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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   benotto decals posted by: galen on 8/6/2002 at 4:25:25 AM
i was wondering if anyone knew where i might find replacement benotto decals, i have a modolo 2700 track frame that would be nice to restore, thanx, galen.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   benotto decals posted by Rob on 8/7/2002 at 6:22:27 PM
I, too, am looking for Benotto decals...I have a Modelo 850 with pretty well complete decals, but I also have a 20 year more or less 'aero' type, model not known with almost all the decals missing...only some suspect seat tube decals remain. The head badge is gone with only the glue left to indicate it was likely an oval shape.

If any one has some information, it would be appreciated.

   on the subject of BENOTTO..... posted by Chard on 8/12/2002 at 7:06:29 PM
I picked up a benotto at the local Salvation Army store and have been trying to restore it. I was wondering how to tell what model and year it is...It has all the decals and front badge if anyone needs digital photos to try and reproduce them, e-mail me and I can send them to you....any info on Benottos would be helpful..Thanks






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Vintage Bianchi on eBay posted by: mc on 8/6/2002 at 1:26:10 AM
Vintage Bianchi up for bid. A good restoration project at a fair price so far. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1848177152


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Vintage Bianchi on eBay posted by Steven on 8/6/2002 at 12:55:48 PM
Apart from the names Bianchi and Campagnolo, this bike has nothing terribly redeeming. It is carbon steel frame, pressed drop-outs, low-end campagnolo gears, cottered crank, touring gearing. In Italy, such bikes bring perhaps $50. This is a very non descript bike boom bike with a historically highly charged paint colour and brand. Nobody is nibbling because the opening price is at the high end of its possible value. Personally I would touch it for more than $50, and even then...

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Vintage Bianchi on eBay posted by Gralyn on 8/6/2002 at 3:01:29 PM
Yes, some of these just look like your typical bike boom stuff - and no better than most...well actually...a boomer with a ChroMo frame and alloy wheels can be much better than some of the steel Bianchi's you see.

     Vintage Bianchi on eBay posted by John E on 8/7/2002 at 3:03:49 AM
I have inspected an identical bike at CyclArt. Yes, it's a lower-end Bianchi, but it rides far better than most of the Asian CrMo of the late 1960s and early 1970s (been there, done that, even had a "Nishiki" T-shirt made!).






AGE / VALUE:   MYSTERY DROPOUTS ? posted by: FREE SPIRIT on 8/5/2002 at 5:42:08 AM
Last week at a 2nd hand store I bought a bike that had forged dropouts with an inscription something like L.S.hinar. The bike is possibly a 70's fuji and was repainted and the head badge removed. Even after looking at the dropouts with a magnifying glass I was unable to make out the name. I know it wasnt shimano because it was in sligtly cursive writing unlike the blockish shimano script on their dropouts. Does anyone know who made these. The bike was outfitted with the standard suntour, sugino, and sr components. The brazing was poorly done with gobs or drops between the lug ends and the frame tubing on the bottom sides of the tubes.







AGE / VALUE:   BEST FRAME TO USE FOR FIXED GEAR BIKE posted by: Kevin K on 8/4/2002 at 2:45:05 PM
Hi to all. Just asking: What is the best frame to use to build up a fixed gear bike? Should the frame be the same size you normally ride or should one secure a smaller frame? I ask this as I will be leaving the brakes off. Tubing. I've located a nice butted Fuji ( Hey it's not a Schwinn ) frame. No damage with nice long stamped steel dropouts. Alot of talk on this site about fixed gear bikes just looking for more info. Thanks to all. Kevin K


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   BEST FRAME TO USE FOR FIXED GEAR BIKE posted by Warren on 8/4/2002 at 4:11:44 PM
Whatever frame you use, you really should insure that the combination of bottom bracket height and crank length allow you enough road clearance in all but the most extreme cornering conditions. One month ago I jammed a pedal on a busy downtown street and went horizontal and scraped myself up badly.

If you were building a true track bike for track racing, you would use a frame a few centimetres smaller than your road bike. A true track position is bent right over the bars. Ignore this for a fixed gear road bike. You want to be able to comfortably ride with your head up to see whats coming.

Please do not ride without a front brake. This is entirely foolish for a novice to do...even "experts" do so at great peril. In my opinion, it is pure machismo and show great disregard for family and loved ones.

   FRAME FOR FIXED GEAR BIKE posted by John E on 8/4/2002 at 9:52:55 PM
Except on a velodrome, every adult bicycle needs at least a good front brake, and preferably a rear, as well.

Yes, a high bottom bracket is very important for a fixie, a is, for the same reason, the shortest possible crank spindle.

If you are converting a decent-quality frame to fixed gear, DO NOT amputate the derailleur hanger, unless you genuinely do not care about potential future resale value.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   BEST FRAME TO USE FOR FIXED GEAR BIKE posted by Walter on 8/4/2002 at 10:49:20 PM
Stay at your current frame size as this will essentially be a roadbike, just with a different transmission.

Keep the front brake. That's all I use on my fixie and 90%+ of my freewheeling too. Learned front brake use on sport (motor)bikes and join their chorus when they claim that rear brakes are way too skid prone. The rear has some use for scrubbing off speed on long downhills but I don't have any of those in S. Fla. On the flats your rear wheel will unweight when stopping a fixie and makes brakes on that wheel superfluous.

The usuals: Long horizontal DOs and as few brazeons as possible.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   BEST FRAME TO USE FOR FIXED GEAR BIKE posted by darryl on 8/5/2002 at 1:42:11 AM
For more info see Sheldon "One Is All You Need" Brown's website at sheldonbrown.com.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   BEST FRAME TO USE FOR FIXED GEAR BIKE posted by Kevin K on 8/5/2002 at 11:51:14 AM
Hi all. The advice on the brakes was well taken. The reason for no brakes was to keep the frame as clean looking as possible. Also, this bike will never see road use. It is strictly for a 20 plus mile bike trail that was completed here last year. So once again to all, thank you. Kevin K

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   BEST FRAME TO USE FOR FIXED GEAR BIKE posted by Pete on 8/5/2002 at 12:35:20 PM
Hey! My first fixer was Schwinn! :)
Anyway to add to the advice.
Any frame with horizontal drops should be able to be converted with out much trouble.
The bottom bracket drop is an issue only if it's unusually low.
I think most production bikes fall within an acceptable range. I'd watch the crank length as a marginal bb drop and long crank will get you into trouble.
I will echo those who said use at least one brake.
Mine has two.
Even on a trail the time will come when somebody will do something unexpected to cause a sudden stop (this trail will have pedestrians? little kids?) If a little kid wanders out in front of me, I'm stopping! If the guy behind me with the cool looking no brakes fixer runs into me he can be assured of an unfriendly reception.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   BEST FRAME TO USE FOR FIXED GEAR BIKE posted by Warren on 8/5/2002 at 1:51:14 PM
Unless you own this path for your own use AND it has a fence surrounding it, use a brake. Without a doubt, someone will have their dog off it's leash and BAM...game over. People tend to behave in a cavalier fashion on secluded paths...keep on your toes.

Sorry, I don't want to sound like Mom but I ride some outstanding paths here in Toronto and they sometimes prove to be just as dangerous as the roads.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   BEST FRAME TO USE FOR FIXED GEAR BIKE posted by Kevin K on 8/5/2002 at 2:08:47 PM
Hi again. The advice will he taken on the brakes. Pete, the Schwinn comment wasn't a jab at Schwinn as Schwinn Letours are usually the only bikes I collect. Kevin K

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   BEST FRAME TO USE FOR FIXED GEAR BIKE posted by Gralyn on 8/5/2002 at 3:29:03 PM
I was thinking...for a nice fixie....A Chro-Mo frame....slightly smaller than what I normally ride....with as few braze-on's as possible. They're hard to find, though...most frames I find have all the braze-on's. I did find an older Fuji...with no braze-on's along the top tube...but I doubt it's ChroMo...probably just reg. steel. I was wondering.....could I cut the braze-on's off...smooth it over...and re-paint - to make the frame look as clean as possible? I guess without actually using a track frame - converting a road bike...most likely I would have to find a higher-end, older bike...old enough to not have a lot of braze-on's.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   BEST FRAME TO USE FOR FIXED GEAR BIKE posted by dafydd on 8/5/2002 at 4:24:36 PM
Cro-mo frames are fairly plentiful and inexpensive. Personally, I wouldn't feel bad about hacking and painting a lower-end model. Plan to do it, actually.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   BEST FRAME TO USE FOR FIXED GEAR BIKE posted by Gralyn on 8/5/2002 at 6:57:54 PM
Yea, that's what I'm going to do, too. I just don't currently have any ChroMo frames I want to do that to. I had one...and I wasn't going to use it - because of all the braze-ons - and at the time - I hadn't even thought of removing them....but I sold it. Now I am looking for another frame. I have a couple chroMo frames - but they are 25"...too tall for me. Maybe I will trade.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   BEST FRAME TO USE FOR FIXED GEAR BIKE posted by Wings on 8/6/2002 at 7:46:15 AM
"Machismo" = Stupido?






MISC:   Strange Freewheel posted by: Bryant on 8/3/2002 at 10:49:29 PM
Hi all. I'm working on a 1983 Trek 520 that was modified sometime during its life. It has a strange shimano rear hub and freewheel. It is not original since the original equipment was supposed to be Helicomatic hubs. I did not have the tool for this freewheel so I took the hub apart anyway to rebuild it. Much to my surprise, the freewheel came off also. It was not screwed on, it slid on the axle. There were some teeth?? on the drive side that kept the freewheel from freewheeling in both directions. Also the bearings were in the freewheel body, close to the smallest gears. Anyone seen a freewheel like this before and know what it is called??
Second cool thing I found on this bike, it has Suntour Symmetric downtube shifters. It looks like as you shift your rear gears, the front shifter automatically feathers itself. Haven't ridden the bike yet to see if it works but I did notice the action when I was cleaning the shifters. Anyone have any experience with these??


     Strange Freewheel / modern freehub, perhaps? posted by John E on 8/3/2002 at 11:53:37 PM
It sounds as though someone (very wisely!) replaced the OEM Helicomatic with an early Shimano freehub.

Yes, I recall a few self-synchronizing downtube lever setups. It was a good concept, but the execution left a bit to be desired, and it ended up as one of bicycling's numerous evolutionary dead ends.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Unknown Schwinn model? posted by: Dan on 8/3/2002 at 4:09:12 PM
I took it home for $10, it had a repaint, a 3spd. S/A hub with a 58 no. on the hub (1958?)coaster brake, a nice Troxel leather seat. What was odd is that it had araya rim on the front (forgot to look at the rear rim name). Did Schwinn have a model with the diamond style frame in '58 ? I checked the picture data base for Schwinn and could not find this bike.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Unknown Schwinn model? posted by David on 8/3/2002 at 11:43:51 PM
Wouldn't the Racer and Traveler models be possibilities for this bike?

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Unknown Schwinn model? posted by Dan on 8/4/2002 at 5:10:23 AM
I have seen a Racer and it is the same styling were they built as early as 1958? There are no decals for identification on the frame, the rims are steel Arayas (?).I found only a set of numbers on the rear dropout which were faint from a heavy repaint, I'll work it up and post it later. It ain't to purdy but it shifts and the tires hold air (Schwinn Touring tires).

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Unknown Schwinn model? posted by Wings on 8/4/2002 at 7:02:53 AM
According to Hurd, "Collectable Schwinn-Built Bicycle's 1950's -1965" -- In 1958 the Travelor (Diamond frame) was built with a 3 speed hub, front and rear caliper brakes. The Racer was also built (diamond frame) with "3 speed gears" and hand brakes. A Racer was also made with a coaster brake as a promotional item.


The Travelor and Racer frames are identical as far as I can see (I have both). They were also made in 1957, 1956. The Travelor was also made in 1955, 1954.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Unknown Schwinn model? posted by Dan on 8/4/2002 at 3:28:28 PM
If this is a '58 Racer w/coaster brake, would it be more desirable if it were a promotional item? What does being a promo item mean for a bicycle, for dealers only?

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Unknown Schwinn model? posted by ken on 8/4/2002 at 7:36:55 PM
The Racer was available with coaster brake.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Unknown Schwinn model? posted by Dan on 8/5/2002 at 12:29:52 AM
Thanks everyone! Dan






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   speedway ti. frame info?? posted by: Barry Fraser on 8/3/2002 at 1:52:14 AM
Hey

I have recently aquired a 1976 Speedway Titanium frame and fork, all fillet brazed, unfinished. Does anyone here know any info on speedway frames, especially the Titanium ones, im betting it is one of the first Ti frames produced..

Let me know

thanks
-Barry


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   speedway ti. frame info?? posted by Chuck Schmidt on 8/3/2002 at 8:04:31 PM
Do you mean the Speedwell Co. out of England? It was the first to make a titanium frame (Luis Ocana rode one in the TdF in the 1970s).

Chuck Schmidt
SoPas, SoCal

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   speedway ti. frame info?? posted by Barry Fraser on 8/7/2002 at 12:47:21 PM
I did some searches on the net and my frame is definately a speedwell. I have the Ti frame, Ti fork and some old campy parts still in original packaging and wax paper, there is a couple of beautiful cassettes and chains, Bottom brackets and handlebarand seatpost.

I am going to start a patient search for unuzed campy super record parts to build it up and use it only as decoration.

The frame is raw right now, i was thinking of reproducing the original stickers, or do you think i should leave it as is?






AGE / VALUE:   Yard sale find posted by: Grant on 8/2/2002 at 8:57:00 PM
Great luck at yard sale this morning.I found a beautiful condition Sansui 9090 receiver.He wanted $45cdn for it.
If I hauled away his son's mint Nishiki Continental
he'd knock off $10.Thirty five dollars for both.He did'nt want the clutter. I agreed to help him out.







MISC:   FB hub/ posted by: Warren on 8/2/2002 at 3:42:47 AM
Picked up a wheel from the thrift shop. It has a 40 hole weinman 27" rim on a 3 piece steel FB hub. It's double sided...fixed and freewheel. It has a 5 speed Regina Gransport freewheel. Very unusual I thought...any ideas about the quality and origins of this hub?


   RE:MISC:   FB hub/ posted by Steven on 8/2/2002 at 3:24:32 PM
FB for many years were among the best hubs in the world. Their top hubs however were generally steel barrel and alloy flanges. What width is the hub? If it is 120 mm, it could be very valuable. Can you tell if the hub has been built up more than once? I would expect that the 27" rim is the second building of the hub.

   RE:MISC:   FB hub/ posted by Steven on 8/2/2002 at 3:25:52 PM
FB for many years were among the best hubs in the world. Their top hubs however were generally steel barrel and alloy flanges. What width is the hub? If it is 120 mm, it could be very valuable. Can you tell if the hub has been built up more than once? I would expect that the 27" rim is the second building of the hub. is the hub bolt-on or Q/R?

   RE:RE:MISC:   FB hub/ posted by Warren on 8/4/2002 at 4:12:28 AM
Steven, it is indeed steel with alloy low flanges, 120mm spacing and bolt on with track nuts. It appears to need a Campy lock ring which I don't have.

Of course I now start plotting how to build a bike around this hub...what do you think? Throw a grand at a $3 hub? Never stand in the way of a man and his dreams. Thanks for the info.

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   FB hub/ posted by Steven on 8/4/2002 at 5:32:18 PM
Warren,

This hub predates Campagnolo hubs. They were actually a subcontractor (supplier) to Campagnolo. I believe they went out of business some time in the 60's. The 40° is however odd.






MISC:   '66? High-end Raleigh posted by: Brent on 8/2/2002 at 2:24:24 AM
I picked up something nice today. Black and gold Raleigh, it doesn't have any model name that I can see on the top tube. Campy strada cranks and I believe brakes. The rear deraileur is a nuevo record. The Cinelli handlebars have
"66 42" on them, I'm wondering if the '66 would be the year. The only bummer is that the wheels are probably early '80s since they are cyclone hubs laced to Mavic ma-40 rims. Someone must not have wanted to pay for sewups.
I finally found Campy equiped road bike.


   RE:MISC:   '66? High-end Raleigh posted by Mike Slater on 8/2/2002 at 1:13:57 PM
Cyclone hubs and Mavic Ma40 rims doesn't sound like too much of a bummer to me. If they have stainless spokes, so much the better. Not original...but who cares!

   RE:RE:MISC:   '66? High-end Raleigh posted by Steven on 8/2/2002 at 3:33:35 PM
If the handlebars are original, the bike cannot be older than the late 70's. The bars that you have are Cinelli Campione del Mondo bend bars. In Cinelli parlance, this is model 66. The 42 is the width of the bars (C/C). Old Cinelli bars only have the model number hammered into the end of the bars. They also have a very fancy heraldic logo on one side of where the stem goes and another logo with the model description. Yours have a stylized design of the word Cinelli and a 4 pointed star-like emblem with model description. Check the Campagnolo parts for the year, not the Cinelli bars. The rear derailleur will likely have a patent date where the cable enters. The cranks will have a date code too.

   RE:MISC:   '66? High-end Raleigh posted by David on 8/2/2002 at 4:38:58 PM
Black, if original, suggests a Raleigh Competition. Does it have brazed-on rear brake cable stop, a brazed-on fitting for the rear brake adjuster, or sloping-crown fork?

   RE:RE:MISC:   '66? High-end Raleigh posted by Brent on 8/3/2002 at 2:29:46 AM
The rear derailleur is an '84 and the only extra marking cranks besides strada and the 172.5 size is a four inside a circle. It doesn't have any extra braze ons for the rear brakes. I would have never guessed it would be that new of bike. I didn't think that Raleigh used the script style downtube badging that late. The frame and fork are the full 531, stays and all. Unfortunatly, I think the frame is going to be a bit too big for me too. (62cm)






MISC:   '66? High-end Raleigh posted by: Brent on 8/2/2002 at 2:24:24 AM
I picked up something nice today. Black and gold Raleigh, it doesn't have any model name that I can see on the top tube. Campy strada cranks and I believe brakes. The rear deraileur is a nuevo record. The Cinelli handlebars have
"66 42" on them, I'm wondering if the '66 would be the year. The only bummer is that the wheels are probably early '80s since they are cyclone hubs laced to Mavic ma-40 rims. Someone must not have wanted to pay for sewups.
I finally found Campy equiped road bike.


   RE:MISC:   '66? High-end Raleigh posted by ken on 8/4/2002 at 7:46:58 PM
Look it up on Retro Raleighs http://www.speakeasy.org/'tabula/raleigh/






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old English? posted by: Jim Barnard on 8/2/2002 at 12:21:56 AM
Hi,
I an interested in a few things under this heading. I know so little about the lightweights that I thought I would post these questions.
I wish to put a Sturmey Archer fixed wheel ASC hub on a bike that would have been a likely cantidate to have had one 50 years ago. [I am concearned with pedals digging into the ground]What would be a good choice?
What might be a fair price for a 1930's Raleigh RRA in good AND rideable shape with the correct K hub on it?
I have found a Triumph drop bar 3sp racer from 1960. How long were "10 speed" style bikes made with hub gears? Did all the manufactures go to derailleurs by then?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old English? posted by Walter on 8/2/2002 at 2:00:07 AM
An ASC hub? That's sort of the Holy Grail there and would buy 2 maybe 3 Record Aces.

I'm somewhat captivated by the old "club" bikes and have read what I could find. The club scene was popular in England from the 1930s through the 1950s. Maybe longer? SA and fixed gears either single or flip/flop were the choice for most of this time. Derailleurs would have become dominant by the early 60s I'd think. Clubs ran time trials as mass start races were illegal on most roads then. Btw and somewhat related: Motorbike road racing was legal only on the Isle of Man which explains the famous TT races still run there.

Top club bikes would be 531 framed. You'll have to check crank arm lengths for ground clearance. When converting "newer" (1970s and up) the preference is for 165mm though many, including myself, get by with 170.

Keep an eye on eBay. Club bikes show up now and again.

Good luck.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old English? posted by smg on 8/2/2002 at 7:17:42 PM
To me, the appeal of the club-type bike is the combination of the clean-looking drive train (suggestive of a track bike) with the practicality and comfort of a road frame with variable gears. I've put together two in the course of the past year, which are very enjoyable rides using different S-A hubs.

Both use Raleigh "Super Course" frames from the early/mid-70s. I've come to like this frame a great deal, because of its long/plain/horizontal dropouts that adapt well to internal hubs, and the main triangle of straight-guage 531 seems to provide a comfortable ride. Best of all, the "Super Course" seems to be fairly easy to find and low-priced, either as a frame or a more-or-less complete bike.

It is, unfortunately, not a good frame for fixed-gear use. The bottom bracket height is a classic 10.5", and I occasionally clip a pedal. This project started out with an Atala "Grand Prix II" of about the same vintage (now, alas, down with a broken dropout) which had an 11.5" bottom bracket height, which would have been better for fixed gear use.

Definitely keep an eye on eBay for Sturmey-Archer hubs. I've bought an FW and an AM there, as well as one of the frames. The fixed-gear hubs unfortunately seem to be cult items that get bid up outrageously. Good luck, and welcome to the "club"!

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Some specifics posted by Walter on 8/3/2002 at 1:07:30 PM
I tracked down an eBay auction from June that I had watched. It was the 'real deal" so to speak. A 1955 Raleigh "Super Lenton." It was definitely a club bike. Full 531, 27 inch Dunlops, Narrow Brooks saddle and a SA 4 speed. Pretty bike. Seller was in the UK and the bike went for 250 Sterling. If you're in the US figure about $100 to get it here. I don't have the link but you can search eBay's closed auctions. Use "Super Lenton" as your search term.
Hope that helps.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old English? posted by Jim Barnard on 8/4/2002 at 1:39:25 AM
Thanks all!
I am starting to dream about top tube shifters on race bikes with fenders and dynohubs...






AGE / VALUE:   Biopace Crankset posted by: Rob on 8/1/2002 at 11:11:54 PM
I see there has been a bit discussion lately on the Biopace crankset. I have a 12 speed Gardin...yellow and blue (built in Mississauga, Ontario by Italian framebuilders apparently...company now, I've been told, out of business). This bike, mostly Shimano (Light Action derailleur), appears to have come with Biopace, aero brakes and some sort of early index shifting. It's actually a very decent bike...light, responsive and quite stable...I've been using mine as daily commuter for about a month and half. I would recommend it as a pretty nice basic lightweight...likely easier to find in Canada than in the US, although they may have been exported.

So...how do the Biopace crankset, the early indexing and the aero brakes date this bike? mid to late 1980's? Any what is the general consensus on Biopace...Frankly I can hardly tell much difference...maybe it's a subtle longer term issue...


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Mid 80s posted by Walter on 8/2/2002 at 2:05:12 AM
Shimano introduced SIS in, I believe, 84 and it dominated the market by 86. BioPace came out right about then too.

I do like their Light Action brakes. I have some from the early 1990s that are dual-pivot and they're wonderful brakes even with the not so great by reputattion Shimano pads.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Mid 80s posted by Steven on 8/2/2002 at 3:41:45 PM
Joe Gardin started his company that built bikes in the early 80's and went bust in the 90's. He di d indeed bring in a few Italian master frame builders to run the business for him. He was also the sole importer of Rino products and one of a few Mavic importers for Canada. Your bike dates from the mid-to-late 80's.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Biopace Crankset posted by Tim Welsh on 8/2/2002 at 10:19:11 PM
Biopace rings varied from extreme (I just put one on a bike where I had a hard time getting the front derailleur high enough so it wouldn't hit the teeth) to fairly mild. My experience is that the effect is most irritating at high cadence, sort of feeling like a rear suspension bike with bad bobbing under torque.

I have read that Biopace rings are good for casual riders who just use flat pedals, and are therefore only engaging the down strokes. I put it on a bike for an older woman who had some hip problems. If you use toe clips or clipless pedals, then that's when Biopace is actually a hindrance to good pedalling, because it's hard to pedal full circles.


   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Biopace Crankset posted by ken on 8/4/2002 at 7:53:58 PM
Cannondale spec'd Suntour Ovaltech, all 3 rings, in 1990. There's good linkage about biopace in Sheldon Brown (surprise, surprise...)






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Components/Raleigh posted by: Andy on 8/1/2002 at 9:33:31 PM
who knows what components can and can not be used on a 1971 Raleigh International frame, Threads are the main concern, Headset, bottom brecket, plus-seat post size?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Components/Raleigh posted by David on 8/2/2002 at 1:21:55 AM
"English" threading. See Sheldon's website.

      Components/Raleigh posted by John E on 8/2/2002 at 3:27:13 AM
The big advantage of older British bikes over their continental cousins is that almost all of their fittings, except the rear triangle spread, conform to modern ISO standards. (Great argument for adding a Carlton, Raleigh, Holdsworth, Hetchins, Dawes, or Maclean to my stable ... )

   RE:   Components/Raleigh posted by Pete on 8/5/2002 at 12:24:35 PM
Just be aware that some Raleighs and some brands taken over by Raleigh used Raleigh specific threading on the headsets and bottom brackets(26tpi). This can be help or hindrance depending on what you're working on.
Best of my knowledge the International uses all "normal" English threading. Uses a 27.2 seatpost. see:
http://sheldonbrown.com/seatpost_sizes.html#r






FOR SALE:   1976 (Approx.) Schwinn Varsity posted by: Pam Bothello on 7/31/2002 at 8:31:44 PM
I am the original owner of this Schwinn Varsity and it was purchased for me in 1976. I no longer have a place to store it and I was wondering if someone would want to purchase it. I will be donating it to charity if I don't find an interested party.


   RE:FOR SALE:   1976 (Approx.) Schwinn Varsity posted by Oscar on 8/1/2002 at 3:37:35 PM
Late Varsities are usually traded hands at garage sales or curbside. Since shipping cost ($35?) would exceed the sales price, look for someone local. Where do you live?