OldRoads.com

This is an archive of Vintage Bicycle Information.
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which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, brake types, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your old bicycle.

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which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your vintage bicycle.

Archived: Vintage Lightweights







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Has anybody ever heard of "Eagle" rear derailures? posted by: Mike Stone on 8/8/2001 at 5:42:33 PM
"Eagle" brand derailure - saw one today on that old Ross I was telling you about (or was it the Fuji?).

Anyway, it was a stylish LOOKING derailure. I don't remember seeing them anywhere before.

Has anybody ever heard of them? Are they worth saving/rescueing?

Mike Stone


   bottom-end Shimano posted by John E on 8/9/2001 at 7:07:07 AM
Walter is correct, unless both of us are wrong.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Has anybody ever heard of posted by Walter on 8/8/2001 at 6:59:01 PM
I seem to remember them on depatment store bikes in the 1970s. However, noone would consider THOSE to be classy. I've never seen better quality agle shifters. I associate Eagle with lower line Shimano but could be wrong.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Has anybody ever heard of posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 8/9/2001 at 5:52:30 PM
This exact one is mentioned in Berto's book "Dancing Chain"

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Has anybody ever heard of posted by Jon Dudley on 8/16/2001 at 3:42:46 AM
Help!,

I used to own an Elswick 'Avenger Convincible' when I was a kid. Most unusual bicycle with duplex down and seat tubes and 'floating' sprung -loaded crank to keep sprockets in line. Anyone else evr heard of it? as I've described it to a friend whose disbelief is absolute! By the way I chose this bike which seemed to be prewar as a birthday gift in the early 60's, over a new bike...it seemed so esoteric!

A pcture would be nice if anyone has one!

Thanks if you can help

Jon






AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix posted by: Gralyn on 8/8/2001 at 4:24:50 PM
I looked at an old Raleigh 10 speed. I thought maybe it was an early 80's or late 70's. It has a serial number stamped on the back-side of the seat down-tube (GK400103). It also has cranks with cotter pins???that seems old...

I tried to look up the serial number in the Raleigh database - but found no such numbers like that up to about 1966....that's as far as it went. Does anybody have any idea?


   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix posted by ChristopherRobin22starmail.com on 8/9/2001 at 12:02:07 PM
This was the basic, cheap, bread and butter ten speed for teenagers. The lower end model, nothing special. A good bike in it's day but it doesn't have the 531 tubing and if you apply yourself you can find the better bikes out there. I take the parts off these like the crank set for projects. The serial numbers won't help because nobody has that chart on the web not really for these years anyway.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix posted by Gralyn on 8/8/2001 at 6:07:30 PM
I found a Retro Raleigh site....but still no luck in figuring out that serial number. Even into the 80's the number made no sense. Maybe it's a lower-end bike - and there is not much info available.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Grand Prix posted by Gralyn on 8/11/2001 at 1:45:12 PM
Thank you for your reply. I appreciate the information. That bike is the kind of thing I'm looking for...but a higher-end bike...something old (I especially like the lightweights) that isn't too expensive. I will keep looking - I hardly ever find anything close to home...that Raleigh Grand Prix was about the closest I have found so far. Maybe with some more diligent looking - and some networking - I will find one.
Again, Thanks!






FOR SALE:   Fuji Dynamic 10 posted by: John Mara on 8/8/2001 at 11:57:17 AM
I have a Fuji Dynamic 10 for sale I am the original owner and the bike is in excellent condition. I have traveled throughout with it and have recently retired it from my fleet. It is a 1975 with all of the original manual. bll of sale and has a 25" frame. If interested I am asking $150 dollars and would deliver in Northern/Central Massachusetts. Shipping to elsewhere would be additional.







MISC:   How do they do that? posted by: Fred on 8/8/2001 at 10:56:25 AM
I watched all of the Giro De Italia and Tour De France recently and have a question that has been bothering me ever since. How do the mechanics change a rear wheel with no more apparent effort than if they were changing a front wheel? I find it a tedious job even on my bikes that have the braze-on post. Is it the hardware or just plain experience and talent?


   chain hanger helps posted by John E on 8/8/2001 at 5:18:08 PM
Lots of experience and cooperation from the cyclist (e.g., shifting into the small-small lowest-tension gearing combination, releasing the brake, and acting as a shop stand). They may also take advantage of that little chain-hanging peg near the bottom of the right seat stay, and they all have either vertical dropouts or horizontals with position-adjusting screws. The way I would proceed is: 1) hang the chain on the peg; 2) open the QR with the left hand; 3) push the axle forward and/or downward with the thumbs, while pulling the derailleur body back with the right hand; 4) exchange wheels, and then reverse the procedure.

   RE:MISC:   How do they do that? posted by Steven on 8/24/2001 at 11:19:48 PM
If you try to use the seat stay peg you will never be able to do quickly. None of the pro's bikes have such useless nonsense! The small cog is needed, as is a lot of experience as mentioned earlier. Please also remember that the pros ride on tyres that are generally no wider than the rim the are installed on, thereby making brake clearance a breeze






AGE / VALUE:   Suntour Le Pree posted by: dave on 8/8/2001 at 8:38:45 AM
Anyone have experience with the Suntour Le Pree DRs? I saw these on an old Nishiki (and I think they were only available on Nishikis) ...
any commnets on quality and where they fit in the Suntour line?
thanks


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Suntour Le Pree posted by Walter on 8/8/2001 at 4:16:21 PM
Like most Suntour derailleurs the LePree functioned very well. It was not one of their top of the liners. Below, obviously, Superbe as well as Sprit. I believe it predates the Cyclones but probably a little bit below that too. Definitely above the Honor.

I'm working strictly off of 20+ year old memory and if someone with more authoritative info wants to correct me by all means chime in.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Suntour Le Pree posted by JIMbo on 8/9/2001 at 12:20:48 AM
THE LEPREE SEEMS TO COME AFTER THE ORIGINAL CYCLONE IN THE EARLY EIGHTIES AND IS PROBABLY BELOW IT AND POSSIBLY SIMILAR IN LEVEL TO THE VX AND VGT. I HAD A NISHIKI PRESTIQUE THAT HAD LEPREE ON IT. EUGENE SLOANE CALLED THE VGT THE FIRST AFFORDABLE LIGHTWEIGHT LONG CAGE DERAILER THAT SET THE STANDARD. ITS A SHAME THAT SUNTOUR HAD TO CHANGE DESIGNS AND NAMES IN THE 80's.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Suntour Le Pree posted by Guy B. Meredith on 8/12/2001 at 10:33:58 PM
The 1985 League Fuji, the entry level 'racer', has SunTour LePree
DR front and back. This surprised me as I thought that line to be
a Nishiki exclusive per 'Sunset for SunTour'. The next level up,
the Club Fuji, has Cyclone equipment, I belienve. I can't comment on
quality as I do not have enough experience with comparing grupos.

Paul Brodek of Fuji has been kind enough to key in a fair amount
of information on the 1985 Fuji products and puts the quality
in the area of the Shimano Tiagra/105. www.firstflightbikes.com/suntour.htm
lists it as mid-priced along with Cyclone. The author of Sunset for
SunTour mentions it, but 1985 is one year for which he does not do a
run down of the pecking order.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Is anybody interested in a Ross or fuji 10-speed? posted by: Mike Stone on 8/8/2001 at 4:48:49 AM
There is a used bike seller in the neighborhood with a bunch of old bikes in front of his house for sale.

Among other very common machines, he has a white Ross 10-speed and an old Fuji ten speed.

These might not be particularly collectible in the true sense of the word, but some people have a passion for them.

Is anybody interested? I could probably talk him into selling them cheap.

Mike Stone







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   NOS early 1970s Peugeot PX-10 posted by: John E on 8/7/2001 at 3:10:22 PM
Time warp, anyone?

eBay item #1174691322

Interestingly, in almost 30 years, the price has gone from $260 to $720 (so far). I have not checked the history of the consumer price index recently, but I think this represents a stagnant (inflation-adjusted) price over the years. I will be very interested to see the final selling price on this item. Seeing the picture of the frame with its original wrapping paper took me back to my days of assembling and repairing Peugeots at Bikecology/Supergo.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   NOS early 1970s Peugeot PX-10 posted by desmo on 8/7/2001 at 8:13:11 PM
Nice find, wow! Did the version with the Super SLJ alloy derailleurs come later? This bike was excellent value for the dollar in it's day. Our bike shop really had nothing comparable at that price point, just a nicely finished Fuji but frankly not in the same league as a rider even if it was perhaps prettier.






WANTED:   Schwinn Paramount Decals posted by: Robby on 8/7/2001 at 3:05:54 PM
I'm looking for a set of decals for a schwinn paramount, 1990..

Robby


   RE:WANTED:   Schwinn Paramount Decals posted by Keith on 8/8/2001 at 9:31:17 AM
I'd contact Waterford (www.waterfordbicycles.com?),or CycleArt (www.CycleArt.com).






AGE / VALUE:   nishiki roadmaster posted by: ratan on 8/7/2001 at 9:46:04 AM
Does any know the nishiki roadmaster, or the fuji league. both seem from the late 70's early 80's. The fuji has suntour le pree derailers, sugino cranks, and dia compe g brakes with valulite quad butted tubing. The nishiki has shimano 600 crank with altus drailers and brakes. My guess is both are mid priced.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   nishiki roadmaster posted by Brian L. on 8/7/2001 at 3:54:07 PM
Were mid-priced is more like it. You couldn't give them away now.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   nishiki roadmaster posted by lgo on 8/7/2001 at 9:21:02 PM
Are you crazy man! Those are nice bikes! Thje Fuji especially. Their top of the line was $1200 in 1978.
I think you've got some nice bikes and hope you enjoy them!

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   nishiki roadmaster posted by Brian L. on 8/7/2001 at 9:33:32 PM
You're joking, right? No bikes, at least none that I know of were $1,200 in 1978, and certainly not these. I remember the finest (no pun intended) Fujis available at our local bicycle shop in that era were around, maybe $300+. I don't remember the componentry, but the items mentioned in the intial post were not top-of-the-line then, or now.

   1970s bicycle prices posted by John E on 8/8/2001 at 6:23:20 AM
If I recall correctly, mid-to-high-end road bicycles (e.g. Schwinn Paramount, Raleigh Pro, Bianchi Specialissima, Masi Gran Criterium, etc.) sold for around $350 in 1970, and prices escalated rapidly during the ensuing bike boom. (Bargain-hunters opted for the $260 Peugeot PX-10 or Nishiki Road Compe instead.) In the mid 1970s, the Colnagos, Cinellis, etc. were still under the $1K mark. Japanese bikes, even the good ones, were consistently priced lower than their European counterparts.

As I learned through personal experience, during the early 1970s, Japanese component engineering (SunTour derailleurs, DiaCompe brakes, even Sugino cranks) was still way ahead of Japanese frame engineering, although the best late-1970s Japanese frames were world-class.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   nishiki roadmaster posted by Keith on 8/8/2001 at 9:28:54 AM
There are some nice Japanese bikes out there, but only the most unusual have collector's value. As John noted above, the far more collector-worthy PX-10 strugles to maintain its original value when the price is adjusted for inflation. I also don't recall $1200 Fujis in '78. I think some top-end bikes were pushing that range, however, as the very expensive Super Record stuff became more popular about then.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   nishiki roadmaster posted by Walter on 8/9/2001 at 5:44:18 AM
My first "real" bike was a Motobecane. A Nomade, at or near the bottom of the line but far superior to what I was riding and, to be blunt, better than the Varsinentals that my friends rode. Paid somewher between 225-275$ for it in I think 1978. Spent 75$ or less for alloy rims, bars and bar-end shifters and had a solid bike for around 300$

Around 1979-80 a dealer began introducing Treks and tried to talk me off my Moto and on to one. Don't remember the model but I do the asking price: 540$. My mother had a fit and I never bought it. By then I was hanging out with some serious riders and the "1000$ bike" was something you said in a hushed and reverential tone of voice. Unless you were my friend that had a top line Viscount that was every bit as light and sold for around 500$ 1000$ seemed to be the standard at least into the mid-80s. Yes you could spend more by then but there was no real need to and 500$ still bought a real nice road bike. As a reference I bought a brand new Cannondale (yeah, yeah, yeah) frameset for 250$ in '86. A 600EX gruppo cost a little bit less than that (Shimano getting ready to switch to SIS) and with LBS made wheels I was rolling on a then quite light 21.5-22lb bike for appox 600$. Those days are gone forever as I see Bicycling mag review bikes and claim this or that is a "great deal" for "only" 1000$.

Oh well.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:  Prices as I remember them posted by Walter on 8/9/2001 at 5:48:51 AM
My first "real" bike was a Motobecane. A Nomade, at or near the bottom of the line but far superior to what I was riding and, to be blunt, better than the Varsinentals that my friends rode. Paid somewher between 225-275$ for it in I think 1978. Spent 75$ or less for alloy rims, bars and bar-end shifters and had a solid bike for around 300$

Around 1979-80 a dealer began introducing Treks and tried to talk me off my Moto and on to one. Don't remember the model but I do the asking price: 540$. My mother had a fit and I never bought it. By then I was hanging out with some serious riders and the "1000$ bike" was something you said in a hushed and reverential tone of voice. Unless you were my friend that had a top line Viscount that was every bit as light and sold for around 500$ 1000$ seemed to be the standard at least into the mid-80s. Yes you could spend more by then but there was no real need to and 500$ still bought a real nice road bike. As a reference I bought a brand new Cannondale (yeah, yeah, yeah) frameset for 250$ in '86. A 600EX gruppo cost a little bit less than that (Shimano getting ready to switch to SIS) and with LBS made wheels I was rolling on a then quite light 21.5-22lb bike for appox 600$. Those days are gone forever as I see Bicycling mag review bikes and claim this or that is a "great deal" for "only" 1000$.

Oh well.

   RE:RE:historical pricing trends posted by Walter on 8/9/2001 at 5:50:42 AM
My post above about prices should be down here and in only 1 copy.

Wrong keys---Sorry.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   nishiki roadmaster posted by JIMBO on 8/8/2001 at 12:40:27 PM
FROM EUGENES SLOANES "THE ALL NEW COMPLETE BOOK OF BICYCLING", PARAMOUNT TOURING $885, RACER $900, RALEIGH PRO $898, WINSDOR PRO $646, GIOS TORINO SUPER RECORD STRADA $1,095, AUSTRO DAIMLER ULTIMA 1,600 AND KLEIN "SUPER LIGHT" $1,998. THE HIGHEST JAPANESE IS THE SOMA SUPERBE AT $800< MOST OF THE MID PRICED BIKES ARE IN THE RANGE OF $200-300 SUCH AS THE NISHIKI INTERNATIONAL $299 AND THE FUJI ROAYALE $229.

   historical pricing trends posted by John E on 8/8/2001 at 5:24:11 PM
Thanks for the much-needed data point, Jimbo. What year is your Sloane's? Because of the bike boom and because of general runaway inflation between 1975 to 1980, bicycle prices escalated pretty fast during portions of the 1970s. Also, were those were list prices, from which "street" discounts were readily available?

   RE:historical pricing trends posted by Brian L. on 8/8/2001 at 9:38:49 PM
I paid $150 for my Nishiki International in 1975. My Dad was furious that I had spent that much money. As I stated in earlier posting, the most expensive bike on the floor, or at least the one accorded the place of honor was surprisingly not a Paramount (the store was a Schwinn dealer) but some sort of hot Fuji in pinkish metal-flake and chrome. May have had Campy or possibly French stuff. I believe that it was in the high $300's, but could be way off base. The next new bike I bought was a 1st generation Trek mountain bike from REI in 1986 on sale for $279.

   RE:historical pricing trends posted by JIMbo on 8/9/2001 at 12:01:46 AM
THAT WAS FROM THE 3rd EDITION 1980. THE 1srt EDITION OF THE BOOK IN 1970 HAS A PX-10 FOR $160! ALSO THE PARAMOUNT GOES FOR $245, A CHINELLI FOR $255 AND A FREJUS FOR $215! THESE ARE THE BOOK PRICES, PROBABLY FORM CATALOGS. THE 2nd EDITION DOESNT LIST ANY PRICES. THE PARAMOUNT PRICE INCREASED OVER 3X IN TEN YEARS!

   RE:RE:historical pricing trends posted by me on 8/9/2001 at 9:36:56 PM
I have the 78- Fuji cat. $1200

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   nishiki roadmaster posted by Guy B. Meredith on 8/12/2001 at 11:02:34 PM
See my posting for the SunTour LePree thread. My League Fuji is a Sonic Blue 1985 model. Linda Wunderlich on the iBOB list mentions that it
is in the 1986 owner's manual for her Fuji. It is an entry level 'racing' bike behind the Club Fuji, Team Fuji Opus III and Professional.
Per a gentleman I can't trace down at the moment, Fuji says it is 'an "Advanced Recreational Rider" from back in 1986. It was their bike
for the "budget minded novice racer or advanced recreational rider."'

Paul Brodek of Fuji was kind enough to key in the following re the 1985 catalog:

Frame: Fuji VALite 1789, quad butted; two bottle mounts, pump peg, chainhook, dt shifter bosses
Fork: VALite tubing
Hbar/Stem: Nitto Olympiade B114 alloy bars/Nitto Young alloy stem
Brakes: DiaCompe GS 400N sidupulls w/DiaCompe 144G levers
Crank: Sugino RT 42/52 forged alloy
Ders/Shifters: SunTour LePree
Freewheel: SunTour Mighty-6 13-26 6spd
Chain: DID Lanner
Pedals: MKS Sylvan Road alloy; clips/straps
Rims: Ukai alloy 700x25c
Hubs: SunTour LePree small flange alloy
Spokes: Wing Star 14g
Tires: SCCR 700x25c w/presta tubes
Saddle: Feather "Silver" FFV-85
Seatpost: Sugino SP-KC alloy microadjust
Color: Sonic Blue, Jet Silver
Weight: 23.4lbs

There were 13 lucky adult road bikes in the Fuji line in '85. There
were 3 entry level bikes (with brake extension levers), the Regis,
Allegro and Sagres (from bottom to top). Then 2 recreational, better
spec'd bikes, the Espree and del Rey. Moving into more
enthusiast-oriented models, there were 3 touring bikes (3 touring
bikes!!!), the Touring Series III, IV & V. Then the
performance-oriented race bikes, starting with the League, then the
Club, Team, Opus III and Professional.

So, starting from the bottom and ignoring the touring models, the
League was 6th from the bottom, or 5th from the top. Another way to
look at it would be as the first real race bike in the line. With
SunTour's road lineup of Superbe Pro/Superbe/Cyclone/LePree, you could
also say that in today's market it would be somewhere around Shimano
105/Tiagro spec level. That would make it between $900 to $1,300 in
today's market.






FOR SALE:   1974 Schwinn Sports Tourer posted by: Tim P. on 8/7/2001 at 8:46:54 AM
23-24" frame, red, in real nice condition. 10-speed, shifters on gooseneck, center-pull brakes with suicide levers, aluminum bars, gooseneck, rims, hubs, chromo frame, 3-piece TA cranks, leather Brooks B15 saddle. Comes with the original owners manual showing purchase date in August of ' 74. Original except bar tape, now has padding on bars. Ready to ride! Best offer/ I paid $120.00, would like to get most of that back.







AGE / VALUE:   F/S/T - July '66 Schwinn ?? Varsity?? posted by: Jeff on 8/6/2001 at 8:46:00 PM
Original violet bike (doesn't appear to ever had decals or silk screening)w/ 26" tires,no fenders,"Sprint" equipment,violet chainguard,Typhoon pedals,drop bars w/ violet tape-Offers or Sting Ray trades??


   July '66 Varsity would have had 27" wheels posted by John E on 8/7/2001 at 2:48:32 PM
I am confused. To me, your posting of "July '66" imples that the date code matches the Schwinn table, and that therefore the frame is a Schwinn. However, by 1963, the Varsity had changed from 26" to 27" wheels.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Info on Colnago World Championship posted by: Mike on 8/6/2001 at 1:03:48 PM
I have a vintage Colnago World Championship frame, and from what I can best tell, it may be an '83.
Is there some database or authority on Colnagos that I can get more info at?
Thanks!


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Info on Colnago World Championship posted by Walter on 8/6/2001 at 2:36:06 PM
Check this out for a quick summary.

http://sheldonbrown.com/vrbn-a-f.html#colnago

Classic Rendezvous at cyclesdeoro.com can help as well.

   Sheldon Brown site posted by Mike on 8/6/2001 at 5:46:29 PM
Thanks for the link - it was one of my first places that I went. However, it really only gives general info. I'm trying to find some way to tie down the year or model of the frame, either by color, serial #, or whatever. Does anyone have any suggestions?
Thanks!






AGE / VALUE:    posted by: bike me! on 8/5/2001 at 10:00:36 PM
Hey guys!
Does any one have an old Concord (Freedom 10) 23''frame they would like to sell. If so I might be interested.

I saw a neat Concord the other day and I almost bought it. It was an old three speed cruiser, but I have too many cruisers anyway so I didn't buy it. Has any one ever seen a Concord crusier before? (model: New Yorker)


   RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by CONCORD FRAME on 8/7/2001 at 7:16:02 AM
Hi. Yes I do. I picked it up earlier last summer. The paint is pretty nice, but it is just a bare frame. Email me if interested. It's yours free, just pay shipping costs. Kevin

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by log on 8/7/2001 at 9:27:47 PM
Thanks, I e-mailed you and I hope to hear back from you soon.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Ebay # 1173726885 posted by: Walter on 8/5/2001 at 7:01:56 PM
I think it's pretty neat looking. I guess this might be what Sheldon Brown describes as a "Clubman" on his English bike site. 1950 sounds like a logical year, derailleurs on the scene but not yet dominating the scene.

I enjoy looking at it. Is it strange to feel nostalgic for a time period you never witnessed in a country you've never been to? When I rode motorcycles I liked the way the older stuff looked too though I must admit I rode modern sportbikes. I'd kind of like to build a "modern" clubman with a 7 or 9 speed hub and lightweight frame/rims. If I ever did I honestly don't know what I'd do with it as it'd be easily out performed by any derailleur bike I own but I like the idea.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Ebay # 1173726885 posted by Warren on 8/5/2001 at 8:59:40 PM
I'm in the process of building up a bike like this now. I'm going the other direction in that I'm going with a fixed gear. I'm using a pre-Raleigh Dunelt frame which lets me use a modern BB/crankset since it is BSC standard threads. The rest of the components are alloy as well and I've picked up some Bluemel fenders to boot. I don't want to preach to the choir but if you haven't tried riding a fixed gear bike you really must. It will change how you ride forever. Soapbox off...

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Ebay # 1173726885 posted by Ed on 8/6/2001 at 6:40:32 AM
I may be mistaken,but I beleive the bke is a 1950 Record Ace

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Ebay # 1173726885 posted by Walter on 8/6/2001 at 2:32:56 PM
Warren actually you are preaching to the choir as I converted an old LeTour awhile ago. That's ok it's a sermon worth hearing more than once and I need to spend more time on that LeTour.

I emailed the Raleigh seller. No frame decals but claims the bike weighs 24#. I'd imagine that makes it 1 of the better frames. Tempting......Nah wife is way past toleration.

   When Johnny comes marching home posted by Oscar on 8/6/2001 at 3:29:20 PM
Talking about nostalgia for a time and and place long ago and never visited, think about Civil War recreationists. I’ll bet the hardcore participants have a few grand worth of vintage firearms and “repop” uniforms. That stuff definitely ain’t for me, but I’m not knocking it. Hundreds of them on a field marching and blasting away…looks like fun actually. Me, I’m just happy riding an old bike.

But..it would be cool to own an 1853 Colt .44 Navy Revolver if anyone has one cheap.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Ebay # 1173726885 posted by Peter on 8/7/2001 at 5:02:12 AM
I'm suprised there is not more interest in this bike. It looks original and complete, which cannot be bad for a fifty year old machine from a famous if maybe not glamourous manufacturer. Then again the opening bid looks like a determined effort. I shall watch with interest.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Ebay # 1173726885 posted by Walter on 8/8/2001 at 4:18:21 PM
Well it sold for 81$. IMO someone got a neat piece of history for pretty reasonable $. I hope it gets restored.






AGE / VALUE:   Mavic BB posted by: mike on 8/5/2001 at 5:23:35 PM
Hi

I recently bought a mid 80's peugeot frame. Its made with columbus slx tubing but the previous owner had chamfered the bottom bracket face to accept a Mavic BB. I found a BB to fit but Im not sure what crankset is compatible with the BB. Anyone know? thanks

Mike


   crank/BB compatibility posted by John E on 8/7/2001 at 2:52:54 PM
There are only three significant sizing/compatibility issues: 1) spacing between the spindle's bearing surfaces; 2) spindle overall length; 3) spindle taper size. I would suggest trying a Stronglight, Nervar, or TA crankset, but you can probably find an old Sugino that will work, as well.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Mavic BB posted by Steven on 8/25/2001 at 10:19:37 AM
The first Mavic B/B were all sealed units and had no fixed cups, hence the chamfering which allowed for perfect chain alignment. If you now have a Mavic B/B, this makes points 1 and 2 of John's comment above irrelevant. I have what I believe was the first Mavic SSC B/B to be delivered to Canada in 1982 and it is still installed on the same bike. It is a fantastic B/B even after close to 20 years of use. I have Mavic cranks on it but I believe you can install any Campagnolo compatible parts. John's Stronglight suggestion would suit the bicycle well.