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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







AGE / VALUE:   K C L SEAMLESS TUBING posted by: Kevin K on 5/31/2002 at 7:58:31 PM
Hi. Picked up an old Japanese 10 speed made of KCL seamless tubing. Seamless tubing is of some quality and I'm wondering what, if any, quality this frame has. Thanks, Kevin







AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn bike posted by: Beth on 5/31/2002 at 4:55:01 PM
I have Scwinn bike serial # f135714. I know it was built in July 1949 but that's all I know about it. If anyone has any info about it and what it's worth I'd appreciate it. I'd call it fair to good condition. Thanks.







MISC:   Last night's find posted by: Keith on 5/31/2002 at 1:55:12 PM
Last night on the way home fromt the local bike shop, I saw the telltale edge of a wheel buried between two trash cans. I stopped, and pulled out one of the 24" wheel road bikes that have been discussed recently. This one's not the higher-end sort -- everything is steel. 5-speed Shimano Eagle rear d. 140mm cottered cranks. The brand is Tyler -- I've never seen it before. Made in Poland. As usual, all it needed was air in the tires -- everything works and it's clean other than some paint scratches. It's just a tad too big for my 8-year old daughter -- she's really tiny. It should fit next year. I think, if I found this one at random, not even looking for a bike in the trash, how many working bicycles are thrown away in this city on a given trash night? I'd have to guess at least a dozen.


   RE:MISC:   Last night's find posted by Rob on 5/31/2002 at 5:33:22 PM
I found this year's various municipal spring clean-up weeks pretty good (actually this was the first year I went 'curb diving'). Over five separate days, a couple of hours each day, I found eleven good bikes...Gitane TdF, Nishiki, a couple of old Carltons, a mid-80's Cannondale, etc., ...and bypassed scads of low end steel crank jobs... The bikes were in various states, but repairable, other than two that were crash-damaged(good parts). I missed two...no room left and when I went back they were gone...a Jeunet (or LeJeune...I forget which now) roadster style with a Sturmey-Archer 5-speed, I think it was, hub...upright roadster style alloy handlebars, which had been badly bent...the reason for the disposal, I guess...the other one I missed was a Nishiki 'mixte' with nice components and alloy wheels...

I most cases the seats were missing...no surprise I guess, most had flat tires and almost all were dirty to varying degrees...I guess if it doesn't shine and look pretty most of us just aren't interested...;)

   RE:MISC:   Last night's find posted by Schwinnderella on 5/31/2002 at 2:24:56 PM
For at least the last five years I have rescued at least 100 bikes per year off the curb. I leave at least that many on the curb,because they are unfixable department store bikes. A few of the bikes I keep,many I fix and give away or donate to the Goodwill,Salvation Army,Etc..Some of them I strip for parts to repair other bikes. Last sunday,the day before trash pick up, I took a bike ride thru the north side of town saw five bikes out for pick up,but left them all.

   RE:MISC:   Last night's find posted by Rob on 5/31/2002 at 5:33:08 PM
I found this year's various municipal spring clean-up weeks pretty good (actually this was the first year I went 'curb diving'). Over five separate days, a couple of hours each day, I found eleven good bikes...Gitane TdF, Nishiki, a couple of old Carltons, a mid-80's Cannondale, etc., ...and bypassed scads of low end steel crank jobs... The bikes were in various states, but repairable, other than two that were crash-damaged(good parts). I missed two...no room left and when I went back they were gone...a Jeunet (or LeJeune...I forget which now) roadster style with a Sturmey-Archer 5-speed, I think it was, hub...upright roadster style alloy handlebars, which had been badly bent...the reason for the disposal, I guess...the other one I missed was a Nishiki 'mixte' with nice components and alloy wheels...

I most case the seats were missing...no surprise I guess, most had flat tires and almost all were dirty to varying degrees...I guess if it doesn't shine and look pretty most of us just aren't interested...;)

   RE:RE:MISC:   Last night's find posted by Elvis on 6/2/2002 at 5:12:59 AM
I too tend to find and save old bikes! I do not understand why some people throw them away. Even on the cheapo frame there are good parts, and some are quite nice. One year I found a Rudge road bike fromt he 50's -- one year, an old gitane. The coolest find so far has to be a motobecane from the 1980's with through the top tube cable routing -- that, and an old "tour de france". If I had a buck for every thrown out bike that passed through my hands, I could afford a Litespeed or Colnago... and would probably still pick up old bikes anyway!

   RE:RE:MISC:   Last night's find posted by Elvis on 6/2/2002 at 5:13:03 AM
I too tend to find and save old bikes! I do not understand why some people throw them away. Even on the cheapo frame there are good parts, and some are quite nice. One year I found a Rudge road bike fromt he 50's -- one year, an old gitane. The coolest find so far has to be a motobecane from the 1980's with through the top tube cable routing -- that, and an old "tour de france". If I had a buck for every thrown out bike that passed through my hands, I could afford a Litespeed or Colnago... and would probably still pick up old bikes anyway!






AGE / VALUE:   SHOE SIZES posted by: Kevin K on 5/31/2002 at 11:47:57 AM
Hi. I'm fianlly going to purchase a pair of real cycling shoes. I've found a shoe I like. It's Italian and sharp. NOS 80's vintage SIDI. Size is 9 1/2. Can someone tell me the US shoe size to this. Thanks alot, Kevin


   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHOE SIZES posted by Kevin K on 5/31/2002 at 7:23:07 PM
Hi Rob. Cool ! Thanks, Kevin

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHOE SIZES posted by Kevin K on 5/31/2002 at 7:23:44 PM
Hi Rob. Cool ! Thanks, Kevin

   King Kong? posted by Oscar on 6/1/2002 at 2:09:47 AM
Size 45. You know what they say: Big feet............big shoes.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHOE SIZES posted by Kevin K on 5/31/2002 at 12:39:12 PM
Too early in the am. Let's try 41 1/2 European size. Thanks, Kevin

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHOE SIZES posted by Oscar on 5/31/2002 at 2:04:07 PM
What's US size 11 in European sizes?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   SHOE SIZES posted by Rob on 5/31/2002 at 4:57:05 PM
Check out this site: http://www.zootsuitstore.com/euroshoesizing.html






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old olmo posted by: Brian L. on 5/30/2002 at 9:37:05 PM
Another interesting, even older(?),Olmo. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1833022883


   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old olmo posted by Steven on 5/31/2002 at 7:02:09 PM
I exchanged a few emails with the vendor. He is not a bike person but from what he can tell it is supposedly not bent. Maybe it is the photo. It doesn't say it on ebay but the rims are Rigida clincher (probably steel). If a knowledgeable vendor were selling, it would probably go for $ 200-300

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old olmo posted by Steven on 5/31/2002 at 1:12:16 AM
This bike is actually slightly newer than the other OLMO mentioned twice below. It is from the early 1960's whereas teh other was from the late 50's. This also has lesser componentry and likely frame. It is nonetheless interesting. I am somewhat worried about the frame/fork perhaps being bent. Proabably good for a few hundred.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old olmo posted by Brian L. on 5/31/2002 at 5:33:18 PM
Interesting - I thought that it was just a weird camera angle generating a hump-backed appearance. I agree about the generally lesser overall quality, componetry and condition.






AGE / VALUE:   Estimated value posted by: Charlie Horne on 5/30/2002 at 8:48:37 PM
I have a Sears 3 speed in hub ladies bike made in Austria. Sears model no. 503 47 390, serial no. 2441839. I have had this bike approximatly 27 years. I would like to know its age and if it is worth keeping.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Estimated value posted by Steven on 5/31/2002 at 1:14:53 AM
Charlie,

There is no real market demand for such a bike, so it is more a garage sale item or something that you can give away to somebody in need. After 27 years does it not have any personal value? That is surely worth more than that which you would ever get selling it.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Estimated value posted by Keith on 5/31/2002 at 2:58:30 PM
I concur. You may inquire with the Oldroads English Roadster folks, since it's a 3-speed. I've had a pair of these given to me about a year ago -- the hubs were dated, like Sturmeys are, with '69 in my case. I believe Steyer-Daimler made them. Mass produced, a good full notch below the quality of a Raleigh 3-speed -- the fenders and chainguards were of very thin guage metal. I'd ride it, give it away, or donate it to a local charity (that's what I ended up doing after a little fixing up and cleaning).






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Mercier Frame - Info Needed posted by: Edward on 5/30/2002 at 8:20:55 PM
I have an old Mercier bicycle that I bought used in France in the Mid-Eighties. Before I decide on whether on not to refurbish the bicycle, I'd like some additional information on the frame. The serial number is M41919 and there are Reynolds 531 decals on both the frame tubing and one of the forks. The mercier script and crown are engraved at the top of the forks. I have already e-mailed Cycles Mercier to see if they can assist with this as well. Any additional information, such as year of manufacture, type of Mercier, etc., would be a great help. Thanks.


   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Mercier Frame - Info Needed posted by Edward on 5/31/2002 at 7:27:11 PM
The dropouts are forged and the derailleur hanger is Campagnolo type. Unfortunately, at the time I was a student on limited funds in Montpellier, and the LBS put the bike together with the used Campy components that were available in-house (i.e. hodge podge), so the componentry is anything but standard. The one feature, that may help with it's age, is that the frame has the notch no the tubing to accommodate the downtube clam-on shifters.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Mercier Frame - Info Needed posted by Mike Slater on 5/31/2002 at 7:42:55 PM
Another item that can narrow down the age is the spacing of the rear dropouts. 120mm was standard for a 5 speed freewheel. These were used till somewhere in the late 70's,early 80's. 126mm spacing appeared in the early 80's.

Anyon know when brazed on shifter mounts started to appear?

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Mercier Frame - Info Needed posted by Mike Slater on 5/30/2002 at 10:48:43 PM
Any bike whose frame and fork are fabricated from 531 is worth refurbing. From your brief description, this sounds like a high end bike. What are the make of dropouts/parts?

I know the Mercier Pro was a full 531 frame.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Mercier Frame - Info Needed posted by tony on 6/12/2002 at 9:12:02 AM
Recently just acquired Mercier bike too. No decals left except blue sticker with "Vitus888 Light Tube". Also "mercier" carved on fork crown. Don't know year model yet.
Here the componentry:
Beautifully lugged frame Vitus888 Light Tube with cable & bottle mount braze-on
unknown headset
Simplex F & R Dee
Simplex Retrofiction on downtube (screw type)
Stronglight chainring (double) with Sugino crank arm
Sedis chain (will be replace soon) -> any suggestion on the replacement?
Pelissier F & R hub
unknown rims (probably Super Champion Medaille d'Or?)
unknown 6 speed freewheel (probably Atom?)
Sakae Royal stem and bar
CLB brake (seems very weak)
unknown brake lever
Mercier San Marco saddle

That's all I remember. I'll try to take a picture or two. Plan to repaint and built as my second bike.
Email me for exchange any info.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Mercier Frame - Info Needed posted by tony on 6/12/2002 at 9:16:18 AM
Recently just acquired Mercier bike too. No decals left except blue sticker with "Vitus888 Light Tube". Also "mercier" carved on fork crown. Don't know year model yet.
Here the componentry:
Beautifully lugged frame Vitus888 Light Tube with cable & bottle mount braze-on
unknown headset
Simplex F & R Dee
Simplex Retrofiction on downtube (screw type)
Stronglight chainring (double) with Sugino crank arm
Sedis chain (will be replace soon) -> any suggestion on the replacement?
Pelissier F & R hub
unknown rims (probably Super Champion Medaille d'Or?)
unknown 6 speed freewheel (probably Atom?)
Sakae Royal stem and bar
CLB brake (seems very weak)
unknown brake lever
Mercier San Marco saddle

That's all I remember. I'll try to take a picture or two. Plan to repaint and built as my second bike.
Email me for exchange any info.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Mercier Frame - Info Needed posted by tony on 6/12/2002 at 10:35:56 AM
Oops... apologize for double posting






WANTED:   WTB -- Road Tandem posted by: Keith on 5/30/2002 at 6:04:55 PM
I need a road tandem so my wife, son, and daughter can join me on some longer, more challenging rides. Need not be vintage, need not be top end. Frame must be sound and straight. Willing to spend $700-$1200. Email me at velohund@yahoo.com Thanks!!!!!







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   gitane road bike posted by: Michael on 5/30/2002 at 4:09:19 AM
I recently purchased a gitane road frame on ebay. How can I go about figuring out how old it is, what model,etc... It's blue and white, simplex dropouts, campagnolo bottom bracket, shifters, headset.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   gitane road bike posted by Rob on 5/30/2002 at 6:04:38 AM
I know a bit about the 1970's Gitanes...I think the lineup went something like Team, Tour de France, Interclub, and Apache Standard. The top ones, Team and TdF, were Reynolds 531 tubing, Simplex dropouts with the Simplex unthreaded derailleur hanger. Look at the chain and seat stays and forks...half-chrome? Any stickers?...TdF has a triangular Reynolds sticker, in French, on the left fork and a map of France with the words, 'Gitane' and 'Tour de France', on the right fork and a Reynold 531 sticker just below the top of the seat tube ...the words, 'Professionnal Tour de France' should appear on both sides of the downtube. My TdF, about 1974, has a Stronglight BB and Shimano derailleurs...my low end Apache Standard has low end Campy components. Yours with the Simplex dropouts sounds like TdF or better if it's from the 1970's...if it's from the '60's or '80's maybe someone else can provide some info. Can you give us some info on stickers and other decals?

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   gitane road bike posted by Eric Amlie on 5/30/2002 at 12:27:39 PM
At some point around the late sixties-early seventies Gitanes top bike was an all Campy equipped model called the Professional Super Corsa. I'm not positive, but I think this had Campy dropouts as well. As well as the models Rob mentions above there was another low level model called the Grand Sport Deluxe or something similar to that. As Rob mentions, I would look for the chrome tipped fork & stay ends and remnants of Reynolds 531 tubing decals as clues that it was one of the better models.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   gitane road bike posted by Keith on 5/30/2002 at 3:00:52 PM
My first real road bike was a 1970 Gitane Interclub. It had a plain steel frame and plain dropouts -- no hanger. I believe the Campy-equiped Super Course had Campy dropouts -- Simplex would not havge worked with Campy without modification. I recall puring over the 1970 catalog, and seeing the models Eric mentions, but not the Apache. One of my best friends got the Tour de France. My 1972 Comsumer Guide to Bicycles lists the Tdf as being equiped the same as a Peugeot PX-10, and retailing for $195. It also mentions the Gran Sport (entry level %95 model), the Tourist (sort of a French Suberban -- I had one), and the tandem, but not the Interclub or Super Course. I also agree with Eric that ofen the shreds or outlines of 531 decals will remain, and if you're familiar with how they look when new, you can identify it. Nonetheless, the Simplex dropouts indicate a TDf IHMO. The Campy bb was likely an upgrade -- good for you if it's in nice shape -- much better than the crunchy-bearing Stronglights of that day.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   gitane road bike posted by smg on 5/30/2002 at 5:04:30 PM
I remember that in many brands of this vintage there usually was a mid-level model in which the rear triangle was half-chromed and the rear dropouts became forged instead of stamped - though still plain. Long ago I had such a Gitane, and I currently have a similar Atala. Both bikes felt a little more lively than the bottom-of-the-line models, and I wonder if that marked the use of a somewhat better steel for part of the frame--though perhaps not necessarily credited with a sticker. Anybody have any knowledge/conjectures? The comparable Raleigh "Super Course" used straight-guage 531 for the main triangle.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   gitane road bike posted by Keith on 5/30/2002 at 5:46:04 PM
I think the big brands approached this gap in their lines differently. The Gitane Interclub, for example, was sort of an entry level racing bike -- plain gauge carbon steel, but with tubular tires. I don't think Peugeot or Raleigh had such a model, as the "next up" Peugeot AO-8 and Raleigh Gran Prix had 27" clinchers. The Atala 104 with Campy Valentino also had no equivalent among the French or English bikes as far as I know. A local resident rides such an Atala to the Library -- it's really beautiful for a non-top end bike. As smg describes, it has half-chrome stays and fork. It also has the classic Yellow-Blue "Campagnolo Equiped" sticker. The Consumer Guide says its plain steel. The early Raleigh Super Course (70 or 71) I had came with half-chrome stays, 531 main tubes, but the dropouts were plain stamped. A later model I now have came with forged Suntour dropouts.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   gitane road bike posted by michael on 6/1/2002 at 12:23:13 AM
There are no identifiable tubing stickers on the bike. There is a derailleur hanger which is threaded. There is a small gitane sticker on he right side of the top tube and one one on the front of the head tube. The fork and chain stays are half-chromed. Does this help?
thanks for all the responses

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   gitane road bike posted by Brian L. on 5/30/2002 at 9:42:21 PM
Keith, is that (Raleigh Super Course) the red one that was just for sale on ebay and full Superbe equipped?

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   gitane road bike posted by Keith on 5/31/2002 at 1:52:02 PM
No, it's not for sale. It came to me with Suntour Cyclone/Dia Compe brakes/Sugino cranks/Sunshine-Araya 700c wheels. I'm guessing it's late 70s, Japanese-made (there's no made in England anywhere, and the headbadge just has backslashes in the place where "Nottingham" appears on English Raleighs). I didn't know they were ever spec'd with Superbe -- that would be an awesome bike.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   gitane road bike posted by d on 6/28/2002 at 11:42:38 PM
just a quick note since i noticed some comments here while i was doing a search...
if there were more than one version of the Atala 104, here is some quick info one one of them:
Frame: handmade dbl butted Columbus tubing , forged lugs and tips;
Frame ends: Campy Record;
Fork: dbl butted Columbus tubing w/ chromed steel forged crown and chrome ends;
alloy crank set: Campy Nuovo Record
Bottom Bracket: Campy Nuovo Record;
Derailleur: Campy Nuovo Record;
Brakes: Universal alloy centers;
Color: came in 5 colors
etc etc
still ride it on old sew-ups w/ strings hanging, ha






AGE / VALUE:   OLMO on eBay posted by: John E on 5/30/2002 at 1:13:24 AM
Nice 1959 Olmo, very comparable in original appearance, components, and quality to my 1959 Capo, but in much nicer, more authentic condition:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1831508802&r=0&t=0&showTutorial=0&ed=1023069994&indexURL=0&rd=1

$500 and counting ...







AGE / VALUE:   Jimmy's crazy bike!( diffrent Jimmy than the one we have here) posted by: Chris on 5/30/2002 at 12:21:24 AM
Years ago I met a homeless dude named Jimmy. He had this junky Schwinn 10 speed bike with a 26 inch wheel in the rear end instead of the proper 27 X 1 1/4 wheel and tire. It had a Sturmey-Archer 3 speed hub. (The basic hub)

Now instead of using the front chainring that Schwinn decided to give him he took a French bike apart and drilled a hole into the French front chainring and he slid this onto the Schwinn one piece crank and thus changed the gearing of the bike. I tell you with the combination he had created he was able to really move with the thing. It was a Continental or something like that. He would fly down the street at incredible speeds! I don't remember exactly what number of teeth or brands of chainrings and the bike was stolen before I could get another look at it.

I gave him a Fleur De Leise Dunelt 531 bike and he looked at me like I was a god. Later on, after his dad died he was cheated out of any inheritance by his own family and to top it off, the brother took his bike leaving Jimmy without anything. I lost touch with him and therefore couldn't get him another bike. I'll never forget how he went so fast with such a arrangement on a cheap o Schwinn ten speed withb that aweful one piece bottom bracket.

He stuck a bread tie around the indicator chain and it kept the hub in low (first gear) all the time and then combined with the front chainring he flew with it. He did not need a trigger shifter or cable. Front wheel was a 27 inch like the bike came with.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Jimmy's crazy bike!( diffrent Jimmy than the one we have here) posted by Chris on 5/30/2002 at 12:35:01 AM
Maybe it was in second gear. I don't exactly remember

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Jimmy's crazy bike!( diffrent Jimmy than the one we have here) posted by Oscar on 5/30/2002 at 3:26:09 AM
I've known and seen lots of homeless guys in the city. The higher-functioning ones have bikes.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Jimmy's crazy bike!( diffrent Jimmy than the one we have here) posted by Gary M on 5/30/2002 at 6:07:37 AM
i give away usually 10-15 bikes a year to indigents. it dont hurt me any.

   bike donations posted by John E on 5/30/2002 at 3:37:32 PM
Bravo, Gary! Your constructive alternative to the dumpster addresses several problems simultaneously.






AGE / VALUE:   my bikes posted by: dave on 5/29/2002 at 6:33:19 PM
I have a Raleigh Competition GS (black), which I stripped of its gearing and installed a 13 tooth rear fixed cog. I think I may still have the original Campy gear, it has center-pull brakes. I added an extension handlebar post and have had various seats on it all of which I still have. I also have a Raleigh International (light brown), it has Campy gears and side pull brakes and a leather saddle by Belt. It has great chrome fancy lug work and half chromed forks as does the Competition.
I also have a Masi (pearl white & red),it has Modolo center pulls and Campy gears, its a Nuova Strada I belive. It (the frame) was purchased at a San Francisco cycle show many years ago and built up here in Cincinnati by the bike shop owner who purchased it.
The Competition has a serial No. of WS 8002024 and the International's No. is (I think) WS or WB ?005597.
Anybody interested in any of these bikes please E-mail me for further information. I have owned these bikes for at least 20 years and rode the fixed wheeler in an MS150 run an a couple of tri-athlons.







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Free very small Nishiki road bike posted by: Schwinnderella on 5/29/2002 at 5:07:12 PM
Free Nishiki Sport to a good home. The wheels are 24" and the seat tube aprox. 17.5" c to c. This is not a high quality bike and it does need a little adjusting,but is ridable as is,some minor rust otherwise a good cleaning and oiling would improve it a lot. This is a traditional drop handlebar 10 speed road bike. This is available no charge to a size appropriate person who can pick it up in suburban chicago,will ride it, and agree to pass it on to someone no charge when they are through with it. Great day for a ride here in Chicago,think I will eat lunch and head out to the bicycle trail. Happy Riding !







AGE / VALUE:   Made in italy road frame -- by "Royce Union"?! posted by: Elvis on 5/28/2002 at 11:29:21 PM
Hi all. I'm confused! I got this frame today. It is black with a white head tube and chrome head lugs! The frame is drilled nicely [i think it came this way] for running the rear brake cabel thru the top tube; holes are on left side. The bike is really light and the only markings are "made in italy" with an italian flag on the bottom back of the seat tube, and a shield-shaped head badge that says "Union cycle company, royce union, made in italy."
I know royce union is now known for cheapo department store bikes, and has been for some time; but nearly assembled this bike is as light as my new TREK 1000 aluminum frame. Any idea on how old it may be or what sort of steel it's made out of? Also, more importantly, I've got it almost put together, except for cranks and peddles: There's a thing on the right side of the hle where the bottom braket should be; it's rouad with three nothces in it, and I can't get it out. Do i need a special tool, and if so, can I get it at bike shops? Or am I just turning it wrong -- is it reverse threaded? Also, if I can remove this piece, how do I install the cranks and do I need a bottom braket? The space for the BB is threaded at the edges.
PLEASE, I NEED HELP! Any info would be appreciated, I can't get this thing ridable without your advice!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Made in italy road frame -- by posted by Ray on 5/30/2002 at 2:04:19 PM
I talk with a lot of bike shop owners and other gear heads and have been told that many good frames have Huffy and other lower brand names on them because they sponsored the bike rider. I have been told it is not uncommon to have a high end bike with a Huffy label one season, Schwinn the next and something else the next. I have seen many triathalon high end bikes with the name Huffy on them and I know for sure it is not a Huffy.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Made in italy road frame -- by posted by Walter on 5/29/2002 at 12:24:54 AM
I remember some decent quality RUs during the Boom days of the late '70s. By decent I mean comparable to low and middle range Motobecanes. Italian made RUs is news to me. I seem to remember at one point in time RUs being an English brand actually assembled in India though that's a fuzzy 20+ year old memory and I wouldn't swear.

If it is in fact Italian made then the BB threading would be "reversed" as opposed to the more common English threading. Of course "reversed" is in the eye of the beholder, If you believe the bicycle to have been perfected if not created in the Peninsula then Italian threading is, of course, the way it ought to be. ;-)

Good luck and I'm sure others will chime in. If you do go to a shop, go to one that's been around awhile. A kid won't know anything about it.

   Made in italy road frame -- by RU posted by Elvis on 5/29/2002 at 12:59:57 AM
Thanks, Walter.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Made in italy road frame -- by posted by Schwinnderella on 5/29/2002 at 1:30:43 AM
All the Royce Unions I have seen appeared to have be cheap bikes manufactured in Japan. My Sutherland's 4th edition lists italy as also having produced Royce Unions.

   Made in italy road frame -- by RU?! posted by Elvis on 5/29/2002 at 4:47:47 AM
Thanks! Again, I'm no expert on RU's, but most the one's I've seen have been cheapos, sort of on the same level as Huffy's or Free Spirit [sears]. The main reason I picked this one up is because of the light weight, chrome lugs, and internal cable routing, which I found intriquing.
Perhaps it is still a cheap bike, just a well made one... But as it's about as light as my new Aluminum Trek I wondered...
P.S. - does anyone know what cranks companies are italian? I'm going to see a guy soon who used to own a bike shop and his old invintory includes Nervar, SR and Maxi cranks... any particular brands I should look for [aside from Campy, duh]

   RE:Made in italy road frame -- by RU?! posted by Steven on 5/29/2002 at 6:30:54 AM
The main Italian chainset makers are: up until the 1960's, Magistroni (THE Original, before Campagnolo!); from the 1970's onward, Ofmega (Campagnolo copy with softer alloys, perhaps a restructuring of Magistroni following their bankruptcy), from the 1980's, Miche (on a par with Japanese product at very reasonable prices.)

   RE:Made in italy road frame -- by RU?! posted by Gralyn on 5/29/2002 at 12:09:00 PM
I had spotted a Huffy about 2 weeks ago - it must have been an attempt - probably during the early 80's - to put out a decent bike. It had all the same type components as a mid-range Schwinn...or mid-range most anything: Araya rims, sugino cranks, dia-compe brakes (side-pull), and I think Sun Tour. I thought about picking it up for the components - but for the price....it was really too expensive, and besides, those components are basically a dime-a-dozen. But that was the first Huffy I saw with those type components. I have a Free Spirit 12 speed I basically got because it was thrown in with a Schwinn - but it had no-name components - but it also had a lugged frame, had those foam rubber grips (80's) but it had cottered cranks - I thought that to be unusual.

   RE:RE:Made in italy road frame -- by RU?! posted by Schwinnderella on 5/29/2002 at 3:00:23 PM
Ever seen one of the Huffy Carltons?






AGE / VALUE:   1989 scwinn road bike sn:lp533832 posted by: Fikret Dogulu on 5/28/2002 at 12:22:05 AM
I have recently purchased this road bike for 50 cents. It was allrusted except for the frame. Tires were very bad. After spending a week on it an changing only the tubes and tires and truing it looks an rides like brand new. Every thing looks original. Paint is metalic red-brown. After waxing and polishing looks brand new. The stickers on it however can not be read. In the front badge it says Schwinn Chicago 1989 Serial number on the frame is LP533832. I wonder the model and the price of the bike at the time. Any other information will be appreciated.
Thanks


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1989 scwinn road bike sn:lp533832 posted by Gralyn on 5/28/2002 at 10:55:31 AM
I picked up one recently - the wheels were shot, the cables were shot, the paint was scratched badly. It only had a head badge and frame material stickers - no other indication of the model. I believe it does have a serial number on the frame somewhere - but it does have the stamped date on the head badge (1979). Maybe check Schwinn.com - maybe someone knows how to interpret the serial numbers on the frame? Otherwise, I don't know.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1989 scwinn road bike sn:lp533832 posted by Stacey on 5/28/2002 at 1:23:47 PM
These "dates" that are stamped on your headbadges, do they run verticaly... as in , do you have to turn your hrad sideways to read them properly? If yes, then these aren't year of production. Moreover, they are the actual birthday of your bike; the first three digits are the day of the year and the last digit is the last digit of the year. So, 2768 would be the 276th day of 19X8. More sleuthing is needed to solve for "X", but one can safely assume it to be an 8.

   head badge dating posted by John E on 5/28/2002 at 8:13:02 PM
Stacey is spot-on regarding the head badge dating.

As for LP533832, L=December; P denotes year
A=1965, B=1966, etc., skip I and O;

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1989 scwinn road bike sn:lp533832 posted by Stacey on 5/28/2002 at 10:28:25 PM
Interesting bit of numerology there... a 1989 bike that was "born" on the 198th day of 9 er, 1989. I would have suggested going to http://www.geocities.com/sldatabook/contents.html for more information and to acertain the specific model, but alas, the "Data Book" only goes to 1979. But all is not lost! Just make some notes of your bike's equipment. Brakes, hubs, bars, gear sets, derailer & shifter set... then spend a bit of time digging through both current and closed auctions at eBay. Look for bikes that match as many points as possible with what you have. You should be able to come up with both model and a reasonable approximation of it's value. Regardless, for fifty cents... you got a bargian! Next best thing to free, LOL. Enjoy your new steed!