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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Kabuki Hilltopper T-15 posted by: Mitchell Rossman on 9/15/2002 at 3:58:27 AM
Do you have any information about this bike? When sold, etc.? I just brought it home from a school garage sale and it seems a sweet bike. It came with front and rear racks, leather seat, and steel frame. I clean-ed it up and it looks like new. Thanks.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Kabuki Hilltopper T-15 posted by Lenny on 9/19/2002 at 4:43:43 PM
Hi Mitchell,

I have a couple of old Consumer Reports buying guides from the mid-70's. The Bridgestone Kabuki Hilltopper was among the many bikes they tested in February 1976. It was rated as "not acceptable" only because of what they judged to be overly "grabby" front brakes (due to the pads used)which apparently pitched one of their testers over the handlebars during an emergency stopping test (one wonders about the riding experience of their testers). If not for that, it would have been placed in their "good-to-very good" category (2nd from the top group). It was the lightest and best of the 3 Kabuki models they tested; I believe its weight as tested was about 28 lbs (pretty good in those days).

Though I am certain that most folks reading these posts don't need to rely upon CU ratings for assessing bike quality, I have found these old buying guides to be a great way to quickly compare specifications of various bikes commonly sold in the US during the bike boom era.

Enjoy the bike! I much prefer riding any of my '70s-era 26-30 lb bikes to a 23-lb composite Trek I own (and plan to component-strip soon).






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   schwinnand raleigh lightweights posted by: AJ on 9/15/2002 at 1:50:13 AM
is a raleigh record a low range mid range or upper range bike,how bout a schwinn sprint with lugged frame made in tiwan,thanks AJ


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   schwinnand raleigh lightweights posted by Gralyn on 9/15/2002 at 4:14:19 AM
I don't know about the Schwinn, but the Raleigh Record was the bottom of the line for Raleigh. But, that's not to say it's not a good bike.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   schwinnand raleigh lightweights posted by Bryant on 9/15/2002 at 6:47:26 PM
I believe the Schwinn Sprint is a entry level (that is so much nicer than bottom of the line) Bike. It would have alloy cotterless crank, perhaps Shimano Altus derailleurs, that funky foam stuff on the bars and steel wheels without QRs. A good beater bike but nothing to write home about.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   schwinnand raleigh lightweights posted by Ken on 9/15/2002 at 7:27:46 PM
Info on Raleigh is at www.speakeasy.org/'tabula/raleigh/






AGE / VALUE:   Huffy aerocycle posted by: Freddie on 9/14/2002 at 6:24:37 PM
Can anybody tell me something about an older bike I picked up curbside It is a huffy aerocycle phase 1. It is in good condition. Odd pedals a lot of little plastic flareings on brake calbers hoods on levers ect. Seems a little better made than most huffys from this age and rides ok. Tubes are tapered seem like a lot of trouble to make this heavy of a bike aerodynamic.thanks for any help.Freddie


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Huffy aerocycle posted by huffy on 9/14/2002 at 8:34:39 PM
Sorry I had to go out and recheck. It is AEROWIND not aerocycle. My mistake.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Huffy aerocycle posted by Walter on 9/15/2002 at 12:50:35 PM
During the later 1980s Huffy sponsored an American pro team, 7-11 if I remember correctly. That team rode "Huffys" which were really Serottas, again if memory serves. In any case they definitely weren't Huffys.

To go along with this Huffy offered a "race-quality" bike to the fortunate masses. By Huffy standards it was an improvement, cotterless cranks, alloy rims, even downtube shifters but the frame tubing crimped into those "aerodynamic" shapes was the same cheap heavy guage stuff they used in all their other bikes. And of course it was constructed to the same high standars typical of Huffy and assembled by the craftsmen of K-Mart.

I suppose if assembled and tuned by a competent mechanic an Aerowind might be comparable to the bottom of the liners offerd by Peugeot, Raleigh, Panasonic and etc. Then again probably not.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Cambio Rino Road Frame posted by: jeff on 9/13/2002 at 7:13:18 PM
I have a Black Cambio Rino Road Bike. I believe it is built with Columbus tubing. Tight racing geometry. 38-1/2" wheelbase. 22.5" frame (c to c). Can anyone tell me anything at all about this frame? Thanks!! Jeff


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Cambio Rino Road Frame posted by Warren on 9/14/2002 at 1:52:50 AM
Seems to me they were made in Toronto "Italian Style" bikes. Toronto is home to some 500,000 Italian speaking citizens. I've seen many of them here and most of them were decent bikes. I think they were made from the 70's through most of the 80's but that is as much as I could hazard to guess.

This came up for discussion once before. Check the archives.






MISC:   Raleighs posted by: JM on 9/13/2002 at 3:32:51 PM
I would be curious, if a newsletter on Raleigh bicycles exists, because, to tell you the truth, I once tried to start one, but could not quite get it going. I wonder, if there is a cheap, easy way to do this. The Retro Raleigh website is fine; but I could not quite contact the webmaster.

To a little discussion on Bicycles at hand, I hear of often, Raleigh Grand Prixs, etc. I have a Raleigh Super Tourer which I rarely see mentioned. Has a Simplex derailleur (the reference I found on the web to this bicycle at " http://www.missouri.edu/'winholtz/bikes/SuperTourer.jpg " appears to not have that kind of derailleur, though I can not tell for certain), ; decal reading 1980 Tour de France winner, a light green color. The pedals, crank arms look the same, with the crank arms reading "stronglight, France, " I got the serial number, but it is after most such tables. Also, in the photo, the handlebars do not appear to be dropped, mine certainly are. I even shellacced (see, " http://www.mindspring.com/'d.g1/shellac.html " <--- anyone see this trick done? nifty I think) the handlebars, originally covered with foam, but I put a handlebar extension on. I understand that a Simplex derailleur often dates a bicycle, but I have not seen exact years mentioned. The bicycle is post 1980 obviously.

Just a few other notes, I searched the archives for Lotus, I have a Lotus Special, red, fine bike I think. Would like to but some lighter rims on. Derailleur reading "DND GX" or something similar, I do not have the bicycle right here with me. I did search the archives, found some interesting information on Lotus. Pretty lightweight for its day and still, easy for me to toss into the car. I would really like to put on some lighter rims, to see how it would ride.
But back to Raleigh, I read comments on Raleigh USA, I have a Raleigh Marathon, Alloy Rims, I think, is a pretty fine bicycle, Suntour derailleur, Olympic decals on it for the USA team. Also, a bicycle I salvaged for parts, the names these Raleigh USA bicycles have from the 1980s, interesting was a Raleigh Wyoming. I have certainly not seen comments on that name before. Being too large, I never rode it.


   RE:MISC: Raleigh, amending website posted by JM on 9/13/2002 at 9:22:42 PM
I note the above link, to the Raleigh Super Tourer did not come out, please go to this bike list
webpage, and click the Raleigh Super Tourer; hopefully this link works not to be redundant,
http://www.missouri.edu/'winholtz/bikes/BikeList.html

   RE:RE:MISC: Raleigh, amending website posted by Helping out on 9/16/2002 at 2:32:29 AM
Replace the ' character with a tilde, and you're good to go.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Now here's an interesting bike ... posted by: Brian L. on 9/13/2002 at 2:55:56 PM
Has anyone else been wathcing : http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2139703571? Seller doesn't seem to know anything about it, even upon inquiry. If it is what it purports (sp?) to be, then the very low reserve has been met and there is surprisingly little bid interest (perhaps waiting for the last minute pounce). Pictures are a little poor to really see what's going on, but the drivetrain is the most intriguing part: Triple front, probably not original, mated to 5-sp internal rear hub (Sturmey?). There is also a long cage Falcon, which looks surprisingly like an old Campy Ralley, maybe bolt-on, hard to tell. Has anyone seen a Falcon like this? I guess the derailleur is there for chain take-up with the triple front? Comments from the peanut gallery?


   The Peanut Gallery speaks... posted by Walter on 9/14/2002 at 3:15:16 AM
Interesting bike. The seller is shorting himself by not providing more/better pictures. Frame does look great particularly lugwork on steerer tube. Too tall for me regardless.

Looks like a triple to me as well. Available in early 1960s? Looks like chrome arms chainwheels but is it cotterless? Also a bit unusual for dates mentioned. I'm also curious about the hi-rise stem. Derailleur would be needed for chain tension but the description has me wondering if there's a multi-cog freewheel too.

Despite these questions, which may well reflect my own ignorance, it looks like a desirable bike at what is now a very good price. It may get sniped at the end for a bargain or it may be driven up. We'll see.

   RE:The Peanut Gallery speaks... posted by Maurice on 9/14/2002 at 2:12:40 PM
Walter why do you think the bike would have an internal 5 - speed hub when from the picture we see a long cage rear derailleur? Aren't most internal gear hubs accompanied by one chainring sprocket?

   Carlton posted by John E on 9/14/2002 at 4:45:08 PM
That frame is way too tall for me, but it otherwise resembles my sister-in-law's beautiful blue-on-chrome ca. 1970 10-speed Carlton. For a tall rider, the bike may be worth buying for the frame value alone.

The description of the transmission is very confused, and the photos do not help at all, but it sounds/looks like a single rear cog with an internal (S/A?) 5-speed hub and a triple chainring, which would give it 15 speeds with an incredibly wide range and lots of gaps. If it were mine, I would replace the chainrings with a tight progression, such as 43-46-49.

   RE:RE:The Peanut Gallery speaks... posted by Walter on 9/14/2002 at 5:28:20 PM
As John points out the description is confusing. It's not unheard of to screw a multi-cog FW onto an internal geared system. Sheldon Brown mentions a bike of his set up like that that has something in excess of 70 gears. Of course there's alot of repetition and it's more a conversation piece really but it'd be kinda fun too. If that bike has (or were to have) a 5spd FW along with the 5 internal you can see how the absolute number of gears can quickly multiply.

Anyways, my speculation was a result of not clearly understanding the written description and there not being, IMO, adequate photos in the ad.






AGE / VALUE:   Skyrider posted by: Michael on 9/13/2002 at 2:42:20 PM
I need some info on my Skyrider: red 26inch mens coaster with bendix hub. How can I determine age and value? Please help







FOR SALE:   2 Bridgestone bikes posted by: Kelle on 9/13/2002 at 5:20:08 AM
Hi,
I just picked up a lovely Bridgestone Road bike and so I'm clearing out some other bikes:
1) a Bridgestone MB-2 from about 1989 or 1990. I can tell you the serial number if you are interested. I currently have an offer for $150, so I guess I will sell for any offer (or the highest) over $200.

2) a Bridgestone Kabuki SYD from the late 70s. I don't really know what to ask for this, if you are interested, make me an offer.

On a seperate note, I would absolutely love some 7 speed bar end shifters. Please let me know if you have any I can buy from you.







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Trade for French Widgets posted by: Brian L. on 9/12/2002 at 3:21:48 PM
Seattle area trade for French bits: Raleigh Gran Sport frameset, guessing 70's vintage, scruffy but attractive, no dents, dings, 531 plain guage main tubes and fork, 1/2 chrome, 49cm x 52cm c-c. Most of the stuff to build up including GB stem, Lyotard pedals, alloy seat pin, Weinman brakes and levers. (206) 633-3139 or respond to email. Also have a 70's Shogun touring with early Dura-Ace and 600 that's a touch too big for me, probably 59cm square. Missing crank, needs love, but includes 600 bar-cons.







AGE / VALUE:   Jeunot 10 sp. men's frame posted by: Jonathan on 9/12/2002 at 3:29:57 AM
I came across a Jeunot 10 sp. with cottered cranks (Universals); Mafac "Racer" brakes; Normandy wide-flanged hubs/steel rims; Jeunot HB (beautiful workmanship). The gold or bronze color paint is still great; all decals are good. There is nothing that specifically id's the metal, but the bike is pretty light, even with steel rims. Derailers are Simplex/metal front&black "plastic" rear. Shifts on front tube; metal alloy levers. They want to get $25 for it. I rode it around the parking lot and it's pretty tame with the relaxed forks, which are completely chromed.
As I had my bike with me and it was closing time, I decided that if I go tomorrow at open-time, it'll be there. Question is: Is this any kind of collectible? I have too many rides as it is, but if something really unusual comes up, there is always a place to wedge another frame into the garge rafters. Thanks for info...sooner is better.


   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Jeunot 10 sp. men's frame posted by Gralyn on 9/13/2002 at 11:55:20 AM
Yes, here lately, everything I have seen has been X-mart / department store bikes. Nothing at all above that...I did however spot some lightweight (not all that light)bike which was made in Spain. I don't even know what brand it was. I may stop back by to see exactly what brand it was. It wasn't all that lightweight...I mean it was more average for a 70's lightweight.....It looks along the lines of a lower end Raleigh, or Peugeot, etc. I don't think it has any value. But it is from Spain - and that's the first bike I have ever seen from Spain. It was $40.....really too steep a price for what it was. I would never pay that much for it. $20 would be pushing it.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Jeunot 10 sp. men's frame posted by Jonathan on 9/13/2002 at 3:53:30 PM
Italvega had a "viva sport" 10 speed which has braze mounts for the shifters on the downtube, which eliminates that clunky screw bracket that's on 99% of the 10 speeds.
It has roadster bars, too. How much for the pair?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Jeunot 10 sp. men's frame posted by Bob Reno on 9/13/2002 at 9:48:27 PM
I came across an older 10 speed at a thrift store. It said it was made in Holland and had a Batavus nameplate on it. It looked to be a pretty solid bike and in good, but dirty shape. The seat was just hard plastic, though. It was listed for $20. Worth it?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Jeunot 10 sp. men's frame posted by Gralyn on 9/12/2002 at 12:05:06 PM
It's probably "Jeunet". From what you describe...I would buy it - just to have a Jeunet. I actually do have one already - but it's a "mixte" frame....which to me, is a woman's frame. I had bought it for parts - took everything off the frame....and am looking for a French frame...like another Jeunet, maybe a Peugeot, Gitane, etc. I think mine had all the same components. Yes, for $25 you can't go wrong. It's probably not all that collectable, or anything.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Jeunot 10 sp. men's frame posted by Jonathan on 9/12/2002 at 3:47:32 PM
Thanks for the ready return! I got up early to empty my truck and make the 9AM start time. I appreciate your kindly input about the Jeunet...yes, that is the correct spelling.
What's wierd is that they had about 15 bikes of all kinds, which is a bit unusual. Right next to the Jeunet was a Huffy MTB with low-end attachments going for $75. I could not fathom what provoked the hefty tag for that monstrosity (abomination?) of a ride.
Seems that an earlier prediction about fall being a good time for bike acquisitions was correct. Here, there are people leaving due to job cuts (dot.com failures?) so that might explain some of the influx of bikes. I'm off to pick up the Jeunet. Thanks again.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Jeunot 10 sp. men's frame posted by Gralyn on 9/12/2002 at 8:12:04 PM
What I've noticed around here....seems there was a surge of bikes....then quickly....nothing. It's been really dry the past 2 weeks....haven't seen anything....except Huffy's and old Schwinns which were both rediculously priced.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Jeunot 10 sp. men's frame posted by Jonathan on 9/13/2002 at 3:53:58 AM
That's interesting. I haven't been checking the usual thrift marts, because I'll always buy something, no matter how junky it might be. I Took some things for a friend to St. Vincent De Paul's and there was a '60's peugeot UO-18 (mixte) that was $5. It was a clean bike, too. Stopped at a gas station, filled the tires with air and rode it for a week while I was visiting. It's a "house" bike, right now. Today, I picked up that Jeunet, "Captivante" at the thrift store that I spotted all the bikes at yesterday. It is a real gem. I think I'll clean it up, which isn't much of a job since it's like brand new, and hang it on the wall. What a funky retro. The Universal crankarms look like 165mm jobs. If it wasn't a jewel, I'd make a fixed gear out of the frame. Thanks for the push. I check here, before I buy on impluse.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Jeunot 10 sp. men's frame posted by flash on 9/13/2002 at 6:23:08 AM
Last week at a 2nd hand store, I saw a pair of his and hers (mixte) Italvegas! The store usaully has junky, as is, worn out X-mart bikes. The mens bike has half chromed forks, rears, front lugs and falk (falck?) tubing. Both have universal mod 61 brakes, campy gran turismo drivetrain, ttt stems and campy (no oil hole) hubs.






AGE / VALUE:   Thinks Kevin posted by: sam on 9/11/2002 at 11:34:01 PM
The NOs lucas cyclemeter came today.This part will make the "Wyman"ride even better as we did not have a cyclemeter.George Wyman talked about them in his original artical written in 1903.here is the link to the compleat story http://bikerodnkustom3.homestead.com/wyman1.html I hope you follow the story on www.bikerodnkustom.com web site as it unfolds.Especialy sence you now have taken part!!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Thinks Kevin posted by Kevin K on 9/12/2002 at 1:10:12 AM
Hi Sam. You are welcome. Enjoy life, Kevin






AGE / VALUE:   Varsitys first year? posted by: elvis on 9/11/2002 at 6:03:47 PM
What year did the Schwinn varsity come out?


   RE:  Varsitys first year? posted by Eric Amlie on 9/11/2002 at 8:15:17 PM
3 speed Varsities (there may have been a one speed version also) like the sixties Racers were available at least in the early fifties. The later derailleur equipped Varsity that we are all more familiar with came out as an 8 speed with 26" wheels in June(I think) 1960. In 1962 (or possibly sometime during 1961) it became a 10 speed, and in 1963 it got the 27" wheels that the 10 speed Continental had from it's introduction in May 1960.






AGE / VALUE:   Query about old? Stella bike posted by: Anthony E. on 9/11/2002 at 4:17:28 PM
I recently acquired an old yellow road bike for 5 bucks and I started doing research on what kind of bike it is. Its a Stella bike but I haven't been able to find out how old it is. All the parts on the bike look original but its hard to tell. The bike has Mafac "racer" brakes, Rigida Superchromix wheels (f-r), cyclo rear freewheel, Shimano Tourney rear derailleur, Shimano FD-AX55 front derailleur
, Messinger Seat, lyotard pedals. I'm going to clean it up, order new tires, tubes and start riding it. I would love to know how old it is. I've tried to date the bike with the components but am not having much luck. The bike is 90% complete, the front mafac brake lever is broke but thats it. Any help in dating the bike would be greatly appreciated. Thanks Aain!!


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Query about old? Stella bike posted by Steven on 9/12/2002 at 2:30:37 PM
The derailleurs are almost certainly not original, but the rest likely is. It probably came with either Simplex or Huret. This is likely from the 70's.

    Stella bike posted by John E on 9/12/2002 at 11:08:25 PM
Stella made a line of bikes, including a Peugeot UO-8 equivalent, which I strongly suspect yours is/was. I would guess early 1970s, from the colour and equipment. During the years that followed, many people (including me) replaced plastic Simplex gear with Japanese or other derailleurs.






AGE / VALUE:   Query about old? Stella bike posted by: Anthony E. on 9/11/2002 at 4:17:28 PM
I recently acquired an old yellow road bike for 5 bucks and I started doing research on what kind of bike it is. Its a Stella bike but I haven't been able to find out how old it is. All the parts on the bike look original but its hard to tell. The bike has Mafac "racer" brakes, Rigida Superchromix wheels (f-r), cyclo rear freewheel, Shimano Tourney rear derailleur, Shimano FD-AX55 front derailleur
, Messinger Seat, lyotard pedals. I'm going to clean it up, order new tires, tubes and start riding it. I would love to know how old it is. I've tried to date the bike with the components but am not having much luck. The bike is 90% complete, the front mafac brake lever is broke but thats it. Any help in dating the bike would be greatly appreciated. Thanks Aain!!







AGE / VALUE:   WHAT TO OFFER FOR A NICE VITUS ? posted by: Kevin K on 9/11/2002 at 3:52:26 PM
Hi all. I've a chance to pick up a nice Vitus road bike from the 70's. Bike is in very good condition with a COMPLETE ( inc. wheelhubs ) Campy Record Group. Mavic wheelset with sewups. Any advice on $$$$$$$$$$$$ would be great. Thanks, Kevin


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   WHAT TO OFFER FOR A NICE VITUS ? posted by Brian L. on 9/11/2002 at 8:46:28 PM
Alloy frame? You've got to love the whippy ride ...(might be nice comfort factor on long randoneur-type events w/o scary downhills).

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   WHAT TO OFFER FOR A NICE VITUS ? posted by Kevin K on 9/12/2002 at 11:25:05 AM
Hi Brian. Yea, it's the aluminum frame. I do want one high quality, collectible non Schwinn bike in my collection. It had a very unusual look plus the nice Campy Record Group insured some form of value. Kevin K

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   WHAT TO OFFER FOR A NICE VITUS ? posted by Keith on 9/12/2002 at 5:49:05 PM
I think we know Vitus best for its early narrow tubing aluminum bikes, as Brian and Kevin describe. I know they also made steel tubing, but I'm not sure whether they sold any steel bikes under the Vitus name. I think I've seen the name recently on newer bikes but it's probably a false memory.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   WHAT TO OFFER FOR A NICE VITUS ? posted by Keith on 9/12/2002 at 6:04:09 PM
Quick check -- yes there are still bikes being sold under the Vitus name -- http://www.roadbikereview.com/Racing+Bike/Vitus+2001+992+Athena/PRD_59235_2504crx.aspx -- but I couldn't find a Vitus site (Sheldon has a link but it would not work for me)..