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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Condor Baracchi posted by: John on 11/13/2002 at 8:30:21 PM
I have a 1973- Condor Baracchi that is apparently extemely lightweight with Campy NR rear D, stonglight cranks, Camp Supper Leg pedals with anodized cages, Diacome brakes, Phil Wood BB. AIt is in very good condition has been garaged for over 20 years. Any ideas on its worth?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Condor Baracchi posted by Warren on 11/14/2002 at 3:45:15 AM
Condor made some top quality bikes but your description is incomplete.More info is required...tubing, rims , hubs, specific condition of paint, decals and chrome etc.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Condor Baracchi posted by John on 11/14/2002 at 4:18:33 AM
Sure, more specifics are provided below, but the bike frame was bought as a frame originally (I know that's true, it was my father's, he used it as a time trial bike).

The tubing is Reynold's 531 double butted. There are no lugs on the frame, which I believe was fairly unusual for the time. I'm not sure how the frame was constructed, but it is whatever a Baracchi was at the time. The hubs are Phil wood 32 spoke in the back 28 in the front, flamme rims, with a 13-21 Regina freewheel and chain. The crank is a stronglight 170MM (new in 1973-1974?) the chainring is black anodized 52 teeth. Cinelli stem and handlebars, both in excellent shape. The paint is in very good condition, a few scratches with very minimal rust, the Condor decals are perfect. It is silver with a red block on the seat tube.
Brakes are black Dia Compe, Grand Compe in very good shape.
Bottom bracket is Phil Wood, Campy bar end shifters in excellent shape.










AGE / VALUE:   Road Bike posted by: Randy on 11/13/2002 at 5:39:02 AM
Friend at work has a bike her Husband bought from his work 20-25 years ago its made by Hexcel Aluminum bike. I havent seen it yet anyone have a background on this ?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Road Bike posted by Brian L. on 11/13/2002 at 6:04:02 PM
When I was in high school, Hexcel skis were all the rage. They made a lot of noise about the fact that they used aluminum honeycomb cores. I don't believe that this brand exists anymore, and never heard of bikes associated with the brand, but then again, I lived in Alaska. I would assume that they re-badged someone else's aluminum bikes - maybe Cannondales? The only other volume aluminum bike manufacturer that I am aware of that vintage was Vitus.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Road Bike posted by Michael Toohey on 11/15/2002 at 4:57:30 AM
As well as Vitus, 'dale and Klein (OK, not exactly volume)there was (and is) ALAN. The Italian scewed & glued bikes were pioneers in aluminium, predating Vitus (I think) with bonded lugs.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Road Bike posted by Steve B on 11/15/2002 at 5:52:22 AM
Hexcel might still be around, the main part of the business was making helicopter rotor blades. Skis were a secondary use of their honeycomb aluminum. I never knew they did bikes of any kind, but I wouldn't be surprised if they made their own. The skis loose their stiffness after awhile(I used mine for about 17 years)
I'd love to see pictures of the bike, if it's possible.

Steve

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Road Bike posted by Brian L. on 11/15/2002 at 4:49:55 PM
I thought that Alans were made by Vitus or vice-versa. Anyone out there know? Keith?






AGE / VALUE:   SCHWINN STEM SIZE posted by: Kevin K on 11/13/2002 at 12:36:28 AM
Hi all. You would think with as many Schwinn bikes I've seen or collected I would know the stem size. But I don't. Could someone please tell me the stem size for say the 70's Schwinn Continentals, Super Sports................... Thanks, Kevin K


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   SCHWINN STEM SIZE posted by Bob Hufford on 11/13/2002 at 4:34:43 AM
Schwinn used .833" stems on many of the mid-line bikes. Usually if it had an Ashtabula crank, it had a .833 stem.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   SCHWINN STEM SIZE posted by Bret on 11/13/2002 at 1:39:40 AM
That'll be 1". Mostly chromed steelavailable. Schwinn did spec an alloy version on Continental's and up.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   SCHWINN STEM SIZE posted by Eric Amlie on 11/14/2002 at 2:34:19 PM
I just measured a few stems from '72-'73 Super Sports. They measure about .825". I suppose the I.D. of the steerer tube is the .833" that Bob specs and the expander plug brings the stem O.D. out .008" to match.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SCHWINN STEM SIZE posted by Kevin K on 11/15/2002 at 1:15:30 PM
Thanks guys, Kevin K






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Rolls - Eurocicio Info posted by: KAP on 11/13/2002 at 12:08:17 AM
I would like to find any information on the italian "Rolls" brand bicycles circa 1960-1970, including pictures.

Thank you.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Rolls - Eurocicio Info posted by Fred A on 11/13/2002 at 7:06:00 PM
WOW! You're the only other person I know of besides myself who has one! Bike is super light and full of Italian and French componentry. Mine is blue & white, all original, and my frame size of 25". Did you realize that the frame is all chrome beneath the paint? I'm still trying to find out who made the frame, which has numbers stamped into the seat tube right beneath where the seat post goes in. If anyone out there can help with the frame manufacturer, it would be great!!

Fred A






AGE / VALUE:   Centurion LeMans posted by: N Templeman on 11/12/2002 at 9:54:17 PM
I intercepted an old Centurion on its way to the dumpster recently. Suntour drivetrain, dia-compe brakes. The suicide brake levers and shifters on the headset lead me to question its lineage.... I'm looking to build up a commuter/tourer, but I don't want to waste time on a cruddy frame. Any information would be most helpful. Serial #: IK74993S
Thanks


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Centurion LeMans posted by Bret on 11/13/2002 at 1:48:06 AM
Japanese made Centurions available in the US during the 70's and early 80's all had good workmanship quality. If a "cruddy" frame means to you anything less than a full chromo frame, then look further. This bike likely had a basic straight-guage, low end Japanese chromo tubing for its main tri-angle only; Hi-Tensile steel for the fork and stays. Not a bad commuter really, if its not rusty. It'll be a cushy and stable ride. Many of these bikes have been adapted to flat style bars for a great commuting posture with little noticeable effect on handling. 27" tires are becoming crummier and harder to find though....beware obsolesce, or stock up!






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Is it the real thing? posted by: Keith on 11/12/2002 at 9:33:22 PM
Being sold as a 69/70 Raleigh Professional. I've never seen a Pro with a brake bridge (they all were spec'd w/ Campy sidepulls, I believe), non-Campy dropouts (these are no-name), or fender eyelets (absolutely never on a Pro). No pic of the trademark cutout bb shell either. What's up with this? http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1580086178


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Is it the real thing? posted by Dennis Savage on 11/13/2002 at 4:21:58 AM
All i can tell you is that the lugs on my 71 Competetion are different then the ones on this ebay bike.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Is it the real thing? posted by desmo on 11/13/2002 at 5:05:36 AM
My guess is that it's a pre Campy brake Pro which has been fitted with period incorrect Gran Sport brakes. Likely came with Weinmann center pulls originally. The Zeus DOs are odd though.

   Raleigh Pro posted by John E on 11/13/2002 at 3:49:23 PM
My wife's brother has a mid-to-late 1960s Raleigh Pro (white with broad stripes on the seat tube) with a brake bridge and factory-original Weinmann centerpull brakes.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Is it the real thing? posted by Ralph Jacobson on 11/13/2002 at 7:58:13 PM
I have a '69 Raleigh Catalogue in .pdf format. The bike on EBAY looks like a '69. The bike in the catalogue had center pull brakes and the same paint scheme.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Is it the real thing? posted by Keith on 11/12/2002 at 9:38:38 PM
Correction -- dropouts are Zeus

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Is it the real thing? posted by Keith on 11/12/2002 at 10:05:09 PM
I contacted the seller. It would help to have some feedback either confirming or disproving my impression about this bike. Retro Raleighs is down, but Classic Rendezvous has a few pics of Pros, including a '69. No brake bridge. It's too plain to be an International (they had Nervex Pro lugs). Could it be a Competition or Grand Sport? The brazing doesn't look all that good on the closeup of the headtube, another detail I wouldn't expect on a Pro.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Is it the real thing? posted by Keith on 11/14/2002 at 3:14:31 PM
Aside from the brake bridge, how about the Zeus dropouts and fender eyelets?

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Is it the real thing? posted by Keith on 11/14/2002 at 3:17:49 PM
Here's a closeup of the fork crown teatment on a 1969 Pro. Compare that to the eBay bike. http://www.classicrendezvous.com/British/Raleigh_Pro_fk_crown.htm

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Is it the real thing? posted by Keith on 11/14/2002 at 3:59:01 PM
I take it all back -- here's where you can still access catelogs -- look at the 1969 -- shows a little knowledge can be dangerous! http://bulgier.net/pics/bike/Catalogs/Retro-Raleighs/






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Is it the real thing? posted by: Keith on 11/12/2002 at 9:33:22 PM
Being sold as a 69/70 Raleigh Professional. I've never seen a Pro with a brake bridge (they all were spec'd w/ Campy sidepulls, I believe), non-Campy dropouts (these are no-name), or fender eyelets (absolutely never on a Pro). No pic of the trademark cutout bb shell either. What's up with this?







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Tire question posted by: Gralyn on 11/12/2002 at 3:27:29 AM
I have a question about tires: I obtained a set of wheels with a bike I bought - the wheels were shot - but the tires were very good. The tires are 700C. Well, I have many 27" wheels. I was going to put these tires on a set of 27" wheels. Well, they don't fit. Not even close. Actually, I compared the wheels those tire came off with another set of 27" wheels. Side-by-side - the axles don't even line-up. The 27" is obviously taller.
What size tires do I need to get for my regular 27" wheels?
What size rim will fit those 700C tires I have?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Tire question posted by Oscar on 11/12/2002 at 5:26:00 AM
Twenty-sevens and seven-hundreds are different tires entirely. 700C tires come in many widths and the width of the rim dictates the width of the tire you can use. I've used tires as skinny as 25mm on hybrid rims that usually take 38mm. If you have skinnier road rims, you can go from 23 to 28mm wide.

27" tires commonly come in 1 1/4" widths. You can use tires as skinny as 1" on most rims, and 7/8" on some rims.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Tire question posted by Warren on 11/12/2002 at 1:29:05 PM
Bead size is what counts. 622mm for 700c and 630mm for 27".

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Tire question posted by Steve on 11/12/2002 at 5:04:59 PM
Take a look at http://tandem-fahren.de/Technik/Reifentips/REIFEN.HTM to see what tire sizes fit a particular rim. Unfortunately, this excellent site is in German, but you can see the table near the beginning. The columns labeled 18 to 57 are tire widths, and the rows labeled 13-25 are the width, in mm, between the "horns" of the clincher rim. Strictly speaking, this applies only to modern, hook-bead rims. Older rims predate the ISO standards (formerly ETRTO), so they don't apply; however, you probably can use this as a general guide. Also, some rims have an ISO standard width that is a little different from the width between the horns. For example, the Mavic Open Pro is 622x15, but its inside width is somewhat narrower than 15 mm. The ISO size simply means that the rim is specified to work with tire sizes specified for a 15 mm width, which is 700-23 to 700-32.

As for your 27" rims--27" tires are getting harder and harder to find in stores, although many such tires are still made. Best bet is one of the mail-order houses like Nashbar or Performance.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Tire question posted by Keith on 11/12/2002 at 6:38:51 PM
First, go read the blurb at bicycleclassics.com about why skinnier tires aren't necessarily faster, as well as some of Grant Petersen's rantings on the same subject that might be at rivendellbicycles.com. I'm a convert, and generally ride 700 x 25s or bigger now. I fully agree that good tires for 27" wheels are less available, and that if you have the chance to upgrade your wheels to 700c, provided your brakes will reach, by all means do it for the vastly better variety and quality of tires you can get on 700. Nonetheless, here are 3 available 27" tires that are excellent: (1) Continental Gatorskin -- tough, round, high pressure, but reasonably light and flexible for 27"; (2) Panracer Pasela -- also tough, fairly high thread count, lower max pressure than Gatorskin, but also reasonably light and flexible, for a 27" AND inexpensive; (3) IRC Road Winner -- not as nice as the Gatorskins or Paselas, but most good LBSs will have them. I think all 3 models are available from bikenashbar.com. That being said, none of these tires will perform as well as a top-end 700c or tubular. One last thing -- be careful if your older 27" rims lack bead hooks -- don't inflate them to the limit, and don't go above 100psi in any case -- you may blow it off the rim, something that can happen while you're riding down a hill at 45+. So just don't do it, okay?

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Tire question posted by Ken on 11/12/2002 at 9:57:05 PM
My last year's 27" IRCs from Nashbar were 7.95 apiece, nice and light, but didn't wear real well. This year I bought Continental Sport 1000s at 14.95 and they were well worth the extra seven bucks. When I first mounted them they didn't seem to seat quite round; then I noticed they are rated to 120 psi. By the time I got em up to 100 they were perfect. Keith's right that these are not top-end tires, but you don't get a Cadillac at Ford prices, as my dad used to say. I wonder where the point of diminishing returns is? It is also true that 700s are just a little lighter, being just a bit smaller than 27 inchers, which may affect performance a little. In addition to width, there is now research (did I see it on IHPV?) to indicate that smaller diameters are more efficient. And finally, Capt. Sheldon has all the bead diameters, in English, for every wheel ever thought of.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Tire question posted by Michael on 11/15/2002 at 5:24:52 AM
ARRRGh!!! Tire size problems between 27 and 700c remind me of my intro to the world of lightweights back in the early 80's. Since then I have worked in bikeshops, and took to many a customers bike with the oxy torch to move canti studs on older tourers so they'd accommodate the new fangled european wheels. ANYWAY, the wheel tyre chart we all used was/is the excellent and exhaustive one in Sutherlands. Another reason to lash out the big $$$ for this tome.Or, you could bribe your favourite bike shop into letting you photo copy the relevent pages (or at least look at the sacred book!) BTW I love IRC tyres. IRC Tandems (sorry, 700c only) are some of the best tandem tyres out there... and are damn good commuting/touring tyres to boot. Are they still available? (I now live in China, so such exotica is now a pleasant memory).






AGE / VALUE:    My failed quest for $900.00 derailer sets/ I'm a bad bird dog. posted by: humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 11/12/2002 at 1:33:34 AM
E- bay item #729938368 1958 Derailler set 1 st generation Huret Alvit. Not my auction ,no relation to seller. I wanted to point this out and mention the rubber finger grip covers. I like these, I have been collecting these covers, all sorts, when I see them. AAAAIIIEEEHHH, I HAVE FAILED AT THIS AGAIN!
I am going to hold this picture up in front of myself like they do with the dogs before they go tracking whatever the guys are looking for.
Then I am going to say to myself "Now you go find it boy, atta boy! Go get those early Alvits! Running about into old shops and digging and sniffing and haggling and bring it home.
What do I find?
My master isn't going to be too happy with me!
All I have is a glass jar filled with these cream colored rubber finger leaver covers. Yup! I have em!
Finger leaver covers?
Perhaps two of the front derailers. That's it.
With all my hunting, all the looking, all the other far less valuable Huret Alvit type stuff, all those boxes upon boxes of Huret stuff I already have, and this is the best I can do?
I hang my head in shame and my tail is drooping between my legs. They'd be asking "What kind of bird dog are you anyways?"
"They told me you were experienced!"
I am! the stuff is not to be found, I need a new hunting ground!
Rare? You ain't kidding mister!
900 some dollars for one set of super rare, early Huret Alvit derailer?
Oh, my head!
E- bay is great because I see what exact model these covers went on! Then it hits me.... I don't have these type anyplace in my stash o goodies. Everybody who has these in their collection can laugh at me!
I'll keep looking!


   RE: Early Huret posted by Eric Amlie on 11/12/2002 at 3:51:24 AM
I think I feel even worse than you do. I am into the pre '67 Schwinn "lightweights". These are the derailleurs that the '61-'63 bikes use. I need a few of those front derailleurs for my bikes. Every time one comes up on ebay (which is rarely) the Japanese buyers bid it up to roughly our national debt. Sigh....






FOR SALE:   Smalll Blue Lugged Bianchi road bike posted by: Trevor on 11/11/2002 at 11:25:43 PM
If anyone is interested in this very small 50cm at the biggest, lemme know and Ill sell it to you. It includes a fork and headset.







AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn World Sport posted by: Kelly Mishak on 11/11/2002 at 3:58:16 PM
I have recently purchased a Schwinn World Tour road bike. This bike only weighs 20 lbs. and it looks to be all factory. I have been looking for information, history and a owners manual on this model bike for some time. I have not been able to find anything. As per one resource information in regards to serial numbers, this bike is an oddity as the serial numbers,(GA917690) are located under the bottom of the frame under the pedal crank housing? Also I have read that the World Sport was only offered in Blue or Red. My World Sport is Black. I would like to know what year this bike was produced and purchase a owners manual for it. I am VERY new to the sport, and really enjoy this bike. Here is a list of the components currently on the bike. Are they production for this bike?
Suntour 3040 Accushift rear derailleur
Suntour front derailleur
JoyTech front and rear open/close axles
Sugino MP 110 crank assembly
Cro Moly 4130 Frame w/ Double Butted Maintubes
Araya Rims with Joytech hubs
Champion aluminum handle bars
Star break controls
If any one can be of help or point in the right direction it would be greatly appreciated. I can be contacted at the following e-mail addresses.
kcmishak@rconnect.com or
kelly.mishak@trimarkcorp.com


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn World Sport posted by Darryl on 11/11/2002 at 9:53:30 PM
Is bike 10, 12, or 14 speed? Are brake levers areo or non-areo? 20 lbs. is pretty light for a bike equipped as you state. Should be more like 25-26 lbs. I have a 1983 Schwinn catalog but it does not list "World Tour" model.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn World Sport posted by Kevin K on 11/12/2002 at 2:03:48 AM
Hi.I like Schwinn bikes alot however I have to agree with Darryl. I doubt the weight of the bike is 20lbs. Collectors,including myself, would be snapping them up. 20lbs is Paramount territory. Track bikes too. The bike is a great everyday rider as the double butted tubing is nice. What matters the most Kelly is that YOU like the bike. To me that is all that matters. Collect and ride what you like and can afford. And keep if affordable. You state you are new to the hobby as most of us once were. A few years ago I was bringing home every dead dog bike I could. No longer. Eventually you will find your niche. Mine happens to be Schwinn Letours, Voyageurs and Super Sports. Some are basic bikes not near the quality of the double butted 4130 your bike has while others are of very good quality. So just enjoy the hobby and bikes. It's your life and time. Kevin K

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn World Sport posted by Will on 11/12/2002 at 2:12:22 AM
I have acquired a scwhinn bike about a year ago. When I brought it home I wanted to find out what make it was and year...I wrote in this discussion form and was pointed to this web site, I have found it useful. Anyway I hope you do too...
http://www.geocities.com/sldatabook/contents.html

   RE:AGE / VALUE: Schwinn World Sport posted by Richard J on 11/12/2002 at 6:30:53 AM
HI, Kelly. World Tour is a new one to me. My World Sport has the 4130 main tubes, and is an excellent everyday rider, as Kevin observed. It was built by Giant in 1984, according to the 4-digit code stamped upon the headbadge. The last digit indicates the year; you deduce the decade (74 or 84 in the case of my bike, for example) from the bike's details. I believe this dating system works for Japanese, Taiwanese and some of the Greenville Schwinns. Hope you enjoy yours as much as I do mine.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Schwinn World Sport posted by Ken on 11/12/2002 at 10:04:55 PM
Take a look at the Schwinn Lightweight Data Book
http://www.geocities.com/sldatabook/models7579.html
it shows the World Sport (not world tour) as a new model in 79. Black must be a subsequent year.






AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn World Sport posted by: Kelly Mishak on 11/11/2002 at 3:58:16 PM
I have recently purchased a Schwinn World Tour road bike. This bike only weighs 20 lbs. and it looks to be all factory. I have been looking for information, history and a owners manual on this model bike for some time. I have not been able to find anything. As per one resource information in regards to serial numbers, this bike is an oddity as the serial numbers,(GA917690) are located under the bottom of the frame under the pedal crank housing? Also I have read that the World Sport was only offered in Blue or Red. My World Sport is Black. I would like to know what year this bike was produced and purchase a owners manual for it. I am VERY new to the sport, and really enjoy this bike. Here is a list of the components currently on the bike. Are they production for this bike?
Suntour 3040 Accushift rear derailleur
Suntour front derailleur
JoyTech front and rear open/close axles
Sugino MP 110 crank assembly
Cro Moly 4130 Frame w/ Double Butted Maintubes
Araya Rims with Joytech hubs
Champion aluminum handle bars
Star break controls
If any one can be of help or point in the right direction it would be greatly appreciated. I can be contacted at the following e-mail addresses.
kcmishak@rconnect.com or
kelly.mishak@trimarkcorp.com







AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn World Sport posted by: Kelly Mishak on 11/11/2002 at 3:58:16 PM
I have recently purchased a Schwinn World Tour road bike. This bike only weighs 20 lbs. and it looks to be all factory. I have been looking for information, history and a owners manual on this model bike for some time. I have not been able to find anything. As per one resource information in regards to serial numbers, this bike is an oddity as the serial numbers,(GA917690) are located under the bottom of the frame under the pedal crank housing? Also I have read that the World Sport was only offered in Blue or Red. My World Sport is Black. I would like to know what year this bike was produced and purchase a owners manual for it. I am VERY new to the sport, and really enjoy this bike. Here is a list of the components currently on the bike. Are they production for this bike?
Suntour 3040 Accushift rear derailleur
Suntour front derailleur
JoyTech front and rear open/close axles
Sugino MP 110 crank assembly
Cro Moly 4130 Frame w/ Double Butted Maintubes
Araya Rims with Joytech hubs
Champion aluminum handle bars
Star break controls
If any one can be of help or point in the right direction it would be greatly appreciated. I can be contacted at the following e-mail addresses.
kcmishak@rconnect.com or
kelly.mishak@trimarkcorp.com







MISC:   Motorists and Cyclists posted by: Gralyn on 11/10/2002 at 11:42:58 PM
A bit of irony here:
Yesterday, my kids were going to see the new Santa Clause movie starring Tim Allen. I didn't really care to see it - So I said I would take my bike....and while my wife and kids were watching the movie - I would ride my bike around town. As it turned out - the movie was sold out - but since I really wanted to ride (it was a nice day) I said I would just ride my bike home - they could go ahead - and I would be home later. So, I rode around town a while - then headed home.
Along the way - many motorists passed me. None of them getting too close. Even when cars were approaching from the other lane - the cars that passed didn't get too close. As I came down the highway....almost home....about a mile or so from home...one van passed me.....and it startled me!...it was really close....I mean really close...too close. I could have moved 2 inches to the left - and I would have been hit. I the van looked a lot like my van. Then I thought....yes, it must have been my wife....she just got really close ...kinda for a joke or something. But maybe not.
Then, I get home....they are getting out of the van. The kids said they saw me....she didn't. She said she never saw me. Of all the cars that passed me that day....everyone of them saw me and responded appropriately. She was the only drive who didn't even see me. She could have run right over me. Drivers like that really scare me. Knowing there are people driving down the road who would not even see a cyclist. How can you miss it?
Well, of course, I scolded her quite a bit - on behalf of all cyclists!
(but then again....maybe she did see me...and she's just trying to get rid of me....after all....I am worth more dead that alive right now - with my life insurance policy....but then - what insurance company is going to believe that a wife runs down her husband purely accidentally?)


   RE:MISC:   Motorists and Cyclists posted by Will on 11/11/2002 at 12:52:23 AM
Good story! I know how it is...atleast most of the people that passed you weren't jerks. :)

   RE:RE:MISC:   Motorists and Cyclists posted by Wings on 11/11/2002 at 1:24:03 AM
Just to be safe I would treat her to a movie everytime you go for a bike ride! Make sure she gets in the theater!! Also if you live in California, please tell me what city you are in and the color of her van.
Wings

   Motorists and Cyclists posted by John E on 11/11/2002 at 8:46:36 PM
A cautionary tale, to be sure! Being invisible to motorists is the scariest aspect of cycling on the road or walking across a street. I have read elsewhere that motorists are conditioned to ignore vertical objects, since most of them (e.g. lightposts and trees) tend to be stationary and therefore nonthreatening.


--- "I didn't see him" is a confession, not an excuse!

   RE:MISC:   Motorists and Cyclists posted by Oscar on 11/12/2002 at 12:37:22 AM
At any rate, that's one reason not to flip off offending motorists.

   RE:MISC:   Motorists and Cyclists posted by sam on 11/12/2002 at 2:34:39 AM
John E is right,I've read a lot of stuff on (motor)cycle safty and the main reason for accendents is the mind did not "see" the cyclest.We need to do more to educate the public.

   RE:MISC:   Motorists and Cyclists posted by Rob on 11/12/2002 at 6:24:20 AM
That's an interesting story! The fact it is someone you know supports my theory that the vast majority of these incidents are simply inattention on the part of the driver, nothing personal and not intentional. (Cyclists usually are quite aware in heavy traffic...we're quite vulnerable. Of course we sometimes make stupid moves too...) Sometimes when I get a bit nervous about the traffic behind, particularly when the escape routes are limited, I kind of wobble my bike a bit...an attention getting gambit...

I've had drivers proceed into an intersection while looking at me as I pass in front of them, then suddenly slam on their brakes...they may have been looking at me but they didn't 'see' me...

   RE:MISC:   Motorists and Cyclists posted by Keith on 11/12/2002 at 6:50:09 PM
It's true, they really don't see us. I go to great lengths to be seen when I ride home from work, as I find drivers are less attentive and more aggressive than ever during their own commute home. Watch out for cellphone users!!!!!!!!!!!! Anyway, I use a 15w Vista whenever I come to an intersection, even during the day, and I have a large international orange slow-moving-vehicle (no jokes, please) triangle with reflative edges on the back attached to my Caraddice saddlebag. If it's near dust, I add a safety vest, and two rear lights. In the winter, I get my gloves in the hunting section of department stores -- cheap ($1-$2) and bright international orange. Last week I added an LED flashlight to my helmet -- I plan to shine it right into their windshield at intersections -- not to blind them, but to get their attention. I look like an absolute dork with all this stuff -- not the picture of some spiffy washed up racer or wannabe. Still, I'm a LIVE dork!






AGE / VALUE:   Delromi? posted by: kevin on 11/10/2002 at 11:19:50 PM
Has anyone ever heard of this brand.. Delromi? Supposed to be French or Belgium. Any info is appreciated.

Thanks.


   Well what do you know? posted by Walter on 11/10/2002 at 11:43:55 PM
I found 1 NOS not quite a year ago and posted a thread on it. Maybe an archive search might find it. I'll recap here anyways.

It's a Belgian 70's Boom special. Not anyhing special at all. Heavy frame and cottered crank. Simplex plastic derailleurs and d/t shifters. Altenberger centerpull brakes. Stood out a little bit b/c it had alloy rims and QR skewers front and back. Nasty plastic copy of the Cinelli Unicantor saddle. All components were Euro including the tires though I swirtched a few out. I bought it for my father in law. Put on a cotterless crank from a Fuji my wife has had for a long time and was surprised to find English threading. That and a cushy sprung saddle (he's a non-rider and unlikely to wear bike shorts) and my fr. in law has a bike to ride if he chooses to do so. Unless yours is a higher line I don't think they have much real value outside of a project such as mine.

BTW I saw a picture of a very lowline "Eddy Merckx" that looked alot like that Delromi. Possible since Delromi was (is?) a Belgian company. That bike was no better though with the Merckx badge and Molteni colors it might be of some interest to someone who wanted a comprehensive Merckx collection.