OldRoads.com

This is an archive of Vintage Bicycle Information.
For current Discussions, go to our main site: OldRoads.com

If you are trying to determine the genealogy of your bicycle by it's features, go to our Vintage Bicycle Price Guide
which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, brake types, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your old bicycle.

If you are trying to determine the make and model of your bicycle, go to our Vintage Bicycle Picture Database
which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your vintage bicycle.

Archived: Vintage Lightweights







AGE / VALUE:   AMF Hercules posted by: Suzanne on 10/7/2002 at 1:42:34 PM
My parents recently cleaned out their garage and decided to get rid of some bicycles. I kept one that I thought looked pretty neat and now I'd like to get more info on it. I've done some research on the web but my bicycle terminology is not up to snuff...sorry in advance:
This is a green three speed (?gear box? says Sturmey Archer). It has a black Brooks saddle that says made in England. The white handgrips say made in England. It also says Sturmey Archer near the reflector on the rear fender. Their is a chain guard. The rear tire is a Coaster 87-590 size 25 x 1 3/8). The kickstand says Esge Pletscher, Swiss made. On the front is a green and gold emblem that says Hercules Nottingham England. On the inside is a sticker that says guarantee genuine english lightweight. There is also the markings AMF separated by silver bars one the back inside of the bicycle. How can I determine age??? Everything says Made in England though I thought the AMF markings meant this was post 1960's American made. The only serial number I found is etched in the crossbar underneath the seat (which we removed to find the serial#) and it reads 72563. Where should I begin to determine it's value or "the sum of it's parts". Any help is appreciated. Sorry for the laborious details.



   RE:AGE / VALUE:   AMF Hercules posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 10/7/2002 at 2:39:47 PM
Go to e- bay and type in Raleigh bicycle and Hercules bicycle under completed auctions. Keep an eye out for these.
They are no longer being made, are neat little bikes that get snapped up and re-done and ridden and prized by a lot of folks.
It is a second class Raleigh. Still the plating and colors and workmanship is very nice. This is called a "city bike" We see fewer and fewer of these all the time. This would vanish at a yard sale within the first twenty minutes! I would show up after that and be bummed out that you just sold it.
The lady I spoke with once,she tightened up her grip on the handlebars and said "No!" When I casually asked her if she wanted to sell hers! She loved this bike. This is how folks are about these. Parts, overhauling instructions anything you would need is here at oldroads.com
Have you seen Sheldon Brown's site? Sheldonbrown.com
Raleigh bikes care and feeding, English 3 speeds, he has a huge shrine(website) everybody visits who is into these bikes.
Oh No! What was there that was not saved? Not good!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   AMF Hercules posted by Ed on 10/7/2002 at 8:10:49 PM
Your Hercules sounds like a post 1960s model made after Hercules was acquired by Raleigh based on the Nottingham headbadge. If your Sturmey Archer rear wheel is original it should have the year of manufacture stamped on it. I have three that I paid $40.00 for all three from a neighbor who was cleaning out his garage last year. I also have one that I paid $40.00 for it alone from a man who was also cleaning his garage some few years ago. I agree with the previous reply that Ebay should give you a fair Idear of what you can sell it for. Good luck with it,they're fun to ride and well made in my opinion.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   AMF Hercules posted by Keith on 10/8/2002 at 2:50:26 PM
I also have a green AMF Hercules -- yard sale $20. It has very nice chromed mudguards and chainguard -- also has a Brooks saddle. Sturmey hub has 1970 date. It's a wonderful utilitarian bike, made by Raleigh. The English 3-speeds are in my opinion the best city bikes ever made. Learn how to adjust the 3-speed hub (indicator chain) and keep the hub oiled, and it will last for another generation. As Christopher suggests, go to Sheldon Brown's site to learn more.






AGE / VALUE:   Paul/shimano 70s disc brakes posted by: Trevo on 10/7/2002 at 4:59:17 AM
I may be getting an old 10 speed(make unknow?) that is ,as Iam told, equipet with disc brakes. Does anyone have any info on old 70's disc brakes? I've read about phil wood and shimano. Any help? are they rare?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Paul/shimano 70s disc brakes posted by Bryant on 10/7/2002 at 11:02:57 AM
Hi Trevo. I just finished fixing up a 1970ish Bridgestone Kabuki Skyway 10 speed that came with rear disc brakes. The bike is entry level but I thought the disc brakes were pretty cool. I decided to keep them because I've not seen them before. They do make the bike heavier, but I could always swap out the rear wheel and put on regular rear brakes. If you do get a Kabuki, be aware that the seat post does not tighten the same way as other bikes. You must remove the seat and loosen the bolt on top, much like you do with the stem bolt on your handlebars. Enjoy the uniqueness of your bike.

   Paul/shimano 70s disc brakes posted by Trevo on 10/8/2002 at 3:23:37 AM
So is it definatly a Bridgestone Kabuki Skyway? Is the disc interchangable with any another 10 speeds?

   Paul/shimano 70s disc brakes posted by Trevo on 10/8/2002 at 3:25:04 AM
So is it definatly a Bridgestone Kabuki Skyway? Is the disc interchangable with any another 10 speeds?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Paul/shimano 70s disc brakes posted by Bryant on 10/8/2002 at 11:03:47 AM
Can't say it is definitely a Kabuki Skyway, That is the only one I saw with disc brakes. Bridgestone may have made others. I doubt the disc brake is interchangeable since the bike had special braze-ons for mounting the brakes.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Paul/shimano 70s disc brakes posted by Trevo on 10/8/2002 at 1:17:57 PM
Whos the maker of yor discs?

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Paul/shimano 70s disc brakes posted by Bryant on 10/8/2002 at 3:57:46 PM
Ahh! there's the rub. I've not found a place that sells the discs. Luckily the one I have still has plenty of life left. When it runs out, I'll swap the wheel and the brake but keep the disc brake just in case

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Paul/shimano 70s disc brakes posted by Bryant on 10/8/2002 at 4:00:48 PM
Here is a site I found that is selling a Kabuki Skyway for $250. IMHO Much too high for the bike but you can check it out at :http://pages.zdnet.com/mlander24/10speedbikes/id10.html

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Paul/shimano 70s disc brakes posted by Trevo on 10/8/2002 at 5:18:38 PM
None of the pictures can be enlarged. Can you show me a picture of your disc assembly? Iam really interestedin learning as much as I can about these older disc brakes. Thanks

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Paul/shimano 70s disc brakes posted by Bryant on 10/9/2002 at 11:04:57 AM
Sorry, no digital camera. I'll try to borrow one and will post here when I get it.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Should I bother rebuilding Gitane Interclub posted by: Erik Arntzen on 10/7/2002 at 1:01:18 AM
I have discovered a Gitane Interclub for sale at a resale shop. It has Mafac brakes (don't know model) and some Sun Tour components. Steel wheels have some surface rust, as does the white frame. Has a leather saddle that has been neglected. Although I can pick this bike up for $2, I'm not sure it would be worth my time to restore this. Although I don't want to do this for the purpose of reselling (rather need to add a nice vintage ride), I would like something that will retain the value of what I put into it. Also is the Interclub the next model behind the Tour de France? Thanks for your input...


   RE: Gitane Interclub posted by Eric Amlie on 10/7/2002 at 2:23:16 PM
According to my circa 1970 Gitane catalog the Interclub was indeed the next model down from the Tour de France. The problem with this bike is that the frame wasn't made from anything special (don't know exactly what the frame steel was) like Tour de France and Super Corsa which had Reynolds 531 frames.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Should I bother rebuilding Gitane Interclub posted by Keith on 10/8/2002 at 3:00:07 PM
The Interclub was my first "serious" bike in 1970. There was a big gap in the Gitane line. The Tour de France was basically the same as a Peugeot PX-10. The Interclub, however, did not have a direct parallel in the other major lines, as far as I know. It's distinguishing feature was that it came with tubular tires, which made it's ride better than the bikes in the same class (in the $100 - $125 range) which generally came with chunky 27 x 1 and 1/4 clinchers. Hence, it was an entry level racing bike (Gitane also had a similar entry level track bike that was not featured in its English language catelog). Mine came with Huret Allvit Ds (I believe some had Simplex Prestige), cottered steel cranks, cotton Dunlop tubies, and Mafac Racer brakes. THE FRAME WAS PLAIN CARBON STEEL. I would not spend a lot of time or money restoring this model.






FOR SALE:   Peugeot PX 10 posted by: JOE on 10/7/2002 at 12:36:10 AM
Nice, clean, original paint bike bought new in 1971. Campy controls,hubs & front derail. Simplex rear derail, Italian rims Reynolds frame $350.







AGE / VALUE:   Year of Mercian? posted by: sam on 10/6/2002 at 10:19:32 PM
Week started off good/ picked up a Mercian at goodwill for $19.95.Decals are good.Has campy headsets, hubs and dropouts/suntoup Derailers.Any way to tell the Age?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Year of Mercian? posted by Warren on 10/7/2002 at 1:36:47 AM
Now THAT is a score. Easy to determine age...give them a call with the serial number. You can order them new.
Go to http://www.btinternet.com/'merciancycleslimited/

I'm green...






AGE / VALUE:   my bikes posted by: metlhed on 10/6/2002 at 1:56:21 PM
hehehe i love the trash man lol i have some bikes i got and i was wondering the value.
1-green schwinn varsity 1972 great pain and decals little rust 10spd.
2-brown scwhinn 1972 little bit smaller frame than the varsity 10 spd great condition
3-white viscount 10 spd. little rust
4-brown 1972 columbia 10 spd. great condition
5-dark blue sears womens 3 speed great condition

all bikes are mens except sears. thanks for any info.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   my bikes posted by Oscar on 10/6/2002 at 11:28:53 PM
1. Varsity $50 tops
2. Other Schwinn $50 tops
3. Vicount ???
4. $10 if you can sell it.
5. $10 if you can sell it.

The Vicount may be interesting. We would need to know more about the components.

I'm glad you saved these bikes. They're probably all mechanically good and there was no need to pitch them except to save space in the basement.

Some people leave bikes by the resale shop, and the collectable ones sell. The Sears Free-Spirits and the Columbia 10-Speeds stay around forever unsold. Where I live, the poorest of the poor have a car, and almost no one is interested in an old bike.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   my bikes posted by Andy on 10/7/2002 at 2:28:48 PM
(3): Viscount, gotta say it; thing to watch out for here, is the so-called "Death Fork" on some 70s bicycles, supposedly, recalled and replaced. Sheldon Brown, has at his site, a whole article on Viscount and Lambert bicycles, sort of innovators at that time. I found someone who fixed up a Viscount, told him about the fork and he knew of it. It is a word of caution to the wise however; one may care to read that article, find it under "French Bicycles" if you don't find it readily, under his articles. But you know, I am puzzled, it may be an English bike. Just double check it.

(5): Sears women's three speed: I have to toss in some kudos, on Sears women's three speeds, I found one with white pedals(?!). Excellent condition, given to a woman whose bicycle was stolen, excellent polished condition, hub too. If 1950s era, feel it is solid.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   my bikes posted by Andy on 10/7/2002 at 2:29:18 PM
(3): Viscount, gotta say it; thing to watch out for here, is the so-called "Death Fork" on some 70s bicycles, supposedly, recalled and replaced. Sheldon Brown, has at his site, a whole article on Viscount and Lambert bicycles, sort of innovators at that time. I found someone who fixed up a Viscount, told him about the fork and he knew of it. It is a word of caution to the wise however; one may care to read that article, find it under "French Bicycles" if you don't find it readily, under his articles. But you know, I am puzzled, it may be an English bike. Just double check it.

(5): Sears women's three speed: I have to toss in some kudos, on Sears women's three speeds, I found one with white pedals(?!). Excellent condition, given to a woman whose bicycle was stolen, excellent polished condition, hub too. If 1950s era, feel it is solid.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   my bikes posted by David on 10/7/2002 at 4:10:00 PM
Top-of-the-line "death fork" Viscount was called "Aerospace Pro" and featured a fillet-brazed DB cro-moly frame as well as the notorious aluminum fork. It was distributed in the US by Yamaha. I tried one out before I chose a Paramount, instead, in 1976. It was relatively light for the time and good handling with OK components; leather saddle, Suntour gears and brakes, cool-looking crank, and the cool fork. I would guess a "good condition" death fork might actually make it more collectible even tho it's less ridable!






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   what size post for Nishiki Olympic 12? posted by: Yosef on 10/6/2002 at 1:33:46 PM
I have a Nishiki Olympic 12 that was given to me by a neighbor who was moving and did not want it anymore. It is in great condition but has no post or seat. Does anyone know the recommended post diamater for this bike? The hole measures 1" or about 26 mm but I want to be sure I am getting the right size. Any other comments about this bike would also be appreciated (like what is it worth, tips on its care and feeding, etc.)

Thanks.

Yosef


    Nishiki Olympic 12? posted by John E on 10/6/2002 at 7:46:16 PM
Hi Yosef,

1) See an earlier thread re: Oly 12.
2) See sheldonbrown.com -- he has been collecting data on seat post diameters. For a bike with thick-gauge tubing, 25.4mm = 1" is possible, but don't quote me on it ...






AGE / VALUE:   Murray Mar Ladies pre 1930? posted by: Ryan on 10/6/2002 at 7:05:00 AM
just picked up an early ladies bike. flat painted rims, intricate pinstriping and words on blue frame. name Murray Mar on tube. BSA coaster rear hub and english made front as well. of 2 horisontal bars bottom one is flat and top one is curved in middle and has a bar joining it to the bottom one. a 2 and a 3 digit code on either side of the top of the seatpost tube. i am guessing it is 1900 - 1920, does any one know any more, any help please?







FOR SALE:   Late 70'sTakara posted by: Robert N. on 10/5/2002 at 11:44:58 PM
Late 70's man's Takara 10-speed I bought new that has "evolved" over the years to a commuter bike. Brooks B-17 saddle, Suntour end-plug shifters, Suntour V-GT derailleurs(Inever could spell that), Sunshine hubs, steel frame, Blackburn rear rack and "straight" bars. I could probably part this bike out but would like to see it used whole. Price negotiable (and fairly cheap). Not a collectable but a solid rider. Houston, Texas area preferably. Questions and photos, contact me at my e-mail.
Robert







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Let's do the time warp again posted by: Walter on 10/5/2002 at 11:50:39 PM
I walk into a newly (re)opened LBS looking for parts for a BMX style bike I'm building for my 6 year old. Looking around and I feel as if I'm back in 1986 or so. A rack full of roadies ranging from Nishiki Olympics with the plain jane "SIS" d/t set-ups to similar vintage Cioccs with DuraAce and tubs. All new except for 15 years or so of dust. Also a considerably older lookingused Merckx in silver. In the case Chorus pedals with toeclips and a Regina America freewheel as well as a slew of other Campy and Shimano stuff. Against the wall boxes of shoes including, swear to God, Detto Pietros.
Where I live is not a roadbike market and the prices are still high enough to where commuters probably aren't looking yet, though an Olympic for $325 compares well to anything else in that price range to be sure. I mentioned there's a pretty reasonable market for this stuff online and the guy says he "doesn't do computers." Actually said he probably ought to throw awy the Dettos.

My guess is they'll be there for awhile. I'm going back to get some 20" wheels and I'll kick around some more


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Let's do the time warp again posted by David on 10/6/2002 at 3:12:20 AM
After you get done grabbing what you want, let us know how to reach him by phone. The shoes are already in boxes, I'm sure he'd send 'em.






AGE / VALUE:   Quick response on bike at rummage sale posted by: Jonathan on 10/5/2002 at 3:29:24 AM
Biking home I spotted the tail end of a church rummage sale that had a bunch of bikes. The a\sale is tomorrow as well, so I need some info real fast. Here are the ones that looked OK.
1) peugeot "sport" 10 speed, cottered cranks with metal simplex derailers, tab for rear derailer
2) Bridgestone "regulus" 12 sp. with all Suntour! 4130 frame and forks
3)Bridgestone "Carmel", lady frame, 6 sp. with AL full fenders
4) Nishiki "Custom Sport" with SHimano 600 set, "high tensile steel" frame, nice alloy bars
All 4 are in excellent shape...hardly run, garage decorations.
Any ideas about these bikes? Are any collectible?
Thanks for any opinions.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Quick response on bike at rummage sale posted by Steven on 10/5/2002 at 6:10:40 AM
Jonathon, All bikes are collectibles for somebody somewhere. The bikes you describe are however not 'high' collectibles, therefore they are out of the mainstream of collecting. The Bridgestone Regulus would IMO likely be the best ride, followed by the Peugeot.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Quick response on bike at rummage sale posted by Walter on 10/5/2002 at 12:10:35 PM
I'm surprised the Nishiki is a heavy frame as Shimano 600 usually appeared on good or better quality frames. Perhaps a refit by someone? If it is indeed low use and low $ the Nishiki could be worthwhile for the gruppo with an eye toward a later project.

I agree with Steve about the Bridgestone but the Peugeot holds no appeal to me personally. Unless it's a true classic from the 1960s or earlier I avoid cottered cranks like the plague, but that's just me.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Quick response on bike at rummage sale posted by Jonathan on 10/5/2002 at 2:21:49 PM
Thanks a lot for the feed on the bikes. I hope to get one...Nishiki with the S600 setup for later project? Sounds good to me.
I'll test ride the Regulus in the parking lot. Could be a "gift" bike for a friend. I know what you are saying about cotters. I only like them for the authenticity.
Thanks, again.

    bike at rummage sale posted by John E on 10/5/2002 at 6:29:09 PM
In 1971, the Custom Sport, Nishiki's bottom-of-the-line offering, was a 34-lb boat anchor with cheapo steel Shimano gear. Later in the decade, it evolved into something a bit more decent, but the frame weight remained pretty high. Even if the Peugeot is a basic UO-8 or AO-8, it is probably a much nicer rider than the Nishiki, but you will have to deal with French threads and diameters.

   RE: bike at rummage sale posted by Jonathan on 10/5/2002 at 8:21:04 PM
The Peugeot was gone! I did pick up a Raleigh "Record Ace" from the '60's with cotterd up cranks and Altebberger brakes; Huret-Alvet
derailer, with a missing front wheel for $5 US. It was lying in a heap off to the side with a ton yardwork junk equipment. It is white with bright orange headtube, black trim paint. It is a noble looking ole fella even with a few pounds of parasitic dust coating. The frame is solid. The Nishiki was gone.
Just a bunch of tiny bikes were left. Thanks for the advice. Every little bit of knowledge can add up to a better decisions later.






AGE / VALUE:   milano frame posted by: joe on 10/5/2002 at 2:08:07 AM
Hi recently i picked up a old 60's milano sports frame at the dump does any one know anything about these bikes it has campy dropouts was it part of cinelli thanks







AGE / VALUE:   Suntour Story posted by: Grant on 10/4/2002 at 10:02:16 PM
I found this doing research for something else.It is a good general interest article.Kind of Suntour vs. Shimano.
http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/'hadland/page35.htm


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Suntour Story posted by Grant on 10/4/2002 at 10:33:11 PM
http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/'hadland/page35.htm

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Suntour Story posted by Walter on 10/5/2002 at 11:57:08 PM
You need a "tilde" in front of hadland in place of the apostrophe. It's the upper case of the accent mark on a Windows keyboard just left of the 1/! key. I've seen the article before but always a good idea to mention it again

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Suntour Story posted by Steven on 10/6/2002 at 1:40:14 PM
The tilde sign appears in different places on different computers, so Walter's hint about the location is not necessarily of much help. It is Ascii symbol 126, so you can get it by holding the 'alt' key and then inputting 126. More simply, you can reach the complete web-page at: http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/'hadland/page35.htm

If you want to copy a web page, the way that I find the easiest is to highlight the page address in your browser and similtaneously input 'ctrl' and 'c' which copies the address. You can then paste it wherever you want by now similtaneously inputting 'ctrl' and 'v'.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Jeunet Bike Value posted by: Donald on 10/4/2002 at 5:31:57 PM
I own a Jeunet Franche-Comte 10 speed that I bought new in March of 1975. It has been kept indoors and is in excellent condition. It is red with chrome forks. I still have the papers that came with it indicating model number 610 and serial number 64132. I am interested in knowing if this is a collectable bike and what a reasonable value could be given to it. The sales receipt shows I paid $160.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Jeunet Bike Value posted by Warren on 10/4/2002 at 11:34:26 PM
$160 in '75 suggests the bike was fairly entry level in the boom bike era...it likely has Simplex derailleurs/Normandy or Atom hubs/Rigida rims and a fairly heavy tubeset. It may be a decent rider but unlikely to have any real value in our lifetime.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Campy QR skewer posted by: Darryl on 10/4/2002 at 3:50:55 PM
I want to cut down a Campy C-Record rear QR skewer to fit the front dropouts. What is the best way of doing this? What is the metric die that should be used? The shaft appears to be 5mm. Thanks, Darryl


      Campy QR skewer posted by John E on 10/5/2002 at 2:57:24 AM
Don't do it! Since these things are very valuable, I strongly advise you to buy a front and sell your rear unit.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Campy QR skewer posted by Darryl on 10/5/2002 at 12:58:04 PM
The cut down QR is for a C-record front hub that now has a Shimano QR on it. I have two rear C-record QR skewers, one I just bought on Ebay for $11.95 plus shipping. Can't find a vintage C-record front QR. Does anyone have one?