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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Colnago CX posted by: Warren on 3/18/2002 at 9:12:45 AM
I have a 'Colnago CX' frame with teardrop tubing. It has 'CX' engraved in various places, as well as the usual clubs. Has unique seat cluster and has Campag super record type seat post, approx 19.5mm ! It came with mainly Campagnolo Athena parts, but these would appear to be a few years more recent than the frame. Can anyone conform that these frames came out in early '80's? How many were made and over what period? I would like to build it up with Super Record parts if this is correct. It has braze on front derailleur and the Campag rear dropouts with the two little holes for the special chainhanger to attach to. Would like to hear from other owners with serial numbers and histories.

Thanks again.







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Pre war Schwinn track bikes posted by: Tom on 3/18/2002 at 7:16:25 AM
I am looking for information and pictures of prewar Schwinn track and Paramount bikes. I am interested in the serial numbers. I would also like to see some pictures and talk to someone who owns one. When did Schwinn start making the race bikes. What bottom brackets were used. What lugs did they use.What size tire and what rims did they use. Is there a website for Paramount bikes.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Pre war Schwinn track bikes posted by Skip Echert on 3/19/2002 at 5:13:05 AM
Hello Bob -
Two resources that can help:
Bob Hufford's Schwinn Lightweight Data book:
and the Waterford site, which is the keeper of the flame for Paramounts:

cheers,
skip






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Zeus Bicycles, and parts. posted by: Jacques on 3/17/2002 at 3:20:18 AM
Does anyone know what or if a professional team(s)used Zeus in the 70's and/or 80's? I'm particulary interested in the white and red Zeus ( 531 tubing ) bicycles of the early mid eighties.







AGE / VALUE:    posted by: Al Rudis on 3/16/2002 at 9:10:26 PM
Does anyone know the value of my Peugeot PX10.

I bought it in 1965/66, the year an identically equiped and framed bike won the Tour-de-France. It was marketed as the champion of the world.

Excellent shape as was in storage about 95% of time. Original paint and stickers. Original gear except for conversion to Simplex shifters. Original set of racing and of touring wheels. Racing wheels hardly used.

Any ideas?







AGE / VALUE:    posted by: Al Rudis on 3/16/2002 at 9:10:26 PM
Does anyone know the value of my Peugeot PX10.

I bought it in 1965/66, the year an identically equiped and framed bike won the Tour-de-France. It was marketed as the champion of the world.

Excellent shape as was in storage about 95% of time. Original paint and stickers. Original gear except for conversion to Simplex shifters. Original set of racing and of touring wheels. Racing wheels hardly used.

Any ideas?


   PX-10 posted by John E on 3/17/2002 at 4:21:12 AM
Traditionally, collectors have preferred the high-end Italian frames over PX-10s, but a few months ago we saw a 1962(?) PX-10 sell for over $7000 on eBay. This price, though definitely a fluke, illustrates how hard it is to set a value on an older classic bicycle. If the paint and decals are near-pristine, figure several hundred dollars.

I am confused by your statement, "Original except for conversion to Simplex shifters," because the original shifters on every PX-10 I have ever seen have been Simplex.






AGE / VALUE:    posted by: Al Rudis on 3/16/2002 at 9:10:26 PM
Does anyone know the value of my Peugeot PX10.

I bought it in 1965/66, the year an identically equiped and framed bike won the Tour-de-France. It was marketed as the champion of the world.

Excellent shape as was in storage about 95% of time. Original paint and stickers. Original gear except for conversion to Simplex shifters. Original set of racing and of touring wheels. Racing wheels hardly used.

Any ideas?







AGE / VALUE:    posted by: Al Rudis on 3/16/2002 at 9:10:26 PM
Does anyone know the value of my Peugeot PX10.

I bought it in 1965/66, the year an identically equiped and framed bike won the Tour-de-France. It was marketed as the champion of the world.

Excellent shape as was in storage about 95% of time. Original paint and stickers. Original gear except for conversion to Simplex shifters. Original set of racing and of touring wheels. Racing wheels hardly used.

Any ideas?







AGE / VALUE:    posted by: Al Rudis on 3/16/2002 at 9:10:26 PM
Does anyone know the value of my Peugeot PX10.

I bought it in 1965/66, the year an identically equiped and framed bike won the Tour-de-France. It was marketed as the champion of the world.

Excellent shape as was in storage about 95% of time. Original paint and stickers. Original gear except for conversion to Simplex shifters. Original set of racing and of touring wheels. Racing wheels hardly used.

Any ideas?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:    posted by Skip Echert on 3/17/2002 at 4:05:23 AM
Hello Al -
Good question. Condition is everything, and in the case of French bikes of about your bike's vintage, front and rear derailleaur type, and frame size. Much interest in French bikes by Japanese collectors. Here smaller frame size is better. Price range on Ebay? Range - $400 to $2500, depending on the above. Derailleurs can be $1500+ on their own. What kind are on your bike?

Normally there is lots of PX-10 info at David Goerndt's site. Unfortunately it is in the process of being moved and is not yet fully operational.

I suggest you send him a note at davidg@iag.net.
cheers,
skip






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Thanks posted by: Will on 3/16/2002 at 5:20:02 AM
Thanks everyone for helping me to figure out what bicycle I have. It turns out to be a 1978 Schwinn Varsity...I believe it's a girls frame. Anyway, thanks again!


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Thanks posted by Stacey on 3/16/2002 at 12:02:07 PM
Congrats, Columbo... er, I mean Will! That was a right nice $29 investment, real purdy too. Not that I'm an expert, but I have to question you "girls bike" conclusion. It's always been my understanding that the top tube on a girls bike bends downward in an "S" to follow the down tube. Your top tube runs basicly horizontal with a bit of an upward curve. I think its a man's bike, what they call a "camelback" because of the hump. Experts, wanna help me out here? Regardless, here's to many safe and happy miles!

In the wind,
Stacey

http://staceyrhymer.freeservers.com

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Thanks posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 3/16/2002 at 4:46:38 PM
Camel backs are considered a man's frame.






AGE / VALUE:   WHAT A GUY !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! posted by: Kevin K on 3/15/2002 at 7:17:01 PM
Hi. A friend presented me with his 1979 Schwinn Letour IV he bought in July, 1979. This is a USA built Letour model. The bike is a time warp. I was presented with all paper work from the original purchase. The paper work looks new also. All Schwinn Lit. was provided along with some pieces I've never seen. It is truely a treasure to own both a piece of Schwinn history and a friends. Enjoy, Kevin K


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   WHAT A GUY !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! posted by Pete on 3/15/2002 at 11:20:41 PM
I have one of these.(sort of)
It was getting tossed and I adopted it.
Stripped it down and used the frame, fork, headset and BB.
Rides suprisingly well.
Check out this website for more info:
http://www.geocities.com/sldatabook/detail7579.html#1979letouriv

enjoy!






MISC:   ta, magistroni, umberto dei posted by: joel on 3/15/2002 at 3:20:01 PM
just wanted to enlist the aid of anyone here with some spare time - ive recently moved my specialites ta database page to my new domain, and started a database page for magistroni, and a little page on umberto dei...

theyre at:

TA: http://www.blackbirdsf.org/magpie/ta/
Magistroni: http://www.blackbirdsf.org/magpie/magistroni/
U. Dei: http://www.blackbirdsf.org/magpie/dei/

anything anyone here might be able to add would be quite welcome! ive been scanning through back postings here for info, but this forum is hell to search through...

anyhow, thanks in advance, and hope they may be of use to someone!

-joel


   RE:MISC:   ta, magistroni, umberto dei posted by desmo on 3/15/2002 at 7:48:19 PM
Bravo, Joel. This is- particularly the TA section- illustrative of the potential of the web for the distribution of what was once highly arcane knowledge to anyone interested. Well done!

   thanks for posting, Joel! posted by John E on 3/15/2002 at 8:32:32 PM
I never knew TA meant "traction avant," which I suppose means their components should be used on ZOX recumbents. The Magistroni - Ofmega link is VERY interesting, since I have owned various components under each of these marques. The Bianchi-branded cottered steel cranks on my 1962 Bianchi certainly look like Magistronis, and I have a 1980s cotterless set, also labeled "Bianchi," and obviously made by Ofmega (including the Ofmega stack bolts).






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Stuck seat post posted by: Tony Truran on 3/15/2002 at 2:50:56 PM
I'm restoring an old bianchi superleggera (steel frame). The aluminum seatpost is stuck. I've heard of two ways to dissolve corrosion in the down tube after first removing the bottom bracket:
1) pouring an ammonia solution through the bottom bracket

or
2) Doing the same with automotive antifreeze

Has anyone tried either of these methods, if so how long do you leave the liquids in the frame? Do I have to worry about the ammonia hurting the steel frame?

Thanks, Tony


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Stuck seat post posted by Oscar on 3/15/2002 at 2:58:15 PM
I've never used those methods, though your dilemma is common. A good penetrant will work wonders. I've had success with PB Catylist and Liquid Wrench. Let it set for 30 minutes before beginning. If it's still stuck, let it sit overnite. Keep the saddle on the post and use it as a handle for your grunt-work.

Good luck, and grease the heck out of the seatpost when you reassemble it.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Stuck seat post posted by Jim V on 3/15/2002 at 5:39:54 PM
Whn I was a teenager a friend bought a '54 Sunbeam Alpine, not running. The previous owner had poured ammonia into the fuel tank, thinking it was gasoline, and then ran the engine until it stalled. The outcome was that the aluminum pistons siezed so tight in the iron block that my friend punched a hole through a piston top while trying to drive it out of the bore. Based on that memory, I wouldn't recommend the ammonia. Good luck with your fine bike!

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Stuck seat post posted by Kevin K on 3/15/2002 at 6:10:43 PM
Hi. If your seat post is junk this is a trick I've learned when using alloy v steel. Heat up the aluminum seat post with a small torch. If your frame paint is of no importance heat as close to the lug as possible. Remember you are heating up the seat post. Aluminum expands faster than steel so after you've got it good and warm, cool the post off with cold water. Stand the bike sideways as to not alloy the water to hit the steel bike frame. Now the aluminum is cooling faster than the steel is try pulling it loose. Twisting it first might help. My son had an alloy bracket on his car that had a steel bolt frozen in it. This worked great. Just be sure to keep the heat/flame off the lug on the frame. Good luck, Kevin

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Stuck seat post posted by schwinnderella on 3/15/2002 at 9:30:03 PM
Last summer I pulled a trek out of the garbage. The bike was well used and beat up but still a sound bike. The aluminum seatpost was seized in the steel frame. I was in no hurry so for a month at least once a day I hit it with some penetrant. After a month I still could not move it. Within 24 hours of trying some ammonia I had the seatpost out. Ammonia worked well for me but this being a beater of a bike I was not concerned with paint damage,although I do not think it hurt the paint.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Stuck seat post posted by HUMP on 3/16/2002 at 6:57:16 AM
A had a Nishiki International with a stuck aluminum seatpost and tried amonia and other cheminical loostners (WD-40 etc.), with no affect I resorted to a three stooges approach of hitting the seatpost as hard as I could with a hammer. The seatpost was frozen tight and wouldnt move. After failing to drill and chisel out the seatpost, I came to the conclusion that the seatpost being aluminum and the frame being steel must have begun a chemical-electrical process where both metals exchange electrons and begin to bond together. Is this possible, or was it rust form the steel attaching to the aluminum like a super-epoxy.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Stuck seat post posted by Peter on 3/16/2002 at 7:38:27 AM
If you are prepared to sacrifice the seat post in order to save your paintwork, cut off the post about 1 inch above the lug, and then, using a hacksaw blade, make 2 or 3 cuts lengthwise along the remaining post from the inside until you have cut right through it. Grip the 2 or 3 long pieces you have made with a pair of pliers, and the post will collapse inwards, leaving an undamaged frame. Slow job, but effective.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Stuck seat post posted by Wings on 3/18/2002 at 6:54:53 AM
Kevin k --
If the seat post is aluminum and expands faster -- doesn't the heat in this case just increase the tightness. As a kid I workded in a washing machine repair shop and we often used heat to unstick parts that were frozen. We always applied heat to the outside of the part -- never to the inside if we were removing the inside part. I never had to toss water on any parts either -- pull them apart when hot with tools! Water on a hot frame may change the frame characteristics. At least that is my opinion.

I would be patient and bathe it in liquid wrench often until it loosens up. I think electrolysis would have to occur in very wet conditions (water).

I have heard of the hacksawing of the inner tube -- that could impact the frame and also you just cut off your leverage by cutting the post!

I say SOAK IT IN LIQUID WRENCH!
Tell us when you get it out --- next summer. (Just kidding)


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Stuck seat post posted by Keith on 3/18/2002 at 3:56:16 PM
Aluminum seatposts in steel frames, without grease, will become chemically-welded into place after a number of years and exposure to moisture (A metalurgit one explained it to me -- called it galvanic welding, I believe). And that's why Liquid Wrench and/or heating with a torch may not do anything to budge it. Fortunately, the seatpost takes the brunt of the process, and the steel frame is probably okay. Try the Liquid Wrench anyway, but if it doesn't work, the method I was taught at the bike shop where I worked was to saw the seatpost to about 1" above the seat tube, and then carefully saw the seatpost into sections with a narrow keyhole saw, going down the seatpost. Yes, it takes time, but it's 100% guaranteed to work, and you won't need to heat anything with a torch (which may not work anyway).






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Apollo bikes posted by: Simon on 3/15/2002 at 2:30:05 PM
Hi, just wondering if anyone has come across, or had experience with Apollo bikes. A friend recently purchased an old(er) Apollo aluminum road bike, about 22-24 lbs, Shimano 600 group, and I was wondering if it's any good. I haven't seen very many Apollo's in Canada and understand there is a company in Australia but this is about 10-15 years. What, if any, has been anyone's experience with these bikes? Thanks.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Apollo bikes posted by Warren on 3/16/2002 at 1:13:28 AM
I've seen numerous Apollos here in Toronto...I've got one. They were made by the Kuwahara manufacturing group which made a lot of Japanese bikes. Some are very decent frames and make great riders. Not likely to become collectible however.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Apollo bikes posted by Rob on 3/18/2002 at 6:06:23 PM
Warren's post covers it for the most part...Apollo was the name used by Kuwahara for bikes they marketed in Canada and Australia, from the 1960's through, I think, to the early 1980's. They are very common in Vancouver, mostly fairly basic bikes...but I have seen a few moderately interesting ones. I recently bought a nice one...nothing exciting, but nice,...lightweight, nice components, nice ride...for $25 CDN at a thrift store. Deeley was the distributor in Vancouver...maybe in Toronto, as well?

A few months ago I got some info at the Kuwahara website http://www.kuwaharabikes.com/company.htm But the link doesn't seem to be up at the moment...






WANTED:   decals posted by: freddie on 3/15/2002 at 1:44:45 AM
Hi I have a very nice schwinn varsity that is all orginal but the decals are almost gone. I have tried memory lane but they dont have them. It is such a common bike that somebody should have what I need. Can anybody help?







AGE / VALUE:   pixe or rixe bike posted by: teresa on 3/14/2002 at 6:47:14 PM
hi, my husband and i have recently acquired an old bike. the fender name badge says rixe or pixe. the writing is fancy so you can't tell whether it is a r or p. it has a leather seat that says person manufacturing, worchester mass. thanks......mark and teresa