at 7:05:27 AM
You apparently have what is known as a two-piece (ugh!) cottered crank. To disassemble the BB assembly, remove the left crank and cup, then (the fun part) unscrew the right (fixed) cup with a tool that can reach it with the right crank and spider still in place. Given the chrome lugs and other niceties of the frame, you may want to consider replacing the crankset with something more practical, such as a very early cotterless Nervar Star, TA, Stronglight, or Campy, saving the old one for a future collector.

You share the dilemma faced by owners of nice 1950s and 1960s bikes -- the frames tend to be much better, and to last far longer, than the components. Do you keep it original and suffer with lousy shifting, unresponsive braking, and unreliable cranks, or do you perform some judicious upgrades and updates, as I do, and end up with a practical machine that is truly a pleasure to ride?

   to quote Sheldon again: posted by John E on 6/11/2001 at 7:10:31 AM
Here is another argument in favor of replacing that crank:

"Two-piece Crank

"A moderately rare style of crankset in which the axle and right crank/chainwheel are a single part, and the left crank attaches to the axle either with a cotter or by tightening a pinch bolt that holds the crank to a splined axle. These are usually found on low-quality bicycles and exercise machines of European manufacture."

   RE:to quote Sheldon again: posted by Fred on 6/11/2001 at 12:41:01 PM
Hi John...

Thanks for the research and info on this ancient beast.

After all is said and done, I'm going to keep it all stock out of respect for the way it was left many years ago. If I were going to ride it a lot, I have old Nervar, Mafac and Stronglight parts to replace them with. I have a lot of older bikes... Peugeot, Motobecane, Mercier, Schwinn, etc. Some are just part of a growing collection, aothers ridden on a regular basis (40 in all... God bless my almost understsnding wife!!!!!!!).

Well, thanks again for your help and "back to polishing "it when I get home from the office.

Fred

   that's alot of bikes posted by John E on 6/11/2001 at 12:48:43 PM
> 40 in all... God bless my almost understsnding wife

I am impressed! With a dozen bikes at home, plus various frames and parts, we have already reached saturation.

   RE:that's alot of bikes posted by Wings on 6/11/2001 at 10:56:05 PM
Fred, Nice Going!!! Sounds like an exciting find! Good women are hard to find!
John, I admire your self control!






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   interesting Varsity on eBay posted by: John E on 6/7/2001 at 3:42:34 PM
eBay item number: 1153427168

"Deluxe Varsity"

Note the very early-looking decals, the "Positron" transmission (is that a front freewheel system, with six spokes instead of the more familiar Schwinn Sprint 5-spoke chainring set?), and the hilariously mismounted rear derailleur. Any comments from the resident Varsinental historians?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   interesting Varsity on eBay posted by Bob Hufford on 6/7/2001 at 8:47:33 PM
I'm sure Eric Amlie can tell you more, but this is an early '80s era Varsity. The '79 - '8? bikes had these decals which are about the worst quality bike decal ever made. I have never seen one that is not cracked and separated. Adds to the vintage look I guess.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   interesting Varsity on eBay posted by Eric Amlie on 6/8/2001 at 5:58:06 AM
I can't add too much to what Bob said. They were made from '80 through '83. These decals identify it as either '80 or '81. The Shimano Front Freewheel system is what distinguished the Deluxe from the regular Varsity.

   Deluxe Varsity on eBay posted by John E on 6/8/2001 at 1:21:20 PM
Thanks, guys. I knew you would have the answer. What really threw me off was those decals, which would have been a truly retro look in the early 1980s.

   RE:Deluxe Varsity on eBay posted by Wings on 6/11/2001 at 11:04:18 PM
Another comment on the decals! That is probably the best decal of that style I have ever seen. That decal style all alligator and fall off!






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Thrift Store Bike posted by: JOEL on 6/6/2001 at 2:34:27 PM
Hi,
I saw an interesting 10 speed at the thrift store. I haven't seen these components before. It was a girl's Iverson with "the official bike of the 76 Olympics" in french and english on the chainring and on a plastic olympic emblem on the frame. The rear deraleur was a Shimano Positron indexed setup with 2 cables.

This made me wonder when indexed shifters came along. Is this Shimano's first index shifter?

( bike was $10 if anyone wants it).


   Positron posted by John E on 6/6/2001 at 4:42:47 PM
Although Positron was certainly not the first indexed derailleur shift system, it was Shimano's first mass production attempt, and certainly not one of the company's best efforts, particularly when coupled with the freewheeling chainring set.

   RE:Positron posted by Art on 6/7/2001 at 8:58:39 AM
Like john said, not one of Shimano's best effort, but an interesting aspect of the Positron is how similiar, although really low end, certain components are to the higher end Dura Ace AX groupo--especially the brakes. I've seen the Positron on a Huffy Aerowind (ever see that bike!) which I think has to be the definitive 'piece of junk with lofty aspirations'.

   RE:RE:Positron posted by JOEL on 6/7/2001 at 2:31:09 PM
So why does it have two cables?

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Thrift Store Bike posted by log on 6/7/2001 at 9:15:25 PM
The two cable system was used to push-pull the derailer instead of a spring.(made cheap)
The brakes were Tourneys and you could replace the derailer with one too.

My friend has one that I fixed for him. the positron was junk, so I replaced it with another Shimano. iverson was renound back in the 1970's for makeing the worst bikes but the olympic was about the best. It wasds not that bad of a bike. I would rank it with aove most Huffys and murrays, but component wise the same as the Free Spirt "Ted Williams"
he rode it with me in a 50 mile tour this spring and it did very well. Have fun!

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Thrift Store Bike posted by Gary M on 6/8/2001 at 10:35:30 AM
I have the exact same bike, male on my kill pile. thing was mint too. never seen such a heavy 10-speed in my life, i bet my 50 Columbia ballooner didnt weigh that much. mail me if you want it.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Thrift Store Bike posted by Gary M on 6/8/2001 at 10:37:38 AM
I have the exact same bike, male on my kill pile. thing was mint too. never seen such a heavy 10-speed in my life, i bet my 50 Columbia ballooner didnt weigh that much. mail me if you want it.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Thrift Store Bike posted by log on 6/8/2001 at 7:39:37 PM
When I rode it to test drive it I noticed that it handled much better than I expected.

   RE:RE:Positron posted by log on 6/8/2001 at 7:46:31 PM
my sis had a Huffy like that but it had a PositronII that worked with one solid cable and the weirdest shifter I have ever seen.

   RE:RE:Positron posted by SteveB on 6/17/2001 at 7:58:57 PM
I have a couple bikes with positron 2 setups. They are sort of interesting. I remember back when they were almost new a friend of mine found one in the trash. The cable was shot, so he tried to get a new one. The price he got from a shop was more than half what the bike would have run new. Needless to say the whole setup got replaced with stuff from the parts box.
I'd like to find one of those Huffy Aerowinds though. Just a liking for the bizarre I guess.






AGE / VALUE:   CAMPY GRAN TURISMO OR GRAN SPORT DERAILLEURS WANTED posted by: Kevin on 6/6/2001 at 7:42:47 AM
Hi. I also need a pr. of either Campy Gran Sport or Gran Turismo front and rear derailleurs.Thank you, Kevin







AGE / VALUE:   RIGIDA RIM DECALS posted by: Kevin on 6/6/2001 at 6:30:20 AM
Hi. I'm looking for a pr. of Rigida rim decals. Have a set of 531 frame(seat tube and 1 pr. fork) decals to trade. Thanks, Kevin







AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn Sport Tourer age? posted by: Steve Williams on 6/6/2001 at 5:55:47 AM
I recently got an old Schwinn Sport Tourer and haven't been able to figure out what year it is. The problem is the serial number(s) don't match up to the references I've seen for Schwinn bikes.

Here's what I can tell you about the bike:

Schwinn Sport Tourer (appears to be original paint and decals)
Round badge on head-tube
Lugged construction, not fillet brazed
Decal on bottom of seat-post tube "Schwinn Extra-Lite"
Two sets of numbers stamped on the dropouts
-left side: 1177462
-right side: GO181
No other stamped numbers on bike


Thanks --Steve


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn Sport Tourer age? posted by Oscar on 6/6/2001 at 7:56:22 AM
From the right dropout serial number G= Giant (bike mfgr)
018 = January 18, 1 = 1981 or 91. This would have been an imported bike, not Chicago made.






AGE / VALUE:   goodrich?/schwinn posted by: diana on 6/5/2001 at 6:31:10 PM
a friend has her original bike from 1941 - she said it is a goodrich made by schwinn - it has the original paint, front basket, very little rust and just a few spokes missing from the back wheel - it is still rideable - is there any worth to this bike? - thanks, diana


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   goodrich?/schwinn posted by sam on 6/6/2001 at 4:52:54 PM
diand,is it a light weight? if so what type of gears and brakes does it have?I ask this because (regretably)the brake handles on very old Schwinns are worth $75 each.other parts are worth some too.I hope she keeps it--sam






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Gran Sport posted by: Chris on 6/4/2001 at 7:36:02 PM
I have a Raleigh Gran Sport from around the late fities. It is gold and white with Campy Gran Sport der., Brooks saddle and a Nervar cottered crank.I am told the tubing is Reynold's 531 although I am doubtful because there are no frame stickers. Does anybody know anything about this bike? Thanks for the help!


   Raleigh Gran Sport posted by John E on 6/5/2001 at 12:45:24 PM
The 1972 Raleigh Gran Sport had Reynolds main tubes. Because of this and because of the Campy gear, I suspect yours does, as well.

http://members.nbci.com/retroraleigh/1972-Catalog.pdf






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Does anybody know anything about a Bottecchia ten-speed? posted by: Mike Stone on 6/4/2001 at 6:30:29 PM
My neighbor just gave me an Italian Bottecchia ten speed. I am not sure of the age, but it is in fabulous condition.

It says "Campione el Mondo 1966" on it. Has Simplex derailures front and back. Dolomite rims that seem to be aluminium.

It also has chrome lugs which look sporty.

Was this a good bike in it's time? Does anybody have any info?

Mike


   Bottecchia posted by John E on 6/5/2001 at 12:16:41 PM
from Sheldon's website:
"Pretty much the same quality level and pricing issues as Atala. One exception is some pretty interesting early-to-mid 80's Super Record bikes that were based on
European team bikes. These are pretty neat. Figure such an S.R. equipped model at about $800. There are many relatively early Bottechia bikes in the U.S. One model in particular has Universal brakes, Nervar crank, and Record derailers Such a bike is worth perhap $375."

Given the Simplex derailleurs, I suspect yours has plain carbon steel frame, rather than Columbus CrMo, although I could be wrong. Does it have an integral derailleur hanger? Campy dropouts? What crankset does it have? Are there any stickers regarding frame tubing pedigree? Italian steel frames look great and handle nicely, and even the lesser ones are being rediscovered. I have seen older all-steel Bianchis, well below the Specialissima class, sell for $100-$250 on eBay. Atala and Bottechia rank below Bianchi in status, but some of them are pretty nice rides.