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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







MISC:   Decals posted by: Tom Findley on 9/10/2002 at 5:39:57 PM
Read what David Edwards wrote on the Schwinn Restoration Forum:

"I took my ole varsity frame to a vinyl sign store.Most have scaning machine. The man just layed my frame on the scaning bed and scaned all my decals and made them from vinyl the back has an adesive.It works realy grate and looks good too. The only one I could not get was the one under the seat post. Hope it works for you. David"

This may be the answer for decals, if it doesn't cost $100.


   RE:MISC:   Decals posted by Gralyn on 9/11/2002 at 2:32:55 PM
Does anyone know...is it possible...to get some type of decal material - with adhesive backing (it would be like a clear plastic-looking stuff) - that you can run through your printer on your home computer? I was thinking that it would really be neat to make some decals to put on some of the bikes I have re-painted. There are all types of possibilities of fonts and styles for lettering, script, etc. Some could be made to look almost exactly as the originals....and on some - you could create your own. If there is such a decal material...where would you find it?

   RE:RE:MISC:   Decals posted by TF on 9/11/2002 at 3:03:04 PM
This decal film paper exists. Mike Stone did this, and said the decals fade if the bike is used outside in the sun.

I think the process is limited to decals put on model cars, trains, etc. that are not put in light with UV rays.

   RE:MISC:   Decals posted by sam on 9/11/2002 at 11:49:39 PM
Do a search on water slide decals.Bell sells paper for ink jet printers.I have heard you can now buy UV ink for the printer so they will not fade.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   value posted by: bill stidd on 9/10/2002 at 4:51:42 PM
i have a 1979 schwinn varsity 10 speed in mint right down to the original tape on the handle bars,cover on end of kick stand, plastic covering frame from chain on side,all mint, how much is she worth? thanks, bill







AGE / VALUE:   price for 1979 varsity shwinn 10 speed in mint shape posted by: bambi stidd on 9/10/2002 at 2:11:17 PM
i have the 79 and a girls shwinn 10 speed but only sereal numbers i can find are a g with 5 or 6 numbers after it any idea how much they are worth? there both mint. thanks alot. bambi


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   price for 1979 varsity shwinn 10 speed in mint shape posted by Jonathan on 9/11/2002 at 5:57:48 AM
If the bikes are "mint", that means they've never been on the road! Around here, the Varsities appear in thrift stores and garage sales for $5 to $50, depending on the situation. My guess is that the bikes were for the baby-boomers who left them for mom and pop to figure out what to do with the hulks that were left in the back of the garage when college days began. I used to find them all over the place. I got a '77 Varsity for $7 from a garage sale down the street. It is very much a good ride, but the was some fade on the paint and rotten HB tape; bricks for brake shoes; cracks in the seat; etc. Well, it's a $50 bike for a strong person who is into retro bikes to ride. One thing that's wierd is there are people who must canvas the thrift stores on a daily basis looking for anything Schwinn before 1980. I mean there just aren't any around. I picked up a matched pair of Schwinn "suburbans" with the positron chainwheel (1968?) for $75 at a thrift store that I just happened to visit just when they were coming out of the truck. The manager indicated that I better buy them, before the "collector" dude sees them. The bikes are nearly new, pristine, not mint. If yours is similar, it might be worth keeping for a while. The market can take off any day, if it hasn't. Wild guess...$150 to a nostalgia buff from the baby boom.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   price for 1979 varsity shwinn 10 speed in mint shape posted by Gralyn on 9/11/2002 at 2:15:58 PM
Yes I picked up an old Varsity (1973 model per serial #) in a thrift store for $10. And I figure...that's about what it's worth. I could clean it up a bit and tune it up a bit - and maybe get $20-$30 for it. But I really bought it because it was old, it was in pretty good shape, and it's kinda like a classic. I didn't have one in my collection...it didn't really want a Varsity to ride ('cause it's a tank)...but I thought every collection should have one. Who knows....several years from now - they may be worth something.....well, they probably will.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   1950's Bianchi Pair on Ebay posted by: Tom on 9/10/2002 at 2:52:38 AM
Here is a very interesting pair of Bianchi bikes on Ebay.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2139743401


   RE:1950's Bianchi Pair on Ebay posted by Steven on 9/11/2002 at 1:44:22 PM
Pirelli Stella tires were produced for a very long time. I believe they were first produced in the 30's and then continued until the 70's. The ertrto coding that the vendor is mentioning in his ad may indicate 70's because I don't think that they used the universal coding in the 60's. I may be wrong however.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   1950's Bianchi Pair on Ebay posted by Steven on 9/10/2002 at 2:25:26 PM
They are actually more likely from the 60's (maybe even 70's) They are however quite interesting. I couldn't put any value on them here in teh US but in Italy they would go for perhaps $50 each (however not likely to be in this pristine shape!)

   1950's Bianchi Pair on Ebay posted by John E on 9/10/2002 at 2:41:30 PM
I vote for early 1960s, mainly because my 1962 Bianchi Corsa road bike came with Pirelli Stella tyres (26 x 1-1/4").

Note the small tyre diameters on these two juvenile bikes. The 22" size could be a bit hard to find, although Sheldon might have some.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   super le tour posted by: Ken on 9/9/2002 at 8:37:17 PM
I just got a Schwinn (Japan) Super Le Tour 12.2 : Shimano 600 cranks and rear der, though not the nice scrollwork one, Diacompe brakes & levers, Shimano hubs and Araya 27" rims and a 5-speed freewheel; early microadjust type post which unfortunately appears to have welded itself in; cro-mo with DB top and down tubes, but no bottle brazeons. From the LeTour thread below, I see somebody will be able to tell me all about this. Age? "Rank" in the hierarchy? And what does the 12.2 mean? Is it supposed to have a 6 freewheel?


   RE:RE: First year LeTour posted by Jonathan on 9/11/2002 at 6:07:41 AM
Eric, thanks. That explains the difference. The Traveler has 4130 butted tubes and forks, while the LT2 is the 1020 type, although there is nothing but a sticker stating; "super lite bicycle" on the downtube near the BB. "Super lite" must be in comparison to galvanized water pipe. Actually, the LT2 shifts real smooth for a medium priced bike.

   Correct info from '77 catalog posted by Tom Findley on 9/11/2002 at 11:08:09 AM
1. The SLT and LT@ were both made in Japan.
2. SLT cost $230, had double-butted tubes (?), Shimano derailleurs, aluminum alloy rims, and weighed 26.5 lbs.
3. LT2 cost $165, had single-butted tubes (?), GT derailleurs, steel rims, and weighed 29 lbs.
4. The Superior was made in USA, and cost $232.
5. The hierarchy in '77 was: Paramount (US), Volare (J), Superior (US), Super Le Tour (J), Le Tour II (J), Traveler (J), Sierra (US), Varsity Sport (US), Suburban (US), Collegiate Sport (US), Runabout Sportabout (US).

I am sure that several thousand other people can now sleep tonight. I hate posting wrong information.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   super le tour posted by Ken on 9/9/2002 at 8:55:14 PM
Oops. Left out the serial # stamped on headbadge, 0858.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   super le tour posted by Eric Amlie on 9/9/2002 at 9:42:07 PM
From the headbadge number I would say that your bike is from 1978. There was no Super LeTour 12.2 in 1988 so it must be '78. According to the catalog your bike should be either full chrome, Scarlet, Black, or Silver Mist. It was third down from the Paramounts with the Volare between it and the Paramounts. Yours seems to be equipped a little differently than the catalog specifies. It says the cranks & hubs were Schwinn Approved. Maybe Schwinn just didn't bother rebadging these components though. The freewheel cluster is supposed to be 5 speed, 14-17-20-24-28. The 12.2 refers to the weight of the bike in kilograms and equals 26.5 pounds. It sold for $249.95 with a price hike to $264.95 sometime during the year. Full chrome cost an additional $50.00.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   super le tour posted by Jonathan on 9/10/2002 at 4:59:01 AM
This whole Le Tour model history thing gets more confusing. After reading this post and the previous one (Elvis'), I got my Le Tour "II" out for a ride. The frame has a sticker boasting "super lite bicycle", which it is not, and another that states "made in Japan". The left rear dropout has a "G" followed with "72" and some other numbers. I take that to mean that it is "Giant, 1972", or it is a coincidence with Panasonic's serialization.
This bike wasn't beat except it must have been kept in a coastal region because there was a lot of surface corrosion of the type that you see on boat hardware. The aluminum brakes were coated. It cleaned up easily, but I can't make out the name. They are center pulls most likely a Weinmann species. The Derailer has; "Schwinn approved: stamped on the cage; it looks like Shimano. The shifters are stem mounts with "Unishift" stamped onto the rubber
sheaths covering the metal shifters. The crank has "le Tour" stamped onto the middle of each arm. The handle bar stem has an "S" on the reach; the bar is alloy.
If the "Traveler" is supposed to be a notch below the Le Tour they must not have tested them on the road. The Traveler is a much superior ride IMHO, and as a result of having both rides to compare. One plus for my Le Tour II is that it shifts smoother. Where is "Le Tour II" supposed to belong in the heirarchy is my main puzzlement.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   super le tour posted by Le Tour models on 9/10/2002 at 11:17:25 AM
I have a '77 catalog, and was looking at it over the past 2 weeks. The Super Le Tour 12.2 was made in USA, and sold for $250. The Le Tour II was made in Japan, and sold for about $165. That was a big difference in price when my weekly net pay was $118 a week. The SLT weighed about 26 lbs., the LT@ weighed about 29 lbs. Lose 3 lbs. on a diet, save $85.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   super le tour posted by TF on 9/10/2002 at 11:19:57 AM
The front derailleurs were made by GT.

   super le tour posted by Elvis on 9/10/2002 at 1:06:19 PM
In my experience lack of water bottle braze ons usually denotes bicycles made in the 60s or 70s, though some 70s bikes have them. Bikes made in the 1980s almost always have at least 1, sometimes two.
BTW, did Schwinn stop putting "Schwinn approved" on components after a certain point? My own le tour, which I was advised in a '84-'85 model, doesn't say "Schwinn approved" on anything except the toe clips.

   super le tour posted by Elvis on 9/10/2002 at 1:06:35 PM
In my experience lack of water bottle braze ons usually denotes bicycles made in the 60s or 70s, though some 70s bikes have them. Bikes made in the 1980s almost always have at least 1, sometimes two.
BTW, did Schwinn stop putting "Schwinn approved" on components after a certain point? My own le tour, which I was advised in a '84-'85 model, doesn't say "Schwinn approved" on anything except the toe clips.

   RE:super le tour posted by Jonathan on 9/10/2002 at 4:07:52 PM
Ahhh, that is useful information, maestro Elvis. I hadn't thought about the "braze-on" feature as an age diag. That is very useful. I checked my bikes of determined age and you are 100%. Good bit of induction, there. Well, that price diff. between SLT and LT's would explain the ride diff. between my "Travel" and "LT2". The LT2 has schwinn "approved" wide flange hubs with steel narrow 1+1/4" rims. The bike is a good ride.
When do you suppose was the first yr. of production of the Le Tour model?

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   super le tour posted by Ken on 9/10/2002 at 5:55:52 PM
Thanks for the help everyone. Eric, I can only guess they're the original wheels; the front fork has those wacky buttons on the inside, to accept the spring tabs that the later (70s) Contis used to prevent accidental dropout, but no tabs. It's black. And 78 sounds right on- with reference to the post re the 77 catalog, this may have been the first year of Japan-made SLT frames. It's clearly marked Japan both on the headbadge and in the painted Schwinn circle on the downtube, which reads "Schwinn Approved" rather than "Schwinn Quality Chicago".

   RE: First year LeTour posted by Eric Amlie on 9/10/2002 at 7:57:47 PM
According to the catalogs 1974 was the first year for the LeTour. I think they were made by Panasonic (National) in Japan. One reason for the difference in quality between the LeTour and the Traveler may be their relative ages. Both bikes started out rather low quality with 1020 carbon steel frames, and were generally improved with succeeding years. Both ended up being pretty good bikes with 4130 chrome-moly frames in the eighties. If you are comparing a seventies LeTour to an eighties Traveler, the Traveler would indeed be a better bike.

   RE:RE: First year LeTour posted by Jonathan on 9/11/2002 at 10:59:03 PM
Thanks, Eric. The LT in 1974 must have been a striking bike compared to the Varsities that most guys were running. My '77 Varsity is in tip-top condition which makes it about like what it must have like when sold as a new bike for $139 (from memory)which means that a guy could have had a LT for a "quarter" more. Hmmm, the question arises; "How could the Varsity compete with the LT"? I mean there is no comparing the rides. Seems like Schwinn could have sold a lot more LT's, than Varsities, so the LT would have become the bike for $10 at GS's and thrift marts.






AGE / VALUE:   Simplex front derailleur posted by: Darryl on 9/9/2002 at 8:27:40 PM
I have a Simplex front derailleur(SUPER), clamp-on, vintage early to mid 70s, that I'm trying to sell. Does anyone know what it is worth? It is in very good condition with the only scratches on the inside of the cage. Thanks, Darryl


   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Simplex front derailleur posted by Ray on 9/11/2002 at 3:36:24 PM
Darryl, Check your e-mail. I am definitely interested in the derailleur.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Simplex front derailleur posted by Ray on 9/11/2002 at 4:28:56 PM
Darryl, I am interested. I have a bike that I am specifically looking for that piece on. Please e-mail me. Thanks, Ray

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Simplex front derailleur posted by Warren on 9/10/2002 at 1:58:18 AM
Very little. Early 60's or 50's Simplex gear can be worth a small fortune. 70's plastic Delrin Simplex derailleurs still live on millions of old bikes and have no worth. But what the hey! Put it on ebay and takes your chances. Better odds than a lottery.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Simplex front derailleur posted by Ray on 9/10/2002 at 3:59:37 PM
Is it a Super LJ? Nice alloy with a nameplate, or black plastic? If one of the former, might be worth a few bucks.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Simplex front derailleur posted by Darryl on 9/10/2002 at 4:42:34 PM
It is a Super L.J, alloy with a nameplate. Also has Simplex logo on front of clamp.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Simplex front derailleur posted by Ray on 9/10/2002 at 10:16:53 PM
If it is alloy with the gold colored nameplate, with chrome cage that has the "S" in a sunburst, I may be interested in it myself.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Simplex front derailleur posted by Darryl on 9/11/2002 at 12:39:28 AM
That's it. Has a gold nameplate w/"Simplex" written in it. Alloy clamp and body.Chrome cage w/"S" in sunburst.Alloy clamp also w/"S" in sunburst. Clamp size about 28mm.Downpull cable attachment on the front side of body.






MISC:   Chains and cogs posted by: Gralyn on 9/9/2002 at 7:57:00 PM
What has been my favorite ride lately...my fixed-gear favorite ride...is my Fuji Special Road Racer - which I converted to fixed-gear. The only thing is that it had French rims on it...because that's all I had at the time...and the originals were too far rusted to salvage. This weekend I put a set of Araya alloy rims on it. I already had a cog on the rear Araya - so I swapped them out. However, as I rode...I kept hearing and feeling this grinding...like if the chain wasn't tracking properly. Well, I checked it out....hmm...I noticed that when I had originally installed the bottom bracket...I had put the longer end opposite the chain wheel....maybe because the bike was upside-down or something....normally I put the short end at the chain wheel....so as to obtain better chain tracking. So, I reversed it. However, I still heard and felt this grinding, rubbing....So, what gives??? I couldn't figure how to make it track any better. So, I had an idea....I put the cog I had on the French wheel on the Araya....I tried it out....NO NOISE, NO GRIND. I guess something was wrong with that particular track cog. It was nothing I could see - just looking at it...What could be wrong with that cog? Any ideas? Maybe it thicker in one area? Maybe it's warped?


   RE:MISC:   Chains and cogs posted by Oscar on 9/9/2002 at 10:06:31 PM
It seems that the chainline is a bit askew. This could be due to the difference in the hubs that you are using. Make the chainline as straight as possible between the chainring and the cog. With my singlespeeds, I build the wheel backward - I dish the wheel with longer spokes on the drive side to allow the shortest distance between the cog and the right chainstay. I also swap the spacers from right to left.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Chains and cogs posted by Steven on 9/10/2002 at 12:40:24 AM
Chains and cogs and chainwheels all wear in together. This means that the spacings of each wear at the same rate too. If you therefore put in a substantially less used or more used cog in the equation, you can have skipping problems.

   RE:MISC:   Chains and cogs posted by Keith on 9/10/2002 at 1:52:41 PM
I concur fully with Oscar and Steven. Chains are cheap (Z-chains are $4-6), so it wouldn't hurt to try a new one with the newer cog. Some inexpensive fixed cogs are very cheaply made -- downright crude, with all kinds of rough edges, and that could also be a factor. Keep your chain clean, lubed, and dry. Lately I've been using Pro-link with excellent results. In addition to re-dishing the wheel as Oscar suggests, if the chainline still isn't perfect add some chainring spacers to improve the line.






MISC:   Gummy Brake Levers posted by: Bryant on 9/9/2002 at 10:44:04 AM
Found a gem at my local thrift shop. A 1982 Trek 614 for $20. Gun Metal blue Reynolds 531 frame with Sakae AT triple crank and Suntour Cyclone Mark II derailleurs. She's a keeper. Only challenge is the gum brake lever covers look like the melted on the brake levers. I have new covers but am wondering what is the best way to get the old stuff off?? Thought I would ask the experst before attacking them with a scraper.


   RE:MISC:   Gummy Brake Levers posted by Lenny on 9/9/2002 at 11:03:47 AM
Hi Bryant,

Congrats on your nice find! You might want to try a product called "Goo-Gone" (I can't remember who makes it, but it is available in grocery or hardware stores). It is specifically designed to remove adhesive gum residues from materials. It will also clean old plastic stuff on bicycles and remove grease and dirt from cable housings. I imagine it will remove gum brake hood residues very well.

If you ever need to clean plastic hoods such as those old white "Carleton" hoods that came on '70s Raleighs, it works great for those.

   RE:MISC:   Gummy Brake Levers posted by Bryant on 9/9/2002 at 3:48:38 PM
Yeah, I remember see that stuff. From the makers of Shoe-Goo. Thanks, I'll give it a shot and tell you what I find.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Messed up posted by: Oscar on 9/9/2002 at 4:09:47 AM
Well, I admit that I really screwed up this afternoon. I managed to misthread a freewheel onto a Campy hi flange hub. Not NR, SR, no grease port, but still, this was a medium sized tragedy.

Do you have any suggestions for rethreading this poor victim, or is it totalled?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Messed up posted by Keith on 9/9/2002 at 4:38:45 PM
Depends. If you cross-threaded it and forced it most of the way and then the threads gave way -- ouch, that's likely hopeless. If you just cross-threaded a few and then backed it off, it really might be okay. You might have success chasing or recutting, but I've never done it on a hub. Loctite on what's left may help. If it looks bad, try it but don't ride it up steep hills far from home. I know 'cause I did it to a cheap hub when I was a kid and I ended up walking a fair bit!






AGE / VALUE:   1974 Schwinn Le Tour / 1973 Raleigh Record posted by: Dave on 9/9/2002 at 2:40:38 AM
I recently picked up Schwinn Le Tour (opaque red) and a 1973 Raleigh Record (blue with black accents), and wanted to know in general what are the typical values of these bicycles. I would probably state these are in above average condition with all original parts (except for the handlebar and saddle on each).

Would it be worth finding and restoring these bikes with original handlebar/saddles? And, how would I go about doing so. Sorry if my questions do not provide enough information for a proper answer, this is my 1st jump into vintage/older bicycles.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1974 Schwinn Le Tour / 1973 Raleigh Record posted by Oscar on 9/9/2002 at 4:00:14 AM
Both your bikes are decent but not hotly sought-after. I have a Le Tour of about your vintage, and it's one of my most frequently ridden bikes. It should be straight guage 1020 tubing, which decently light, but not of the highest quality. Ditto the Raleigh.

I wouldn't think finding original parts would be necessary to the enjoyment of these bikes. Probably, though, if you want the original red bar tape, you might post a message at www.schwinnbike.com/heritage in the Classic Classified section. Possibly the early Le Tours used the same tape as Varsities and Continentals.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Humber posted by: Ian Buunk on 9/8/2002 at 7:50:35 AM
Hi

I have a Humber Clipper Series 3 from 1958
can anyone tell me what the original componentry would have been on this bike?
Drop bars?

it is currently set up with a 3 speed hub and 27" x 1 1/4" rims and an upright position north road style handlebar
but i am sure this is not original

any information would be most appreciated
thanks in advance
Ian


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Hot for Humber bicycles! posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 9/8/2002 at 7:02:41 PM
If you send me a postal address, I can send you a copy of a catalog sheet.
I'll get back to you here and tell you what it says.

I must confess, I want very much to own a Humber Clipper model! Please tell me what you want for it.I'm itching to have one pretty badly and would give you a very good offer for it.
This particular model, along with the 26 inch wheel "Royal Elf" are two bikes I would dearly love to own.

I still have Humber bicycle fever and it's pretty bad.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Hot for Humber bicycles! posted by Ian Buunk on 9/10/2002 at 4:35:16 AM
Thanks but I live in New Zealand
and even if postage were'nt an issue this one is never going to be sold
my uncle got it new and it was my fathers bike during all my childhood so i'm keeping it , sorry :-)

could you scan the catalogue and email it to me?

thanks
ian

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Humber Clipper: the whole deal posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 9/10/2002 at 10:00:29 PM
The Clipper
Model 328 Gents only 21" and 23" frames
Frame: Reynolds "531" tubing, 71 (degree symbol)head and seat angles. Fully brazed up. FORK: Humber taper round blades with solid ends. WHEELS: 26 x 1 1/4 Endrick rims. TIRES: Dunlop GEAR*: Sturmey-Archer 3 speed. HANDLEBAR: Special design,adjustable stems, 6" rubber sleave grips. BRAKES:Caliper front and rear. SADDLE: Brooks best butt leather. MUDGUARDS: White celluloid, detatchable, with mud flap. FITTINGS: Tools, touring bag, pump,reflector. FINISH: Polychromatic lilac on spra-bonderized rust-proofed surface.
328AW Gent's $77.50
328LAW Lady's $77.50
328AWDH Gent's $85.25
328 LAWDH Lady's $85.25

THE WHEEL BY WHICH ALL OTHERS ARE JUDGED
(Humber bicycle slogan of the time period)

End.

My comment, With a Reynolds 531 frame and that wonderful Polychromatic lilac finish, I do not blame you for not wanting to sell the bicycle. These are nice.
The astarisk* symbol means that other Sturmey-Archer gears are available at extra cost. You could specify a A.M. or F.W. hub for example.






AGE / VALUE:   Kubuki road bike w/ wierd seatpost and DISC brake posted by: Elvis on 9/8/2002 at 6:12:02 AM
Hi all. Just picked up the mother of all wierd bikes!
It doesn't have handlebars or a seat, but it's clearly a road bike. What gets me is it's got a Bridgestone disc brake on the rear wheel! Senterpulls on front. No QR. The seatpost is also wierd; it's got a bolt protruding from top. I've heard they made a bike with a seatpost that had to be adjusted by a bolt in the top, but I never heard nothin' about a disc brake! Except for the seatpost and brake it seems like a normal average road bike, perhaps from the "bike boom" years -- it isn't light, not like another Kabuki I have with is more of a road road bike. I have never heard of any road bike with a disc, yet The frame is made to fit the brake mountings, so the disc appears original. What a far out concept! Anyone with any info on this bike [or any road bike with such a brake] is appreaciated. THIS IS A REALLY REALLY WIERD ONE!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Kubuki road bike w/ wierd seatpost and DISC brake posted by Jonathan on 9/9/2002 at 4:28:18 AM
Is it yellow? I thought they were made in China...bicycle-cabs. Mine has the Alum. BB that is one cast piece that ecases the spindle and extends out to acept the chainstays. I'm confused about the origin. Kabuki sounds Japanese, yet I sem to recall that they made heavy service commercial bikes (taxis) in China.
Anybody? Mine has "pressed" on dropouts. Seat adjustment is an expansion bolt, which is OK, except there is a bolt that is just like a "normal" seat stem clamp would have, but all it does is support the rear brake cable!! That is wierd enough.

   A Submariner -- w/ a DISC BRAKE?! posted by Elvis on 9/8/2002 at 9:55:33 AM
Hi all. After testing w/ a magnet and finding that the lugs on the Kabuki were aluminum [not magnetic like steel] and that the seatpost was indeed tightened by an expander bolt like a handlebar stem, I have concluded that the model is most likely the "Submariner" described on the Sheldon Brown bicylce website.
However, his description if I recall doesn't describe a disc brake -- and there is no model name on this bike. It says only "Bridgestone Kabuki Skyway". I know Skyway was the name of a company that made BMX bikes. Was there a connection to Kabuki, or is this model called "Skyway? Model names are usually on the top tube, but this is all on the downtube where company or brand names usually are... Could "Skyway" have been a bike similar in frame construction to the "Submariner", but w/ a disc brake? And why would someone put a disc brake on a road bike, anyway? Any info appreciated, this bike is really strange...

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Kubuki road bike w/ wierd seatpost and DISC brake posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 9/11/2002 at 5:38:15 PM
I have a Bridgestone disc brake unit. Interesting piece.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Kubuki road bike w/ wierd seatpost and DISC brake posted by Elvis on 9/10/2002 at 3:27:11 AM
It is sorta yellow, a goldish color. The bike is no light racing ride, anyone could see that. Commericial use? Maybe. But since it's a regular bike not a tandem or trike I don't know how it would be used as a taxi. Maybe it would have been fitted with a trailer? Perhaps it was intended for comercial use. But Kabuki is indeed Japanese. My other Kabuiki which I got intact is a lightweight blue road bike with nice fast gearing and was made in Japan [Kabuki was the Bridgestone Co.'s bike business]. The funky disc brake bike which puzzles me, also a Kabuki, also says made in Japan on it, but conceivably it could have been an export to China, or somewhere's else. The frame [which has all aluminum lugs though the tubes are steel] is nice, but sorta heavy, and the huge crown on the half-chrome fork doesn't help the weight any... The rear and front derailiers are low end and it has basic steel rims. Had handlebar stem-mounted shifters til I changed 'em for downtube-mounted ones. Funny thing; the last few big gears on the wheel have big gaps between the teeth. And idea why that might be?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Kubuki road bike w/ wierd seatpost and DISC brake posted by Kelle on 9/10/2002 at 4:34:08 AM
I also have a weird Bridgestone Kabuki. Mine has the same funny seat post; but plain brakes. Does anyone know if there is any resale value to these bikes?

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Kubuki road bike w/ wierd seatpost and DISC brake posted by Jonathan on 9/10/2002 at 5:21:45 AM
There's probably a "godzillioin" in China and other regions where a bike is used as a work vehicle, family transportation and recreation, because the one I've got is not very responsive, yet it is very stable on the road; kinda like my '77 Varsity, only lighter! It's a no nonsense-type ride and the day-glo yellow is great in traffic. I'm thinking it's collectible because I don't see anything like it anywhere. I bought it from a Chinese guy, who probably brought it from China when he moved here.
You have to admit that it is strange bicycle by normal standards. Actually, I like the seat post wedge adjustment; it might be a superior idea, but like so many other superior ideas, they are doomed to "failure" if they aren't marketed. The converse is true, as well, I suppose; thinking of VCR's for example. "Ole Yellar" has a place of prominance in a shed, right now. The wierd karma surrounding it's return to me and its strange design have convinced me to keep it...for a while.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Kubuki road bike w/ wierd seatpost and DISC brake posted by Jonathan on 9/10/2002 at 5:37:25 AM
I, too, have a wheel with the "skip-tooth" low gear. My take is it helps reduce chain drag and that it makes for smoother shifting under tension. I think it would cause the chain to pivot less on the pins of the links, but that there would be more strain on a given link. This would tend to nalance out with a lot of shifting. It seems like a good idea. Probably it's possible to get a very large low gear with such a design.
I believe mine is a SunRace freewheel.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Kubuki road bike w/ wierd seatpost and DISC brake posted by Elvis on 9/10/2002 at 11:33:57 AM
The wierd seatpost seems to be used because the lugs are aluminum [though frame is steel]. At least mine are. An internet search reveals such a bike was made with "normal" brakes, i.e. calipers, not a disc brake. This model as I understand it was called "submariner" and marketed to sea-coast regions; the weird frame construction [which resulted in need for weird seatpost] was supposedly intended for durability's sake.
WHAT puzzles me is my disc-equipped version isn't marked Submariner, and it also appears the disc is factory installed; the mountings do not look added at a later time to the frame.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Kubuki road bike w/ wierd seatpost and DISC brake posted by Jonathan on 9/10/2002 at 5:34:17 PM
The seatpost wedge being a result of necessity makes sense, but so does just brazing a steel lug and having a regular-type seat clamp. I'd like to think that it was an innovative idea rather than one born out of necssity. Serendipity has its rightful place in the evolution of bikes too, I suppose. The curiosity of the bike made me check just now. It has pointed reflectors anchored into the sides of the front forks. Pretty cool idea. The fork crown is chromed-beefed as all getout. The only written marking is "Kabuki" in black script lettering on a silver tape on the down tube. They put a bunch of silver tape on the top tube and front tube. The shifter (front tube) bracket has what looks like; "333" stamped across the chrome face. That's wierd enough. My wildest guess is that the time frame was "bike boom" and the company was scrambling to send something stateside to grab some market. They took the off the line utility bike and slapped a Shimano low-end system and bought ten zillion miles of silver tape to sparkel it up to catch the eye of the frenzied buyer. BUT, it has Dia Compe cp brakes!! They are great brakes. Must have been the only supply they could get for the units before shipping. If you've ever seen a fancy dress saddle on a old workhorse, you have an idea how the bike looks on the curbside. Why the stamped in dropouts? OK, it seems plausible that if you have a lot of rough use and the dropouts get bent, it's a garage with a vise that'll fix that. The handlebar stem is alloyed with bent chromed gaspipe handlebar. I definitely have to keep "ole Yellar" as a piece of "bike boom" descriptive history.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Kubuki road bike w/ wierd seatpost and DISC brake posted by Jonathan on 9/10/2002 at 5:37:57 PM
The seatpost wedge being a result of necessity makes sense, but so does just brazing a steel lug and having a regular-type seat clamp. I'd like to think that it was an innovative idea rather than one born out of necssity. Serendipity has its rightful place in the evolution of bikes too, I suppose. The curiosity of the bike made me check just now. It has pointed reflectors anchored into the sides of the front forks. Pretty cool idea. The fork crown is chromed-beefed as all getout. The only written marking is "Kabuki" in black script lettering on a silver tape on the down tube. They put a bunch of silver tape on the top tube and front tube. The shifter (front tube) bracket has what looks like; "333" stamped across the chrome face. That's wierd enough. My wildest guess is that the time frame was "bike boom" and the company was scrambling to send something stateside to grab some market. They took the off-the-line utility bike and slapped a Shimano low-end system and bought ten zillion miles of silver tape to sparkel it up to catch the eye of the frenzied buyer. BUT, it has Dia Compe cp brakes!! They are great brakes. Must have been the only supply they could get for the units before shipping. If you've ever seen a fancy dress saddle on an old workhorse, you have an idea how the bike looks on the curbside. Why the stamped in dropouts? OK, it seems plausible that if you have a lot of rough use and the dropouts get bent, it's a garage with a vise that'll fix that or just a vise...or a hammer and a 2x4. The handlebar stem is alloyed with bent chromed gaspipe handlebar. I definitely have to keep "ole Yellar" as a piece of "bike boom" descriptive history.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Kubuki road bike w/ wierd seatpost and DISC brake posted by Jonathan on 9/10/2002 at 5:38:12 PM
The seatpost wedge being a result of necessity makes sense, but so does just brazing a steel lug and having a regular-type seat clamp. I'd like to think that it was an innovative idea rather than one born out of necssity. Serendipity has its rightful place in the evolution of bikes too, I suppose. The curiosity of the bike made me check just now. It has pointed reflectors anchored into the sides of the front forks. Pretty cool idea. The fork crown is chromed-beefed as all getout. The only written marking is "Kabuki" in black script lettering on a silver tape on the down tube. They put a bunch of silver tape on the top tube and front tube. The shifter (front tube) bracket has what looks like; "333" stamped across the chrome face. That's wierd enough. My wildest guess is that the time frame was "bike boom" and the company was scrambling to send something stateside to grab some market. They took the off-the-line utility bike and slapped a Shimano low-end system and bought ten zillion miles of silver tape to sparkel it up to catch the eye of the frenzied buyer. BUT, it has Dia Compe cp brakes!! They are great brakes. Must have been the only supply they could get for the units before shipping. If you've ever seen a fancy dress saddle on an old workhorse, you have an idea how the bike looks on the curbside. Why the stamped in dropouts? OK, it seems plausible that if you have a lot of rough use and the dropouts get bent, it's a garage with a vise that'll fix that or just a vise...or a hammer and a 2x4 scrap. The handlebar stem is alloyed with bent chromed gaspipe handlebar. I definitely have to keep "ole Yellar" as a piece of "bike boom" descriptive history.






AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn Le Tour posted by: Elvis on 9/8/2002 at 5:43:35 AM
Hi all. Picked up a Schwinn Le Tour. Ain't like other Scwhinn's [varsity, etc] that I've seen -- this one's got lugged steel frame kinda light and nice Siguno cranks. Suntour derailiuers and downtube shifter, but the shifters are wierd; thei're on top of the down tube, not on the sides of it... The sidepulls are diacompe 500 and the brake levers are neat with a row of rectangular perferations running down each. It even has a Blackburn bottle cage on the braze ons and the tirees hold air. LaPrad fluted seatpost; road-style Schwinn seat. 52 outer chainring. Inner one not marked that i could see. Cool shiny grip tape that looks almost clear, never seen the like. White and yellow stripes running halfway down seat tube culminating in a "S" of same colors; downtube says "SCWHINN" in yellow and white [split horixzontally] and it says "le tour" in very thin white letters att he front of the top tuvbe ander the front of the 3 cable brake cable housings for the rear sidepull. I figure it has to be sorta old or good [one or the other] cause the frame says "Made in USA" and the headbadge [star on red background] says Chicago.
Question; any idea where the le tour sat in the Scwhinn line? This thing was in like new shape cept for two small scratches one can barely see and LOTS of dust. I know it's a cut above the Varsity or Conti, but I don't know much about Scwhinns 'cept for Stingrays. Any info appreciated.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn Le Tour posted by Steve on 9/9/2002 at 2:52:00 AM
According to Sheldon, the on the top shifters date to 1982 or 1983. Unusual for a lugged Schwinn to be made in USA, pretty neat. Never read much about lugged Schwinns made in USA. Steve

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn Le Tour posted by Stacey on 9/8/2002 at 11:19:02 AM
Got a S/N, Elvis? How about a four digit number stamped in the head badge?

From your description of the graphics/lettering, I'd guess early 80's though.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn Le Tour posted by Kevin k on 9/8/2002 at 1:38:41 PM
Hi Elvis. Nice find ! I know I'd like to have it. I've several catalogs on Letours I'll try to see what I can find on it. I agree on the shifters. They work very well but.....Kevin K

   Le Tour SN! posted by Elvis on 9/9/2002 at 6:11:29 PM
Hi all. Got the Serial Number. on the headbadge: 3054


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn Le Tour posted by Eric Amlie on 9/9/2002 at 6:58:20 PM
Looks like you have a late '84 frame that was used for an '85 model. Your description matches exactly the LeTour in my '85 catalog. Where it falls in the hierarchy is kind of hard to say because the bikes are split into different catagories and the catalog doesn't have prices. The categories are Competition, Touring, Sport/Recreation, and Recreational. The Sport/Recreation catagory is comprised of the Super LeTour and the LeTour. Your bike should be a pretty nice one. I have an '85 Traveler which is the top of the Recreational catagory and presumably just below your LeTour. I like my Traveler pretty well. Both bikes look to have the same 4130 chrome-moly frame with the same geometry but the components are a little different. If you need any other info from the catalog email me.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn Le Tour posted by Joe on 9/9/2002 at 10:38:12 PM
Ha Stacey the MORON, GO AWAY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

   Joe's posting ain't about my  Schwinn Le Tour so why did he put it here? posted by Elvis on 9/10/2002 at 3:30:03 AM
Bub, looks like you forgot to take yer meds today... 'Case you didn't notice this be a bike board, not a sounding board. Go write "dear cr abby" if you got problems...

   Joe's posting ain't about my  Schwinn Le Tour so why did he put it here? posted by Elvis on 9/10/2002 at 3:33:08 AM
Bub, looks like you forgot to take yer meds today... 'Case you didn't notice this be a bike board, not a sounding board. Go write "dear cr abby" if you got problems...

     Schwinn Le Tour posted by Elvis on 9/10/2002 at 3:38:35 AM
Thanks... The frame sticker down at the base of the seat tube does indeed say "4130" tubing. Note: Armor all paint protector works great for jugs and forks as well as chainstays to prevent chips on an old bike. I used to with this one and it shines like new. Also: Armor-all [regular] seems to help keep brake hoods protected from sweat. I've been warned it'll make them hard to grip or slippery, but haven't noticed that...







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Help: Need info on Centurion Le Mans RS posted by: Kurt on 9/8/2002 at 12:20:36 AM
I've been needing a new bike and at a garage sale today I was able to buy a Centurion Le Mans RS for $10. The person selling it said he hadn't riddin it in 14 years and after dusting it off, I believe him.
Any info on this model would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Are they still made? posted by: Rich McCarthy on 9/7/2002 at 4:02:02 AM
This past year I joined a local cycling club and lo and behold one of the older riders had a Bob Jackson and another a Bertin,. Neither could remember how old the bikes really were although the use of Simplex on the Bertin aged it. Other names..Atala,Motobecane, Dawes (I owned one)Gitane also came to mind. I'd really appreciate knowing what became of these names and when they passed on into oblivion. I currently have a Schwinn Paramount I bought new (but it was old then)7 years ago..Tange tubing,RX100 componentry and I can't even date that...Thanks for any info


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Are they still made? posted by Walter on 9/7/2002 at 1:36:58 PM
Hmmn. Motobecane died the French equivalent of Ch. 11 bankruptcy and is now part of a company called MBK. I haven't seen any in the States. I noticed a French team riding MBKs during the Tour but have heard they were rebadged LiteSpeeds. The name "Motobecane" was resurrected by an Asian company and has a line of both aluminum and steel framed roadies and off-roaders.

I'm pretty sure Bob Jacksons or at least the name are still around. Same with Dawes. I haven't seen hide nor hair of a Bertin in years. Don't know about Gitane. If they're still around in Europe, they're not a big presence here in the US. There are many Schwinn resources. Waterford is the direct inheritor of the Paramount legacy and their site has historical info.

   nice old Bertin on eBay posted by John E on 9/7/2002 at 7:20:02 PM
Nice old Bertin frameset on eBay:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1856037131

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Are they still made? posted by Elvis on 9/8/2002 at 8:41:31 PM
Wait! BOB JACKSON! Now I recall. I saw onew once. Beatiful bikes. Awesome amazing totally intricate lugwork and attention to detail that you don't see on a $100,000 Ferrarri... Someday I'd like to own one. Some day... Yeah, and maybe Dana Scully will jump right out of the X-Files off the sci-fi channel and into my lap... ah, we all have dreams.
Seriously though, that BJ is in my opinion one of the most beautiful bikes I've ever seen! They sure know how to make 'em!
and yes, someday, I would like to own one.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Are they still made? posted by Oscar on 9/8/2002 at 11:01:14 PM
Hey, Elvis - Special Agent Scully popped out of my TV screen and stayed for a visit. She said she was looking for you but you were watching American Idol.

I see a few Bob Jackson's around town. They are out there. (The truth is out there too.)

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Are they still made? posted by rt1943 on 9/9/2002 at 2:53:26 AM
The reason I brought up the Bob Jackson and other vintage where are they now bikes is I owned a jackson.I picked the bike up in 1980 at a police auction for..$25.00 complete with the orig. campy eqpt.and sew ups. I owned the bike for years,along with the Dawes I bought new in '78 untill a breakin resulted in the loss of both bikes back in the mid 80s

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Are they still made? posted by rt1943 on 9/9/2002 at 2:54:14 AM
The reason I brought up the Bob Jackson and other vintage where are they now bikes is I owned a jackson.I picked the bike up in 1980 at a police auction for..$25.00 complete with the orig. campy eqpt.and sew ups. I owned the bike for years,along with the Dawes I bought new in '78 untill a breakin resulted in the loss of both bikes back in the mid 80s

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Are they still made? posted by rt1943 on 9/9/2002 at 2:55:18 AM
The reason I brought up the Bob Jackson and other vintage where are they now bikes is I owned a jackson.I picked the bike up in 1980 at a police auction for..$25.00 complete with the orig. campy eqpt.and sew ups. I owned the bike for years,along with the Dawes I bought new in '78 untill a breakin resulted in the loss of both bikes back in the mid 80s

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Are they still made? posted by Rich McCarthy aka rt1943 on 9/9/2002 at 3:09:39 AM
Let's hope this response doesn't multiply like the last one..Supercycle..Is there a stateside dealer still carrying the Jacksons?

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Are they still made? posted by Elvis on 9/8/2002 at 5:43:19 AM
Motobecane... Haven't seen any under that name since the 80s, I believe they were indeed bought out or something. Atala [have an old one myself] and Dawes [have an old one] are still in business, I believe. In fact, they both have modern web sites, though the Atala one isn't in English...

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Are they still made? posted by supercycle1@aol.com on 9/8/2002 at 5:26:45 PM
Although Bob Jackson passed a way a couple of years ago, his frame workshop is still producing BJs and Hetchins.
My BJ dates from 1996. My local bike shop was rung by Bob to see if he wanted to be an agent, and mine was the first frame BJ produced for him.

Dawes is still around as a smaller mass manufacturer of mid-range bikes. They are OK, but nothing special. Their Galaxy is still the benchmark touring bike, like the Trek 520.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Are they still made? posted by ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 9/8/2002 at 7:05:47 PM
I have a 1960's perhaps 1970's Motobecanne catalog I would love to donate to somebody who would scan it and post it on the web for folks to go to for refrence.
Please advise me. Thanks

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHT Two good things: Bob Jackson bikes and X files posted by chris on 9/9/2002 at 5:37:20 PM
After that episode where Dana' mysteriously pregnant with a alien baby, I'd pass on Dana, she's got some baggage.
No Alien V.D. for me, Thank You
Bob Jackson produced wonderful machines and his shop still does.