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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Pro posted by: Gary on 5/3/2002 at 8:06:55 PM
I am looking for information on a English Carlton Raleigh Pro. The serial is #F3541. Any info on age and value would be helpful.







AGE / VALUE:   reply to Sting ray boy, 63 Continental posted by: Paul.G on 5/3/2002 at 4:23:57 PM
This is a reply to Sting-ray boy who posted on 4/30 & said that Lightweight bike were worth nothing & that only Sting-rays brought in good money. Well Sting ray boy That nice 1963 continental on eBay is now up to $227.50 & moving up like a bullet. Keep your sting rays, I'll take a lightweight bike anyday.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   reply to Sting ray boy, 63 Continental posted by JimW. on 5/3/2002 at 6:53:32 PM
There's no such thing as a bad bicycle; there are only bad bicycle fanciers. Why this "boy" felt compelled to go to the trouble of visiting a list in which he has absolutely no interest, merely to denigrate a given type of bike, is beyond me. What is it about that type of bike by that particular maker which brings out this type of behavior? Granted, the original owners of those bikes were adolescent boys, therefore almost automatically sullen and obnoxious, but this is over 30 years later. Maybe the upholstery material in the seats causes testosterone levels in the contacting body parts to rise to toxic levels? I wonder if it also causes pimples, even in adults? There's an interesting clinical study here, if one only had time for it. Too bad I'm too busy messing with bikes to do it myself.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   reply to Sting ray boy, 63 Continental posted by Gralyn on 5/3/2002 at 7:41:33 PM
Yes, I just don't understand some people. I enjoy my bikes - and I have particular interest in a certain type of bike. But that's just my particular interest. I don't expect other people to only be interested in vintage lightweights. I know some are interested in the balloon-tire bikes - I just don't like them, personally. But I respect other's interests - and I don't cut them down because they like a particular type of bike different from mine. But, that's just the way some people are.

Hey, it kinda reminds me of when I was a kid. I had one of those bikes with the bananna seat, high rise handlebars, etc. but it had grip tires - with tread...kinda looked like mud/snow tires. Well, my cousin got a new bike with racing slicks!!! He made it a point to inform me that his tires were for drag racing - and mine were only for "riding in the dirt". Hmmm. My bike is worth money....your's will never be worth money.....
....maybe they did put something in those bananna seats

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   reply to Sting ray boy, 63 Continental posted by Jimp on 5/5/2002 at 3:00:52 AM
I once had a '63 Continental that I bought for $60.00 in '63. That was a lot of money for a young kid back then. Wish I still had it!! Sting-ray boy obviously doesn't know value.






AGE / VALUE:   Old Vintage Vs. New $2500 Bike posted by: Gralyn on 5/3/2002 at 2:33:26 PM
As I was coming up during the bike boom - unfortunately, we were financially challenged - so, I could only long for a 10 speed. It wasn't until I was out of college that I bought one - a used, no-name, probably dept. store brand 10-speed. I re-built it - and rode it. Not long after, I decided to try and get myself a good bike. So I got myself a Lotus - I had to get it on lay-away - because it was more than I could cough-up at one time....but really, even for back then, it wasn't a really good top bike - I could have paid a lot more for a much better bike. But....I was amazed at the difference in the ride between the Lotus and my old dept. store bike. It was very noticeable.

(Now, I'm finding myself picking up those same bike I aspired to - for like $10 - $20 in thrift stores)

But what I wonder now: I see these new bikes in the shops - for like $2000 to $2500. I can't afford one of those. But I wonder - from anyone who can - or who has one: How does the ride compare with that of a $400 bike? Say, how does it compare with an old vintage lightweight? Can the non-professional really tell the difference in the ride between the $2500 and the $400 bike?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Old Vintage Vs. New $2500 Bike posted by Walter on 5/3/2002 at 3:39:58 PM
I don't own any $2K+ bikes but I have ridden someof the new stuff.

In sum a quality vintage lightweight holds up nicely. Steel frames are still being made. Alloy have changed somewhat but the ride qualities are pretty similar.

Weight has gone down. Where 21# was pretty much the benchmark for a quality racer today the mark is about 18#. I'm sure that'd be noticeable on climbs but living in Fla it's a nonfactor to me.

Of course all kind of different frame materials with carbon fiber and aluminum being the most popular. Word is if ou don't spend big $on aluminum your teeth eventually become loose.

The one area where today is definitely w/o doubt better than the "vintage" days is the quality of clinchers. Build yourself a nice light wheelset and spend some money on first line rubber and older Reynolds or Columbus will ride as well as anything out there.

Changes in shifting are obvious and, to me, are more a matter of preference than improvement unless you actively race.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Old Vintage Vs. New $2500 Bike posted by Steven on 5/3/2002 at 3:53:50 PM
Gralyn,

Better riders can most definitely tell the difference between one bike and another, because of the solicitations exerted on the bike. Your average rider, who doesn't solicit as much of the bike would be hard-pressed to tell the difference between, say, a straight-gauge tubing frame and a Double-butted frame. For new bikes today, you need to start at about $350 for anything with an acceptable frame design.

My own advice to the financially strapped: 1) buy a well-designed used bike and then put the best wheels that you can afford and a sufficiently comfortable leather saddle. This will generally require hand-built wheels with box-section alloy rims (i prefer Mavic and Campagnolo myself)and good tires. I keep away from Kevlar and folding tires because they tend to be very jarring when you inflate them to proper pressure. Keep the wheels in shape and tires properly inflated and you can make most bicycles much better.

Depending on where I go riding, I'll take my 1930's Bianchi city bike (with upright bars and rod-brakes), my 1940's Campagnolo Corsa equipped lightweight Ciclo Piave, my 1981 Mavic SSC equipped Team Miyata or my 2000 Campagnolo Record-10 equipped De Rosa Merak. All give me equal enjoyment. My wife, siblings and parents all ride straight-gauge high tensile steel European frames with great wheels. While you could never race competitively on these bikes, everybody is always impressed on how well they ride.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Old Vintage Vs. New $2500 Bike posted by Rob on 5/3/2002 at 5:40:34 PM
This is an interesting thread...thanks, Gralyn, for starting it off... I would be nice to get some more input from the various "old pros" who regularly post to this site. As for myself..and I'm far from a "pro"...I like the old stuff, probably more from an intuitive sense...the good, old bikes just feel well designed, efficient, elegant, and "focussed". I recognize some of the "short comings"...mainly the brakes. I'm happy enough with the 'friction' shifters on the downtube, and even with a 5 or 6 cog freewheel. I would say I'm after a fast, comfortable,but non competitive, non "cutting edge" ride. And I think, for the most part, the better old bikes still more than fit the bill in that regard.

I'd like to hear more on upgrading wheels and tires...the older freewheels and derailleurs (in good condition and Shimano or SunTour) seem to work well for me...Any comments?

I haven't ridden any of the top end new stuff and I wonder about the price/value relationship...of course, it is more likely in our "throw away" culture, the marketplace is dramatically underrating the good old stuff...

   wheels! posted by John E on 5/3/2002 at 6:51:25 PM
The wheels and tyres affect ride quality and performance far more than any other components. My recommended best value for the nonracing sport or transportation cyclist is a good old steel frame with a d.b. moly steel main triangle, high-quality friction-shift derailleurs (SunTour, Campa), center-pull or dual-pivot sidepull brakes, high-quality 32- or 36-spoke 700C wheelset, 7-speed freewheel (for 126-128mm OLD rear axle), and high-quality 100 PSI clinchers (23mm for sport, 28mm for transportation).

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Old Vintage Vs. New $2500 Bike posted by Gralyn on 5/3/2002 at 7:56:11 PM
Yes, one of these days I will just have to find out whether that extra $2000 makes all that much difference in the ride. There are lots of shops around - I could probably test-ride one. I'm really curious about it.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Old Vintage Vs. New $2500 Bike posted by Warren on 5/3/2002 at 9:01:42 PM
I have one such bike...an EL-OS Columbus tube road bike with 8 speed campy ergo. It rides far different than anything else because I'm heavy and frames flex easily when I get out of the saddle. When I was riding hard on weekends it was a good bike to have...light, very strong and ergo shifting saves your butt when you get caught asleep and start drifting off the back of the pack or someone attacks on a hill. This is the only reason to ride a bike like this. Otherwise it is twitchy and aggressive and requires a fit rider. I think I put less than 400kms on this bike last year while putting thousands on my vintage bikes. A nice luxury but really they are for competitive riding.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Old Vintage Vs. New $2500 Bike posted by darryl on 5/4/2002 at 1:37:24 AM
My current road bike is a Ultegra equipped Specialized Allez which retails for about $1700. This bike has a alum frame w/carbon fork. Carbon fork softens the harsh alum ride. Also switched tires from 20mm to 23mm and softer Terry saddle. Bike rides much better than the $300 bikes I have ridden. I recently restored a Kurahara 1985 Summit 12sp w/Suntour, Diacomp, Araya, Nitto & 700X20 tires. The ride was hard but very fast bike and handled well, very much comparable to my Allez. If I keep this Kurahara I would increase tire size and softer saddle. I also own a Miele Latina 14 sp Italian road bike which cost $800. Rides similiar to the Allez, but the Columbus steel tubing in the Miele is not as harsh as the rigid alum in the Allez. Unfortunately when I ride older bikes not as many other cyclists want to talk about them or are they interested in older tech.??

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Old Vintage Vs. New $2500 Bike posted by Steven on 5/4/2002 at 3:07:31 PM
I went through college as one of the only people without a car. Instead, I had at least 4 bikes that would be the equivalent of the $2K+ of today. One great story from those days involved the father of a girl I dated. He thought that I was a bit crazy not having a car and all those expensive bikes. At least, he did until one day I turned up to pick up his daughter in a Jaguar V-12 E-type. A friend had given it to me for a weekend in exchange for use of my Bob Jackson tandem. Back in the 70's and 80's with the slower pace of innovation, I was able to build up a new bike every year (buying parts wholesale or in Europe which was then much cheaper), ride it for a season and flog it at the end of the year for at least what the bike cost me. You can't do that anymore.

To upgrade a bike, it doesn't give much performance return on money spent to upgrade the following components: handlebars, stem, seatpost, pedals, freewheel. Even on hubs the return is usually not that great if they are properly packed and adjusted (for cone and ball models). For the frequency of use, most derailleurs also will not greatly affect the ride or performance either, however changing the pulley wheels from bushing models to ball or sealed bearing models does have an impact well beyond the cost in general drivetrain efficiency.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Old Vintage Vs. New $2500 Bike posted by Keith on 5/6/2002 at 3:20:14 PM
In addition to the vintage stuff (Mercian, Bottecchia, Motobecane, Dawes and Lotus), I have two titanium Airborne Zepellins, one with Campy 10-speed Chorus (the money I saved over Record bought me another groupo), and one with Campy 3 x 9 Centaur. I got the first Zep frame new for $450 at an Airborne "garage sale", and although I never intended to go this route, once I was on it there was no going back. The ride quality is superior to any vintage bike I've been on (and that's quite a few). The Zep has a compact frame, and it does what it's supposed to -- makes the rear triangle stiff, but allows the seat post to flex slightly in the sleeve within the seat tube, and hence absorbs a lot of road vibration (objective tests in Germany show this is not just marketing hype). I agree with Steven that each road bike has a distinctive feel, and quality is evident. Geometry and alignment have far more influence on ride quality than the material. These qualities become more important when: (a) you are riding competatively; and/or (b) you are doing rides with significant climbs and decents. For short rides at less than 20mph, it doesn't matter as much. I also own two Raleigh DL-1s with rod brakes, 28" tires, and these are my casual neighborhood and erand bikes. I also have two StingRays and a Schwinn American middleweight with spinger fork, just for fun. I wouldn't trust or touch modern aluminum -- they are disposable bikes. Columbus himself (current family owner) admits this in a recent interview in either ProCycling or Cycle Sport. I feel the same about carbon -- abrade it and it's finished.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Old Vintage Vs. New $2500 Bike posted by Keith on 5/6/2002 at 4:23:54 PM
I would add that along with geometry and alignment, proper fit is crucial to obtain the best performance.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Stuck seat post posted by: darryl on 5/3/2002 at 2:29:09 PM
Bought a Nishiki Prestige 12 sp. "Handcrafted By Kuwamura" on frame also. Tubing is Infinity Cro Mo Double Butted Tange. Equipped with Suntour LaPree ders, Diacomp brakes, Araya 27X1 rims and Sansin hubs. Any idea on how to get a very stuck seatpost out of seat tube????


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Stuck seat post posted by Gralyn on 5/3/2002 at 4:33:48 PM
I believe there were some posts on this very problem a few weeks ago. Check the archives.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Stuck seat post posted by Craig on 5/3/2002 at 6:45:12 PM
check out www.sheldonbrown.com/stuck_seatposts.html great info. The only tip I would add is to use Kroil a super penetrant,www.kanolabs.com. Turn bike upside-down, remove a water bottle bolt and spray some in, let stand a day or two.Sometimes I take off wheels and handlebars, clamp post in bench vise, twist,pull,sweat etc.After,use a brake cylinder hone to clean seat tube. If you have a steel frame and a aluminum seat post, Do not use lithium grease, these ingredients with some salt water(sweat,salt air) make a chemical reaction like a battery! Good luck, this has always worked for me. Kroil is worth it, better than PB Blaster,wd40 etc.....

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Stuck seat post posted by Schwinnderella on 5/4/2002 at 11:10:38 PM
Having made my living as an auto mechanic I used many types of penetrants,including PB Blaster and Kroil mentioned in another post. I have always had very good luck with Kroil and continue to use that today when a penetrating oil is called for. In this case ,if the seat post is aluminum and stuck in a steel frame I have had very good luck with ammonia. On really stubborn ones I drill a hole thru the seat post and use a long rod thru the hole to give me lots of leverage.






MISC:   campag mech thanks posted by: Martin Higgins on 5/2/2002 at 3:45:00 PM
Thanks to all the people who responded to my query on Campag. freewheel sizes. For the tour I want to go for a top gear of about 76" and a bottom of 27" so a 26 or 28 inner chainwheel is in order. All I have to do is find someone willing to put together a 6 speed freewheel to give the ratios I want. Martin Higgins, Wales UK.


   freewheel posted by John E on 5/3/2002 at 2:16:59 PM
Unless you have a 120mm rear axle, I recommend a 7-speed, which is only a mm or two wider than a standard 6-speed. Standard, easily-found sizes include 12-14-16-18-21-24-28, 14-16-18-20-22-24-28, and 13-15-17-19-21-23-26, which I have used on various bikes.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Columbus seatposts posted by: Steven on 5/3/2002 at 4:46:43 AM
In 1981 or 1982, I bought two 27.2 seatposts from the Columbus stand at the New York bicycle trade show. They are the only columbus seatposts that I had and have ever seen. One was installed on a Pinarello that I sold on to a friend, and the bike was subsequently stolen. The other was installed on a frame I built up for my then girlfriend. The relationship ended and unfortunately she took the bike back home with her to Denmark. I would love to get my hands on one now. It has a bone in socket design that allows you to adjust the saddle angle in every way. If I remember correctly, it has no writing on it, solely the columbus dove. Has anybody ever seen one? Does anybody know where I can find one?







AGE / VALUE:   RARE PEUGEOT posted by: Kevin K on 5/2/2002 at 11:58:41 PM
Hi. I've a chance to buy a nice and possibly rare, at least to the US market, Peugeot. It's a 10 speed, but the frame was originally a 5 speed as the shifter boss is welded on for the rear derailleur but uses an adapter for the front derailleur shifter. It has all sorts of braze ons. The bracket for the generator is welded on. It's got dual eyelets on the dropouts for mudguards and racks. It has the coolest polished aluminum mudguards I've ever seen with beautiful lights mounted front and rear. All the wiring for this is hidden. It runs in small tubes inside the mudguards and on little braze on tabs on the bottom side of the down tube. The paint / decals are near mint. Chrome is above average but up close some pitting shows. It is bright yellow and stunning to see. Has anyone ever seen a bike like I've described in the Peugeot line ? Because of the Simplex pieces I'm guessing late 60's early 70's but still not sure. Any advice ? Thanks, Kevin


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   RARE PEUGEOT posted by Steven on 5/3/2002 at 4:17:18 AM
Kevin,

My first multispeed bike was exactly as you described. I bought mine in France in 1973, but they were also sold in North America. It should have a nice solid chromed carrier on the back. You can date the bike somewhat by the shape of the headlight. If it is squarish, it is definitely from the 70's, if it is ovaloid, it could be from the late 60's as you guessed. The same can be said of the rear light: if it solely has a rounded red lens cover (without built-in reflector) it may be late 60's or early 70's; if it has a squarish combination lens cover reflector it is from the 70's. In France you still see them everywhere. Mine was converted into a racing trike for winter riding in the late 70's. I paid the equivalent of $88 for it then and it was indeed quite special at the time for a teenager to have. it is forgiving to ride but nothing special.

    PEUGEOT UE-8 posted by John E on 5/3/2002 at 2:20:52 PM
It sounds like an early 1970s UE-8 to me. The UE-8 and UE-18 mixte were the European/touring versions of the more common (in the U.S.) UO-8 and UO-18. Until they went to those horrible stem shifters in 1974, the Peugeot AO-8/UO-8/UO-18/UE-8/UE-18 bikes always had a single right-side downtube boss, with a clamp-on boss for the left side. This allowed Peugeot to make 5-speed and 10-speed frames on the same assembly line.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   RARE PEUGEOT posted by Rob on 5/3/2002 at 5:28:23 PM
I'll 'second' what John E. says... From what I've learned in the last few months I would say it's an UE-8...apparently they aren't so common in the US, but they are quite common in Vancouver, in both versions...UE-8 and UE-18 (mixte version). A typical price for one in good shape..(and the UE-18s, especially, often seems to be in fairly nice shape) is around $75CDN, more or less...

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   RARE PEUGEOT posted by Pete on 5/3/2002 at 6:32:47 PM
I get this mixed up all the time.
What is the difference between a UO-8 and a UE-8?
Mine was missing most of ti's original parts but had braze-ons for a single shifter,light, rack, and little clips for the wiring running up the underside of the downtube.
Some of this stuff looked like it was spot welded on rather than brazed. All cheeerfully shaved off in it's resurrection as a fixer!

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   RARE PEUGEOT posted by Warren on 5/3/2002 at 9:13:09 PM
The "E" denotes the touring version...fenders, lights, racks etc






AGE / VALUE:   Tall Frame green Raleigh 1970's 12 sp posted by: Maurice on 5/2/2002 at 10:37:22 PM
Does anyone recognize the model name of the Raleigh 12 speed
on eBay # 1098615237 ? I'm not well versed with the Raleighs and would like to know what it is - the seller didn't have a name - I noticed it has rubber pedals - surely they're not original - the rest of the bike looks OK - price looks very good - can anyone give more specific info?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Tall Frame green Raleigh 1970's 12 sp posted by Warren on 5/2/2002 at 11:31:40 PM
That looks like a Grand Prix and it is near the bottom of the food chain. Contrary to the posting it ain't light. I thought they had steel rims...especially with the steel spoke protecter on the rear wheel. The pics are poor and the sales pitch is sugar coated in the extreme. I'm surprised the seller has 50 positive feedbacks with no negatives. Maybe bikes aren't his thing.

I think it would be a bad deal...you could find the same at a garage sale or thrift store, be certain of what you're getting and save the shipping. I always liked the colour of these bikes however.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Tall Frame green Raleigh 1970's 12 sp posted by David on 5/3/2002 at 3:08:23 AM
After about '76 the GP had mostly Japanese components, maybe alloy rims. ($170 then) Save on shipping and just get the wheels, fenders, and saddle sent to you.






MISC:   Um... Question posted by: Niki on 5/2/2002 at 9:44:28 PM
I have a question that I was wondering if you guys could answer. I'm doing some research for one of my friends who is thinking about selling his bike but he's not sure it exists. What I mean is that from what we can tell it's a 1967 Schwinn World Traveler, dual 10 speed, 1 piece crank, dual 27" rims, diacomp brake handles and arya wheels. That's how it was when he got it but from what we can find that particular bike doesn't exist. Do you have any ideas?


   RE:MISC:   Um... Question posted by Kevin K on 5/2/2002 at 10:07:37 PM
Hi.You are right. The bike doesn't exist. Schwinn never made a 1967 World Traveler. The Die-Comp brakes were not being used until the mid 70's. You MIGHT have a 1977 World Traveler though. As for value it's not a collectible bike. It might make someone a good rider but I wouldn't expect to get more than $10-$20 out of it. Kevin K






MISC:   columbus decals posted by: mark on 5/2/2002 at 8:30:42 PM
Hi Jim Do you have information on the frejus at Ray`s.do you know the age , or if the frame decal was on the top tube. p.s. simichrome did the trick on the chrome. thanks Mark.


   RE:MISC:   columbus decals posted by Keith on 5/2/2002 at 9:12:02 PM
Ah, the 1972 Consumar Guide to the rescue. Not Columbus, probably. Frejus offered 3 Nouvo Record-equiped models in 1972: (1) Super Course 10-speed made with 531 db($350);(2) Super Course 15 speed also 531 db ($400); (3) Tour de France 10 speed made with Falk db tubing ($250).






MISC:   columbus decals posted by: mark on 5/2/2002 at 8:20:17 PM
yes , It was the one at ray`s bicycles.







MISC:   Campag Nuovo Record posted by: Martin Higgins on 5/2/2002 at 3:45:00 PM
I've got a 1984 Campag. Nuovo Record rear mech. and wonder if you can tell me what is the largest freewheel cog it can handle? I'm planning on touring and am loath to change it.


   RE:RE:MISC:   Campag Nuovo Record posted by Steven on 5/2/2002 at 8:01:02 PM
I've found some old technical sheet in Italian that indeed does recommends that you not go beyond 26 teeth, however anecdotal experience above says that 28 will work if a) you do not have too great a difference in the chainring sizes, b) do not place the wheel right in the front of the drop-outs, c) do not have too wide an axle length. If you were to try it on a modern 8 block, I doubt it could handle more than the 26.

    Campag Nuovo Record posted by John E on 5/2/2002 at 8:39:46 PM
I concur: 26 in general, 28 under special circumstances. I currently happily run a 13-26 7-speed with an 8-tooth drop (50-42) in front, with the rear axle halfway back in the dropout.

   RE:MISC:   Campag Nuovo Record posted by Steven on 5/2/2002 at 4:10:03 PM
From memory, I believe it is 26 teeth for the freewheel. As long as you don't make the common mistake of bringing the kitchen sink with you, you should be OK with a 26.

   RE:MISC:   Campag Nuovo Record posted by Eric Amlie on 5/2/2002 at 4:48:07 PM
I'm using one on a 14-28 freewheel. I didn't have any trouble with it but I've heard that it can be picky about chain length when using a 28t.

   RE:MISC:   Campag Nuovo Record posted by smg on 5/2/2002 at 4:59:43 PM
I used one on a 14-28 as well and had no trouble, but that was also with a very narrow chainwheel spacing, 42-46.

   RE:MISC:   Campag Nuovo Record posted by Keith on 5/2/2002 at 5:01:00 PM
I used one with a 14-28 5-speed freewheel on a Paramount I had, and it worked perfectly, but it required backing out the dropout adjuster screws as far as they'd go without removing the springs. This was necessary to obtain the a workable chain gap -- otherwise there was no gap at all in 28, and the chain would ride directly between the jockey wheel and the 28 cog, which will flutter and make lots of noise. I believe '84 was the last year for NR. As with any drivctrain, things will only work well if the cogs/chainrings/chain aren't worn out.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Campag Nuovo Record posted by Steven on 5/2/2002 at 7:55:56 PM
I've found some old technical sheet in Italian that indeed does recommends that you not go beyond 26 teeth, however anecdotal experience above says that 28 will work if a) you do not have too great a difference in the chainring sizes, b) do not place the wheel right in the front of the drop-outs, c) do not have too wide an axle length. If you were to try it on a modern 8 block, I doubt it could handle more than the 26.






MISC:   Cirque du Cyclisme posted by: Gralyn on 5/2/2002 at 3:25:29 PM
I believe this weekend is the "Cirque du Cyclisme" in Greensboro, NC. Saturday and Sunday. The theme is Vintage British Bicycles. I think it's being held at the Lewis Recreation Center. I-40, the Wendover Ave. N, then maybe Battleground Ave...W, then Pisgah Church Rd. I am going to try and go on Suday for the swap meet and bike show.


   Hetchins Heaven posted by John E on 5/2/2002 at 8:41:50 PM
We're having a smaller-scale, similar event in Fallbrook CA on Saturday 11 May. Last year, they had 30 Hetchins bikes.






MISC:   ride posted by: rickey@knowlesbicycle334-756-7561 on 5/2/2002 at 2:48:25 PM
would you like to come ride this sat may 4 we will have 300 or more bike riders this is an annual event here in valley alabama 30 min. from columbus ga. 1 hr. south of atlanta ga. I-85 valley lanette exitlots of fun & activities an auction at the local kroger gro. in lanette al. to raise money for valley haven school call 334-756-2868 334-756-7801 or the local bicycle shop 334-756-7561 hope to see you thare








MISC:   ride posted by: rickey@knowlesbicycle334-756-7561 on 5/2/2002 at 2:47:23 PM
would you like to come ride this sat may 4 we will have 300 or more bike riders this is an annual event here in valley alabama 30 min. from columbus ga. 1 hr. south of atlanta ga. I-85 valley lanette exitlots of fun & activities an auction at the local kroger gro. in lanette al. to raise money for valley haven school call 334-756-2868 334-756-7801 or the local bicycle shop 334-756-7561 hope to see you thare