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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Interesting Raleigh/Carlton frame+ on ebay posted by: David on 6/16/2002 at 2:16:51 PM
NMA and not-my-size! Nice rough older 23 1/2" 531 frame, cottered cranks+BB, bars.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1836730552







AGE / VALUE:   bike ID posted by: ray-ray on 6/16/2002 at 7:12:56 AM
I recently bought a early 70's road bike. I was wondering if anyone could help me identify the brand. the frame is english thread with campy dropouts. the bike was probably built for touring as it has braze-on cable stops on the down tube where there would usually be a shift lever braze-on. It appears to be a very well made frame. The lugs are very clean and also very thin. The only decal is a reynolds 531 on the seat tube. The only other marking is on the bottom bracket shell, it has a small stamp with the letters "RGF" on the top by the seat tube. If anyone has any info on what this frame might be I would really appreciate a reply. Thanks, Ray


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   bike ID posted by Keith on 6/18/2002 at 3:49:32 PM
I have no clue. It's a longshot, but go to Classic Rendezvous and check the Brit bikes -- maybe something will look similar in terms of lugwork or other details, and maybe the meaning of RGF will reveal itself. http://www.classicrendezvous.com/British/British.htm






AGE / VALUE:   bike ID posted by: ray-ray on 6/16/2002 at 7:12:56 AM
I recently bought a early 70's road bike. I was wondering if anyone could help me identify the brand. the frame is english thread with campy dropouts. the bike was probably built for touring as it has braze-on cable stops on the down tube where there would usually be a shift lever braze-on. It appears to be a very well made frame. The lugs are very clean and also very thin. The only decal is a reynolds 531 on the seat tube. The only other marking is on the bottom bracket shell, it has a small stamp with the letters "RGF" on the top by the seat tube. If anyone has any info on what this frame might be I would really appreciate a reply. Thanks, Ray







AGE / VALUE:   dura ace posted by: nico on 6/16/2002 at 7:22:04 AM
is this dura ace u or centerpull brakeset worth something ive noted the pivoting ball brake cables inside the levers for smooth operation


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   dura ace posted by Warren on 6/16/2002 at 1:22:13 PM
I've never seem them but I've read that they are a very early generation of DA brakeset...they are desireble to the right collector who needs them for a bike. Not real valuable but you could probably sell them on eBay

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   dura ace posted by Oscar on 6/17/2002 at 6:05:45 AM
I saw a set on a low end Japanese bike boom bike. I almost bought the bike just for the interesting brakes, but that's getting a little too obsessive. Interesting find, nonetheless.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   dura ace posted by nico on 6/17/2002 at 10:28:05 PM
by the way there from a Mi lano with crap components






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Savoy lady's posted by: JC Taylor on 6/15/2002 at 8:53:35 PM
The bike is a black 26" lady's model with SA 3-speed. I bought it new in 1960 from a hardware store (or the like). It's been hanging in our garage for 30-some years, and now my wife wants to start riding it again. It seems ready to go except for needing some dusting off, but I'm wondering what ought to be done to a bike like this to bring it back into service after some many years. I'd also like to find out whatever I can about its origins. The decals and badge all say "Savoy". The badge is badly worn, and all I can make out, besides "Savoy", is "Union . . . Company . . . " I'm wondering where to go from here.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Savoy lady's posted by Warren on 6/16/2002 at 1:33:04 PM
Put some light machine oil (not 3 in 1) into the hub. Spin the wheels and see if they rotate freely...if not then the hubs need to be cleaned and repacked. Spin the crank slowly backward...if there is much resistance then the bottom bracket needs similar service. Make sure the wheels don't have too much lateral play...same with the cranks and headset. If so they need adjustment. Make sure the brake cables aren't seized. Put air in the tires. Adjust the shifter cable at the axle.

Many of your questions can be answered at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/english-3.html

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Savoy lady's posted by Keith on 6/17/2002 at 8:38:47 PM
I've found with SA hubs that have been sitting for along time, it helps to spray a generous amount fo WD-40 into the hub's oil hole. Rotate the wheel and change the gears. Then let the bike sit on it's side overnight so the WD-40 will drain out. After that, put about 1 tablespoon of good, new motor oil into the hub -- any 10W30 oil will do. The front hub may have an oil hole -- the same procedure may be used. The English 3-speeds were meant to be oil-lubed, so unless there's a good reason you really don't have to disassemble and pack the bearings in grease, for the most part. In fact, you can use oil on almost everything in them -- get it into the bottom bracket if there's an oil hole, or work it in by dripping some between the bb cup and axle, and turning the crank. As warren says, brake cables may need to be lubed -- remove them from the housing and apply grease or oil. You may also need to adjust the indicator spindle, which is the rod that fits into the rear hub, which links to the cable via a small chain. Essentially, if the bike is in first gear, there should be a very tiny amount of play when you squeeze the shift lever. Warren's reference to Sheldon Brown's site is important -- Sheldon is quite the expert on old 3-speeds.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Varsity Silver Mist and SteelMaster posted by: Fil on 6/15/2002 at 8:07:17 PM
I've recently come into posession of 2 vintage bikes - a Schwinn Varsity, Silver Mist color, big chrome faucet-handle gear shifters, 26" wheels (i think), older-style lettering (i think) - VARSITY is on the horizontal part of the frame in sans-serif, unlike what i have sen here in the picture DB. the back wheel fork (pardon my nomenclature difficulties) is attached on the outside of the main frame, like this - |U| - also unlike anything i can find here. Any clues as to what year it may have been made? (i could only find silver mist for 1977 online...) I would also like a value estimate if possible, but am NOT looking to sell this thing - it's one of the best looking bikes i have ever seen. The other bike I have is a SteelMaster - and i can find NOTHING about this thing online - it's a metallic blue, has black-tipped faucet-handle gear shifters also 26" wheels, and a quilted seat. Any pointers/suggestions on this one? I'm having them both fixed up, and am also looking for cleaning and maintenance tips, as I am a comple bicytard at this stage.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Varsity Silver Mist and SteelMaster posted by Wings on 6/16/2002 at 5:05:30 AM
I do not understand what you are saying about the chain stays.
Where is the serial number and what is it? (Check left chain stay, Head tube, bottom bracket)
How large are the gear shift handles? Where are they? Do they have an "S" on them?
What kind of rims? Size of tires?

Where the underside of the top (horizontal) tube meets the head tube -- is the joint smoothed out? (Is the vertex of the angle formed by the top tube where it meets the head tube (handle bar tube) rounded or smooted or does it form a clearly sharp angle at the vertex?)

Just reading what you describe I wonder if someone could have put "Varsity" on another bike? I don't know. The additional information would help.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Varsity Silver Mist and SteelMaster posted by Fil on 6/16/2002 at 5:13:27 PM
Where is the serial number and what is it?
It's at i believe "head tube, bottom bracket" as you call it and it's DN584331

How large are the gear shift handles? Where are they? Do they have an "S" on them?
They are 4" long, at "head tube, top bracket" and they have a vertically elongated sans serif S on the slightly-teardrop-shaped tips. The tips are 1/2" across at their widest.

What kind of rims? Size of tires?
Size of tires: 27 x 1 1/4"

Where the underside of the top (horizontal) tube meets the head tube -- is the joint smoothed out?
Yes. The joint between the head tube and the downward diagonal tube is also smoothed out.

I do not understand what chain stays are (heheh) so I highly doubt i was trying to communicate anything useful about them.

I will try to post some pictures of this bike and the SM from my original post later on today.

   Schwinn Varsity Silver Mist and SteelMaster posted by John E on 6/17/2002 at 3:26:06 AM
Those big chrome shift levers are Schwinn TwinStiks, which became standard on all Varsities, Continentals, etc. during 1967. The "D" in your serial number = April. The N is the year (A=1965, B=1966, etc., but skip "I")






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   stems for schwinn world voyageur posted by: Dennis on 6/15/2002 at 5:49:56 PM
I recently bought a Schwinn World Voyageur frame. This is my first total rebuild. I found a ITM quill stem on sale and need to know if there is any reason I can't use a particular stem for fit reasons? If so, how do I find out what stems will fit?

Thank you


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   stems for schwinn world voyageur posted by John E on 6/17/2002 at 3:35:48 AM
There are several different standard diameters for the stem itself and for the handlebar clamp. Sheldonbrown.com is a good place to start. I THINK your Schwinn takes a 22.2mm stem diameter, but I am not sure.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   stems for schwinn world voyageur posted by Walter on 6/17/2002 at 5:50:52 PM
When converting an old LeTour I found that a "standard" 22.2 stem was just ever too big. I was told that Schwinn had the Japanese maker use their own size steerer tube. I do not know if this would apply to a World Voyageur or not but check before spending money. I didn't and ended up having to change forks and headsets before I got to use the stem I wanted.






AGE / VALUE:   1972 Mens Collegiate Value posted by: mary roberts on 6/14/2002 at 5:08:18 PM
i have a Mens Campus Green color Collegiate bike. i found the serial number on the front part of the frame and it is CH113578. i looked up how to read them and i think that means it's March 1972. i dont' know what the other numbers mean, if anything. it is in good condition. big seat in good condition. has plate on back of seat that says schwinn approved. the tires say 28 x 1 3/8 Schwinn to fit S-5 or S-6. i don't know how to measure for it's size but it's very tall so i would say it's the largest. i have pics if needed. i think it's a 5 speed. (don't know how to tell if its 3 or 5). it has hand brakes and on the brake handles it says Type LS28 brake.
Tire size (24 x 2.125) (26 x 1.75) (etc)
Male frame
Original paint
Seat condition -very good condition
Paint condition -good to very good-light scrapes and very light rust on over all bike
Extra features: fenders are in good/verygood condition also.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1972 Mens Collegiate Value posted by Kevin K on 6/14/2002 at 9:10:13 PM
Hi Mary. Your Collegiate probally isn't worth alot of cash. Maybe $25-$40. Maybe. But it is one of the best bikes of it's type ever built. Schwinn bikes from that era were tanks and built to be handed down through generations. They are easy to service and parts are plentiful. I rode a mint 1973 woman's Opaque Blue Surburban 5 speed about 20 miles or so last fall. Heavy but such a nice ride. Polish your bike up and enjoy it. Kevin K

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1972 Mens Collegiate Value posted by Kevin K on 6/14/2002 at 9:10:14 PM
Hi Mary. Your Collegiate probally isn't worth alot of cash. Maybe $25-$40. Maybe. But it is one of the best bikes of it's type ever built. Schwinn bikes from that era were tanks and built to be handed down through generations. They are easy to service and parts are plentiful. I rode a mint 1973 woman's Opaque Blue Surburban 5 speed about 20 miles or so last fall. Heavy but such a nice ride. Polish your bike up and enjoy it. Kevin K

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1972 Mens Collegiate Value posted by rickey@knowles bicycle shop on 6/15/2002 at 1:50:04 PM
mary i personaly can't keep my mouth shut some times asking questions brings on disipointment 40.-50. sad the value of bikes depend on what one would pay for it. i like the collegiate's - varsity's - & conti'a i have some here that i have restored 100.00 & up reguardless these old bikes have & when you get it rolling it's not to bad it makes me appereate my cannondale many of my friends condition there selves on there old heavy bikes & can go very much faster on there cool bikes so lets ride






FOR SALE:   Bio-Pace posted by: Dale on 6/14/2002 at 4:29:56 PM
Before we recycle the aluminum, we have a BioPace crankset from the mid 80s, with road gearing. These things are bad for your knees, but if somebody wants 'em for a restoration project, they're yours for the cost of shipping.


   RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Bio-Pace posted by Wings on 6/16/2002 at 5:10:04 AM
Yes, I have heard that Bio Pace are better for knees also. Someone shine some more light on knees and biopace!

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Bio-Pace posted by Wings on 6/16/2002 at 5:11:20 AM
Yes, I have heard that Bio Pace are better for knees also. Someone shine some more light on knees and biopace!

   RE:FOR SALE:   Bio-Pace posted by Steven on 6/14/2002 at 6:44:44 PM
The cranks should still be good for use with non-Biopace chainrings. You only need to change the chainrings as there is no biopace specific crank.

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Bio-Pace posted by Oscar on 6/14/2002 at 7:55:20 PM
Somehow I think there are a lot of loose Bio Pace chainrings laying about. I have a set of oval mtb rings (middle and small) in the box.

   RE:FOR SALE:   Bio-Pace posted by Mike Slater on 6/15/2002 at 3:29:38 PM
Nix Dale...Elliptical chainrings are tough on knees - BioPace chainrings are designed elliptical in a different sense and better for your knees than round chainwheels. See Sheldon's artical at: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/biopace.html

What size are your rings??? I'm interested.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub advice needed posted by: Art on 6/14/2002 at 2:47:21 PM
The earlier discussions on British club bikes and the Lenton had me looking through all of my stuff to see what I needed to build up a similar bike. I have a Torpedo/Sachs three speed internal geared hub, coaster brake, a three speed cog, with a Huret rear derailleur--all as one set up. I like the idea of this unusual 9 speed hub but the coaster brake throws me for a loop. Anyone have a lightweight outfitted with a coaster brake? Anyone know this hub? Should I forget this hub because of the coaster brake? I know I could add a single front brake to offset the rear coaster brake but that seems convoluted to me. I like the idea of clean bars with no brakes but my experience with coaster brakes is rather limited. Any suggestions? (the hub is laced to an Italian rim. I have the matching front and it's lace to a Maillarid French hub. Wheels are 700.)


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub advice needed posted by dafydd on 6/15/2002 at 11:50:21 PM
Have you tried using the Torpedo/Huret setup? Something about it seems like it wouldn't/shouldn't work. At least to me, it's like taking a bike w/ derailleur, holding the freewheel and backpedaling. The derailleur gives slack that would prevent the coaster brake from working (?).

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub advice needed posted by Keith on 6/14/2002 at 5:49:10 PM
Art I'd ask Peter Brown what he thinks. It doesn't sound right to me at all, but what the heck do I know about club bike? (precious little) I do get the sense from what I've read, however, that the term club bike encompassed a very wide variety of British machines from the 1930s through the 1950s, the heyday of club racing (it continues today, but you should see the bikes -- stripped down 5-speed tt bikes). In other words, it could be anything from a custom small shop frame with the very best components of the day, to a garden variety 3-speed sports bike with the north road bars turned upside down and the mudguards removed. I have no basis for this other than common sense, but I really wonder what percentage of serious club riders used internal gear hubs -- but I bet most didn't. I think we believe otherwise because the most common club bikes we end up seeing in the states are the off-the-shelf Raleigh Lenton and Clubman models, which were imported here during the pre-bike boom dark ages. But then,keep in mind the Sturmey hubs were a Raleigh product! I'd love to find out more, but I've got to believe the more advanced riders used flip flop hubs or derailleurs, which were lighter and, yes, more mechanically efficient.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub advice needed posted by smg on 6/14/2002 at 6:05:23 PM
I'd worry about safe stopping power. Back in '74, I needed a basic flat-ground utility bike in a hurry and at minimum cost. I scrounged a 3-speed frame and fitted it with 26" coaster wheels and drop bars. It worked and was fun, but hard braking often made the rear wheel lock up and break loose in a skid. The drop-bar configuration put less weight on the rear wheel, and the weight transfer forward when braking unloaded it still more. Upright bikes carry more weight on the rear wheel, so the coaster is harder to lock up. I'd consider a front brake prudent, like a track bike on the street.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub advice needed posted by Keith on 6/14/2002 at 6:08:29 PM
SMG -- good point -- calipers allow much better brake modulation.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub advice needed posted by Art on 6/14/2002 at 7:33:18 PM
Peter's in Morrocco on a journey, but I'll ask him about this hub when he gets back. I think your essentiallly right Keith, but I think there were some bikes that were commuter bikes in the city that used a wheelset with an internal hub. Riders wound travel to races on that bike carrying an extra racing wheelset using a set of wheel carriers that attach to the front hub. Swap out the wheelset. Race. Swap the wheels back and them ride home. Wheel carriers show up on e-bay and I think there is one on there now. I've always wondered about the weight of an internal hub vs. a deraileur set up. I don't know the answer. While the hub I have is unusual, I don't think it is appropriate for a club bike type build up. I think it is not very safe, as smg, said anyway, especially for a quick in traffic bike. Perhpas for a suicide mission, but that's another story.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub advice needed posted by Oscar on 6/14/2002 at 8:20:44 PM
Suicide mission: I once resurrected a single speed upright bike and rode on coaster brakes for the first time in 20 years. I cartwheeled off the bike when I was hopping a curb and spun the crank back at the same time. Oops.

Weight: Heavy. I later made a fixed gear wheel for it and the bike felt 5 lbs lighter.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub advice needed posted by Keith on 6/14/2002 at 8:44:33 PM
I've read the story of club riders carrying their lighter racing wheels to the race site as Art indicates, and then stripping the bike down for the race, which was always a time trial of sorts -- 25 miles, 12 hours, 24 hours. Where was that -- a Bicycle Trader article. Anyway, I still kick myself for not buying a pre-Raleigh Hercules club bike with a flip-flop, being sold by the owner of a LBS for $50. He was selling his collection to raise money to pay creditors, and his shop and the remains of his collection eventually went to the auction block. He also had a complete Wastyn Paramount for $350. Kick kick kick! This same guy sold me my Gitane Interclub when I was 12, and my Peugeot track bike and Mercian Professional when I was 14 or 15.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub advice needed posted by Keith on 6/14/2002 at 9:09:48 PM
Another couple of thoughts. 1. Build and ride a flip flop wheel now, and be on the lookout for a proper SA internal hub. 2. Go to your local road racing or triathlete club, ande find out what night they hold time trials. Ride your Brit Club bike in a time trial -- this is a race for yourself, not to prove anything to guys on sub-15 pound tricked-out aero-everything ti and carbon stuff. See how it is to ride a 25 mile or whatever time trial, then look at the times in the Grimsby records!

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub advice needed posted by Mike Slater on 6/15/2002 at 1:23:24 AM
You can still buy SA hub new. I've also been thinking about a club style bike - ended up deciding that the SA 5 speed Sprinter hub was the best bet. Can be set up for 120 or 126 spacing, so it pretty much a drop in. A little pricey at $130 - but sure looks like a clean install. New 3 speed hub are around $60.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub advice needed posted by Pete on 6/15/2002 at 5:56:23 PM
Art,
I'm putting together my own rendition of a "Club" bike.
Started with a Raleigh Super Grand Prix, which is a decent enough bike. I'm using a Phillips roadster as a donor. It was made by Raleigh so as it turns out the bottom brackets and headsets of both bikes were Raleigh spec (26tpi). This made swapping parts much simpler. (BTW: The Phillips was rusty, no crime committed in parting it out :) - luckily the hub was coated in old oil.)
I'm using this picture as my inspiration:
http://www.classicrendezvous.com/British/Raleigh_Lenton.htm
Just picked up the wheel from my LBS. He had a few 40 hole rims, looks very nice. I'm using the centerpulls, think I'd forego the coaster brake, especially as an only brake.
Look at Sheldon Brown's pages, and he also has parts available(like the funny axle washers you'll probably need).
Good luck.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub advice needed posted by Dave on 6/18/2002 at 11:44:55 PM
Hi Art...contact me offlist about club wheels please.






MISC:   Waterproofing leather seats posted by: Elvis on 6/13/2002 at 11:07:37 PM
Hi all. I have what probably should be a stupid question, but just wanted to make sure: I have an older Dawes road bike that came with a nifty Brooks Bros. leather seat with nice big huge rivets. The seat is worn smooth on the sides so the writing is hard to see but has no cracks, tears, etc. I sweat a lot when I ride, and am also concerned about rain damage. I have a thing of waterproofing stuff inteneded for leather jackets, but have never tried it on bicycle seats. Will this hurt my Brooks Bros seat or keep it free from damage? If that is a bad idea, any one else know how to save the seat without getting a goofy seat cover? I have a good many older bikes with leather seats, so if the waterproofing stuff is safe I'd like to use it on all of them.


   RE:MISC:   Waterproofing leather seats posted by David on 6/14/2002 at 2:18:27 AM
Use Brooks Proofide on it; it's a wax and oil concoction from the maker. Most larger bike shops have it or you can mail order it (www.permaco.com, the importer, or www.harriscyclery.com, or many others). You should try to dry the saddle off when it gets wet but it should be durable as long as you don't leave it out in the rain. (Carry a plastic bag to put over the saddle if you have to park it in the wet for a while)

   RE: Waterproofing leather seats posted by Elvis on 6/14/2002 at 4:46:01 AM
Thanks! I just didn't want the seats to get all crappy. I've seen some really decrepid leather seatsa and think its a shame people let them go to waste -- I don't want to be the cause of something like that.

   RE:MISC:   Waterproofing leather seats posted by Keith on 6/14/2002 at 2:38:18 PM
I keep one of thoese cheap waterproof nylon saddle covers in my pack -- the cover is the kind made for those big gel pads, available at your friendly LBS. Rivendell sells a fancy Carradice waxed duck cotton model -- sounds durable but can't vouch for it's waterproofness (is that a word?).

   RE:MISC:   Waterproofing leather seats posted by Gerry on 6/14/2002 at 3:58:36 PM
You're right. Its a dumb question. think for yourself.

     Waterproofing leather seats posted by John E on 6/15/2002 at 12:27:49 AM
Since the underside of the leather is more vulnerable than the top to moisture, consider mudguards or stuff a plastic bag under the saddle when it rains.

   RE:MISC:   Waterproofing leather seats posted by Warren on 6/15/2002 at 12:45:10 PM
Brooks seats don't last forever if you use them. Don't use other products on the saddles....usually you end up with stains on your clothes. Very attractive. Even proofhide should be used lightly. When I get a "new" old saddle I take it to the washbin and scrub it hard with soap and water to get it clean. The I really rub in a small amount of proofhide and buff it till it glows. You should also treat the exposed leather under the seat to protect against the elements. Works for me.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Waterproofing leather seats posted by Bill Putnam on 6/17/2002 at 3:00:02 PM
Brooks saddles can last a long time if taken care of. I bought my first Brooks saddle, a B17 narrow, in 1978 and have ridden it nearly every day since then. I would estimate that it has at least 50,000 miles on it based on the riding I do. It is still in good condition and I find it very comfortable. I do use Proofhide and have fenders on the bike, and I don't let it sit out in the rain. Also, I don't mess with the tension adjustment. For saddles that have been left out in the rain and not taken care of, however, the situation is much different.






AGE / VALUE:   TORPADO/ITALIA posted by: josh on 6/13/2002 at 11:03:04 PM
hey everyone i have a question about a bike im going to buy tomorrow.ive already enough research to know i want it,but i cant find a website that tells me how to date torpado's.the company went out of buisness in the early 90's so no luck there.if i had to guess i would say late 80's bike,but im no expert.anyways if anyone has any information about torpado dating,i would be very gratefull!!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   TORPADO/ITALIA posted by Walter on 6/14/2002 at 1:42:27 AM
Unless there's a Torpado specialist out there the best approach would be thru components, if you're reasonably sure they're OEM. Tell us what's on this bike.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   TORPADO/ITALIA posted by josh on 6/14/2002 at 4:44:41 AM
ok here is the bike basically.there are a few differences.http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Italy/torpado_alpha.htm and the components are on this page.http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Italy/torpado_specs.htm now the only differences are no chrome dropouts,stem has been changed(stripped threads),seatpost changed(rusted in place),and the derailers are sachs huret.everything else is the same exept the model ofcourse.the bike is in really good shape cosmetically.very lite(compared to my continental)23 lbs.exellent italian craftsmanship.






AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh / Carlton posted by: Don Schlicker on 6/13/2002 at 5:24:18 PM
I have had a Raleigh raodbike for over 15 years (obtained used) that I would like to sell. I had it in a bike shop circa 1987 getting it road-worthy and was immediately offered $500 for it. I never took the cash, but now find I would rather sell the bike than continue to own it and not use it. I have been able to understand the following: It is a Carlton Raleigh that was hand-made. By virtue of the Carlton manufacture (it has the Carlton red bolt under the seat, I cant make out the would be Carlton decals at the bottom of the frame) it is probable early 70s vintage. I am unsure how to find the exact age or value of this bike. It is in good road worthy shape (tires are probably flat - it has not been ridden for 10 years) I was also able to find what looked like the same frame, 1972 vintage for sale in NY for $400. I have no clue, and would appreciate the guidance of those who monitor this list. Hopefully someone knows the would-be value and the proper venue to sell this bike.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh / Carlton posted by David on 6/13/2002 at 6:02:23 PM
Provide the size, model, frame material, list of components etc and ask for offers. (or put it on Ebay WITH pictures) You might want to take it to a shop that's been around for a while and ask them to answer the above questions. "Raleigh/Carlton" covers a very wide range of quality from "just ok" to very good.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh / Carlton posted by Dale on 6/14/2002 at 4:36:22 PM
Raleigh quit using the Carlton badges around 1971-2.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh / Carlton posted by Keith on 6/14/2002 at 5:58:41 PM
My '71 Raleigh International had Carlton stickers. It was a beautiful bike, but the workmanship was substandard, an observation I'd apply to many bike-boom era Raleigh lightweights I've seen. All of the 531-frame bikes were made at Worksop during that era, Raleigh and Carlton, and I can only say they must have been in a rush to keep up with the bike boom demand. Earlier Carltons are very nice. After Raleigh acquired Carlton, it was just another Raleigh mark. If your putative Carlton lacks decals or tubing stickers, it might be identifiable from the droputs (Campy = good; plain hanger-less probably not so good), and the lugs (chrome Nervex Pros good, painted Nervex okay). As David says, components are another clue. I'd ad that the $400 price tag on a similar bike in NY may not be a good clue.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh / Carlton posted by Keith on 6/14/2002 at 6:07:10 PM
P.S. Here's the CR blurb on Carlton -- http://www.classicrendezvous.com/British/Carltonmain.htm The fancy lugged model is kind of, but as I believe Grant Petersen once quipped about Brit bikes in general, the heavy-handed striping around the lugs may be hiding some mediochre to poor brazing.






FOR SALE:   70s Raleigh Grand Prix posted by: David on 6/13/2002 at 3:27:10 AM
I have a 25 1/2 inch Raleigh GP that I'll either fix up or get rid of. Drop me an email if you're interested in it; cheap/offer/etc. All original, Wrights saddle, toe clips, Simplex ders, steel wheels, dirty scratched white paint. Mostly needs all the bearings lubed and adjusted. Near Boston.







AGE / VALUE:   Shogun ?500? posted by: Elvis on 6/12/2002 at 8:00:31 PM
Hi all. I just acquired a Shogun road bike. It has Deore downtube shifters, triple chainrings and is black with a gold-copper color headtube. It has no real model designation; only says "Shogun" on downtube and "CR-MO 500" on the rear of the top tube near the seat tube. Simple lugs, with the edges trimmed in gold. Sidepull brakes. Any idea where this sat in the Shogun line? I've never owned a Shogun before, only other one I've seen in person was a beat up old clunker ridden by the local drunk.
Thanks for any info.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Shogun ?500? posted by Fred A on 6/13/2002 at 2:15:02 AM
Hi Elvis.

I have a Shogun 400, one model below yours. One of my favorite bikes (I have over 30 including some vintage high end ones)for all around riding. I recently picked up a Shogun Samurai, all Shimano 105, with a frame that resembles the GT FORCE. (Never saw or heard of this model, but it's amazing what you'll find at a local garage sale.)
As far a price goes, I don't know. But I do know that the models like ours went up to at least the 900 series. That I would really like to pick up in a 25" frame. Good luck with yours. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do mine. By the way, the color I have is a deep burgandy with a silver head tube. Bike is a 12 speed in almost mint condition I bought off of ebay about 2 years ago.

Fred A

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Shogun ?500? posted by Elvis on 6/13/2002 at 6:05:48 AM
Thanks! I haven't ridden it yet [need to find a wheelset most of mine are on other bikes] but it feels really light and looks well made. I bet it does indeed ride well!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Shogun ?500? posted by Keith on 6/13/2002 at 2:33:52 PM
What a coincidence! My son rode to work with me today, and he was on his 50cm Shogun 600. A very nice frequenter of this site gave it to me for him. I have it set up with 700c wheels, Suntour Superbe Pro brakes, Suntour XC Sport long cage rear derailleur, and a single Suntour barcon -- six speed, 42 x 14-32. The frame pretty very nice. Clean brazing, though not anything fancy or thinned. A decal on the top tube says, "Cromoly 600 Double Butted."