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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Lightweights posted by: jack on 11/30/2003 at 12:21:08 AM
T-Mar et al, were the early (late-60's, early-70's) Raleigh Competition and International framesets identical? From pics the complete bikes look identical except for components.



   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Lightweights posted by Joe on 11/30/2003 at 5:53:37 AM
I have both a Competition and an International, both from the early 70's. The most noticable difference is that the Comp. has Huret dropouts and the Int. has Campy dropouts.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Raleigh Lightweights posted by jack on 11/30/2003 at 6:13:06 AM
Thanks Joe, specifically I want to know if the angles and tube lengths are the same for a same size frame. The RetroRaleigh website lists the wheelbase for a 21.5" Comp as 39.375". My '70 Int'l has a 40.5" WB but its a 24". I'm wondering if the Comp has steeper angles and shorter chainstays.






AGE / VALUE:   columbia tourist V posted by: tim on 11/29/2003 at 11:31:56 PM
I just got ahold of a Columbia Tourist V. I cant find any history/release date/pricing guide anywhere, much less on this site. anybody got ideas of where to look?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   columbia tourist V posted by paul on 12/1/2003 at 1:45:07 PM
if the following spec's are there: inch pitch chain, single speed coaster brake, frame shaped like a British roadster, tires 26 X 1 and 1/4, narrow fenders crimped at the end with a "peak", my sense is that it's a "victory bicycle" built in Westfield, MA ca 1940 to 1945. Check the underside of the bottom bracket for serial numbers: A=1936 plus 5 digit, hence 1942 would be Gxxxxx.......hope this helps! paul






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Favorit Rapido? posted by: John on 11/29/2003 at 5:37:58 AM
Couldn't resist stopping at unfamiliar thrift store on way home from Thanksgiving feast. Found a Favorit Rapido that was made in Czechoslovakia. Since I had never seen one before forked out $20 and took it home. I haven't looked at it very closely yet, but all the components are marked Favorit. The brakes look sort of like Mafac Racers, the rear derailleur looks like a cross between a Campagnolo Nuovo Record and Huret Allvit and the front looks like a Campy Valentino. The cottered crank looks like a Nervar 3 pin. It has a Los Angeles license that expired December 1978 so I suspect bike is mid 70s. Does anyone know anything about the Favorit?


      Favorit Rapido posted by John E on 11/29/2003 at 3:41:29 PM
Try the archives, John. I recall seeing something about Favorit several months ago. Other standard sources are the BikeForums.net Vintage/Classic discussion forum, SheldonBrown.com, and classicrendezvous.com. Let us know what you learn; your Favorit sounds somewhat akin to the Russian "Sputnik" bikes, which have also been discussed here previously.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Favorit Rapido? posted by John on 11/30/2003 at 2:20:53 AM
John, thanks for the advice, there are a number of informative threads listed in the archives. I haven't gone to bikeforums.net yet but I couldn't find anything at classic rendezvous. I did notice that the bike certainly generates opinions. One person at cyclingforums.com said it was nothing but a Communist POJ (piece of junk) with "horrible paint and finish," "the Yugo of the bike industry." Most of the other messages in the old roads archives report the bike is nothing special but still not as bad as all that and in fact better than a number of the inexpensive French bikes that were available at the time. Apparently it was also offered with full Campy components but only in Canada, not the US. As far as the fit and finish, the one I just found seems to be just fine. The frame is nicely lugged, the purple paint is in very good condition, especially considering the bike's age and even the decals are in pretty good shape. I'll know more about the bike's condition when I get around to taking it apart for service. My daughter is the main reason I bought the bike. When we were in Czechoslovakia she fell in love with the Skoda cars. I was a running joke that whenever we saw a Skoda we would all loudly whisper "sssskkkkkooooddddaaaa." When I saw Skoda on the head badge I had to have the bike!






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh "Racing USA" (or Grand Prix?) posted by: Pierre on 11/28/2003 at 11:36:37 PM
I just purchased a Raleigh "Racing USA" (Grand Prix?) on eBay, and I'm trying to learn more about this rather interesting bike. Unfortunately, I've found very little information, and some of it is conflicting.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3639913757&category=22681

I'm not sure that it's technically "vintage" just yet (circa 1984-8x?) but I was wondering if anyone is familiar with it, just the same. Or if not, do you know where I can find out more about it.

I've Googled for days, and I've only come up with Sheldon Brown's write-up on it at:
http://retroraleighs.com/racing-usa.html
And a guy selling one nearly identical to mine at:
http://www.shoal.net.au/'mmueller/

But other than those two webpages, I've found nada, bupkiss, zilch -- not so much as a casual reference anywhere else on the net.

Are there any books that might tell me more about it? Any information, any at all, would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Pierre


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh posted by T-Mar on 11/29/2003 at 6:55:21 PM
Ads for the Raleigh Racing USA consumer bicycles first appeared in 1984 to capitalize on the upcoming 1984 Olympic in Los Angeles, where the Levis-Raleigh team would be strongly represented.

The consumer models featured graphics similar to the team bikes, but had rear triangles, forks and head tubes that were chrome instead of black. There were four models: Prestige, Competition, Super Course and Grand Prix, in descending order. All models used the same frame and differed only in colour and component mix. The frames were made from Ralieigh 555 SL chromium-molybdenum, butted tubing. While the decals indicate this tubing was "Designed and Engineered in the USA", this appears to have been another marketing ploy to capitalize on nationalistic pride for the upcoming Olympics. The tubing appears to be a re-badging or variation on Reynolds 501, which was their entry butted tubeset at the time. The team bikes were made from Reynolds 531 or 753 and at least some were reportedly manufactured by Marinoni.

Based on ads for the 1984 models, component mix on the models were primarily Suntour/Dia-Compe/SR with Ofmega cranks on some models. The Ebay item appears to properly represent a 1984 Grand Prix, with the exception of the Modolos shift levers. The top two models were 14 speeds, while the lower two models were 12 speeds. All used 700C wheelsets with 36 spokes laced to Araya aero rims. The ads imply that all models utilzed Suntour sealed bearing hubs.

The big advertising push on these models appears to have been short lived. In 1986 Raleigh USA shifted their emphasis to the newly introduced line of aluminum framed, Technium bicycles.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh posted by JONathan on 11/29/2003 at 9:07:16 PM
Thanks for that post, Tom. My Raleigh-USA, "Technium" is equipped with Shimano's biopace chainrings, which would support the timeline that you gave for the date on my 6061 Al frame.
I rode mine for two days in wet conditions over Thanksgiving (Thur. and Fri.) on flat, blacktop. Great ride, except for a flat, which was easy to fix with a spare tube in the rain. Using a patch kit in the rain is a challenge.
The Shimano "Exage" 300Ex derailers worked great in the indexed mode, too. I had previously gone with front and rear 23-622's, but I ran a Continental 25-622 (120psi) touring tire on the rear for this ride and it made the bike.
I won't go back to tiny on the rear. There is very little clearance under the forks for upsized tires, but the rear has enough clearance for a larger tread. I was impressed with how comfortable and solid the bike handled.
For a 3rd string bike (Team Fuji; starter/Bianchi "Limited"; 2nd.) I was impressed. My impression of Raleigh-USA (Seattle?) is high. I am running a SunRims M1311 ABT rim on the rear, which is great for heavier riders who like to have decent braking..."ABT" stands for "Advanced Brake Track".
Do you know if Exage was used on the Reynolds 501 Raleigh-USA bikes? They are superb brakes, but part of the high opinion is due to the rims being excellent. Thanks for that Raleigh-USA listing of models...very informative.
Good rides, wet or dry, JONathan

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Raleigh posted by Pierre on 11/29/2003 at 11:37:56 PM
Wow, T-Mar, that's way more information than I could have possibly hoped to get. Thanks!

Yah, I was trying to figure out how the 555 SL tubing and chrome stays/forks/headtube came into play, and that explains it -- there was a consumer version, in addition to the team version.

That's why the guy in Australia had one with the exact same components -- right down to the tan brake lever hoods: the consumer versions were sold as complete bikes.

Now I know to leave the components as-is, except for swapping the Modolos plastic shifters for some metal Suntour shifters I have lying around to complete the set.

Any suggestions on wheels? I have a nice set of double-wall Araya-rim wheels with a 6-speed Suntour "Perfect" from around that time period that seem somewhat appropriate.

But if you have a better suggestion, let me know, and I'll keep an eye out for a set of those. Thanks again.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Raleigh posted by Pierre on 11/30/2003 at 12:12:02 AM
Duh, I just realized you already told me about the wheels in the original post :)

Thanks again.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Raleigh posted by JONathan on 11/30/2003 at 12:58:33 AM
Tom, if you can squeeze another bit of info, my Technium has the Olympic rings on the seat-tube. The LA Olympics were '84. Is is possible that my bike is 1984, even though it is the thermal-bonded 6061 Al frame?
The Biopace rings were introduced about in the mid-80's and were a short lived phenomenon...1987?
BTW, the forged cranks are 175mm; Sugino GP-400's. Would those be stock!? They seem top-o-line...very robust construction. Thanks,
JONathan
BTW, I can climb a 10% grade in 5th gear! I'm amazed at the delivery of power with those cranks and the aluminum frame. No wonder the road-racers were excited about the Al frames.

   Wrong bike! posted by JONathan on 11/30/2003 at 1:32:45 AM
Oops! Not 175mm (wrong bike); they're 170's, but kind of a "Frankie". The drive cranks is Shimano "Exage", the other side is Sugino "GP (4GC)".
chainring is 52/40; rear is 12-23(6) with a 28 tooth (7) for a combined 14 speed gearing. I wonder about the different crank.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh posted by T-Mar on 11/30/2003 at 3:21:01 PM
JONathan, I have not seen any of the steel framed Raleigh Racing USA bicycles with Exage. The lowest component group I've seen is Suntour AR. But that doesn't mean they didn't exist.

Regarding the Techniums, they definitely came out in 1986. The road models that year were the 440, 460 and 480. There is no evidence of Olympic rings in any of the photos I've got. Based on the Exage components, it sounds like you may have a later model. I'll dig a little deeper and see if I can find anything. Yeah, that left hand crank sounds like a replacement. I've seen manufacturers do some pretty wierd substitutions, but mixing a Shimano and Sakae crank would really be pushing things!

Pierre, that's a typo on the brand of shift levers. It should read Modolo, not Modolos.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh posted by T-Mar on 11/30/2003 at 4:08:25 PM
JONathan, I've done a little more sleuthing and based on the somewhat limited description, I'm guessing that you have a Raleigh Olympian (circa 1990). The Technium frame and Exage 300 components are a match and the model name would definitely seem to be a tie-in with those Olympic rings. However, when I did this, I had the strangest sense of deja-vu! Didn't we already research this bike in a past post?

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh posted by JONathan on 11/30/2003 at 5:50:16 PM
Thanks for nailing the date of my "Technium". The previous posts were less specific...more of a discussion on the aluminum construction.
The mismatched cranks made me wonder about defects. There some recalls. These were not part of the list, fortunately. The magnitude of forces working on the cranks are prodigious.
I must admit some timidity in running this bike...being a steel-bike guy in the main. 220# (before TG!) is a lot for any road-bike that gets torqued mercilessly. I'm still amazed at the robust (over-designed) nature of these vintage LW's.
The last few rides on the "Technium" were full out, no looking back. The confidence is building. I figured that with wet conditions, the aluminum frame would be a good choice. Rust is the enemy of steel bikes...in places you can't readily observe, it is eating the frame.
30 miles on this bike is effortless at cruising speed. 100 miles would be no problem. Any touring gear would have to fit into a backpack in conjuction with credit card touring. I recommend the 28-622 (700-28C) 120 psi "Continental" tire on the rear. You are absolutely correct about those rings. The Raleigh "Record Ace" leaning against the "Technium" has the rings. The "Technium" has "Olympian" in small-block lettering on the front part of the top-tube.
Topend on this bike is up there...faster than I dare go. The "Exage" brakes are masterful. The tight clearances, precision construction and long pads really are superb.
Thanks so much for all the information.
JONathan

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh posted by Derek Coghill on 11/30/2003 at 11:38:29 PM
If you're doing all weathers, remove and slather the bottom bracket assembly with copper grease. I have removed various seized b/b's in the past for both myself and friends (I have oxy-acetylene kit) and the aluminium frames tend to lose threads if removal is "difficult"!

   RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh posted by JONathan on 12/1/2003 at 2:07:48 AM
Thanks, Derek. I'm backing off my plan to use it for wet weather. For one, the bike is a bit high-strung for slogging. I just run my Giant "nutra" into the ground.
The plastic fenders work OK and the 1 3/8 in. tires on it help keep the upright position in the slicks. The "Technium" has Al main tubes and I think the lugs are steel, along with the forks and stays.
I have used a spring steel insert (threaded inside and outside) to fix a stripped sparkplug hole in an alloy MC head. I wonder if something like that is available for BB's. Might be a problem due to the thin wall.
Good rides, JONathan

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh posted by T-Mar on 12/1/2003 at 3:18:19 AM
JONathan, stripped bottom bracket shells (except Italian) can be salvalged by reaming them out and re-threading them as Italian.

The thread repair kits (I believe the trade name is Heli-Coil) are available in most common thread standards. However, the bottom bracket threads are rather large and I've never repair kits for them. I have seen kits for most other threads (pedals, gear hangers, water bottle bosses, cantilever studs, etc.). The kits involve reaming out the old threads and tapping a new hole to accept the insert. The kits themselves can be rather expensive, especially if you only need to perform a single repair. It's often less expensive to have your LBS perform the procedure.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh posted by JONathan on 12/1/2003 at 3:50:16 AM
"Heli-Coil" is the same one that I used on my vintage MC head. The tap for a BB would indeed be expensive, due to the size.
I have learned something new. I didn't know they made them for bicycle threaded holes. Good to know that it is available. Even the little inserts are expensive, the tap and wrench are a one-time expense, fortunately.
They work quite well, I can attest to the results. Most important is the information you provided for using the Italian thread for a re-work damaged ISO threaded BB's. Some of my French BB's look pretty thin-wall to use that method, but I guess it is academic.
Thanks, JONathan

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh posted by JONathan on 12/1/2003 at 3:54:21 AM
Back to the "Technium"s. Ok, if it 1990, then were the Biopace chainrings still being used that late?
I am not questioning your data, just inquiring more about the appearance...and disappearance of the Biopace gears.
Rides!
JONathan

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Raleigh posted by WArren on 12/1/2003 at 4:35:20 AM
There are two sleeved BBs that are designed to solve stripped threads that I know of...one by Mavic and the other by Stronglight. Both are high end and a little dear...they show up on ebay once in awhile. I have one of the Mavic assemblies...I bought it from a cheesy suburban bike shop that was closing. I got it and an NOS Mavic 631 crankset for $40. A good day...

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh posted by T-Mar on 12/1/2003 at 1:42:20 PM
JONathan, the Biopace chainrings are correct for the a 1990 Exage 300 crankset. Unfortunately, there is no clean drop dead date for Biopace chainrings. It's lifespan was for a function of the group's level and function. It tended to live longer in the low end and ATB/commuting groups. In the case of Dura Ace, the top end, road group, it was never even introduced. Near as I can tell, the last year for Biopace on Exage groups was 1992, even though it had already disappeared from the higher groups.

Warren, thanks for reminding us of the Mavic and Stronglight BBs. The Mavic comes with its own complications though, as the the BB shell ends have to be chamfered to accept the lockrings.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh posted by JONathan on 12/1/2003 at 5:00:43 PM
Thanks, Tom and Warren. I have often wondered about what was possible as a fix for the blown BB's.
Great to know that there is something...albeit a bit pricey. If the bike means something or is collectible, the option has great appeal.
JONathan






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Mafac centerpull brakes on Schwinn Paramount? posted by: Richard Chinn on 11/28/2003 at 4:58:40 AM
I have a 1973 Schwinn Paramount tourer that I have had for several years - it was purchased by my father in the late 70's. It has Mafac Racer centerpull brakes and I am trying to determine if Schwinn ever put these brakes on their Paramounts.

Anyone aware of this?

Thanks,

Richard


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Mafac centerpull brakes on Schwinn Paramount? posted by jack on 11/28/2003 at 6:05:16 AM
I have two early-70's paramounts, race and tour and they have Campy sidepull and Weimann centerpull. I've never seen anything else from this vintage although it doesn't mean it isn't factory. One tip would be to see if your levers are Mafac too? Is yours a race or tour model(eyelets,27" wheels)?

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Mafac centerpull brakes on Schwinn Paramount? posted by jack on 11/28/2003 at 6:14:21 AM
Sorry 'bout that, you did say tourer. Don't know, why would someone bother to switch? Weimanns don't have the best reputation but they seem to work alright for me. I know if you change to sidepulls you may run into reach problems. Are your levers Mafac or Weinmann?

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Mafac centerpull brakes on Schwinn Paramount? posted by T-Mar on 11/28/2003 at 1:41:29 PM
I concour with Jack. Schwinn Paramounts only used MAFAC brakes in the late seventies on the tandem models. Standard Paramount brakes were the Weinmann or Schwinn Approved centre-pulls, Campagnolo Record side-pull (optional, depending on the year) and Weinmann Carrera side-pull (optional, depending on the year).

   Mafac centerpull brakes on Schwinn Paramount? posted by John E on 11/28/2003 at 4:05:54 PM
I believe the other posters are correct. I have seen plenty of Vainqueur 999 centerpulls on old Paramounts, but never Mafacs. With short straddle cables and Kool-Stop brake pads, either Weinmann or Mafac centerpulls should work fine. I like Mafac's adjustable straddle cable length and adjustable pad strike orientation, but the Weinmann levers look better and fit my hands properly, whereas Mafac, Campag., and Modolo levers have an uncomfortably long reach.

You can boost your braking leverage by about 10 percent by switching to modern brake levers with aero cable routing. I have done this on my early 1980s bikes, but not on my 1959 Capo (original Weinmann 999s) or my 1972 Peugeot (Mafac front / Peugeot-labeled Weinmann 999 rear; don't ask why).






AGE / VALUE:   1974 SCHWINN VARSITY 10 SPEED posted by: GARY LAKOFKA on 11/27/2003 at 1:31:56 PM
WANTING TO KNOW THE VALUE FLAMING GREEN 1974 SCHWINN VARSITY GOOD CONDITION 27 INCH RIMS


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   1974 SCHWINN VARSITY 10 SPEED posted by Kevin K on 11/27/2003 at 2:53:26 PM
Hi Gary. Value. The going rate of scrape steel to a guy that wanted one when he was a kid and offers you $$$. The Varsity / Continental line are bikes I personally feel are unappreciated but should be collected. At least those from the 50's, 60's and early 70's. Yea, they are heavy, even unresponsive bikes. But they are USA built. Built when our country took pride in it's products. I fianlly added a Varsity to my collection. A 1973 Kool Lemon 22" frame. The frame paint/decals are 99%. The mechanics of the bike are 100%. I paid $45, way more than I thought I would ever pay for a 70's Varsity. It is however so nice I did not want to see it sold off to some kid and trashed. If you like the bike, keep it. As for value. Only what someone is willing to pay. Happy Thanksgiving.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1974 SCHWINN VARSITY 10 SPEED posted by LUKE on 11/28/2003 at 8:33:21 PM
Yea kevin,
Saw two varsitys at the goodwill store yesterday.one from the 1960,s a very mettalic blue for $15.00 AND MABYE A 1971
for $20.00 VERY METTALIC green.
Im not sure i care for them myself,but whoever buys them will probely love them.
thanks,luke,happy thanksgiving!!!!!!!!!!!!!

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   1974 SCHWINN VARSITY 10 SPEED posted by JONathan on 11/30/2003 at 3:37:43 AM
I am the proud owner of two "varsities" ('68 and '77). The '68 is green and is fully original for my collection. Price was $5...there were two! I only got one.
The '77 is red; got for $7. This one has been rigged for everyday with upgrades to all components (especially the brakes!) except for the one-piece crank. Too expensive to convert, unless I find a deal on a kit.
Value? Check this. The bike is always ready to ride. It's comfortable. The air seems to stay permanently in the tires. It'll crash through anything. It'll still be running after my other bikes have given up..or broken up.
It doesn't need TLC...doesn't even like it. It runs worse when I tune it. After a a 100, things settle back to normal for a long time. Now, is that not a valuable machine? Of course, they're worth what somebody is willing to pay.
But aside from the collectibility factor, the value as transportation equipment makes it worth at least 1/2 the price of a good quality new bike...not the stuff that falls apart. Collectibility can go anywhere, but down. Hang on to it...or any you can scarf up, or upgrade the components and use it. You will be pleasantly surprised.
I have not seen a "varsity" for sale in two years. I picked up a '71 "Continental", last year for $5 at a church rummage sale. I need to spend about 10 hours to get it to ride status, but everything seems to be functioning; just a lot of crude and dried lube making it seem like a heap. It really isn't, which is why they can be so cheap.
My '77 "Varsity" has about $150 in parts...tires, cables, chain and brtake pads are new. The alloy wheels, hubs and Vainqueur brakes are v. good, used. That isn't counting labor.
I'd value it at $250, if I had to sell it. The '68 is in need of tuning and cleaning to be presentable. I'd value it as $50, mainly due to the condition. After restoration...and a decade of cafe cruising, who knows what it will be worth.






AGE / VALUE:   Bridgestone Blouson posted by: jack on 11/27/2003 at 2:15:08 AM
Ran across a Blouson for sale. Rather strange example of contempory industrial art. For pic go to Sheldon Brown's website. Supposedly fairly rare in this country but featured in some bike collections on the web. Any idea if these are worth picking up? or similarly anybody looking for one?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bridgestone Blouson posted by Ray on 11/27/2003 at 5:01:30 AM
I own one of these in Silver, can you tell me the color and condition of this one.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Bridgestone Blouson posted by jack on 11/27/2003 at 5:40:14 AM
Ray, It was either red or blue, I didn't pay attention to color since it was such an odd duck. It is in excellent condition considering mid-80's with original tires, fenders, platform pedals, etc. It appears to be well made and I was wondering if I should jump on it as the guy wants $200?

   RE:AGE / VALUE: Bridgestone Blouson posted by jack on 11/28/2003 at 11:59:42 PM
Ray, its silver. Does anyone know what these are going for?

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Bridgestone Blouson posted by Ray on 11/29/2003 at 2:27:09 AM
Jack, It depends on condition. If it is in very good condition then $200 is a good price. One thing to consider is that finding parts for this bike will be difficult as you have already noted, it is an odd duck. It has band brakes, front and rear and that swan like stem arrangement. Mine is silver also with red striping. Make sure it is all original if you are going to plunk down $200. I am on the lookout for a red one. I believe they only came in red and silver with silver being the rarer color. Good luck.
Ray






AGE / VALUE:   JUST A QUESTION posted by: Kevin K on 11/26/2003 at 1:00:14 PM
Hi all. I've read several posts about havig to have stays made wider for rear hubs but what happens when the stays are about an inch too narrow for the chosen hub? Same on the fork only about a half an inch. Thanks, Kevin


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   JUST A QUESTION posted by T-Mar on 11/26/2003 at 9:43:27 PM
Kevin, this should not be a problem, provided it's steel and not something super thin. While I haven't cold set stays by this amount, I have straightened forks that were bent by this amount. Any good bike shop should be able to do the job. I reccommend a shop, because at that amount, the dropouts will definitely have to be realigned or derailleur performance will suffer and too much bending stress will be out on the axles. You MAY run into a problem with some cracked paint, but there shouldn't be any problem with wrinkles or creases in the tube. You may also find afterwards that you have to install a longer bottom bracket spindle to achieve the necessary crank clearance.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   JUST A QUESTION posted by Kevin K on 11/26/2003 at 11:41:51 PM
Hey, this modification is on a 50's (1957 Corvette)Schwinn cantilever frame that will use a 70's Super Sport fork OR an all chrome Tange unit from an 80's Panasonic. There will be plenty of metal on both the frame and axles. The front hub is a really slick looking 50's alloy small flange hub from a middleweight bike. Most from that vintage on middleweights were chromed steel. The rear hub was to be a Sturmey-Archer 3 speed but may end up being a unique looking coaster brake unit with a neat looking oiler on it. The rims will be Polished Sun CR-18 700's. 700x32-35 tires, probally Michelin. Paint damage is not an issue as the frame will be blasted and repainted. I apologize for putting this question on the lightweight section of old roads but I communicate more often with guys here and wanted a response from this area. Any ideas. Still think I should have a bike shop make the adjustment(s) Thank you, Kevin

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   JUST A QUESTION posted by Oscar on 11/27/2003 at 3:41:56 AM
It sounds like it's going to be a cool custom.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   JUST A QUESTION posted by T-Mar on 11/27/2003 at 6:20:31 PM
You can try setting things yourself. If you can't get it right, then take it to the shop. Changing the spacing is not the problem. The critical issue is aligning the dropouts so that they are parallel. I estimate that they will each be about 2 degrees out of parallel (4 degrees relative to each other)which will place a considerable bending moment on the axle. If you don't align them, your axle will break prematurely.

The frame itself, sounds like it's probably a basic carbon steel, which should set easily. The forks will be a little harder to do if they are CrMo. If you need instructions for creating the tool, doing the setting or checking the alignment, please e-mail me directly. I'd post them, but it's quite an lengthy process that I'd rather avoid it, unless necessary.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   JUST A QUESTION posted by T-Mar on 11/27/2003 at 6:20:57 PM
You can try setting things yourself. If you can't get it right, then take it to the shop. Changing the spacing is not the problem. The critical issue is aligning the dropouts so that they are parallel. I estimate that they will each be about 2 degrees out of parallel (4 degrees relative to each other)which will place a considerable bending moment on the axle. If you don't align them, your axle will bend or break prematurely.

The frame itself, sounds like it's probably a basic carbon steel, which should set easily. The forks will be a little harder to do if they are CrMo. If you need instructions for creating the tool, doing the setting or checking the alignment, please e-mail me directly. I'd post them, but it's quite an lengthy process that I'd rather avoid it, unless necessary.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   JUST A QUESTION posted by sam on 11/27/2003 at 10:52:43 PM
The sturmey archer has an anti-rotation washer that needs to fit the drop-out slot.The schwinn will have a wider slot than what came on English bikes.A little work in this area may be needed-too--sam

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   JUST A QUESTION posted by Ken on 11/30/2003 at 6:43:15 PM
Don't forget Sheldon has a nice page on cold setting/spacing.






FOR SALE:   Some unusual stuff posted by: Ray on 11/25/2003 at 9:27:10 PM
I have posted some unusual bicycle stuff on ebay. Look under my ebay name Wheelman@nac.net
I am going to solicit any information on the frame I have up for sale. I am not quite sure what it is. If anyone has an idea just post it here. My best guess is Italian made but I cannot be sure of that.







AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by: brent on 11/25/2003 at 8:01:55 PM
DBS Winner. Huret Allivit rear, Weinman centerpulls and levers with barrell adjusters and Huret wing nuts. The frame looks like it's brazed, at least at the head tube; and the seatstays are super thin. The head badge is a sticker with DBS and Ogaend on it and the seattube sticker says Jonas Ogleand. My quick google shows DBS is still around and is THE bike company in Norway. Anyone else see something like this around?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by brent on 11/25/2003 at 9:24:04 PM
More info. There is a wiring terminal on the back of the headtube with a wire that runs down to the bottom bracket. I don't know what it was connected to down there. The bottom bracket is the funkiest thing I've ever seen. It uses a one piece nervar crank but it has threaded cups in the frame and outer cups that come over the frame. I only managed to pull the left side and the crank won't come out without pulling both threaded cups.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Rob on 11/26/2003 at 1:42:03 AM
Try searching the "OldRoads" archives...we've had a few postings about DBS over the last six months or so...A search using "DBS" should be good enough...DBS was the Norwegian national bike maker for close to a century...it produced a wide range of bikes from basic to the high-end Campy-equipped "La Migliore". I understand that the "Winner" was imported into the US (I don't know about Canada, though I doubt it...I've never seen a real, live one...). I doubt they were very abundant in the US, and from what I understand the "Winner" is a pretty basic bike...

Apparently the DBS factory in Norway closed in 2000 and production moved elsewhere in Europe...a conglomerate (Swedish, I think) called Cycle Europe, owns the brand now...along with Gitane, Peugeot, Bianchi and MCB/Crescent(a Swedish brand also imported into the US for a while...and Canada too..I've seen them on several occasions).

Pretty hard to keep track of all this takeover stuff...I guess a person has to focus in on the era a bike was actually built, and not be too influenced by brand names by themselves...ie, who actually made the bike and when it was made...

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by JONathan on 11/26/2003 at 9:42:23 PM
I think that "DBS" means "The Best Bicycle". I wondered about that head-tube fitting on the DBS I looked at for $25 US at a thrift-store. There was no wire attached, but it could have been removed. The BB was as you described, with a one-piece crank.
The bike was kind of funky, utilitarian looking. I passed it up due to my extreme self-control (laugh). It was gone when I went back to buy it, a week later. Your find is very interesting. How does it ride?
BTW, maybe there was some kind of generator running off the cranks with a line to a light. Is that not possible?
JONathan

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by Don on 11/27/2003 at 5:31:47 AM
Yes, there were bottom bracket generators available once upon a time. My 84 Specialized touring was wired just the way you describe. I put a French Soubitez bb generator down there that works quite well. LBS told me you could order these bikes from Specialized with a Japanese bb generator for extra $.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by kjell on 12/2/2003 at 6:53:37 PM
Sorry to be late adding to this post. On bikes of the Winner type ment more for transportation, the generator is mounted on the front fork, a wire connected via the terminal on the back of the head tube, inside the front tube to a terminal under the bottom bracket. From there another wire goes inside the rear mudguard to the back light.

The crank is a variant of the "Astabula" type used on american bikes 100 years ago. It is heavy but bombproof.






AGE / VALUE:   Another mystery bike posted by: brent on 11/25/2003 at 8:01:55 PM
DBS Winner. Huret Allivit rear, Weinman centerpulls and levers with barrell adjusters and Huret wing nuts. The frame looks like it's brazed, at least at the head tube; and the seatstays are super thin. The head badge is a sticker with DBS and Ogaend on it and the seattube sticker says Jonas Ogleand. My quick google shows DBS is still around and is THE bike company in Norway. Anyone else see something like this around?







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Nice Butler on Ebay posted by: David on 11/25/2003 at 11:51:28 AM
Nice short-framed Claud Butler w/SA hub.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2205711105


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Nice Butler on Ebay posted by Warren on 11/25/2003 at 9:54:45 PM
Agreed! Most desireable.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Nice Butler on Ebay posted by Derek Coghill on 11/26/2003 at 11:00:57 AM
Very nice; older than mine which has 4-spd derailleur sprockets on one side of the hub and a fixed gear on the other whereas this has a hub gear.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Nice Butler on Ebay posted by Brian on 11/26/2003 at 12:36:47 PM
I love that fork crown on the CB!






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Apollo posted by: Tim on 11/25/2003 at 4:32:55 AM
Does anyone know anything about Apollo bikes? Just found a beat up Apollo road bike - lugged, Kuwahara 4130 tubing, Nitto bars and stem, and a nice drilled Sakae chainring set. It appears it is an Australian brand, imported to Canada by Fred Deeley Ltd. Any other thoughts?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Apollo posted by Rob on 11/25/2003 at 6:22:39 AM
Apollo was a common brand in Canada through the 70's and, I guess, into the early 80's...now long gone. They were made by Kuwahara in Japan and imported from Japan to Canada by Fred Deeley Ltd, as you say...The brand was also sold in Australia...but I don't know who imported them to that country...I presume they were also made by Kuwahara???

Yours sounds like a slightly later model...what's the model name??? Gran Tour or maybe Prestige XL???






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub freewheel threads posted by: Darryl on 11/25/2003 at 2:25:38 AM
Somewhere I read of determining thread size on a vintage freewheel hub by looking for grooves in the hub. This was before the thread size was printed or embossed on the hub. Anyone have any info. on this?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub freewheel threads posted by T-Mar on 11/25/2003 at 3:29:32 AM
You are correct. Unfortunately, the same scheme was not used by everyone. According to my references and notes:

Campagnolo: 1 groove = English, no grooves = French or Italian

Ofmega: 1 groove = English, 2 grooves = French, no grooves = Italian

Zeus: BSC stamped on centre shaft = English, no stamping = French.

Reportedly, Atom and Normandy also used the Campagnolo system.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Hub freewheel threads posted by Eric Amlie on 11/25/2003 at 2:08:14 PM
If you can find an older copy of Sutherlands bicycle handbook(or whatever they call it...basically Sutherlands) they have that info in there.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Sports Tourer bottom bracket posted by: Brent on 11/25/2003 at 1:06:42 AM
Does anyone know what type of threads are on 1971 Schwinn Sports Tourer bottom bracket? The crankset is a TA Specialties. Will the standard 68 mm English thread bottom brackets fit? I love the bike, but I think that the bottom bracket is about worn out, and I'd like to put on a triple. I need the granny gear--getting old.


   Schwinn Sports Tourer bottom bracket posted by John E on 11/25/2003 at 2:09:12 AM
I can almost guarantee you have standard British/ISO BB threading, including the 68mm BB shell width, despite the French crankset. You can trivially distinguish 70mm (Italian) vs. 68mm (almost entire rest of world) BB shell width by simply mesuring the distance between the inside flanges of the BB cups, i.e., the width of the frame's BB shell itself. English-threaded cups MAY be stamped something like "1.37x24," particularly if made in Japan, but many (most?) European BB cups are not marked.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Sports Tourer bottom bracket posted by T-Mar on 11/25/2003 at 3:07:38 AM
John E. is correct. Literal thread designations on bottom bracket tended to be a Japanese (and Campagnolo)practice. Most European manufacturers such as Stronglight and TA have coded bottom brackets.

TA cup codes are as follows; two concentric rings on the surface of the fixed and adjustable cups indicates English threads, one ring indicates French threads, no rings indicate Italian threads.

You can also determine TA threading by examining the knurling pattern on the edge of the lockring. A straight knurl designates English. A crosshatch knurl designates French. A diagonal knurl indicates Italian.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Sports Tourer bottom bracket posted by Brent on 11/25/2003 at 3:49:51 PM
Wow! you guys are great! Thanks.