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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







AGE / VALUE:   Stainless steel spoke test? What is it? posted by: humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 12/14/2002 at 7:50:20 PM
How does one determine the difference from Stainless steel spokes vs. regular (chrome plated?) spokes?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Stainless steel spoke test? What is it? posted by David on 12/14/2002 at 10:25:47 PM
Stainless is much less affected by magnets than ordinary steel. Compare the effect of a magnet on a stainless spoon and a wrench.






MISC:   Tange Infinity posted by: Greg on 12/14/2002 at 4:23:17 AM
Can someone help me? I have an old bike (Performance).Late 80's early 90's maybe. Tube matl says Tange Infinity. Not 1,2, or 3. Double butted, tapered. Is this frame worth refurbishing? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks Greg







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Colnago information posted by: DeanJ on 12/13/2002 at 1:50:25 PM
G'day Guys, I was wondering if there is a web site around that has some info about the colnago super of early ninetie/late eighties,I have searched the web sites as I am looking at identifying mine from a serial number.
Thanks
Dean


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Colnago information posted by Warren on 12/13/2002 at 8:19:45 PM
It may be easier to contact Colnago. I'm not sure vintage bicycle "enthusiasts" have embraced the nineties quite yet so it may be awhile until you see data on these years. Even the eighties are a little iffy...

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Colnago information posted by Rob on 12/13/2002 at 11:43:44 PM
I would agree with Warren...for this site it seems you have to talk the very early '80's and back...I have several '80's to about 1990, road bikes which I guess aren't really vintage but sort of seem close. One is a 1985 Nishiki Royal, very nice ride; nice but basic SunTour components, smooth operation...I use it as my dirty weather bike...so I guess I don't care too much about it. Another is about a 1990 Gardin...a very nice Canadian bike, some aero features , a classic little road bike, very nice ride, but I guess it still isn't really vintage...I only ride during nice weather. Maybe in ten years or so it'll be a classic. The other is, I would guess, a mid-'80's aluminum Cannondale. It's rather beat up and actually too big for me...I never ride it, but it seems so interesting I don't want to get rid of it...






MISC:   Replacing batteries in computer posted by: Edward in Vancouver on 12/13/2002 at 12:37:56 AM
Anyone know of any tricks to replace the batteries in a Cateye computer without losing any data? I've heard if you stick the computer in the freezer for an hour or so it puts the computer to "sleep", but haven't tried it. Any suggetions?
Although I visit a lot in the "English Roadsters" discussion group, I have a road bike too. It's a Pinarello Gavia, bought in Singapore in '95 with all Dura-ace,(albeit the 8spd gruppo) even the stem and seat post. However it's down in the laundry room now, on the rollers, safe from Vancouver's persistant winter rain.


   RE:MISC:   Replacing batteries in computer posted by David on 12/13/2002 at 3:26:11 AM
The instructions for a Cateye model CC-7000 just tell you how to get the battery out and back in. The next page describes how you set the wheel size [since the computer has now forgotten!] It also sez you shouldn't use the "clear all" function unless you've changed the battery - I guess because it won't matter. In any case, putting the thing in the freezer before you change the battery won't make it any worse. Be quick about the battery change. Let us know if it works.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Replacing batteries in computer posted by Ken on 12/13/2002 at 9:40:18 PM
Being able to reenter your data is a recent feature. I await the results of your experiment, but write your data down first and don't get your hopes up.

   RE:MISC:   Replacing batteries in computer posted by Wings on 12/15/2002 at 8:21:21 AM
You are going to lose your data. Record it and then make the battery change!

   RE:MISC:   Replacing batteries in computer posted by Ray on 12/16/2002 at 4:15:52 PM
Since freezing electronic circuits only makes them more efficient, you computer will lose its data just a micro second faster. You will however run the risk of damaging the LCD display. Overall I would not recommend the freezer method. As the last posting says record it and move on.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh SC tubing Q posted by: David on 12/12/2002 at 5:06:12 PM
There's a "mid-70s" Super Course for sale. The seller stated that it was all-original (1st owner) w/Japanese components and 531 DB frame and fork. I asked specifically what was on the tubing label and he replied that it sez "Reynolds 531 Aluminum." Does this make sense to anyone?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh SC tubing Q posted by Eric Amlie on 12/12/2002 at 5:48:47 PM
I think your seller is seeing things (aluminum) 531 refers to the alloy ratio of the metals in the manganese-moly steel that the frame tubing is made from. I always thought the Super Courses were also straight gauge (not double butted) 531. I might be wrong on this, but I don't think any aluminum frame bikes were being built in the seventies

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh SC tubing Q posted by Rob on 12/12/2002 at 6:10:23 PM
This discussion seems to come up from time to time...my understanding is basically the same as Eric's. The main tubes are straight gauge. I don't think the seat and chain stays, or the forks are...??? The metal composition is a steel alloy (manganese) and was, as I understand, originally developed in the mid 1930's for aircraft use...531 tubing and a few others (Columbus and I forget the name of the French company...Vitus???) were the high end standard for bicycle tubing.

Maybe John E. and Steven want to wade in and give us some insight...maybe there's a definiive online source we can all use as a reference.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh SC tubing Q posted by David on 12/12/2002 at 6:41:45 PM
I didn't expect anyone to say that the "531" trademark was ever used to refer to aluminum tubing. (Maybe this guy can't get the Reynolds Aluminum Company association out of his head.) I've asked this seller some even more specific questions. Maybe it will make sense yet. Thanks to all.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh SC tubing Q posted by Steven on 12/12/2002 at 11:23:20 PM
Reynolds uses a manganese molybdenum steel alloy, whereas Columbus and Vitus used mainly chro-moly steel alloy. To the best of my knowledge, none of these made any aluminum tubing prior to Vitus glued frames of the late 70's-80's. The 531 name also relates to the exact alloy component mix and therefore cannot possibly have been used for more than one single alloy. There were however different 'versions' of 531. These versions took into account the thickness of the tubing, the butting (or absence thereof) and perhaps other variables. The fellow stating that the frame decal says Reynolds 531 aluminum is most definitely mistaken, especially as any Brit would call it aluminium with the added 'i'.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh SC tubing Q posted by Oscar on 12/12/2002 at 11:35:19 PM
I think some people think Reynold's Aluminum when they read Reynolds 531. Like Reynold's Wrap for the chicken salad sandwich or something.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh SC tubing Q posted by David on 12/13/2002 at 3:16:21 AM
Well, he finally actually READ the label and it says, of course, that the frame tubes are 531 and nothing about butted tubes, forks, or stays. Why won't they bother to read the damn labels before writing their ebay descriptions?

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh SC tubing Q posted by Rob on 12/13/2002 at 6:18:10 PM
Well, I glad to hear that is all cleared up...it seems with just about everything in life these days, it's "caveat emptor"... It would be nice to know if there is a definitive source somewhere for this info. The Reynolds website

www.reynolds-cycle.com/internet/english/tech/tech.htm)

has quite a good discussion on their tubing but they, of course, don't relate it to specific bicycle models. I have a couple of early '70's Super Courses, one of which I ride regularly in nice weather...it really is a nice ride...






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Mystery Columbus/Colnago posted by: Dean Jorritsma on 12/12/2002 at 1:58:09 PM
G'day guys, in my ever constant search for cheap colnagos, I found today what the young guy thought was a colnago{it had stickers, but thats all}, but what it did have is very interesting and I was wondering if anyone would be able to help identify it,was circa 1980's with a columbus bird stamped into the fork crowns and, columbus dropouts, the gear was shimano 600 after EX, and no marks in the brackets at all, any idea??. also there was hanging in his garage a Mercian bike that I mean to look at aswell.







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   '64 Varsity posted by: Dave on 12/11/2002 at 9:02:24 PM
Just thought I'd tell you about the 64 Varsity I won on EBAY last week.It was built in March and has Suntour Honor Rear Derailler and Sprint Front. Der.,w/a Cromoly Fork! It is a 22" frame and to get more Standover height I put Alloy QR 700C wheels on it. It weighs about 28lbs.,lightest Varsity I' ve ever had.Since the couple I bought the bike from live in the Western suburbs, they were nice enough to give me a Schwinn ladies frame for my wife for free!All for $30.86.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   '64 Varsity posted by Kevin K on 12/13/2002 at 12:51:00 AM
Hi Dave. Getting rid of that Varsity fork and installing almost anything else will make a big difference in how a Varsity rides. I do like the older Varsity bikes with the shifters on the down tube. Nice, with 700's. Cool. You didn't mention the color though. What is it? Kevin K

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   '64 Varsity posted by Dave on 12/17/2002 at 7:07:50 PM
The Varsity is Copper-colored(Tan).I also put a Brooks B17 saddle on it and plan to use it as a commuter bike.






MISC:   Rev up the discussion on Delrin Simplex derailleurs posted by: Ray on 12/11/2002 at 8:57:17 PM
Not long ago there were the usual remarks about the plastic delrin Simplex derailleurs and their prone to failure. A question was asked if anyone else did plastic derailleurs. Here is the answer. Not that there is anything wrong with it...
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=744501872&category=420


   RE:MISC:   Rev up the discussion on Delrin Simplex derailleurs posted by Steven on 12/11/2002 at 11:46:59 PM
The Ofmega modelis not made out of delrin. It is made out of Rilsan and is very durable. I have two of these, one that was the original derailleur mounted on a bike that is now 20 years old. It continues to work as well as the day it was brand new. You cannot compare the Ofmega to the Simplex. They are very different in quality and durability. (PS: both of mine are black, not the pink shown in the ebay auction)






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Condor Baracchi posted by: John on 12/11/2002 at 6:54:22 PM
Hello, tried this before, but didn't get much response. Trying to find out what I can about the "mojo," cache, and value of a Condor Barracchi I recently received. Its a 1973 silver w/red block paint job in good condition with all decals entirely intact, frame is Reynolds 531 DB, lugless frame (rare for the time?). The bike is equipped as follows with all componentry in excellent working condition and was all new when the frame was purchased in 1973:

Brakes - Dia-Compe Gran Compe (Black)
R. Deral. - Campy NR (no front Deral, used as tt bike).
Crank - Stronglight w/anodized 52 tooth chainring
Pedals - Campy Superleg with anodized cages.
Stem/Handlebars - Both Cinelli
Shifter - Campy Bar end
Hubs - Phil Wood small flange, single cross 28 hole front, double cross 32 hole rear (sew-ups).
Bottome Bracket - Phil Wood.

The bike was used by my father as a time trial bike and raced from approximately 1974-1978 and very well maintained. He bought the frame and equipped it himself. After racing it was garaged. As a result the bike is in superb condition and for the most part needed just cleaning. Replace all the cables and plastic/rubber with vintage replacement parts. It is a very responsive lightweight bike (sub 20 lbs), a real dream to ride. I've written Condor and they still make a baracchi, but its now made of Reynolds 853. They did send me some vintage decals from the 70's so If I ever want it refinished, I have those. If anyone knows anything about this bike, I would appreciate hearing. Thanks




   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Condor Baracchi posted by Gralyn on 12/13/2002 at 2:30:39 PM
I see that you say you have posted about this before - and didn't get any information. I see also, that there has been no response. My guess is that nobody knows anything about this particular bike. I certainly don't. Also, I have posted asking information about specific bikes - and got no response. Sometimes it's that nobody knows anything about it...and sometimes it's probably that a particular bike may not be of interest to certain people - and maybe they know some about it - but they're just not really interested.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Condor Baracchi posted by Keith on 12/13/2002 at 6:10:48 PM
Here's a bit on Condor: http://www.classicrendezvous.com/British/Condor_main.htm As for mojo, it's completely up in the air. Italian steel is the darling child of the majoroity of collectors. British iron has a smaller but equally dedicated following. To many Italophiles, the Condor may just be another nice bike. To Anglophiles, it's a gem. A lot of this is of course due to the fact that Merckx rode bikes made by the big three: Colnago, DeRosa and Masi, and few British names were really huge in the 70s. It's a separate set of traditions -- Italians and the peloton, Brits and their unique brand of "club" cycling (time trials). You choose

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Condor Baracchi posted by Keith on 12/13/2002 at 6:11:15 PM
Here's a bit on Condor: http://www.classicrendezvous.com/British/Condor_main.htm As for mojo, it's completely up in the air. Italian steel is the darling child of the majoroity of collectors. British iron has a smaller but equally dedicated following. To many Italophiles, the Condor may just be another nice bike. To Anglophiles, it's a gem. A lot of this is of course due to the fact that Merckx rode bikes made by the big three: Colnago, DeRosa and Masi, and few British names were really huge in the 70s. It's a separate set of traditions -- Italians and the peloton, Brits and their unique brand of "club" cycling (time trials). You choose

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Condor Baracchi posted by Keith on 12/13/2002 at 7:09:03 PM
Sorry . . . which is best. I think for a time the British lagged behind the more prominent Italian names in prodicing stiff road bikes with aggressive geometry, as the Brits would put fender eyelets and long enough chainstays to allow clearence for mudguards on just about everything. But the truth is by the early 70s you could get a Jackson or a Witcomb, or even a Raleigh Pro that could go toe-to-toe with anything else being made at the time. And keep that grain of salt handy -- those who profess an extreme sensitivity to esoteric ride characteristics may be seeing the Emperor's new clothes.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Condor Baracchi posted by John on 12/13/2002 at 9:30:36 PM
Thanks for your input. Was trying to find out what I could. Its certainly true that English bikes are more known for touring. However, this bike and its new namesake (condor Barracchi) have fairly aggresive geometry. A gentlemman named Bill Hurlow was the framebuilder at the time it was built and he apparently had a very good reputation and was very innovative. I know this frame was chosen over Masi, Colagno, etc, by my father becasue it was lighter than these frames. It wasn't cheaper when it was new, but obvioulsy worth less now, but is a very nice ride and is a beautiful lightweight bike (sub 90's pounds) and most inportantly, it was my fathers. Thanks for you input.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Condor Baracchi posted by John on 12/13/2002 at 9:33:48 PM
Oops, that was sub 20 pounds with single cross front wheel and sew-ups, no front deraullier, etc.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Condor Baracchi posted by nickz on 12/14/2002 at 2:21:54 PM
There is a section in The Custom Bicycle regarding Condor.It specifically mentions the Barrachi model as being lugless & uses a fully sloping Cinelli fork crown.The owner/builder at the time of your father's bike was probably Monty Young.For me this bike has no 'mojo'.For you it has major 'MOJO'!!!! Contact me & I will forward a copy of the article.






WANTED:   Sprint front deraileur 60's model posted by: M. on 12/11/2002 at 12:21:58 AM
I am continuing my search for a 1964-69 Sprint front deraileur. These would have been on the Varsities, Continentals and Super Sports of the late '60's Check those old lightweights that are parts bikes and let me know what you've got - thanks guys, M.


   RE:WANTED:   Sprint front deraileur 60's model posted by Eric Amlie on 12/11/2002 at 1:55:47 PM
M., the chrome moly tubing used for the frame of the Super Sport has a larger diameter than the steel frames of the Varsity and Continental. The clamp for the derailleur for these is also bigger as required. The Super Sport derailleur will not clamp securely to your Continental frame with out quite a bit of shimming. You need the derailleur from a Varsinental unless you can mix and match parts.

   RE:RE:WANTED:   Sprint front deraileur 60's model posted by Kevin K on 12/11/2002 at 6:09:35 PM
Hi M. Memory Lane has a swap meet each spring / fall. Those Sprint derailleurs are easy to find at the meet. Most are rough, but once in a while a nice one does show up. Very expensive though. Same on the rear. If you need it now I quess watch ebay. If you still need it this spring let me know. Kevin K

   RE:RE:WANTED:   Sprint front deraileur 60's model posted by Kevin K on 12/11/2002 at 6:16:47 PM
Hi M. Memory Lane has a swap meet each spring / fall. Those Sprint derailleurs are easy to find at the meet. Most are rough, but once in a while a nice one does show up. Very expensive though. Same on the rear. If you need it now I quess watch ebay. If you still need it this spring let me know. Kevin K

   RE:RE:WANTED:   Sprint front deraileur 60's model posted by M. on 12/13/2002 at 4:27:15 AM
Hey Eric and Kevin - Eric you are correct about the diameter of the tubing and thus a different size Sprint der for the Super Sport - Kevin yes indeed - Spring seems a long time away - I'll be checking the Ebay items and also the garage sales - My '67 Super Sport has the Sprint front der as does my '64 Varsity although they are indeed different sized tube clamps - I guess I'm getting a little greedy this Christmas but want to improve on the very rusty one I have now on my otherwise sharp '67 Radiant Coppertone Continental - I have all of the rear Sprint deraileurs I need - but the front ones are a tough find (in good condition)they were only used a few years? The rear one on my '64 has thick metal smooth rollers instead of the later cheaper plastic compounds found on the Fastbacks and other bikes - man it is a solid deraileur the chrome is also very good - I've seen the Sprint deraileurs with a gold emblem, a red emblem and a black colored emblem - thanks guys






AGE / VALUE:   EARLY SCHWINN CONTINENTAL SERIAL NUMBER posted by: Kevin K on 12/10/2002 at 3:27:14 PM
Hi. Can someone out there I.D. the year of the Schwinn Continental serial number for me please. # is D19698 stamped on the bottom bracket housing. Bike has a 3 piece cottered crankset. Any help is great. Thanks, Kevin


   RE:  EARLY SCHWINN CONTINENTAL SERIAL NUMBER posted by Eric Amlie on 12/10/2002 at 5:40:48 PM
Hi Kevin, check out http://www.angelfire.com/rant/allday101/SchwinnCodes2.html

It looks like your bike is probably 1947 or early 1948. Looks like your number is before the known numbers (previous were lost in a fire), but 1948 starts with D and transitions to E. '49 is F, '50 is G etc.

   RE:RE:  EARLY SCHWINN CONTINENTAL SERIAL NUMBER posted by Kevin K on 12/10/2002 at 11:42:43 PM
Hi Eric. Cool site. Now all I need is pics of original or restored 40's Continentals, decals, paint, wheels................... it never ends. Thanks, Kevin K






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   70s Colnago posted by: gotham on 12/9/2002 at 12:46:09 AM
I have a Colnago frame from the early 70s with components from the late 80s. Where would I sell this? Ebay? Anyway I can find out exactly what it is and how old it is?







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   70s Colnago posted by: gotham on 12/9/2002 at 12:46:09 AM
I have a Colnago frame from the early 70s with components from the late 80s. Where would I sell this? Ebay? Anyway I can find out exactly what it is and how old it is?







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian (?) Bottom Bracket posted by: Bob H. on 12/8/2002 at 5:53:35 AM
I'm hoping you can help. I'm working on an Atala from the early 70. I have it stripped down to the fixed cup of the bottom bracket, and man, it's a bear. The fixed cup doesn't have flats, only three notches and I don't have a wrench to fit it. I have visited Sheldon Brown's site, and have been trying to use a bolt washers and nuts to turn the cup. The bugger won't budge.

Now, here's where I'm losing confidence. I assume it's an Italian bottom bracket because it's an Italian bike, and the bb is 70mm wide. Because it's (supposedly) Italian, the fixed cup is right threaded, so I'm trying to loosten it from the left. But how can I be certain about the treading and I'm not turing it the wrong way? The thread pitch isn't stamped on the old bb, and I don't know how to count tpi's.

Thanks from a frustrated novice.


   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian (?) Bottom Bracket posted by Warren on 12/8/2002 at 8:18:06 PM
The bottom bracket is longer across the width of the BB shell...not across the diameter of the cups. You can safely assume that the threads are Italian or normal right hand thread. You need the right tool or find an older bike shop that seviced road bikes in the 70's. It's too bad it doesn't have flats.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian (?) Bottom Bracket posted by Bob H. on 12/8/2002 at 10:54:36 PM
David and Warren: You greatly relieve me in that I'm trying to turn the thing the right (left) way. Yes, Warren, the shell is 70mm, and yes, David, I learned from you that the Italian diameter is slightly larger than British. I tried a Brit. lockring on the It adjusting cup and no dice.

Onward for another grunt.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian (?) Bottom Bracket posted by Warren on 12/8/2002 at 11:41:47 PM
You're right about a size difference....it's only 1 mm. Fairly imperceptible without a guage but you might see it. They would have the same thread on the removeable cup. An ISO would likely fit albeit loose

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian (?) Bottom Bracket posted by David on 12/9/2002 at 2:58:36 AM
Try squirting plenty of penetrating oil into the threads from the inside and let the bike sit on its side for a few days so it can seep in. Maybe that'll help. I gather the cup requires a "hook" wrench to turn it. Will a wrench for a typical adjustable cup engage it?

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian (?) Bottom Bracket posted by Keith on 12/9/2002 at 7:57:08 PM
You'll need the correct wrench -- I assume the notches are evenly spaced along the outside edge of the cup. The Park HCW-5 tool may happen to fit -- Nahsbar has it for $13. http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?category=&subcategory=&brand=1198&sku=2671&storetype=&estoreid= Measure the cup and find out if the HCW-5 will fit -- you could even call Park or Nashbar. I agree with David about soaking it with LIquid Wrench from both sides. Tap the cup with a mallet to get the Liquid Wrench to penetrate better. As Bob says, if it's Italian, then the fixed cup is regular, right-hand threads. For a job like this I like to support the tool with an arrangement of bolt with washers to keep the tool from slipping, which could injure you and mar the cup. You may need to fit a piece of pipe over the tool to get enough leverage.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian (?) Bottom Bracket posted by Bob H. on 12/10/2002 at 12:00:48 AM
Gentlemen: Thank you for your efforts. I am surrently bathing the inside of the cup with penetrant and will rig something up to bathe the outside. The hook end wrench for the lockring is larger than what was used for the fixed cup. In other words, I already ruined one spanner on the job.

I'm confident that it will give. I'll be sure to let you know.

      Italian (?) Bottom Bracket posted by John E on 12/10/2002 at 2:36:19 AM
The lockring test is probably the easiest.

Incidentally, the number of threads per inch, 24 is the same on Italian and English, despite the 36 vs 35mm diameter. (If anyone knows how the Italians ended up with an English thread pitch on a metric diameter, please advise. Even Frank Berto doesn't know.)

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian (?) Bottom Bracket posted by Keith on 12/10/2002 at 2:29:26 PM
If you're willing to sacrifice the cup, then you have options, like going at it with a chisel and hammer, sawing it,drilling holes and using a stout spanner, etc. -- yikes. There are old bbs out there to replace it, and I assume you already have one since you're removing this one. If you're willing to put modern cranks on it, the new Campy AC-H sealed bb is available for about $20 -- I've been riding one pretty hard (through rain, mud and snow) for about a year and it's still as smooth as it was when new. But it lacks the required offset for older Campy cranks.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian (?) Bottom Bracket posted by Bob H. on 12/10/2002 at 11:44:17 PM
Keith:

Thanks for the advice. I'm about ready to resort to violence. It's darn hard metal, but I may try to saw some flats on the cup and try to turn it. We're still soaking in the penetrant at the mo.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Italian (?) Bottom Bracket posted by David on 12/8/2002 at 2:45:15 PM
Isn't the Italian BB a larger diameter than ISO? If you have the adjustable cup out, you should be able simply to compare it to an ISO adjustable cup. (Yours or bike shop's) Same thread or not?

   Italian fixed cup removal posted by John E on 12/11/2002 at 5:29:43 PM
Have you tried Sheldon Brown's method of passing a bolt through the cup, threading a nut onto the other side, and then turning the whole affair with a wrench (from the inside with a long socket extension for French and Italian, or from the outside for English and Swiss)?

   RE:Italian fixed cup removal posted by Bob H. on 12/11/2002 at 8:14:10 PM
John - That's the method I'm working on. I've done this before with another Italian bike, and I was amazed by the effort it took to remove the cup. This one is even tougher. It's enjoying a Liquid Wrench bath at the mo, and tonite will be a final test of my brute strength.

   RE:RE:Italian fixed cup removal posted by Bob H. on 12/12/2002 at 11:40:17 PM
Stripped the treads on the bolt if you'd believe it. Back to the hardware store for 9 1/6th.

   RE:RE:RE:Italian fixed cup removal posted by Bob H. on 12/13/2002 at 4:28:44 AM
It's free, thank goodness, and thanks for your advice and support.






WANTED:   Campy Delta V Brake part posted by: MC on 12/6/2002 at 11:53:08 PM
I am looking to find an internal cable pinch bolt for either the front or rear brake. I believe that it is a 7mm screw with a pivoting head. Or, I would be interested in buying a trashed Campy Delta V Brake for the needed part. Please let me know if you have one or access to one. Thanks.