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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Help what do I have?!? posted by: Richard on 9/20/2002 at 12:07:10 AM
Picked up an interesting bike today and I need any info as to who the manufacture is. Frame has been repainted and no decals or headtube badge. features are: has clamp on style cable guides, nice chrome lugs and chrome fork crown (lower fork looks like it was chrome once), campy style rear dropouts that say "Yuko cold forged", suntour deraillieurs and shifters, sugino "mighty competetion" cotterless crank, mikashima unique road pedals w/christophe toe clips, nitto universade 105 drop bar, dynamic nitto forged stem, normandy front hub with a steel rim simular to a late 70's motobecane, sunshine rear freewheel w/alloy rim (probably not original). Any guesses? I believe it to be of asian decent...


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Help what do I have?!? posted by Richard on 9/20/2002 at 3:40:43 PM
MORE INFO: english threaded sugino cup and spindle bottom bracket, forks at one time appear to have been all chrome (what knuckle head would sand and paint a chrome fork?), frame fork and headset weight 5#, nice tubing very little surface rust inside, serial numbers, transversely located, appear to have been removed from bottom of bb shell (Hmmm frame starting to feel warm to the touch, though I purchased from a legal vendor).

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Help what do I have?!? posted by Ri~chard on 9/26/2002 at 5:36:57 PM
After a zillion hours of looking at vintage bike pic's, I believe I have a Fuji America. Thanks to all for your more than overwhelming help?!?






MISC:   Correct derailleur for '60 varsity posted by: jim barnard on 9/19/2002 at 11:27:16 PM
Hi,
I have recently aquired a 1960 schwinn Varsity 8 speed in black. I have been told that there was a rare pull chain rear derailleur on the bike originally. On it now is a vintage alvit unit of the correct year. I have seen pictures of a similar bike in books from 1960 with another type of alvit on it. What is the right Derailleur for my bike?
thanks!


   Correct derailleur for '60 varsity posted by John E on 9/20/2002 at 12:49:52 AM
Although I have heard a few conflicting stories, most people who know first-year Varsinentals say that they came with the clockspring/pull-chain Simplex Tour de France, which featured an upside-down cage with the tension wheel on top. This would be consistent with the Simplex suicide Competition front shifter/derailleur, and would predate the famous Kingbay-and-the-brothers-Huret Chicago steak house incident, which presumably occurred sometime in 1961. The Simplex rears performed so poorly that many owners and bike shop mechanics substituted the vastly superior Huret Allvit (e.g. the 1960 Varsity in the Smithsonian). Your downtube shift lever may provide a clue, as it should presumably have been of the same brand as the rear derailleur.

According to Frank Berto, the familiar encased Allvit came out in 1961, and was preceded for a year or two by an open-frame variant.

   RE:MISC:   Correct derailleur for '60 varsity posted by Ray on 9/20/2002 at 2:12:58 PM
I agree with John, the confusion may come from the fact that the 1961 model looked very much like the 60 but they started phasing in the Alvit derailleurs in 61. Many people who have these bike either do not know that they have a 61 or the TDF broke and was replaced with an Alvit because they saw it on the 61 thinking it was correct. I have had 3 of the Varsities and 4 of the Continentals from 60 and each one had the TDF on the rear. The strange thing with the TDF is that you set it up with the cage up side down which is proper. At least 3 of mine came with the cage set up to look normal but that is wrong. I believe the CR site will show you how it should be. Another strange thing about the TDF is that it shifts in reverse. That is as you pull back on the shift lever it goes to a higher gear (smaller cog).






AGE / VALUE:   Loads of bike parts for sale posted by: Steven on 9/19/2002 at 8:02:11 PM
There is a fellow on Ebay who is unloading what seems all the remnants of a former Schwinn store. Take a look at this item and then check out the vendor's other auctions.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?MfcISAPICommand=ViewItem&item=715641987







AGE / VALUE:   Mafac madness, It has to stop! posted by: humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 9/19/2002 at 7:28:11 PM
May I stop collecting Mafac brakes now? I mean at least stop it with the cheaper "Racer" versions?
Anything marked Mafac no matter what model I have been greedily collecting and hoarding like a fiend.

How much "Racer" must I have before I am permitted to move on?
The racer is common, not worth bothering with. It is the other models, that people pay for not "Racer"
I have Competition, Top 63, the canti stuff and other Mafac models, clips, wires, rear seat bold triangular dohickys.
I was chanting "Mafac, Mafac, Mafac" in a transe and tore away and emptied all the drawers. I got all there was.I have been looking for a part needed and I see all this Mafac everywhere and I ask myself "Dude... What's up with you and these alloy Mafac brakes?" The voice of reason re- surfaces and wants an explanation!





   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Mafac madness, It has to stop! posted by smg on 9/19/2002 at 7:49:31 PM
If your recovery would be aided by getting rid of any "Randonneur" - style levers, I'd be willing to help!

   RE:Mafac posted by Eric Amlie on 9/19/2002 at 9:58:29 PM
How do you get the durn things to stop making more noise than a marching band?!

   RE:RE:Mafac posted by Oscar on 9/20/2002 at 4:22:24 AM
The original pads screech like a mad tea kettle when going down hill, and the levers chatter on rough pavement. Otherwise, with fresh pads, the work great and look so cool. Full hoods on the levers are so rare to find.

   RE:AGE / VALUE: Mafac madness, It has to stop! posted by Richard J on 9/21/2002 at 5:15:47 AM
I hung a set of Top 63 calipers on the wall above my workbench, at my eye-level.

   RE:RE:Mafac posted by Stacey on 9/22/2002 at 11:16:39 AM
I don't know if this will work with Mafac units, but I've had great success in quieting noisy brakes by 'adjusting' the brakes pads so that the front edge of the pad contacts the rim about 1/8" to 3/16" before the the back end of the pad. That is to say you don't want the pad to contact all at once, rather the front edge to lead in contact.

Just slip a small adjustable wrench (with rag to protect the caliper) over the caliper arm and give a slight twist so that the front of the pads are beveled in... like this, when viewed from above.

_
| |
/ | | \
/ | | \
/ | | \
pad rim pad
(Illustration Exagerated, of course)

   RE:RE:RE:Mafac posted by Oscar on 9/23/2002 at 12:44:56 AM
Stacey - are you the one drawing all those crop circles??

__--__--__--__--__--__--__--__--__
--__--__--__--__--__--__--__--__--

   RE:RE:RE:RE:Mafac posted by Stacey on 9/23/2002 at 8:02:22 PM
Oscar... you promised to keep mum on that! Thank Gods that I'm better in Winter Wheat than I am with ASCII!

   RE: Brake shoe toe in posted by Eric Amlie on 9/23/2002 at 8:44:13 PM
Thanks Stacey. I'm aware of the need for the toe in but I haven't had the courage to do it yet on the Mafac Competitions on my '71 Gitane Tour de France. They were noisier than a room full of kindergartners when I got the bike(stopped it like crazy though, much better than my other bikes with Weinmann brakes). I recently replaced the old original Mafac pads with Mathausers and set the tow in on 3 of the four shoes. I was able to get the tow in without bending the caliper arms, just by adjusting the mounting for the shoe. The last shoe goes back to straight though every time I tighten it up. The noise level is much improved now but there is still some there. As I said, I haven't had the courage to try bending that aluminum alloy arm. I have replaced many of the French components on this bike with period correct Campagnolo record, nuevo record, and tipo parts (much like the top of the line Gitane Super Corsa was equipped) and am strongly considering putting on the period correct Campagnolo long reach brakes.

   RE: Brake shoe toe in posted by Eric Amlie on 9/23/2002 at 8:48:12 PM
Thanks Stacey. I'm aware of the need for the toe in but I haven't had the courage to do it yet on the Mafac Competitions on my '71 Gitane Tour de France. They were noisier than a room full of kindergartners when I got the bike(stopped it like crazy though, much better than my other bikes with Weinmann brakes). I recently replaced the old original Mafac pads with Mathausers and set the tow in on 3 of the four shoes. I was able to get the tow in without bending the caliper arms, just by adjusting the mounting for the shoe. The last shoe goes back to straight though every time I tighten it up. The noise level is much improved now but there is still some there. As I said, I haven't had the courage to try bending that aluminum alloy arm. I have replaced many of the French components on this bike with period correct Campagnolo Record, Nuovo Record, and tipo parts (much like the top of the line Gitane Super Corsa was equipped) and am strongly considering putting on the period correct Campagnolo Record long reach brakes.

   RE: Brake shoe toe in posted by Eric Amlie on 9/23/2002 at 8:49:00 PM
Thanks Stacey. I'm aware of the need for the toe in but I haven't had the courage to do it yet on the Mafac Competitions on my '71 Gitane Tour de France. They were noisier than a room full of kindergartners when I got the bike(stopped it like crazy though, much better than my other bikes with Weinmann brakes). I recently replaced the old original Mafac pads with Mathausers and set the tow in on 3 of the four shoes. I was able to get the tow in without bending the caliper arms, just by adjusting the mounting for the shoe. The last shoe goes back to straight though every time I tighten it up. The noise level is much improved now but there is still some there. As I said, I haven't had the courage to try bending that aluminum alloy arm. I have replaced many of the French components on this bike with period correct Campagnolo Record, Nuovo Record, and Tipo parts (much like the top of the line Gitane Super Corsa was equipped) and am strongly considering putting on the period correct Campagnolo Record long reach brakes.

   RE: Multiple replies posted by Eric Amlie on 9/23/2002 at 8:52:22 PM
Sorry for that. I was trying to correct some spelling. I guess when you hit stop, it doesn't






AGE / VALUE:   three vintage road bikes posted by: robert on 9/19/2002 at 7:39:39 AM
hi, does anyone know anything about Campania ? or how about Norco? or maybe, Fuji? i have three 10spd type bikes, they are not all 10 SPD but same style. any info would be cool. i will name of components if anyone thinks they can help me on of them! thanks


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   three vintage road bikes posted by Bryant on 9/19/2002 at 11:34:18 AM
Don't know the other two but I've worked on older Fuji's. I fixed up a Fuji Special Tourer for my daughter in Philly. 10 speed, orange frame, QR brakes, chain hangar, Suntour parts. Real nice bike, she still rides it and gets quite a few comments on the bike. Just be careful when taking apart the headset, they used loose bearings.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   three vintage road bikes posted by Warren on 9/19/2002 at 12:32:28 PM
Norco is a canadian manufacturer/importer who brought in Japanese frames and built them up. They used to distribute Nishiki as well. Usually they are decent butted chromoly frames (Tange or Ishwata) with Shimano or Suntour components. Good riders or candidates for fixed gear conversions. Not unlike Fuji.

Norco now does high end mtn bikes with a couple of road bikes in their line-up. All aluminum of course.

   Campania posted by John E on 9/19/2002 at 2:06:21 PM
During the early 1970s, (while Nishiki was still selling Kawamura-built frames under the American Eagle label), Campania was a Italianate marque (complete with red-white-and-green colour scheme on the decals!) used on another series of Japanese bikes. If your frame has double-butted Tange or Ishiwata CrMo tubing, an integral derailleur hanger, half-chrome stays, etc., then you own one of their higher-end offerings, such as the Campania Pro. The Campania line roughly paralleled the Nishiki/American Eagle, Fuji, etc. lines.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   three vintage road bikes (C ITOH) posted by Andrus on 9/19/2002 at 3:05:09 PM
On this topic, had to remark, saw a brand, I never saw before, and I believe I have the spelling right as on a lady's road bicycle, "C ITOH", anyone know of this bicycle brand? Thanks in advance. (Could it have been Citoh instead?). It did not look like anything special; but I might do a double take, if anyone has any additional info. It was all pink, about all I can think of.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   three vintage road bikes posted by David on 9/19/2002 at 3:52:06 PM
C. Itoh was fairly common in the 70s. Japanese, I think, decent quality.

   RE: C. Itoh posted by Eric Amlie on 9/19/2002 at 4:54:32 PM
From Sheldon Brown;

C.Itoh
Brand name used by Bridgestone in the early '70s. These were pretty crummy bikes.

   RE:Campania posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 9/19/2002 at 7:27:15 PM
I have color original dealer catalogs of these companies brought from Canada 20 years ago. If there is a web site where they would display scans of these catalogs I would give them to whoever runs the site.

Nobody is going to see these if they are sitting in my paper files. That's why I want to send them away to somebody who would put them up on a web site.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   three vintage road bikes posted by robert on 9/20/2002 at 3:58:23 AM
wow, i did not expect so many replies! thankyou! the norco i knew was canadian and it was tange tubing. the fuji is a Sport s. and the Campania is a Medalist. i don't know what kinds of tubing it is. the tubes , where they are usuallt wlded together, actually fit into each other. is that double butted? the fuji will be gone tomorrow, i think? if nto is someone interestd in it? email me and i will give full specs. the norco is all there too, as wel as the campania. all original accept maybe the tires? thanks and anyone is welcome to email me or respond to this ad.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   three vintage road bikes posted by robert on 9/20/2002 at 3:58:46 AM
wow, i did not expect so many replies! thankyou! the norco i knew was canadian and it was tange tubing. the fuji is a Sport s. and the Campania is a Medalist. i don't know what kinds of tubing it is. the tubes , where they are usuallt wlded together, actually fit into each other. is that double butted? the fuji will be gone tomorrow, i think? if not, is someone interestd in it? email me and i will give full specs. the norco is all there too, as wel as the campania. all original accept maybe the tires? thanks and anyone is welcome to email me or respond to this ad.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   three vintage road bikes posted by Bob on 9/26/2002 at 4:56:08 AM
I owned a C.Itoh bicycle in the 70's it an early effort on Japan's part to get a foothold in the American Market. It was heavy but it was solidly built and served me well. I rode it from Boston to Pittsburgh and back again when i was just 15 years old. Today it rests in my cellar awiting the restoration project I've put off for the last 25 years.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Super Le Tour follow-up posted by: ken on 9/18/2002 at 11:50:27 PM
The Super Le Tour turned out more rideable tan I expected and slightly under the "12.2" weight. The Shimano hubs were spec; the front hub has a sticker reading, "Caution. Wheels must be properly secured. See owner's manual. Schwinn Bicycle Company" -good advice...
Now, is there a safe way to get an alloy post out of a steel seat tube? If I can, I've got a nice rider; if not, parts is parts.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Super Le Tour follow-up posted by Trevo on 9/19/2002 at 1:52:35 AM
I had a basic,actually 2) Le Tours.I had one of those I built up with sealed Raligh(actually early campy) wheels. It was a hot bike untill It bent two of my axles. The frames are crap carbon steel. Fast rides though

   Stuck seat post removal posted by Tom Findley on 9/19/2002 at 11:47:31 AM
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/stuck_seatposts.html

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Super Le Tour follow-up posted by Kevin K on 9/19/2002 at 7:32:48 PM
Hi Ken. I just picked up a 1980 Schwinn Super Letour. Mine is made of 1020 tubing ( heavy stuff ) but is otherwise nicely equipted. It's got a very nice set of Weinmann wheels which is mainly why I bought the bike. It is also a mixte frame in a nice green metallic. Decals are real nice too. Shimano Altus LT derailleurs and shifters. Weinmann brakes with gum hooded levers, but SR stem and micro seat post. More Letour history or should I say mystery. Kevin K

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:Super Le Tour follow-up posted by Ray on 9/20/2002 at 2:29:13 PM
Although I respect Sheldon's site and suggestions on the removal of a seat post there is one method that has worked for me and it is not as time consuming as the other traditional methods. If you are going to destroy the seat post anyway then why ruin the paint on your seat tube by using a torch. You first have to use a lubricant of some type as called out on Sheldons site. Next I place the frame in a stand and turn it upside down with the post facing the floor. I then drill a 1/4 inch hole horizontally through the post at a strong point. Next I take a nut and bolt that will fit the hole and place it in the hole but do not thread it down all the way. Now I take a claw hammer and place the claw behind the head of the bolt and whail away by striking the head of the hammer with another hammer. This has removed many impossible seat posts and it has not failed me even once. Do not drill the hole to big especially on an alloy post so it does not break. Also on an alloy post drill the hole close to the top of the post as possible. If it breaks then you can drill another hole further down. Good luck and save that frame.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   PK-10, Px-10E posted by: Brian L. on 9/18/2002 at 5:22:00 PM
Anyone live in San Fran area? Peugeot fans check out: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1859986311. Looks to be the real deal, lacking the a few original bits. Photo is poor, and seller doesn't know beans about the bike, but definitely not a UO-8.


   Carbolite 103? posted by John E on 9/18/2002 at 9:41:40 PM
Correction #1: The bike is in the greater Los Angeles area.

Correction #2: I am not at all sure because of the crummy photo, but I think it might be a late 1970s/early 1980s Carbolite 103 framed UO-8 successor, judging from the big spoke protector on the rear wheel. Sometime in the late 1970s, even the lower-end Peugeots were getting aluminum cranksets, albeit with swaged spiders integral with nonreplaceable outer chainrings.

If I am correct, I do not recommend this bike, although I might want the Swiss-threaded BB cups and other nonstandard fittings. It may even have a Helicomatic rear hub (ugh!).

   RE:Carbolite 103? posted by freeespirit on 9/19/2002 at 3:07:39 AM
John E is right, that the bike is a entry level peugeot. It doesnt have chromed forks or rear drops, no mafac brakes or stronlight 93 crank or simplex derailers. The picture is poor and you can't see the crank side but it doesnt look like any of the PX-10s Ive seen before.

   RE:Carbolite 103? posted by Brian L. on 9/19/2002 at 4:54:11 PM
Actually, the bike clearly has Mafac levers with full hoods and trademark cable-guide at the rear seat. Hard to tell for sure on the calipers. Geometry looks tighter than the Carbolites I've seen, but is rear wheel seated all the way? Wheelset appears to be aluminum rims on Normandy high-flange. I agree about the spoke protector, but speculated that at least the rear wheel might not be original. Kickstand, hmm ...

   I'm befuddled posted by John E on 9/20/2002 at 12:53:36 AM
Brian and I have been trading emails on this one. Although I originally dismissed it as a Carbolite junker, it may indeed be a mid 1970s PR-10/PK-10. Is that a Stronglight 49D crank? Is that a Reynolds 531 "3 tubes renforce" sticker between the shift levers? Is it a plain-lugged frame? Is the geometry as tight as it looks in this picture? If so, it is going way too cheaply. I wish the information were less ambiguous!






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Peugeot PKN10 posted by: Randy on 9/18/2002 at 10:12:27 AM
Have a Peugeot PKN10 was wondering if anyone would know all the exact components that this bike came with, the frame is in great shape so I want to put the bike back to how it was exactly .


   Peugeot PKN10 posted by John E on 9/18/2002 at 2:16:18 PM
I have a 1980 PKN10 (s/n B0xxxxx), which I bought used with a blend of original and replacement components. The PX-10 website (in the "French quarter" of www.classicrendezvous.com) lists what are claimed to be the original PKN10 components; most match my years of experience with Peugeots, but a few don't.

DEFINITES:
crankset: Stronglight B-9, with factory-drilled 52-42 rings
derailleurs: Peugeot-branded Simplex aluminum
shifters: aluminum Simplex friction downtube
seatpost: Simplex aluminum

PROBABLES:
brakes: Galli sidepulls (mine)
wheelset: ???? Normandy Luxe Competition hubs, ala PX-10 ????
saddle: ??? (Mine came with some padded vinyl thing, which I replaced with a used Brooks Competition, which is the Brooks Pro's less attractive sibling. For many years, U.S. Export PX-10s came with Brooks Pros.)

My attitude toward mine is that since the frame is far better than many of the original components, I have shamelessly swapped out derailleurs, shifters, saddle, etc., and, only because I wanted a triple chainring, the otherwise superb crankset.






AGE / VALUE:   Age Value Quality posted by: Phil on 9/18/2002 at 2:22:17 AM
I Have been shopping around for a bike for parts and picked up one this weekend. It appears to be a very top of the line piece but am not knowledgeable about upscale bikes. If anyone could shed some light on the age, quality, value, and intended use I would appreciate the info. The bike has Nisi rims - it has glue on tires - the frame appears to be annodized aluminum which is probably not true - the frame I believe reads Alan and is made in Italy - wheels have low flange and double butted spokes - all gearing and brakes are Campy - brakes have factory drill circles which appear to be a litenning affect -
Thanks in advance for any help you can furnish. I will forward any other pertinent info but bike is out of state right now.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Age Value Quality posted by Jonathan on 9/18/2002 at 3:53:51 AM
It was an early attempt at Al frames. What was the price? If it was cheap and it has SR components, you are lucky to find one. Have you checked the frame for any weaknesses? A clean, solid frame is probably very collectible. I'd check Sheldon Brown on the Harris Cyclery site. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gloss_st-z.html#sr
This is the glossary page that you can select; "A" and you'll be able to read about the "Alan".






AGE / VALUE:   Catalogs are wanting to go away into show business ! posted by: humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 9/18/2002 at 12:04:33 AM
Monshee, and Mailllard and Sekanne and Peugot.
Where do I send these catalogs to?
Who has a web site for any or all of these names.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Catalogs are wanting to go away into show business ! posted by Ken on 9/18/2002 at 11:45:17 PM
Leon Dixon would archive them; nostalgic.net might scan them and post the whole shebang, which woud be cool. Is there a similar site with a more European flavor?






AGE / VALUE:   '34 Iver Johnson SPCL Racer posted by: Kevin Nixon on 9/17/2002 at 6:02:08 PM
My Grandfather purchased a '34 Iver Johnson SPCL Racer which is now sitting in my garage in decent condition. I have the wooden rims which came with the bike and most of the spokes as well as the valve stems [and on deteriorated tire]. Can anyone give me an approximate value of this bike? May be interested in selling it to someone who is willing to treat it well and cherish it. Contact me via email with any info or interest. Serial number is 485897


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   '34 Iver Johnson SPCL Racer posted by Wings on 9/18/2002 at 6:37:38 AM
I grew up with a Schwinn Black Phantom (second bike) and a used Iver Johnson with wooden rims and tires that were glued on. I had the Iver Johnson first and learned how to ride on it -- it was an awesome bike and when I received a Black Phantom I preferred the Iver Johnson by far! I still remember the wooden rims which I eventually replaced.

My local bike shop has an Iver Johnson on display in great condition! I think you have a great bike there!!!! I may be biased!






AGE / VALUE:   '34 Iver Johnson SPCL Racer posted by: Kevin Nixon on 9/17/2002 at 6:02:08 PM
My Grandfather purchased a '34 Iver Johnson SPCL Racer which is now sitting in my garage in decent condition. I have the wooden rims which came with the bike and most of the spokes as well as the valve stems [and on deteriorated tire]. Can anyone give me an approximate value of this bike? May be interested in selling it to someone who is willing to treat it well and cherish it. Contact me via email with any info or interest.







AGE / VALUE:   Milano Sport "Montecarlo"? posted by: Elvis on 9/17/2002 at 3:15:16 AM
Hi all. Just picked up an old single speed. But it is as light as some older road bikes I've seen. Cottered cranks, fenders, front rack. Cantilever style frame and chainguard with i big long fin attatched to the top. Frame is mostly copper color with some white [fin on chainguard and head tube/ front of frame near head tube].
Anyone ever heard of either Milano Sport or the Monte Carlo model?







AGE / VALUE:   Pegot Catalog(poster)/need web site address posted by: ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com on 9/17/2002 at 12:25:18 AM
I am wanting to give away a Peugot poster with pics and descriptions of bikes to somebody who will display it on a web site. Any Peugot web sites out there willing to take a free poster for refrence.
please e- mail
ChristopherRobin2@starmail.com







AGE / VALUE:   Falcon Bicycle posted by: Rick McLaughlin on 9/16/2002 at 9:05:51 PM
I need Info on a 70's Falcon ten speed bicycle. A coworker gave me a old Falcon bike that is in rough shape. I want to fix it up for my son. I don't know if I want to restore it or put new components on after I have it sandblasted and repainted. does it have any value restored? It is a nice lugged frame that is made in england. The seat tube decal and head badge says Falcon. the most of the top tube decal has peeled away, the letters that are left are "ac" "ond" it appears to be two words. It has suntour front deraileur and the rear deraileur says FALCON but stamped "Made in Tiwain", Williams cranks and Wienmann 999 brakes. the color is a candy apple red. Any info would be greatly appreciated.


      Falcon Bicycle posted by John E on 9/17/2002 at 1:15:44 AM
To quote Charlie Harding of "C. Harding's For Bikes," "A Falcon is a good English bike." Since Falcon made a full range of frames, look for the usual telltale signs of quality, such as an integral derailleur hanger, half-chromed stays, or a Reynolds 531 sticker. The bike should at least be worth fixing up as a daily driver, with the benefit of mostly-ISO threads and diameters.

   Falcon Bicycle posted by Frank on 9/17/2002 at 1:46:41 AM
wonderfull frame.. i sandblasted on two weeks ago... i was impressed. I wished i still had it. Traded it for a tandem.
the work on the frame was much better than the components.

Frank