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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







AGE / VALUE:   E- BAY ITEM #1072588047 posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 2/14/2002 at 7:19:39 PM
(This is for one pair) N.O.S. Michelin 700 X 28 tires Made in France
not my auction, no relation to seller, Another surprise, at least to me.
Are these tires still being made? How old are they?


   Michelin posted by John E on 2/14/2002 at 8:59:42 PM
Michelin is still very much in the bicycle tyre business:

http://cycleus.webmichelin.com/

They have discontinued 27" tyres, but still make 700Cs in various widths. I have always been satisfied with Michelin car and bike tyres.

   RE:Michelin, much love for Mr. Bib! posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 2/15/2002 at 12:55:46 AM
The best tires in the world. I use nothing but on the car.

   RE:RE:Michelin, much love for Mr. Bib! posted by Oscar on 2/15/2002 at 4:45:26 AM
Yokohama man, myself.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   E- BAY ITEM #1072588047 posted by Keith on 2/15/2002 at 6:34:35 PM
Why do you have a car???!!!

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   E- BAY ITEM #1072588047 posted by ken on 2/15/2002 at 6:56:12 PM
To carry home bike parts, obviously...:)






AGE / VALUE:   What do I have? posted by: mike on 2/14/2002 at 6:23:30 PM
Good Afternoon:

I was wondering if you could help shed some light on what I have (see picture!). I found it at a garage sale. The bike is a 3-seater, 3 speed, 16" tires, rear coaster brake, and front drum brake. It has the name Graziella on it but I think it was made by Carnielli. It looks like it was built in the late 60's or early 70's. Can't find anything about it on the internet.

Any guesses??? Thanks in advance for your help.
I have a picture but it won't paste here.....





   RE:AGE / VALUE:   What do I have? posted by Steven on 2/15/2002 at 3:01:48 AM
They were built in Italy and were indeed very popular in the 60's and 70's. They are still a dime a dozen in Italy. They usually were folding bikes with a cam locking device. It seemed to be the ideal solution for getting around in the crowded cities. They are neither great bikes or terribly collectable. Sorry.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:    posted by: Dan on 2/14/2002 at 4:41:15 PM
I have a nice single speed 1969 (?) Triumph ladies bicycle I bought today in very good condition, a beautiful blue color and nice chrome. Are there collector's for this brand or is there a low desire for them among collector's ? Would it be catagorized as a Vintage Lightweight or what? Two Triumphs on Ebay have not been bid on and it's near closing time. The Ebay items are priced in the $50-60 dollar range opening bid, is the bid to high or are the buyer's not there for now. Just wondering as a new collector would !


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:    posted by Keith on 2/15/2002 at 6:40:26 PM
I bought a nice men's one-speed 1969 Dunelt at a garage sale for $10. Same bike. Triumph was another Raleigh Industries brand. Nice utilitarian bike, but nothing collectable. The British Roadster group represents folks who collect older Brit 3-speeds. To be collectable, they really need to be pre-1970, AND have features like rod brakes, enclosed chaincase, and dynohubs. Ladies models are less desirable.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:    posted by Dan on 2/16/2002 at 3:36:46 AM
I paid $10 for this 1969 Triumph, it is a very clean and original down to the tires, so I gave it to my wife for Valentine's Day. She really liked it but complained that everytime I come home with a new bicycle I tell her that I bought it for her, and maybe I'm collecting to many bike's. I tell her that I'm not the problem here and that she's the one with to many bicycle's. Dan






FOR SALE:   Raleigh Super Course posted by: Jim on 2/14/2002 at 3:28:00 PM
Selling my Supercourse - on ebay Item # 1073250845 Yes, I feel some shame for both this post and for selling it in the first place....Jim


     Raleigh Super Course posted by John E on 2/14/2002 at 3:54:22 PM
Good luck anyway, Jim! I almost bought a Super Course in 1971, but went for the Nishiki SemiPro because of the double-butted CrMo main triangle and aluminum crank (both of which broke after 40K miles of use) and SunTour gear. In retrospect, I think the Raleigh frame is superior in durability and ride quality.






AGE / VALUE:   Lambert Sealed Bearing Hub posted by: John S on 2/11/2002 at 8:38:09 PM
Got this old "Torrot" Spanish bike from a street vendor. Bought it for $40 primarily to get the Stronglight 49D cranset. Rear wheel high-flange hub labeled "Super Olympic", while front hub looked very similar, but labeled "Lambert" and has sealed bearings. I'm sure these wheels date to at least early 70's, as did the bike. What's with the Lambert hub? It spins soooo smoothly, yet this set-up didn't become common until recently.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Lambert Sealed Bearing Hub posted by DBean on 2/12/2002 at 11:39:23 AM
I looked at Lamberts in 1978 when I was shopping for the first "good" bike I could afford. By then they were called "Viscount" and distributed by Yamaha. The sealed-bearing hubs (and "death fork!") were highly touted by the salesman. Perhaps your front wheel is left over from some fatal fork disaster.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Lambert Sealed Bearing Hub posted by Ray Weekly on 2/15/2002 at 10:32:35 PM
You're the first person I've heard that had, or had any knowledge of, a Torrot. I got one a few years back, actually very nicely made, Super Vitus tubing, and in my opinion, a nice ride. Mine had 49D crankset, and Simplex SLJ derailleurs, with Atom and Maillard hubs. Sorry I have no info on your hubs, just wanted to jaw about the bike.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Valentino posted by: Oscar on 2/11/2002 at 6:41:18 PM
Does anyone know when Campy stopped producing Valentino derailleurs? I think they were introduced in 1966. I'm working on a bike with a nice frame but low-medium end components that I'm trying to put a date on.


   Valentino posted by John E on 2/11/2002 at 8:36:17 PM
Ah, Valentino, the Edsel Ford of the Campagnolo family. According to Berto [Dancing Chain], the Valentino was introduced in 1964, the V. Super in 1967, and the V. Extra in 1968. He lists V. Extra production as continuing until 1985.

   RE:Valentino posted by Oscar on 2/11/2002 at 10:55:40 PM
1985?!? Well, that's not going to narrow down the date at all! Is the rear unit so bad? I notice it has a huge range of gears it can use.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Valentino posted by Kevin K on 2/11/2002 at 11:53:20 PM
Hi. I had a bike that came equipted with the Valentino Extra group. I thought it to be junk. Then a bike shop owner ( actually a real bike lover ) suggested I not be too quick to discard the pieces. Just my, and his, two cents. Kevin K

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Valentino posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 2/13/2002 at 1:35:01 AM
Who knows, someday the Valentino stuff will go real high on e- bay. Doubtful, but you never know. A Alvit can get a surprising amount. Don't discard it at any rate.

   future collectibles posted by John E on 2/13/2002 at 1:49:26 AM
Christopher is right. Perhaps, as others have suggested, years of tossing, crashing, oxidizing, and wearing out have thinned the herd of even bike boom era components and frames. If it looks good and works well, don't toss it!






AGE / VALUE:   Falcon Bike posted by: Tom on 2/11/2002 at 3:50:19 PM
Anyone have any info on British made Falcon bikes. I was offered a frame with fork. 531 tubing. It has a braze-on on the front fork for a light. He tells me it is late 40's or early 50's. Anyone know these bikes. Any way I can tell what year it is.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Falcon Bike posted by Dan on 2/11/2002 at 4:40:17 PM
I remember seeing Falcons in the mid to late '80's advertised.

   from classicrendezvous.com posted by John E on 2/11/2002 at 5:48:30 PM
Around 1970, when someone asked Irish-born Charlie Harding [C. Harding's For Bikes, West Los Angeles CA] about Falcon, he replied, "A Falcon is a good English bike."

Also, from www.classicrendezvous.com:
"A solid Coventry [as in Jaguar] based British concern dating from the 1930's, Falcon was best known originally as the Coventry Eagle. The Falcon marque hit it's full stride in the 1950's to 1970's under the management of famous British racer Ernie Clements. (that was he is the picture being kissed on the opening page of this site!)
"A prestigeous move in the early 70's saw Falcon become the exclusive European and USA supplier of the Eddy Merckx brand. (At the peak of King Eddies reign in the Pro peloton!)
"Falcon bikes were popular in the USA during the 1970s bike boom and most examples in this country date from that period."


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Falcon Bike posted by DBean on 2/11/2002 at 11:42:43 PM
Falcon's still around:
www.falconcycles.co.uk






MISC:   Carlton frame and Qs posted by: DBean on 2/11/2002 at 3:41:51 AM
There's an extremely beautiful Carlton on Ebay:
http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?MfcISAPICommand=ViewItem&item=1072672936
My Qs: What is the tapped fitting on the RH fork leg? (And does the fork seem straight?)
And would this bike have been intended to use a SA hub? (There's no derailer hanger on the dropout, which proves nothing.)


   RE:MISC:   Carlton frame and Qs posted by Brian L. on 2/11/2002 at 1:00:08 PM
The fitting is to receive a headlight bracket. Could not discern any fork irregularities. Carltons of that era were among the most beautiful of the Brit bikes.






AGE / VALUE:   Stop grinning, that's a wounded bike! posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 2/10/2002 at 6:40:38 PM
When I first got my second vintage Raleigh Record Ace, the origonal rear wheel and chainring was switched over to derailer gears. The handle bars were not origonal, they were mountain bike bars. The bike had been messed with. It was bad enough, that somebody did this to this vintage bike, the old school, vintage- loving riders would stop me and they would point and start jabbering. The worst thing was, that I enjoyed riding it so much. I went all over on it, grinning like a fool. It shifted wonderfully, had a great range or gears, I liked the position and feel of these handle bars. Finally, I gathered up some proper, origonal parts and this was returned to origonal shape. I still ride and enjoy it. I saved the other set up, just in case...


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Stop grinning, that's a wounded bike! posted by Walter on 2/11/2002 at 2:23:44 AM
The 64,000$ question is which way did/do you enjoy riding it more? It's not like those old Roadsters were never modified, even back on "The Good Old Days."

One of the neater bikes I've seen pics of and possibly the one I'd be most likely to imitate is Sheldon Brown's PX10 based "Clubman." It even has a Japanese hub, I believe.

Just don't ride down the streets where the other vintage bike people live.






AGE / VALUE:   old lightweight posted by: freddie on 2/10/2002 at 1:11:21 AM
I trade and collect older bikes and try to get my hobbie tosupport it's self. Recently I came across a nice John Deere 3 speed for $20.I called it in on a local radio morning show for trade or sale. What a John deere collecter traded me was one of the best looking older road bikes I have ever seen. I don't deal much in light weight bikes much but this must be something special. Very light .Thanet Silverlight.Distinctive V-shaped bottom bracket. Lookes bran new. Rides great. Can anybody tell me anything about it? Thanks.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   old lightweight posted by Warren on 2/10/2002 at 3:52:09 AM
I don't know if you're fishing here Freddie but the Thanet is a highly collectable bike, one of the lightest bikes ever made, and I don't think you should ride it...they were a little under engineered and it is likely worth good money. There is a section on the bike in the Pryor Dodge book "The Bicycle". There is a book on the Thanet bikes by Hilary Stone. Find out more at http://www.classicrendezvous.com/British/Thanet_home.htm

A remarkable trade for $20.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   old lightweight posted by Hilary Stone on 2/15/2002 at 9:47:26 AM
If Freddie would like to get in touch directly with me at hilary.stone@blueyonder.co.uk I may be able to provide him with lots more detail on his particular bike as I have copies of the framebuilder's records. the frame number will probably be on one of the rear dropouts most commonly the left hand one, sometimes on the inside.
Hilary Stone






AGE / VALUE:   DATING RALEIGH RECORD 10 SPEED?? HELP! posted by: Allen on 2/9/2002 at 7:24:14 PM
Hello, Anyone know how to date a Raliegh record 10 speed? Bike has serial number. Bike has Huret derailleurs, late 60S? Anyone know what year Raleigh came out with the "Record" Are they good bikes? Thanks for all replys.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   DATING RALEIGH RECORD 10 SPEED?? HELP! posted by DBean on 2/11/2002 at 11:42:27 AM
Record is the bottom-of-the-line 10-speed of Raleighs 70s line. Heavy and very common. I would doubt that a collector would be interested unless it's brand new.






MISC:   Ann Arbor Swap Meet Vendor Form posted by: steve on 2/8/2002 at 10:12:15 PM
If you are going to the Ann Arbor, Michigan show this year and want to be a vendor, we've included a sign up form on our web site for your convienence. Go to:
www.ann-arbor-bicycleshow.com

Click on the "VENDOR FORM AND FLYER" link. Follow the directions on the page.

See you in April!







AGE / VALUE:   Carlton and a sticker problem posted by: dafydd_williams@yahoo on 2/8/2002 at 8:12:35 PM
Dick and Warren,
You expressed an interest in the Carlton I bought last week. I'm not selling mine (just got it yesterday, and man am I excited!), but there's a frameset on ebay, which looks even nicer, albeit pricier (not mine):

http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1071788472

On my frameset, someone attached their nameplate with what looks like double-sided foam tape. You know, the stuff that only comes only half off when you try to pull it off, and then you have to take a putty knife to it to get the rest off? Anyone have any idea how to take it off without marring the paint?

david


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Carlton and a sticker problem posted by Dick on 2/8/2002 at 9:08:16 PM
David,
Thanks for the heads-up. That is indeed a nice looking frame. Still not as nice as yours. Unfortunately its a little too small for me. And my wife still hasn't ridden that last 2 bikes I bought for her. So she's not going to buy into that old ploy again. She wants jewlery for Valentines day! Not another damned bike! Oh well.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Carlton and a sticker problem posted by Oscar on 2/8/2002 at 11:34:32 PM
Heat will soften the adhesive holding that awful foam sticker stuff onto your frame. Use you wife's blow dryer and aim it at the sticker. You should be able to peel off what's left with your fingers. Citrus degreaser will remove the adhesive residue.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Carlton and a sticker problem posted by Oscar on 2/9/2002 at 2:31:50 AM
I worked on a neat old bike that was covered in large reflective stickers. They took over a week of evenings to remove. The bike evidently lived out of doors for years, and when the stickers were finally off, I found that they protected the paint very nicely.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Carlton and a sticker problem posted by Warren on 2/9/2002 at 3:48:59 AM
Wouldn't it be great if vintage bikes were appropriate for Valentines Day! Sigh...

Nice Carlton, my size, too much, too far, too broke. Thanks anyway.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Carlton and a sticker problem posted by Kevin K on 2/9/2002 at 4:42:55 AM
Hi. On decal/sticker glue removal I use Zymol wax. This stuff has removed glues that chemical solvents would not touch.Very mild on the paint.Kevin K






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh 1980s posted by: joe on 2/8/2002 at 8:05:37 PM
Hi, I just bought a Raleigh Carlton Cycle bicycle from a junkyard and want to learn more about the history of my bike. All I know that its a raleigh and it has a tour de france 1980 winner badge on it. The model number was half scrapped off with only the last 2 digit remaining which is 81. I think that its a Carlton Cycle bike because it has the CC logo all over the bike. The bike is exceptionally light and a real joy to ride. If anyone knows where I can get any net resources on my bike pls tell the the url as well. Thanx!
joe







MISC:   Fixed gear/single speed posted by: Keith on 2/8/2002 at 3:53:41 PM
Okay, it's new stuff, but it looks pretty cool to me. Check http://www.vandesselsports.com/contentbike.html


   RE:MISC:   Fixed gear/single speed posted by Walter on 2/9/2002 at 2:29:02 AM
Keith I agree. This company has some of the more interesting new bikes I've seen. Legitimate 700C single speed commuters are just about completely absent from current line-ups yet this company has several.

I like the "Straight-Ups" esp. with the Moustache bars though I think they took simplicity too far with the coaster brakes. The "Country Road Bob" with a true fixed/free flip-flop is very cool and may have earned a spot on my personal "watch" list.

No, I don't work for them.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Fixed gear/single speed posted by Warren on 2/9/2002 at 3:56:03 AM
Here's another shop to check out...http://www.ucycle.com/

These guys are selling a LOT of fixed/single speed and retro gear in Toronto. Good solid bikes at very good prices. I see them on the streets every day. Any colour you want as long as it's dark blue...occassionaly black.

No affiliation other than a satisfied customer.

   RE:MISC:   Fixed gear/single speed posted by John S on 2/11/2002 at 8:36:33 PM
Found a fixed/single speed site called "ABSESS" that has photos of conversions - good for ideas.

I enjoy taking mid-range road bikes from the late 60's/early 70's and converting to single speeds using a BMX freewheel. Easy to do with minimal parts-swapping. These bikes are usually braze-on free, often don't have a derailleur hanger on horizontal dropouts for a real clean look. They are great riders and can be set-up as commuters with the right bar/stem combo and have room for fenders and fittings for racks.

Currently working on my second Raleigh Supercourse and a Gitane Pro Tour de France. Have completed a Italvega Gran Rally, Lygie, Frejus, Olmo.

I'm glad there is interest out there.