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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Flat Spots on Rims posted by: Gralyn on 11/17/2003 at 9:23:05 PM
Does anyone have a technique for getting flat spots out of rims (wheels)? I have a couple of sets that have flat spots - I wouldn't consider trying to fix them - but since even the common alloy wheels are so hard to find at a cheap price (single wheels, parts bikes, etc.). I have an idea I may experiment with - but I wanted to know if anyone has had any success fixing the flat spots.


   Flat Spots on Rims posted by John E on 11/18/2003 at 12:08:54 AM
That's a tough one, and most shops won't touch it. However, for a minor flat spot, you can certainly try loosening the half-dozen spokes surrounding the distortion, then pushing it back outward with a scissors-type car jack. (I prefer this over the rubber mallet alternative.) If the rim sidewall is dimpled and/or if the radial reduction exceeds a few mm, toss the rim.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Flat Spots on Rims posted by Joe on 11/18/2003 at 7:49:56 AM
Many older bike shops may be able to help, there was a tool made years ago by Overland that was used to 'pull' the dent out on the rim. This was done by supporting the rim on each side of the dent and it used a puller type hook which cradled the rim and pull the rim back into shape.
I've been looking for one of these for myself for sometime, I've borrowed and used one in the past, but haven't seen any for sale lately. It can save most minor damaged rims, as long as there is no creasing or serious twist in the area of the bend. Using it takes some practice, you can easily distort the rim in the other direction, or dent the face of the rim itself.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Flat Spots on Rims posted by paul viner on 11/18/2003 at 9:35:13 AM
try taking them to a rim manufacturer,and get them rolled to the size that is stamped on them,fortunately i live just around the corner from a company called VELOCITY,who make all sorts of steel and alloy rims.they only charge me a few dollars to do it.i asked them one day if they could make me a pennyfarthing rim of 52' in a deep v style, not a problem half an hour later one rim.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Flat Spots on Rims posted by Derek Coghill on 11/18/2003 at 9:27:15 PM
The trouble with straightening alloy stuff is that it work-hardens so you have to soften it again, like re-annealing copper washers. Otherwise there's a danger of it snapping.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Flat Spots on Rims posted by JONathan on 11/19/2003 at 3:12:50 AM
Flat "spots"? Sounds like the wheels were thrashed pretty hard. I have a couple of rims that could use a fix for the same problem, only the flat region covers a few spokes. Imagine a wheel has a few loose spokes and low tire pressure (maybe none) and then they smack a few road craters in the course of several miles hard riding...flat spots.
Sometimes, and I hate to do this, some stuff has to get tossed into the scrap heap with my eyes closed and head turned with a grimace. If the flat spot is a continuous curve, that is one thing. If the flat spot has distinct angular "breaks", then the rim is very suspect as a candidate for repair, IMHO, of course. Then, you have the hubs to inspect for damage from the spokes being jammed inside the holes.
For me, it is a perfect excuse to search out another vintage LW at $15 that has a couple decent alloys. Good luck, whatever you decide. I hope they get salvaged. The Araya rims are pretty tough, as opposed to some of the other alloy stuff I have. Low ductility is a major problem with aluminum. Steel rules, when it comes to toughness, IMHO.
JONathan
Note: I know there are some really strong alloy rims (Durex for one), but once the geometry is distorted, the ductility problem is still an issue...I think. But what do I know?

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Flat Spots on Rims posted by Robert on 11/21/2003 at 2:35:19 AM
Loosen the spokes in the damaged area. Go into your garage and find a 2x4 long enough to be able to reach from one ceiling truss to another. Put 2 x 4 through the spokes in the damaged area. Now the 2 x 4 goes into the ceiling trusses. Use your body weight to pull the flat spot out.
Go "easy" . Depending on the type of rim it may pull out very easily or it may take some effort . Check it after you are done for any possible cracks. Remember, if you should screw up, the rim was dead already , right??






AGE / VALUE:   C.ITOH 3-sp. posted by: JONathan on 11/17/2003 at 5:01:28 PM
Anyone know what the deal is on this make. There is one hanging at the Sal. Army shop for $16. The same place that had my Bianchi "Limited" that I got last friday.
The C.ITOH frame may have aluminum lugs, although I didn't have a magnet to test it. Looks a lot like the lugs on my Kabuki which are aluminum. Is it possible that Bridgestone made the C.ITOH? Just wondering, although if it is there this friday, I might buy it just for the novelty factor.
Nobody around me is going to ride it, but that hasn't slowed me down.
Rides, JONathan


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   C.ITOH 3-sp. posted by Rob on 11/17/2003 at 7:16:42 PM
JONathan...From what I've heard they aren't much of a bike...but for $16, I know I'd buy it, unless it's totally beat...at some point I seem to recall they morphed into some other name...

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   C.ITOH 3-sp. posted by Oscar on 11/18/2003 at 4:09:42 AM
C Itoh morphed into Bridgestone.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   C.ITOH 3-sp. posted by Tim on 11/18/2003 at 7:30:49 AM
Indeed C. Itoh morphed Bridgestone. My first road bike was a C.Itoh, purchased at the Marshall Fields department store in Milwaukee (mom's discount). It was a real bike, envy of all my friends. Got my first taste of a complete rebuild at 15 years old when I tore it down, repainted it, rebuilt it, and promptly got it stolen. For $16, or even $25, I'd buy it.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   C.ITOH 3-sp. posted by JONathan on 11/19/2003 at 3:27:30 AM
Thanks for the info, everyone. The C.Itoh is in pretty good shape.
I will give it a try, but it may be out the door, before I get back there.
I;m intrigued by the alumium lugging, especially the BB unit which extends back to the chain-stays.
The lugs and paint scheme look identical to my Kabuki. The C.Itoh looks a bit better in general construction.
Probably the difference between a bike-boom bike and one before that period.
JONathan

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   C.ITOH 3-sp. posted by mc on 11/20/2003 at 2:55:43 AM
I own the very first C Itoh made (1964), all steel with sturdy lugs and OLD Suntour components including rare Grand Prix derailleurs. Heavy, but a solid bike. Bridgestone later absorbed Itoh along with the Kabuki.






MISC:   I've been to the mounaintop posted by: Bryant on 11/17/2003 at 12:25:06 PM
i just got back from some training at UC, Davis. What a great place for a cycle junkie!!! They have thousands of bike there. The University has closed off the center of campus to cars (you need a special pass to get a car in) and you can either walk, skate, scoot or bike to classes. Most use bikes. In the city there are bicycle lanes on all streets and in some cases, specail bicycle traffic lights. There are bike racks with cables to lock your bike in front of most stores in the city. I guess Davis is about as big as most college towns, yet it can support 9 bicycle shops. My county has 1 1/2 bike shops. It was wonderful just walking around and looking at all the differnt makes and models. The University has a bike auction twice a year, I would love to be there for that. My dream now is to retire there and fix bikes out of my garage. What a wonderful place!!


   RE:MISC:   I've been to the mounaintop posted by JONathan on 11/17/2003 at 5:31:30 PM
Right on, Bryant. Sacramento area is great place for bikes. My all time favorite trail is the Jedediah Smith Memorial Bikepath that runs from Discovery Park (about 10 mi. fr. Davis) up to the foothills of the Sierras along the American River. My wife got through Davis (UC) two years with a single speed "breeze". I loved the rides through the flatlands when the Canada geese are migrating to the rice fields. There may now be a trail that goes all the way to Sacramento from Davis; I saw a bikepath all along Hwy. 80 the last trip up.
I didn't know of the auctions, there. Hmmmm, got me thinking. And here, I've been poking all around there for years, and never had a clue.
JONathan

   RE:MISC:   I've been to the mounaintop posted by gary m on 11/18/2003 at 5:54:52 AM
Awesome place. I run a bike shop in a college town as well, 13,000 students. not one of these lazy punks will stoop to a bicycle. one student i talked to paid 800$ in parking tickets last semester. this tiny town is a madhouse most days, the foolish place only has 1 north south avenue, and 1 east to west, and the rest is a maze of city streets, none lining up with anything. to make matters worse bicycles are required to be walked across both bridges, and arent allowed downtown at all on the sidewalks. the sidewalks on the bridges are big enough for a truck, but no bikes. think i am joking? i have right now about 20 collectible or useable Schwinns setting outside in the rain by the road, and they wont even steal them. I would love to be somewhere that people ride bikes. I can reapir any facet of them, and have the tools. But where is this place? the one you told me about has 9 already. Only very few places i have ever seen any volume of bikes. and i have traveled a lot.

   RE:RE:MISC:   I've been to the mounaintop posted by Wings on 11/18/2003 at 6:42:39 AM
I have driven past Davis -- had I know I would have visited.
I also know the bike path along the American River.
I had a conference at USC once and it was an island of bikes (almost all cruisers) in the middle of the city. I spent my lunch time walking past all the bike racks and checking them out.

I often get to go to UCSB and that is a bike community with trails all over and Isla Vista was an amazing place to go to see all types of collectibles about ten years ago! But now the bikes all seem to be the $79 cruiser copies or mountain bikes from Costco. It no longer is as interesting!

   RE:MISC: I've been to the mounaintop posted by jack on 11/18/2003 at 7:29:59 AM
I've been living in Sacratomato for twenty years and its all true. I went to the last auction at UCD about 2 mos ago. There were about a hundred or so bidders, and several hundred bikes in varying condition. Most were newer oriental junk 10-speeds and mountain with a few older (70s-80s) Schwinns and half-dozen Raleighs. Prices ran from $20 to $60.

   RE:MISC:   I've been to the mounaintop posted by Rob on 11/18/2003 at 6:40:16 PM
University/college towns are great for old bikes...It didn't surprise me, when, during a conversation with the owner/partner? of a bicycle consignment shop, he said that a lot of their customers were students from a large nearby university. This store has been a good source of intresting stuff...including some higher end bikes at higher end prices..., though they seem to have a lot less sutff than a couple of years ago...partly, no doubt, because they ran up against some silly outside display by-law...municipal government...you gotta love it!!! ...there are parts of the city where you are practically forced into the gutter by all the crap on display outside the stores, or by outside restaurant seating...then, there's this consignment shop with practically no foot traffic in the area, except for people actually coming to the store, and the by-law enforcement officers are on the job!!!






AGE / VALUE:   early derailers posted by: sam on 11/16/2003 at 7:42:03 PM
T-Mar,I have photos of a Swiss bike "a 1938 Zwingli" showing an early derailer.Only I couldn't load it to the Free photo host to show.If you would like you can email me at samclingo@hotmail.com and I'll email you some pics---might use zwingli as subject so I'll know not to deleat ya--sam







AGE / VALUE:   fuji posted by: dave on 11/16/2003 at 3:22:37 PM
Hello,
While out checking a local thrift store,i picked up a fuji
[bedford] ladies bike.For $12.50 i couldent pass it up.
Blue with white lettering,its a sure eye catcher.
Has a rear carrier,fenders,dia-compe brakes,tires are fried,
Its a 3 speed and even has a bell.
The big cushy seat was well worth the money itself.
Anyone out there to date or put a value of such a bike.
Thank you,
Dave


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   fuji posted by jim on 11/16/2003 at 8:16:39 PM
Wow you got a deal dave!
i have 4 fuji bikes that sound quite alot like yours.
I paid $85.00 for a bedford last year.It,s a very well made
all lugged bike that rides great.My wife is the proud owner
of all 4.
The other 3 are in fine shape for there years.
go fuji!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
jim

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   fuji posted by jim on 11/16/2003 at 8:17:28 PM
Wow you got a deal dave!
i have 4 fuji bikes that sound quite alot like yours.
I paid $85.00 for a bedford last year.It,s a very well made
all lugged bike that rides great.My wife is the proud owner
of all 4.
The other 3 are in fine shape for there years.
go fuji!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
jim

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   fuji posted by Gralyn on 11/16/2003 at 9:50:31 PM
I have a few Fuji's: A Regis, Grand SE, Special Road Racer, ...and I had a Del Ray. I sold the Del Ray on e-bay - but it got lost in shipment....so, somewhere out there...who knows where - in a box, is a 25" Del Ray frame and bars. I'm thinking of parting with the Regis and the Grand SE. The Regis - mainly because it's too big for me.

The Special Road Racer - I picked up at a thrift store for $4. It had lots of rust. Considering what I paid for it, and the amount of rust - I re-painted it. Maybe I shouldn't have - but at the time it seemed the only option. I converted it into a fixed-gear bike. I found some old Japanese alloy wheels for it (the originals were too rusted), the original bars and stem (alloy) were in good shape, also, the cranks. I've been keeping my eyes open for a Special Road Racer - because I really like it.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   fuji posted by Bryant on 11/17/2003 at 12:24:51 PM
I found a Fuji Special Tourer for my Daughter two years ago. Beautiful bike, very well made. She rode it back and forth to crew practice in Philly. It is a real looker too. I offered my daughter other bikes but she would rather I upgrade this one. So I'm just finishing putting on Alloy wheels, and three piece alloy cranks for her. I'm keeping the Suntour GT rear der and Sprit front der. They work great so why change it.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   fuji posted by JONathan on 11/17/2003 at 4:57:22 PM
Fuji used "Valite" tubing in various bikes. I've been on the lookout for one. Any Fuji bike is great, IMHO. They only made quality machines from what I have experienced from personal use ('84 Team Fuji") and from my brother who has a '70's tourer with valite tubes and from all accounts from chance encounters with owners of these fine bikes.
Dave, the 3-sp. you got for a song sounds great. I have not seen a Fuji "3", but I know I would pay more than that and be happy. Great find. Got to be a new one to the list. BTW, those vintage Fuji's have a way of staying on the road forever, it seems. That is the true test of a bike, IMHO.
Way to go!
JONathan

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   fuji posted by Fred on 11/18/2003 at 2:11:33 AM
What an interesting thread! I am lucky to have 4 Fuji's; an Allegro, a Tourist, a Design Special, and a Resolute. They are all high quality I found the Allegro first in about 1993. Paid $20 for it and 3 others. The Allegro had a bent fork which was easy to repair, other wise it was in beautiful condition. Its my Daily rider in FL. The Tourist csme next out of a neighbors garage in fair condition It is probably the best of the bunch when new. The Design special came next. Don't look for one, I have the only one since I built the bike from a NOS frame and all new parts of my choice. It has beautiful graphics. The resolute came to me in 2000. It is a typical 12 speed and is similar to lAte 80's Schwinns I have. You can look at these bikes at fredhaj.tripod.com. T

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   fuji posted by Fred on 11/18/2003 at 2:12:40 AM
What an interesting thread! I am lucky to have 4 Fuji's; an Allegro, a Tourist, a Design Special, and a Resolute. They are all high quality I found the Allegro first in about 1993. Paid $20 for it and 3 others. The Allegro had a bent fork which was easy to repair, other wise it was in beautiful condition. Its my Daily rider in FL. The Tourist csme next out of a neighbors garage in fair condition It is probably the best of the bunch when new. The Design special came next. Don't look for one, I have the only one since I built the bike from a NOS frame and all new parts of my choice. It has beautiful graphics. The resolute came to me in 2000. It is a typical 12 speed and is similar to lAte 80's Schwinns I have. You can look at these bikes at fredhaj.tripod.com. T

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   fuji posted by Fred on 11/18/2003 at 2:13:42 AM
What an interesting thread! I am lucky to have 4 Fuji's; an Allegro, a Tourist, a Design Special, and a Resolute. They are all high quality I found the Allegro first in about 1993. Paid $20 for it and 3 others. The Allegro had a bent fork which was easy to repair, other wise it was in beautiful condition. Its my Daily rider in FL. The Tourist csme next out of a neighbors garage in fair condition It is probably the best of the bunch when new. The Design special came next. Don't look for one, I have the only one since I built the bike from a NOS frame and all new parts of my choice. It has beautiful graphics. The resolute came to me in 2000. It is a typical 12 speed and is similar to lAte 80's Schwinns I have. You can look at these bikes at fredhaj.tripod.com. T






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Carlton Racer posted by: jack on 11/16/2003 at 2:35:14 AM
First of all, thanks to all of you who have responded to to my questions. The info you all have is invaluable for figuring out what's going on in the wonderful world of vintage bicycles.

Today's hunt turned-up a Carlton lightweight, almost illegible Reynolds 531 decal, Williams steel cottered 2-ring crank, cool brass headbadge depicting guy riding on a bike. What really caught my eye was fancy lugs exactly like the '73 International on Retro-Raleighs having long points with holes. In your collective opinions, would this bike be worth bringing back from oblivion? They wanted $125 and the only things original are what I've already mentioned.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Carlton Racer posted by jack on 11/17/2003 at 12:12:12 AM
From what I've found so far, the Carlton Co. (based in Woksop) was bought by Raleigh in late 50's-early 60's. Thereafter, Raleigh 531 frame production was transfered to Carlton facility. Since this bike has a unique Carlton headbadge, I'm betting that its from the pre-Raleigh period.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Carlton Racer posted by jack on 11/17/2003 at 12:13:17 AM
From what I've found so far, the Carlton Co. (based in Woksop) was bought by Raleigh in late 50's-early 60's. Thereafter, Raleigh 531 frame production was transfered to Carlton facility. Since this bike has a unique Carlton headbadge, I'm betting that its from the pre-Raleigh period.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Carlton Racer posted by jack on 11/17/2003 at 6:32:20 AM
Probably should have posted this thread on English Roadsters but anyway...I found more info. Indeed a late Carlton-early Worksop Raleigh having Capella lugs. I'll try and get it but the store said it was already sold although it hadn't been paid for. Cross fingers!






AGE / VALUE:   Bianchi "Limited" c. Shimano 600 group posted by: JONathan on 11/15/2003 at 3:58:01 AM
I got lucky...again! Seems that a casual stop at the Sal. Army shop, which was very random, turned up a beautiful black Bianchi "limited" with Shimano 600 cranks; shifters (bossed); hubs; brakes and headset. Wheels are Durex "super elite" (made in Italy) with English, Redestein 25-622 tires. ITM bars, also Italian and a Sella "Italia" seat. This bike was well maintained and is in excellent condition with zero scratches! A little cable buffing at the seat-tube, which is barely visible.
The stickers have "Tubi Rinforzati; Formula Two; Bianchi, Columbus". Another is "Made in Italy", near the BB along the seat-tube.
Any estimates on the date? The geometry is road-bike, too. About 39" wb...measured with a yardstick and the rear tire is very close to the seat-tube. Nice lug work and finish, but I would guess it is mass produced. The shop that first sold the bike is(was) noted for top quality, but they had a range of models.
Price was $119 US, but I got it for $100...it didn't hurt to ask.
BTW, it came with a manual, but no dates! The ride is superb, which probably goes without saying.
The Italian family is now up to three bikes, but they are nice: Maino, Bottechia (touring) and now the Bianchi; my first Bianchi. Frame size is 59cm, which makes it perfect for me to ride.
Thanks for any info you got on this cool ride.
JONathan
Note: Judging by the recent posts bending toward the higher end rides, I am thrilled to make this one. Happy ridin'.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bianchi posted by Gralyn on 11/15/2003 at 1:40:02 PM
Wow!
You could possibly check bulgier.net
there are some pics of bianchi catalogs there - not sure which year's catalogs are there - but it's worth a shot.

My closest thrift store encounter with a bianchi - was a girls 24" ....maybe a cross bike from what I recall....obviously mass produced and asian....and they were asking $150

I have 2 bianchis - one I bought on e-bay (frame), and the other.....can't remember....may have been from someone on this group (frame).

It seems a lot of the 80's bianchis were celeste or black.

     Bianchi posted by John E on 11/15/2003 at 9:12:33 PM
Nice find, JONathan! You can probaby estimate the age from the components, such as the number of cogs and whether it has a freewheel or a freehub.

Gralyn -- for awhile during the 1980s, each model of Bianchi road bike came in a choice of Celeste and no more than one or two other colors. My 1981 is a fairly rare metallic brown ("charcoal"), rather than black.

   RE:AGE / VALUE: Bianchi posted by Warren on 11/15/2003 at 10:16:10 PM
Nice find Jonathon...those are my favourite rims. Build them properly and they are bombproof. I like them better than Mavics. That was a popular bike in the 80's...Bianchi was starting to outsource and mix components more.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Bianchi posted by JONathan on 11/16/2003 at 6:44:45 PM
Thanks for your comments. I just did some research and it appears that the MF-6208-(6) freewheel is the most recent component by date, which is 1988. Seems the freewheel was made that year, only. Probably is hard to find, however, I discovered that the cogs are interchangeable with the HG-20... I think. This gets a bit to the right side of the brain for me to handle. One thing that is subjective is the fine machining that went into the componentry. I am convinced that it doesn't get much better, but what do I know about it?
The wet weather has me trudging on the MTB beater (Raleigh "Seneca"), but the clearing trend has afforded the chance to spin the Bianchi later this afternoon. I can't wait! A bike ride partner has a "veloce" with Campy group which will be an interesting direct comparison. I think mine ("Limited") is geared tighter with the 14-16-18-20-22-24 rear cog-set. Either way, it is as good a bike as I will need for any recreational riding. Now, things look complete with five different bikes each dedicated to a specific ride type..(winter, ice excluded!!) which makes for lots of good rides.
One last note on the "B": The forks have a sticker on which is printed; "Foderi Forcella Bianchi Formula Columbus", which must mean something about the forks' construction. Have a good ride, today...and everyday; got to get aired-up and out there, myself.
JONathan






AGE / VALUE:   Peugeot Track posted by: jack on 11/15/2003 at 2:34:51 AM
Found a nice, original 60's-70's Peugeot Track bike, Reynolds 531, full Campy Pista Gruppo. I searched the web and couldn't even find a mention. This either means they are rare or they are of no interest. Which one is it?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Peugeot Track posted by Gralyn on 11/15/2003 at 1:56:47 PM
I would think any 60's or 70's original track bike would be of interest. Since Peugeot is such a big name - I would think they would have made quite a few track bikes

   RE:AGE / VALUE: Peugeot Track posted by Warren on 11/15/2003 at 10:13:38 PM
Great bike...I think Keith has one of those. Probably rarer here in NA than in Europe and definitely collectible...most all track bikes are.A keeper!!!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Peugeot Track posted by Keith on 11/18/2003 at 1:35:36 AM
I have one. Someone out there must have a catelog -- not me. I don't even know the number designation. I didn't study it -- I just raced it. Now it's a wall hanger. I can't say much for the workmanship, as it has lots of sizeable gaps in the brazing. It came with the period's Record Pista gruppo, and a cool lugged steel fully adjustable stem which I switched out and disgarded as it was heavy. Ah, the folly of youth. What size is yours?

   RE:AGE / VALUE: Peugeot Track posted by jack on 11/18/2003 at 2:18:12 AM
Keith, its not mine due to being too small, 50-54cm. By the way, folly is not exclusive to youth. The 60ish seller showed me the original steel adj stem and bars (as you described) when I remarked that the bike had road bars. He said he was going to ebay them SEPARATELY! If you really want the originals, let me know how much you would pay and I will try and get them for you. It is not often that we get the opportunity to rectify a folly of our youth, but it'll cost more.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Peugeot Track posted by Keith on 11/18/2003 at 2:50:11 PM
Thanks Jack. I'll check the stem out on eBay. Another thing I recall about the stem that makes me feel only slightly better is that I had a hard time getting it tight enough that it wouldn't slip. I'd think it was cranked down as far as it would go without stripping the bolt, and then it would slip in a sprint. That was another reason I abandoned it. Still, it would look cool on a display bike. Now watch it get big $$$ on eBay!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Peugeot Track posted by Ken on 12/12/2003 at 9:05:24 PM
I recently sold my 1972 Peugeot track bike with I bought new in '72. I researched the bike before I sold it and found out it was made for Peugeot by another company probably MASI but the workmanship on mine was not of MASI quality. The bike was all campy and cost me $304 new. I sold it for much more ($1200). So, the value is what its worth to someone else. Personally, I want a chrome Paramount!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Peugeot Track posted by Ken on 12/12/2003 at 9:05:55 PM
I recently sold my 1972 Peugeot track bike with I bought new in '72. I researched the bike before I sold it and found out it was made for Peugeot by another company probably MASI but the workmanship on mine was not of MASI quality. The bike was all campy and cost me $304 new. I sold it for much more ($1200). So, the value is what its worth to someone else. Personally, I want a chrome Paramount!






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Pro posted by: jack on 11/14/2003 at 9:31:41 PM
I have a chance to buy a Raleigh Professional ($400 although a little rough). It's a 1974 by all observations. My question is, according to Sheldon the Professionals came out in the early seventies, does anyone know the exact year? This one is blue mink and silver and I'm trying to determine if a 1974 is considered an "early" model.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Pro posted by John E on 11/14/2003 at 9:47:59 PM
There are 1969 and 1974 Raleigh Pros on www.classicrendezvous.com, and I have seen a ca. 1967 specimen, off-white with stripes on the seat tube.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Pro posted by jack on 11/15/2003 at 1:07:06 AM
Thanks for the response John. The bike looked like a good deal at first but a second look (after a trip to the bank) revealed slightly bent top and bottom tubes. Strange though, the forks looked straight. Too bad, it would have cleaned-up nicely. Is it possible to successfully straighten the frame at a reasonable price or is it just a wall-hanging dust collector?

   Raleigh Pro posted by John E on 11/15/2003 at 9:08:33 PM
Unless the bending is VERY slight, the only way to repair a frame that has deformed in a front-end collision is to have the tubes replaced, which just might be worth doing on a Raleigh Pro. I once had a Reynolds 531 (my first Capo) frame restraightened, but it broke within a few years. The undamaged fork is typical; fork blades and steerer tubes are generally extremely robust, for product liability reasons.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Jim Redcay Classic For Sale posted by: Brian on 11/14/2003 at 7:23:39 PM
There is this Jim Redcay Bicycle on ebay ending today -friday the 14th at around 6pm EST. So far bid at $510. You're unlikely to see these very often. http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3636251575&category=7298
No relation to seller


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Jim Redcay Classic For Sale posted by Warren on 11/14/2003 at 8:19:10 PM
That's a steal...






AGE / VALUE:   How to monitor E-Bay? posted by: TimW on 11/14/2003 at 3:17:36 AM
Please help an E-Bay neophyte. How the heck do you monitor items on E-Bay. There's no category I could see for Vintage Lightweights (the fools!), and there are thousand of bicycle items posted. I tried searching my favorites (Raleighs, Flying Scots), but that's a crap shoot and who knows what interesting items will come up.

Am I getting this wrong? The categories I saw listed for bicycles are "BMX", "SCHWINN", and "OTHER". Not even "MOUNTAIN BIKES"?

Please help! I'm not looking to buy things, I just enjoy seeing what comes up and how much it goes for. Especially when its something I have in my garage.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   How to monitor E-Bay? posted by Brian on 11/14/2003 at 4:20:31 AM
Follow this link and you will see at least 10 new pages of bicycle items each day.
Collectibles-Transportation-Bicycles

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   How to monitor E-Bay? posted by Gralyn on 11/14/2003 at 1:21:15 PM
I think the majority of bikes ....and lots of lightweights - can be found ...Sports/Sporting Goods/Cycling/Road Bikes and Parts....something like that. It seems to me more are listed there than in Collectibles/Transportation/Bicycles

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   How to monitor E-Bay? posted by Derek Coghill on 11/18/2003 at 9:36:35 PM
A little note on Flying Scots (my local bike); an English friend, now married to a Scot and living about a mile from me, went to the dump to throw some stuff out. In the metal skip he saw a Flying Scot frame, so he took the head badge as a present for his fiancée.........who told him what he had done. Very embarrassed man!






AGE / VALUE:   Medici Dura ace posted by: Bill Farmer on 11/13/2003 at 8:07:01 PM
Hello, I do not know a whole heckuva alot about road bikes. I am a mtb guy. My uncle picked up a bike at a thrift store the other day and asked me to look at it. I did not know anything about the bike other than that every component on it was Dura ace. I have been in the bike shop enough to know that it is the good stuff. It is a Medici cromoly frame, all Dura ace components. It has 25 inch wheels (Mavic). It is white with some flag on it. Really look 80ish to me. Does anyone out there know anything about what I have described? Thank you for your time Bill


   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Medici Dura ace posted by Bill on 11/14/2003 at 5:21:52 PM
Hello everyone, to answer Tim's questions: the frame is chromally, lugs are fancy, and I am pretty sure it said "made in the USA" on it. Hope this helps.

   Medici posted by John E on 11/14/2003 at 9:56:48 PM
Medici framesets were made in Southern California during the 1980s and trace part of their lineage to the California Masis. Since I have seen an early 1980s Medici with full Campag. NR/SR, you may have their next lower model.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Medici Dura ace posted by TimW on 11/14/2003 at 3:09:21 AM
Hi Bill. I don't know Medici, but the presence of a full Shimano Dura Ace groupo is a good (but not excellent) indication about the general quality of a bike.

A true 'thoroughbred' Italian lightweight would have Campagnolo components. Early Dura-Ace components came out to compete with Campagnolo's best, and performed well for the money, but would not have gone on the best bikes, nor are they worth as much as Campy parts for collectors. I see lots of old Shimano 600 (Shimano's second best component set) equipped bikes around Vancouver, but few Dura-Ace.

Dura-Ace components have more recently closed some of the gap with Campagnolo, and Dura-Ace on a newer bike is probably a better indication of a higher end bike, although Campagnolo is still the choice for competitors, the fussy, and the rich.

Is there any sticker on the bike frame that mentions what type of 'tubing' it is made from? Where is the frame chromed? Are tubing joins (lugs) and other frame details fancy in shape, or plain? Can you see a name stamped in the 'dropouts' (where the wheel clamps to the frame and fork)? If you report these things here, someone can give you a better idea about the bike.

Then again, maybe someone on this site knows all about Medici.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Medici Dura ace posted by Skip Echert on 11/16/2003 at 5:45:44 AM
Hello Bill -
Medici Information from Lou Deeter's "A Guide to Used Bicycles":
MEDICI: 3238 Union Pacific Avenue, Los Angeles CA 90023. 213-262-3212. 12465 Mills Road, Unit 4-B, Chino CA 91710. 714-591-5881. 909-591-5881. Formed by Bill Recht. Gian Simonetti and Mike Howard once built for Medici.
Models:
El Dorado 90-94 Tange
Pro Strada 90-94 Prestige
Pro Strada OSSO 94 Prestitge OS
Custom 95 Aluminum

(See for information on Lou's guide.)






AGE / VALUE:   Medici Dura ace posted by: Bill Farmer on 11/13/2003 at 8:07:01 PM
Hello, I do not know a whole heckuva alot about road bikes. I am a mtb guy. My uncle picked up a bike at a thrift store the other day and asked me to look at it. I did not know anything about the bike other than that every component on it was Dura ace. I have been in the bike shop enough to know that it is the good stuff. It is a Medici frame, all Dura ace components. It has 25 inch wheels (Mavic). It is white with some flag on it. Really look 80ish to me. Does anyone out there know anything about what I have described? Thank you for your time Bill







AGE / VALUE:   What with this derailer price? posted by: sam on 11/13/2003 at 4:42:47 PM
I admit I know little on L/W stuff---but what's with this price? Is that campy derailer that rare? http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2202249887&category=420


     What with this derailer price? posted by John E on 11/14/2003 at 10:02:11 PM
That looks like a very early (ca. 1955) Campag. Gran Sport. It is far less common and therefore much less valuable than the usual ca. 1960 fare.

   less common / more valuable (of course) posted by John E on 11/14/2003 at 10:02:58 PM
Correction: less common, therefore more valuable ... duh!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   What with this derailer price? posted by Gralyn on 11/13/2003 at 8:32:46 PM
Holy Crap! I thought I would check it out....so see what the price was....because sometimes folks list stuff there with a rediculously high price....but I see this thing has bids on it!

What is it with some of these items? Is it maybe more a bid war between some wealthy folks? Maybe when compared with most average income folks - it would be like throwing down about $20. Now I'm sure most of your average folks wouldn't have any problem at all bidding against someone and going up to $20 or $30 if we were bidding on some rare bike component. I suppose there are a lot of folks out there who can throw $2000 or $3000 around and feel the same way about it.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   What with this derailer price? posted by Rob on 11/13/2003 at 8:50:36 PM
That's Kauzo...a Japanese bidder...if he's after it, it's rare or valuable... He was involved in the bidding on that pristine mid-60's PX-10 last year that went to...what was it?? $7,000+...I don't recall if he got it or not...I think one of his competitors beat him out on that one. On this item, I haven't seen the other names before, so I don't know who he's up against...

   RE:AGE / VALUE: What with this derailer price? posted by WArren on 11/13/2003 at 9:41:23 PM
Go have a look at the other auctions...he's got a pair of TA pedals that are at $1000 and haven't met reserve! He's a little silly that way. He's also got an early telecaster thats at 10 grand...

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   What with this derailer price? posted by Tom M on 11/14/2003 at 4:56:37 AM
The top bidder(kauzo) is from Japan and some of the other bidders are from Japan on this derailleur. If you look at their feedback the Japan bidders only buy on Ebay never sell. I sold some parts to a buyer(cannot remember who it was) from Japan 2 years ago and he sent me some interesting emails. He runs a bike shop and makes his own lightweight frames claims he worked as a framebuilder for a high end company for many years. I used to have his email address but lost it in a computer dying and now it is lost. The stuff he pays high dollars for is mostly for customers. Some of the items he bids on go for crazy high prices and he sells them for a profit. Old rare lightweight parts can go for very high prices depending on who wants them. For this derailleur it must be rare and the bidders want it. Funny thing is that the reserve is not met. How does the seller know what to put his reserve at.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   What with this derailer price? posted by harris g on 11/16/2003 at 2:37:48 PM
Kauzo was the runner up on the PX 10 auction 2 years ago. His bid caoused the price to jump form $2200 to $7100!






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn hand brazed posted by: andym on 11/13/2003 at 5:06:08 AM
Picked up a Sports Tourer today at a thrift store for $19.95.Should look nice,next to my two Superiors.I've owned a couple of Supersports in the past.You gotta love those fillet brazed Schwinns!


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn hand brazed posted by Oscar on 11/13/2003 at 6:57:10 PM
There are a lot of Supersports out there, but a Sport Tourer is a rarer find. Very nice bike for the money (under $20). Good find, andy.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn hand brazed posted by Gralyn on 11/13/2003 at 9:09:19 PM
I still haven't gotten over passing up a silver Schwinn Superior. I had spotted one in thrift store once....but I didn't know what it was. I was fooled by the brazing.....but you would have thought the weight (actually lack of weight) would have been a clue. And then again - it was back when I would only pick up one bike....actually, at that time, there was the Superior and a Peugeot Grand Sport. I picked the Peugeot. If that were today - I would probably take both....but probably just take the Schwinn.