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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Campy QR skewer posted by: Darryl on 10/4/2002 at 3:50:55 PM
I want to cut down a Campy C-Record rear QR skewer to fit the front dropouts. What is the best way of doing this? What is the metric die that should be used? The shaft appears to be 5mm. Thanks, Darryl







AGE / VALUE:   French Pedals posted by: Darryl on 10/4/2002 at 12:43:38 AM
I have an old set of Frence pedals. The name on them is BERTHET LYOTARD. They are platform models, all steel(highly polished) and set up for standard toe clips. Are all French pedals 1/2" threads, or just the "old" ones? Would these be considered vintage collectibles?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   French Pedals posted by Oscar on 10/4/2002 at 2:22:01 AM
I have an NOS pair that I'm just itching to put on a bike. The problem is that I can' find a crank to take that spindle. It seems too big for a Schwinn ashtabula crank.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   French Pedals posted by flash@charter.net on 10/4/2002 at 1:30:35 PM
French threaded pedals are 14 mm x 1.25 (.551" x 20.32 TPI).
You can still purchase Lyotard 45A pedals in the French thread for around $35.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   eddy merckx mexico posted by: Niels on 10/3/2002 at 10:35:48 PM
I own a Eddy Merckx Mexico frame (Size is 25,5", 4 cm; Nr. 2205, metallic blue sprankeled color, chainstai is crome - I only saw this model once on a webside, it was dated to year 1982). At the moment I'm restoring the bicycle and complete it with Campy SR-equipment. Sorry to say: I don`t have any idea which year the frame was builded, and also don`t know with SR-groupt I have to put on. I would be very happy if someone could help me out with some informations.







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   age/history of bianchi track posted by: jacob knable on 10/3/2002 at 12:27:37 PM
My friend has recently purchased a bianchi track frame with an interesting graphic on the downtube. the name bianchi is written differently than I have ever seen it. each letter is composed of a thin navy blue skeleton surrounded by a thick white outline. there is a columbus tubing sticker on the seat tube with no tubeset name so I figure it's sl. the serial number is stamped into the seat lug. on one side i think it says 2d. on the other side it says 895? the bike is celeste. Does anybody know anything about the bianchi serial numbering system? Does anybody think they recognize this graghic? I'd love to know.


   age/history of bianchi track posted by John E on 10/3/2002 at 10:19:33 PM
Sorry, I have yet to meet anyone who knows much about the Bianchi serial numbering "system." The isolated, bordered letters sound like mid-1960s to me.






AGE / VALUE:   Motobecane Nomade, 70's posted by: Inkwolf on 10/3/2002 at 3:34:57 AM
Hi, I've picked up a Motobecane Nomade and am interested in finding out what year it is, and where to look for a serial number (under the BB looks bare.)

It is a women's step-through frame, blue. There are no decals, the lugs are outlined in gold paint, and the bike name , pinstriping, and Made In France are also in gold paint. The shifters are stem-mounted, the bike has steel Rigide rims, some Huret parts, and I can't quite read the name on the derailleurs, but it starts with an A and looks like Ally or Allvin or something. Fleischer kickstand, and somewhat flat/cruiser-style bars, with hard plastic grips. Cottered cranks, I think. (They have the little side bolts.) The saddle has a plastic cover, over padding and a series of springs. Brakes are sidepull. Odd-looking tapered brake levers.

This bike looks like it needs nothing but a really good cleaning to run (and maybe chainrings--they look kind of uneven) but if anyone else has modified one of these, I'd be interested in knowing what modifications they made, and what parts they'd recommend as upgrades. Thanks!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Motobecane Nomade, 70's posted by David on 10/3/2002 at 2:44:43 PM
Dunno where to find SN, but the bike is early-mid-70s; Huret Allvit der, Pletscher stand, cottered cranks.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Motobecane Nomade, 70's posted by Ri~chard on 10/3/2002 at 4:22:02 PM
Serial# should be (?) on the left rear dropout.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Motobecane Nomade, 70's posted by Gralyn on 10/3/2002 at 4:54:35 PM
I have a Motobecane Nomade, also. Mine is a men's 23" frame - gold color - everything else though, I believe is as you describe. I figure it's early to mid 70's. But I have no idea how to exactly date it.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Motobecane Nomade, 70's posted by Inkwolf on 10/3/2002 at 5:38:40 PM
Thanks, found it! :)

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Motobecane Nomade, 70's posted by Ed on 10/3/2002 at 6:28:24 PM
Regida embossed the year of mfg.enclosed in a very small diamond on their rims during the seventies. If the rims on your Motobecane are original they can probably tell you the age of your bike. Good luck with it.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Motobecane Nomade, 70's posted by Inkwolf on 10/5/2002 at 12:29:45 PM
Wonderful, thanks, Ed!

Judging from the older rim, my bike is a '73. (The rear says 80, I assume it was replaced.)

I was in third grade when it was made! Four years before Star Wars! Three years before the Bicentennial! One year before I even discovered Nancy Drew! Coooooool!






WANTED:   STRONGLIGHT parts posted by: TIM on 10/2/2002 at 11:53:18 PM
looking for '70s vintage and NOS:

Stronglight Competition headset
Stronglight sealed bearing bottom bracket assembly

any help will be greatly rewarded! thanks

[email]tcookdist@aol.com[/email]







AGE / VALUE:   centurion super le mans posted by: L. Hagan on 10/2/2002 at 9:05:22 PM
I bought a centurion super le mans around 1975. number is N-814. I am currently restoring the bike. I cannot seem to find much information about this bike. I would appreciate any comments.







MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by: Gralyn on 10/2/2002 at 12:30:49 PM
I have an Exage Bio-Pace crank set. I think it's maybe 52 t and 42 t. I was putting it on a Bianchi last night - when I noticed something odd. I thought maybe it was my eyes....maybe it was just an optical illusion....So, I then laid another chainring over it just to compare.....I wasn't just seeing things....the chainring was not round. It wasn't bent or anything...and showed no signs of damage. It had to have been made that way. It was so odd....that it wasn't round. It was more oval....or more flat in some areas. On the outside of the large chainring it says "computer-designed drive system". Well, I guess that's what the computer came up with.
Is anyone familiar with such an animal? Has anyone ever seen one of these? It originally came on a Centurion Lemans.


   RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by Ray on 10/2/2002 at 2:43:01 PM
Shimano made the BioPace cranks and rings for a year or so in the late 80s to early 90s. They did not catch on and yes you are right, they are oval. The theory was that the ring gave the optimum mechanical advantage during the power stroke of your pedal cycle. I used a tripple BioPace on my early Schwinn MTB and liked it very much. I still have several of these cranks and rings today but none installed. Also this was not the first attempt at this theory. Columbia in the late 1890s had a bike with the same oval chainring.

   RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by Keith on 10/2/2002 at 3:04:16 PM
Sheldon Brown still likes these -- I think especially for low rpm climbing. A cycling couch told me in about 1995 that Biopace works from a pure mechanical standpoint but not a biomechanical standpoint, and that leg muscles cannot react to the change in gearing quickly enough to take advantage of it. Whatever that means. I've used them and I'm not fond of them (probably years of fixed gear riding ruined that) but I didn't think they were a disadvantage either. Some friends oncve told me about an article that said they were bad for your knees, but I never saw it. I have a triple crankset with regular (round) large and middle, and an oval granny gear. That seems like a good combo to me.

   half-step gearing posted by John E on 10/3/2002 at 1:00:46 AM
I still use half-step gearing, Gralyn. In fact, for many years I ran third-step gearing: 49-46-43 / 13-16-19-23-26, which yields a particularly smoothly developing set of 14 (no large-large crossing!) gears.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by Warren on 10/3/2002 at 3:36:27 AM
Good point Keith...of course there were no Biopace Record or Dura-Ace cranksets. No self respecting hight-level racer would have been caught dead on them. Take me for instance.... (grin)

I just thought they were ugly.

BTW...I loved the Shimano XT U brake referred to earlier. My first and only nice mountain bike had one but it was mounted in the traditional position on the seat stays. I have a new one in my stash...it's too bad I'll never use it.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by jimbo on 10/3/2002 at 5:49:46 AM
In a mid to late 70's bicycle magazine (Bicycling?), there were ads for an oval shaped CR attached to a Campy NR crank . There was also an article about the oval CR"s and how it was used in a race or competition, showing how much more efficient it was over normal CR's. The CR's were really oval compared to the shimano and looked fairly simple with no holes or openings, just a flat oval of aluminum with teeth.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by Wings on 10/3/2002 at 5:57:44 AM
My first mountain bike, which I still have, had biopace chainrings. I thought it was great. However after riding another bike with non-biopace chainrings for a year or so -- when I rode the bike with the biopace chainrings it was difficult to spin and instead I felt like every stroke was a slide! Once I ride the bike for awhile I don't notice that.

I eventually replaced the large and middle chainring with a circular chainrings and left granny as a biopace. I love the biopace in granny -- it seems to make sense there! (For me!)

   RE:RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by Wings on 10/3/2002 at 5:59:20 AM
My first mountain bike, which I still have, had biopace chainrings. I thought it was great. However after riding another bike with non-biopace chainrings for a year or so -- when I rode the bike with the biopace chainrings it was difficult to spin and instead I felt like every stroke was a slide! Once I ride the bike for awhile I don't notice that.

I eventually replaced the large and middle chainring with a circular chainrings and left granny as a biopace. I love the biopace in granny -- it seems to make sense there! (For me!)

   RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by MWM on 10/3/2002 at 7:00:37 PM
I still ride biopace rings almost daily on my MTB. I'll re-confirm the largest chainrings have less "ovalness" while the smallest are the most pronounced. Seems to help me at low cadence, especially when climbing. My only problem is that it feels so strange when I get on my other bikes that don't have them. Happy pedalling.

   RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by Grant on 10/2/2002 at 3:30:42 PM
Just got interested in bikes, did you?
Shimano's Biopace products were a mistake on their part.Was it science or marketing,who knows? At the beginning the chainrings were a very pronounced oval shape(so much so clearance for the shifter cage varied from 3mm to 20mm in one rotation,imagine the problems).Once they realised their error,to save Japanese "face" instead of just discontinuing it they reduced the ovalness each year until it was barely perceptible.You got a late example if you had to lay a proper round chainring on top to check.
On 9 to 13 year old mountain bikes you will find the full range,barely out of round to egg shaped,if you're good at it you can age a bike by the biopace chainrings.
Biopace was an (r)evolutionary deadend so common in the bicycle industry.For examples read some 15 year old cycle magazines.Shimano was a large enough company to weather their "Edsel". Blunders like that kill small companies.

   RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by andrus on 10/2/2002 at 3:55:47 PM
Slam Dunked repair question, loosening handebars in English Roadesters, when others didn't, to tellya the truth, if Mr. gralyn chooses not to answer in responses etc. fine with me.

   RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by andrus on 10/2/2002 at 3:55:50 PM
Slam Dunked repair question, loosening handebars in English Roadesters, when others didn't, to tellya the truth, if Mr. gralyn chooses not to answer in responses etc. fine with me.

   RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by Honathan on 10/2/2002 at 4:25:18 PM
I find the "drop-off" (lack of a better term) on the torque after the downstroke of the crank causes a slight forward impulse on the knee. This could be a problem for me if I had to range far and wide. The system works well on the granny hill climbs as a lot of dirt and pebbles get spit out the rear as that torque seems to accelerate the chainwheel. I have toyed with placing a set with a round large CR and an oval small CR on a regular 10 sp. road bike. For the top-end, I think the round is way better.
Evolutionary deadend? Look at the chainstay U-brakes. The idea is still around even though its initial run was off the mark. I'd like to put a chainstay UB on a road bike. What about that?

   RE:RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by Grant on 10/2/2002 at 4:44:46 PM
Why not? It would not have the main problem associated with the U-brake installation on M bikes, mainly mud and obstacle damage.
The comparison of C-stay U-brakes and biopace products does not quite play.One is a decent enough idea(mountain bikes being the wrong application)while the other is just fundamentally flawed all round. Shimano admitted as much by quietly phasing them out, the word Biopace never to be spoken aloud again at headquarters.

   RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by Keith on 10/2/2002 at 5:32:29 PM
FWIW a LBS here has some NOS Boiopace rings, if anyone would like me to obtain them, let me know.

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by Elvis on 10/2/2002 at 5:40:08 PM
I had a sturdy [though not particularly flashy]ountain bike. It was a bit beat up but rode well particularly in snow so for a year it was my winter town ride... The thing had a brake under the chainstays AND biopace rings. The biopace rings seemed to make riding on smow covered roads, but the rear brakes got all crudy from slush. I have heard that the chainstay brake idea originated out west where it is dry and there is not so much mud or slush -- maybe such brakes on mountain bikes aren't a bad idea so much as there use in particular climates is. I could see a benefit to using such brakes on a touring road bike -- more space on the back to attatch racks and stuff.

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by Gralyn on 10/2/2002 at 5:40:09 PM
I am very pleased to have received so much information about these cranks. Yes, on mine - the larger ring is almost - but not quite - round. The smaller ring is obviously oval. I had not noticed it before - because I was only seeing the larger ring - while it was on the Centurion. I suppose lots of ideas come and go over the years in the bicycle industry. I feel lucky to have such a crank set. I even have an old Hercules 10-speed with a 1/2-step gearing. The smaller chainring is only very slightly smaller than the larger ring. That's an odd animal you don't see these days! I bet when these Biopace cranks are as old as that 50's Hercules - they will be quite a rarity, too. But who knows? Maybe somebody will try to revive it again some years in the future. Thanks for all the response!

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by Jonathan on 10/2/2002 at 7:47:16 PM
Not to defend eccentric CR's too much, as I prefer round CR's, I really don't see the problem with running them. They have some advantages as was pointed out in the mechanical end. Since I don't have blown knees and have been riding everything on 2 wheels it is no problem to make adjustments in riding the bikes I have with the biopace. I just wouldn't want to push it. However, I notice the hill climbing seems more aggressively transferred to the traction area. But it was marketing, or rather lack of it, I think that caused them to "disappear".
One thing is certain and that is you have to pay attention to the registration of the rings when reassembling.

   RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by Keith on 10/2/2002 at 8:27:08 PM
One exlpanation of the Biopace demise I've heard is that no records were broken with them, so eventually riders kind of figured out that they didn't increase efficiency. Kind of has the ring of truth but I'm sure there's more to it.

   RE:MISC:   Exage Bio-Pace Chainrings posted by MichaelW on 10/5/2002 at 8:37:59 PM
You can get non-circular chainrings custom made for any crank/size from
http://www.argonet.co.uk/highpath/cycle.htm
Even their round rings are pretty good.
Chris Bell, who makes them, reckons that Shimano sabotaged the concept of oval rings by putting them on the cranks the wrong way.
Ive used Biopace , but prefer round ones.






WANTED:   French threaded fork posted by: Ray on 10/1/2002 at 7:59:05 PM
An idiot pulled out in front of me and I was forced to t-bone them. Consequently the steerer tube of my fine old bike is ruined. I've decided to spend way too much money and have it repaired, but I need a good quality French-threaded fork from which to cannibalize the steerer tube. Needs to be at least 172mm long. Can anybody help? I can pay ??, also have some good vintage parts to trade. Thanks, Ray


      French threaded fork posted by John E on 10/2/2002 at 1:18:05 AM
Another option: replace the headset and use an English-threaded fork (22.2mm instead of 22mm steerer diameter). Sheldon Brown has a good discussion on this.

   RE:   French threaded fork posted by Ray on 10/3/2002 at 7:46:20 PM
Thanks much, I appreciate your input. I thought about that, but it just wouldn't "feel right" to me. I've had this bike so long, so many miles, that I want to keep everything on it French. It just wouldn't be fair to the bike you know. I have a nice one in line right now, a response to this discussion forum.

   RE:WANTED:   French threaded fork posted by Niels on 10/3/2002 at 10:28:37 PM
I guess french threads will be hard to find... I would bring an very ordanary tube (22.2) to an friedly metal worker, who can spin down a bit of the material and is able to cut a threat with his spinning bank following your specifications.

   RE:WANTED:   French threaded fork posted by Niels on 10/3/2002 at 10:29:40 PM
I guess french threads will be hard to find... I would bring an very ordanary tube (22.2) to an friedly metal worker, who can spin down a bit of the material and is able to cut a threat with his spinning bank following your specifications.

   RE:WANTED:   French threaded fork posted by Niels on 10/3/2002 at 10:29:40 PM
I guess french threads will be hard to find... I would bring an very ordanary tube (22.2) to an friedly metal worker, who can spin down a bit of the material and is able to cut a threat with his spinning bank following your specifications.

   RE:WANTED:   French threaded fork posted by Niels on 10/3/2002 at 10:29:40 PM
I guess french threads will be hard to find... I would bring an very ordanary tube (22.2) to an friedly metal worker, who can spin down a bit of the material and is able to cut a threat with his spinning bank following your specifications.

   RE:WANTED:   French threaded fork posted by Niels on 10/3/2002 at 10:29:40 PM
I guess french threads will be hard to find... I would bring an very ordanary tube (22.2) to an friedly metal worker, who can spin down a bit of the material and is able to cut a threat with his spinning bank following your specifications.

   RE:WANTED:   French threaded fork posted by Niels on 10/3/2002 at 10:29:40 PM
I guess french threads will be hard to find... I would bring an very ordanary tube (22.2) to an friedly metal worker, who can spin down a bit of the material and is able to cut a threat with his spinning bank following your specifications.






AGE / VALUE:   Panasonic DX 2000? posted by: lonerider on 10/1/2002 at 5:06:18 PM
Hi! I picked up a Pansonic DX 2000 at a tag sale for $20.00. The bike is in great shape but I can not find any information about it such as year it was made or specifications. Can anyone help?

Thanks


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Panasonic DX 2000? posted by Kevin K on 10/2/2002 at 7:30:20 PM
Hi. Give me a few more facts on the bike such as colors and equiptment. I've some info here and I may be able to help. Great buy on the bike too ! Kevin K






AGE / VALUE:   Nishiki "Olympic 12" frameset posted by: Elvis on 10/1/2002 at 5:25:37 AM
Hi all. I just picked up a road bike frameset tonight. The bike was painted read and white fade, and it looks like some patriotic soul added blue and a few stars afterwards. Only markings are Nishiki on a head badge sticker [partly obscurred] and "Olympic 12" on the front sides of the top tube. Bike has Shimano bottom bracket and Tange fork; the sides of the fork crown are cut out like stylized hearts. There are two sets of water bottle holes in the frame, on the inside of the main triangle, one on the top of the down tube and one on the inside side of the seat tube. three loops for a cable guide evenly spaced underneath top tube and downtube shifter mounts brazed into sides of down tube. I have no idea how old the bike is but can't get a seatpost to fit! Any idea on the age of the bike or where it sat in the Nishiki line?


      Nishiki posted by John E on 10/2/2002 at 1:20:50 AM
The Olympic was a lower-midlevel offering, comparable to a Raleigh Super Course. The braze-ons suggest early 1980s vintage, which is fortunate for you, since the early 1970s Olympics were extremely heavy.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Nishiki posted by Gralyn on 10/2/2002 at 12:48:57 PM
I have a Nishiki Olympic. It has (had) braze on's for the rear break cable and one for the rear deur. cable near the deur. It had a 5-speed cassette (with large skip-tooth 1st and 2nd gears). I was thinking 70's for sure. I took off the braze-on's from the top tube, Re-painted it, converted it to fixed-gear. It turned-out pretty good. It rides good, too.

   Nishiki posted by John E on 10/3/2002 at 10:22:30 PM
Gralyn, with the 5-speed skiptooth freewheel and the braze-ons you describe, I concur that your Oly was of early-to-mid 1970s vintage.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Simplex "plastic" front derailer posted by: Jonathan on 10/1/2002 at 3:21:54 AM
Has anyone tried fixing a fractured plastic housing on a Simplex fornt derailer. One half is some kind of pot-metal, while the other is a black "bakelite" looking plastic thing that houses the shaft. The bike is a '50's Peugeot mixte which is in superb condition mechanically and cosmetically. The white paint and black detailing and understated decalery (new word?) is new looking.
Well, I was given this bike by a friend who managed to break the front derailer. Actually, I traded a MTB for it as he would be better off with a big-tire bike. I'd like to restore the Peugeot to original condition. I tired epoxy on the FD housing and it popped off as soon as it was tightened onto the seat-tube. Any suggestions? Even the seat is the original spring-loaded Peugeot seat.
Mafac "racer" brakes. Rigida rims with chisel-shaped QR cam levers...really cool. Campy style r. dropouts. White handle grips and a raised roadster handlebar. The bike rides real smooth. The cottered cranks are funky, too. Thanks for any help; if you can save me a lot of fussy dinking around trying to fix the plastic derailer, I'd be beholding.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Simplex posted by Oscar on 10/1/2002 at 4:08:06 AM
The world is full of those plastic derailleurs. Expect a reader to reach into his parts box and send it to you. Not me, though, I gave my last one away. Who's got one?

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Simplex posted by Stacey on 10/1/2002 at 1:50:48 PM
I have one... plunger or lever style? eMail me, it's yours for postage.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Simplex posted by Ray on 10/1/2002 at 7:57:37 PM
I have some, too, also have new matching shifters and probably a rear or two to go along with it. I'll never use them so.....

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Simplex posted by Jonathan on 10/2/2002 at 4:44:19 AM
Thanks for the kind offers. I guess also that answers my question; once that plastic goes that's it. I noticed a couple of my other vintage bikes have little cracks in the yolk. Inherent weakness I conclude. A recent inspection showed the same problem only to a lessor degree (little cracks) in my Maino, Dawes Galaxy and a UO-18. They work OK, but the prospect of a derailer jamming into the chainstays and catching the real wheel spokes scary enough to change them all out.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What's a Cazenave? posted by: David Bowen on 10/1/2002 at 3:16:31 AM
I have a Cazenave 10 speed that my dad bought me 1n about 1973. The logo is "Cazenave" lettering under a lit torch w/ Olympic rings in color above.It has a "Made in France" sticker on seatpost frame. We bought this bike in North Little Rock, Arkansas from an individual secondhand.
It has Campagnola front chainwheel w/ cottered crank, and Suntour derailears front and rear. Mafac "RACER" centerpull brakes, indented rims w/ lever released Shimano ubs.
It has a Campy kickstand as well.
This has been a great bike and holds great sentimental value to me. Can anyone help w/ any background on 'Cazenave" as a braond? I have found nothing and am really surprised! Any info would help.
Thanks!


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What's a Cazenave? posted by Jonathan on 10/1/2002 at 4:58:51 AM
Try 1973 Consumer Reports issue with bicycle comparisons. The info I got on the make was that it was bike-boom bike that was in the UO-8 (around $100) class from France.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   What's a Cazenave? posted by desmo on 10/4/2002 at 12:18:13 AM
Campy kickstand!!??






FOR SALE:   Campagnolo NR with NOS English Club Frame 51cm posted by: Ben on 9/30/2002 at 7:57:04 PM
I put this on ebay a couple of days ago, would like it to go to a good home, so putting it here too:

NOS Revell Frame (English Club racer, no rack eyelets, one set water bottle bosses, Reynolds 531 throughout) with complete Campagnolo Nuovo Record gruppo with exception of Shimano cartridge bottom bracket. 126mm rear spacing with 6sp new winner freewheel as new. Campagnolo Omega clinchers on 32h record hubs built with DT 14g with new Continental Ultra 2000 23mm tires and tubes. Brooks ladies road saddle in honey color with copper rails. All cables and housing new. All bearing surfaces professionally rebuilt. Bike is virtually unused, with exception of pedals, which show some wear. This bike is virtually new and unused. No marks on frame whatsoever. Great retro ride.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1864114199

Thanks,

Ben







AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn LeTour year of Mfg. posted by: Jim Maier on 9/30/2002 at 6:23:55 PM
What month/year would serial #4D03026 be? This is on the lower left dropout of a Schwinn LeTour. This number format does not match up with the charts posted.

Any help appreciated.

Thanks,
Jim


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn LeTour year of Mfg. posted by Kevin K on 9/30/2002 at 11:06:19 PM
Hi Jim. I believe your Letour is an April 1974. What color is it? If it's mint you might want to leave it as is. If not a nice set of aluminum 27" wheels will look alot better on the bike. Enjoy it, Kevin

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn LeTour year of Mfg. posted by Jim Maier on 10/1/2002 at 2:10:16 AM
Kevin,

This is a yellow, 23" frame. Not mint condition however all original and rides nice. It has some surface rust and needs cleaning and a tune up. This was purchased at a flea market for $12.00 by my father. By the looks of things, it sat unused for many years. Back in June of 1975 we purchased a new 25" Red LeTour which my father still has in mint condition. The serial number on that is H420151. What do you show for a build date on this one?

We were comparing the two bikes and they seem to have the same components which would make them close in manufacture dates. All of the charts posted on the web seem to be for the Chicago built bikes, not the imports.

Thanks for the info!

Jim

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn LeTour year of Mfg. posted by Tom Findley on 10/1/2002 at 12:58:23 PM
Schwinn may have gone back to the numbering system used 1957-1964. We know that Le Tours were not made during that time. The 4 in each number may mean 1974. The letter stands for the month the frame was made; "D'= April, "H"= July.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn LeTour year of Mfg. posted by Kevin K on 10/2/2002 at 7:36:54 PM
Hi Jim. Sorry for the delay. I've had 2 1974 Letours in Kool Lemon. I like the rear derailleur and the crankset on the bike but that's about it. Personal taste Jim. If you like it polish away! I've got bikes I'm sure not too many others would collect but that all in the fun of it. Enjoy, Kevin