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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







AGE / VALUE:   Mystery Schwinn posted by: Gralyn on 11/6/2003 at 6:38:55 PM
I spotted a bike yesterday - it was white (spray can job) They had even painted over the head badge. It was difficult to tell - but it didn't look like the badge stood out all that much.....it was oval....and it could have been a decal for all I could tell. The bike had no other markings on it. The frame construction didnt look all that impressive either. The think that caught my eye, though - was that it had QR wheels front and rear. I looked closely at the rims...I saw "Schwinn" on the rims...and they were those very heavy indesctuctible steel rims, too. I had more come to associate the lighter alloy wheels, on higher-end bikes - with having QR. Maybe someone had swapped out the axles at some point in time. Anyway, if it had been about $10 or less - I may have picked it up for parts - but it was more like $30. This place also has a 24" old Schwinn Collegiate with short fenders. I'm thinking it's not a girls frame - a boys - but I'm not 100% sure...maybe 80% sure. It was $30. If anyone would be interested I would pick it up and ship it to you just for the cost of it plus the shipping cost.

Another thing: one particular store has had ...maybe 20...department store bikes (including an "executive" I posted about previously)....for months and months. They just sit there with their price tag....and they sit and they sit. Well, yesterday.....they were all gone! I wonder if someone bought all of them....or maybe they trashed them.

Also, I have noticed a trend: each time I have stumbled onto another source for old lightweights.....there will be several there....but then, they dry-up....and I never see anymore. Take for example, one particular place...they had several bikes. I thought I had found a potential supply. There were 2 identical bikes there with ChroMo frames, there was a Puch, and several others. I bought one of the twins, and I bought the Puch. The next time I stopped by...the other twin was gone....and there hasn't been anything there since....except an occasional dept. store mtn. bike. I have had this same experience at several other places. There was the one place where there were several old Japanese 10-speeds, a Nishiki Olympic 12, etc....then one day they were all gone....and there haven't been any back since. And it goes on and on.

I've realised this week that it's been just too much a waste of time to check these places. The pickins have gotten so slim that it just isn't worth the effort. I'm going to have to do the word of mouth thing.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Mystery Schwinn posted by Rob on 11/6/2003 at 8:07:41 PM
Gralyn,

I sympathize and I understand...I can go for weeks without finding much, but then... The approach I take is to go about the search during the course of my normal activities, and without a sense of expectation. For example, every week or so I go by a large thrift several miles from my house...I quickly check in...almost always there is nothing I'm interested in...but every so often I hit it just right. I also check for old books on lightweights, too, and again every so often I find something worth the $1.99 or $2.99 CDN asking price... Once a week or so, I visit my favorite second hand bike shop...lately I've been real lucky, but I know it'll dry up for a while...I look for parts and whatever... During the past month, I found the Schwinn Le Tour frame, I posted on a week or so ago; a low-end early '70's Phillips...really nice paint, only the wheels missing; and a scratched-up Velosport frame (a reasonable CDN make)...all for nothing. After following that lengthy threads on pedals, a week or so ago, I checked out their 'pedal box' for the first time in over a year...I found among others, a set of Campagnolo quills with Milremo clips, reasonably good shape...alloy body and steel cage...$5CDN ($3.75US)...and the bearings are absolutely smooth...like silk...amazing quality. Once a week I go to a consignment shop near a supermarket I regularly shop at...occasionally I find something...not often...I was recently monitoring a Motobecane Gran Tour in really nice shape (it had a SunTour Sprint front der. that looked like a little piece of jewelry). This place drops the price about 10% per week...the price was approaching my interest level, (I was targeting early Nov.) but someone nabbed it just before Halloween...I think it had dropped to just under $70CDN ($52.50US). And so it goes...it is after all a treasure hunt...one day that Masi, or Rene Herse, or whatever, will just be sitting there, no one else knowing what it is, and your timing is perfect!!!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Mystery Schwinn posted by Fred on 11/9/2003 at 1:13:36 AM
Gralyn:

My advice-buy it when you see it. Keep it a while and you will consider it a bargain when they are no longer available. I have never been sorry that I paid too much at the time. But then I rarely sell a bike so the price is moot. I bought a Packard one time at market price and was considered foolish by some. That car appreciated 500% in just a few years. All of a sudden I was called some smart guy by the guys that critisized me before. I still have the car and don't have the faintest idea what it is worth. YOu can see the Packard and a lot of my bikes at fredhaj.tripod.com.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Mystery Schwinn posted by Fred on 11/9/2003 at 1:13:47 AM
Gralyn:

My advice-buy it when you see it. Keep it a while and you will consider it a bargain when they are no longer available. I have never been sorry that I paid too much at the time. But then I rarely sell a bike so the price is moot. I bought a Packard one time at market price and was considered foolish by some. That car appreciated 500% in just a few years. All of a sudden I was called some smart guy by the guys that critisized me before. I still have the car and don't have the faintest idea what it is worth. YOu can see the Packard and a lot of my bikes at fredhaj.tripod.com.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Reg Harris posted by: Tom M on 11/6/2003 at 3:28:24 PM
Where does a Raleigh Reg Harris bike fit in the the Raleigh lineup. What years were they made, late 50's/early60's? What components were on them when new.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS: Raleigh Reg Harris posted by P.C. Kohler on 11/7/2003 at 3:50:10 AM
I believe you are referring to the Raleigh Lenton Sports II and III (and later Gran Prix)which was known (and badged) as being "Reg Harris Road Models" with the famous flaming torch transfer on the seat tube.

The Mark I Lenton Sports dates to 1949, but I believe the Reg Harris Road Model dates to 1955 when the frame geometry was tightened up and the components upgraded and this is sometimes referred to as a Mark II. In 1957-58 the Mark III was introduced and the Gran Prix a year later; this was first Raleigh with a derailleur gear as standard fit. Hitherto Lentons had the classic SA AM/FM hubs.

I am almost done with a history of the Raleigh Lentons for the Yahoo Group "Roll Britannia" to go with my already posted feature on the Raleigh Clubman series. This will include a comprehensive chart of specs.

Reg Harris, the greatest cycle champion of the age, was Raleigh spokesman during the 1950s and was said to have used a Lenton Sports for his road training. He won most of his races, even into the 1970s, on a 1949 RRA however! Reg also started his own unsuccessful lightweight cycle company in the early 60s when the nitwits at TI (Tube Investments) took over Raleigh and ended lightweight cycle production at Nottingham.

P.C. Kohler

   Hey P.C. posted by Walter on 11/8/2003 at 12:33:35 PM
I have long been entranced with "Blubman" bikes Raleigh and otherwise and would enjoy reading your mentioned work. Could you post a URL or email me a link?
Thanks:
Walter

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh Reg Harris posted by T-Mar / Tom on 11/8/2003 at 12:59:53 PM
Here's a link to some pics of a Lenton Grand Prix. It has some good component pics. http://www.rydjor.com/bikecollection/1955ral.htm

Also visit Classic Rendezvous' Reg Harris section for an excerpt from his bio. It tells the story about Raleigh's proposed Reg Harris line of bikes, how Reg engineered Raleigh's purchase of the Carlton factory to produce the bikes and how Raleigh pulled the rug out from under Reg.

   Roll Britannia URL posted by P.C. Kohler on 11/8/2003 at 3:09:30 PM
Here's the url for "Roll Britannia":

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/rollbritannia/

You'll need to join and then access the Clubman article in the FILES section. It's a Word document.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:Roll Britannia URL posted by Derek Coghill on 11/10/2003 at 11:05:05 PM
Reg Harris used to advertise/endorse Raleigh's entire range in magazines of the time; I've seen adverts from the "Boy's Own Paper" (UK magazine, up to 1960's) with him and his pipe and a heavy steel 3-speed. I think I have a couple of them somewhere.






WANTED:   tires for fuji palisades featherweight size 27 x 1 1/8 hooked rim only posted by: hal and anita on 11/5/2003 at 11:21:21 PM
looking for 2 tires for my Fuji Palisades featherweight 10 speed purchased in the mid 80's. anyone with info for purchases?? help is appreciated


   RE:WANTED:   tires for fuji palisades featherweight size 27 x 1 1/8 hooked rim only posted by Gralyn on 11/6/2003 at 4:14:34 PM
Try nashbar.com






WANTED:   tires for fuji palisades featherweight size 27 x 1 1/8 hooked rim only posted by: hal and anita on 11/5/2003 at 11:21:21 PM
looking for 2 tires for my Fuji Palisades featherweight 10 speed purchased in the mid 80's. anyone with info for purchases?? help is appreciated







AGE / VALUE:   Peugeot U 18 posted by: brent on 11/5/2003 at 8:59:16 PM
I picked up an addition to my stable today. Hopefully the wife will believe that I bought it for her. Blue Peogeot mixte frame, simplex drivetrain, mafac racers. The brake levers are mafac with plastic levers on a north road type bar. I haven't come across any of these, should I pull them before I let her take off on it?


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Peugeot U 18 posted by Rob on 11/5/2003 at 11:25:40 PM
Yeah..good point, Brent...I have a UO-18 as well, purple, good shape with those plastice levers...it isn't used much but those levers do make me nervous, considering their age and UV and ozone issues...I have thought of replacing them...

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Peugeot U 18 posted by Stacey on 11/5/2003 at 11:29:41 PM
I bought a similar bike in white at an estate auction eariler this year with the same set up. They looked to me like Zytel or Nylon, no apparent flex or frailty. Got good $'s for them on the 'bay.

   RE:AGE / VALUE: Peugeot U 18 posted by Warren on 11/6/2003 at 12:24:54 AM
Those plastic levers are fantastic for fixed gear road bikes...couriers love 'em, so do I. You mount them under drop bars and take a hair dryer to 'em to bend them to follow the curve of the bar. Really, they are very comfortable and give you 4 finger power.

I bought a beat beat up Mercier to get the same levers in metal. I forget the name of them...Guidonet? They are becoming collectible.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Peugeot U 18 posted by Warren on 11/6/2003 at 1:14:34 AM
Of course Sheldon has them on his web pages. Guidonnet levers. Go to...http://www.sheldonbrown.org/rochet/pages/rochet04.html

    Peugeot U 18 posted by John E on 11/6/2003 at 2:39:58 PM
When I worked at Bikecology, I bought a 1973 Peugeot UO-8 frame and built it into a bike for my wife, complete with UO-18 style bars and Weinmann brake handles. (I offered to get her a UO-18 mixte frame, but she wanted a UO-8, instead.) If you ever cannot find the plastic French handles, the aluminum Weinmanns look right and work properly.

Since my wife now avoids on-road cycling and borrows my mountain bike for trail riding, I "repossessed" the UO-8 last year and installed drops, barcons, and closer-ratio gears (45-42/13-26), and converted it into my main commuter and cyclecross bike. The ample frame clearance for 27 x 1-3/8" knobbies came in very handy for this application. This is one of the best beater bikes I have ever owned.






AGE / VALUE:   Peugeot U 18 posted by: brent on 11/5/2003 at 8:59:16 PM
I picked up an addition to my stable today. Hopefully the wife will believe that I bought it for her. Blue Peogeot mixte frame, simplex drivetrain, mafac racers. The brake levers are mafac with plastic levers on a north road type bar. I haven't come across any of these, should I pull them before I let her take off on it?







AGE / VALUE:   Eduardo Bianchi posted by: JOEL on 11/5/2003 at 7:44:41 PM
Hi All,
I saw this vintage Eduardo Bianchi 10 speed in the thrift store. It has Campy Vigenza deraleurs, Weinmann brakes. The frame construction didn't look too impressive. I'm guessing these aren't the best Campy parts. Just wondering if it's worth picking up.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Eduardo Bianchi posted by T-Mar on 11/5/2003 at 8:58:50 PM
I have never heard a Vigenza model derailleur. However, Vicenza is the city in Italy where the Campagnolo factory is located. Vicenza appears on the shift levers used by Campagnolofrom the 50's through the mid 80's. Maybe this is what you saw?

The model name should be on the outer parallelogram arm of the rear derailleur. In most cases it is on the outer surface. But in the case of some of the lower end models (Valentino, Velox) it appears on the side of the arm. Many cyclists malign the low end Campagnolo derailleurs. They didn't shift well, but they were robust. The low end front derailleur uses a push rod mechanism, as opposed to a paralleogrm. For me, the decision would depend on the asking price.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Eduardo Bianchi posted by Joel on 11/5/2003 at 9:56:16 PM
Thanks Tmar. I didn't take the time to wipe off the grease. I did see some lettering on the side of the arm. Price was $20. It was complete and in great shape except for the frame decals.







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Nice vintage Raleigh on Ebay... posted by: Sammi on 11/5/2003 at 2:33:11 PM
Item number 3636278165.







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Universal Centerpull Brakes posted by: Shaun on 11/5/2003 at 12:57:29 AM
Hi All,

I am currently assembling a new steel lugged frame and would like to use an old pair of Universal centerpull brakes...'cause I like 'em! But, after new shoes and buffing/lubrication, I think it would be wise to swap out the "transverse" cables (you know, the cable that gets pulled up in the center of the upper arms) with new replacements. This is proving to be problematic, since nobody makes them, and with the unique "anchors" that attach to the top of the arms, it's not like I can just slap some new shifter cable in there to do the trick.

Any suggestions on NOS replacements, or should I just give up and use new brakes...or trust in the 30+ year-old originals?

Shaun


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Universal Centerpull Brakes posted by Don on 11/5/2003 at 1:47:05 AM
Last year, I ordered a set through my local Bike shop here in Olympia, WA for the Weinmann centerpull brakes on my 1971 Raleigh Super Course. Took about 2 weeks to come, so they are out there.

   Universal Centerpull Brakes posted by John E on 11/5/2003 at 3:44:00 PM
Straddle cables for Universals (two teardrop ends) and for Weinmann Vainqueur 999s (two barrel ends) are getting hard to find. You can always copy Mafac by using a conventional cable, securing the cut-off end with a cable anchor bolt and nut. The added benefit is that you can shorten your straddle cable to increase braking leverage.

   WEINMANNS, not Universal posted by Shaun on 11/5/2003 at 6:27:25 PM
I have Unversals on my other bike. The brakes in question are Weinmann "Vainqueur 999"'s, but the same challenge. If anyone has a source of replacements, please post a reply and thanks.

Shaun

   RE:WEINMANNS, not Universal posted by Joe on 11/6/2003 at 10:59:55 AM
Shaun, These straddle cables are available in 100 mm lengths only at: http://www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cgi
Part number to search is: DC-B1270.10 they're $2 each
They used to carry the 110 mm length but it's been discontinued. I believe they are the only place left that still lists them. These are DIa-Compe branded. Loose Screws used to have them as well, but they clearanced them out last spring. The straddle cables are the same for both Weinmann Vainquer, and Dia-Compe. The cheaper Cherry calipers found on lesser bikes use a similar cable but the slug on each end is slightly smaller and tends to fall out of Weinmann or Dia-Compe arms.
Until I found the ones online, I had used the latter by simply putting a dab of RTV Silicon over the hole to keep the cable end in place.
The longer, discontinued length as well as some extra long versions no longer available, were used to allow the caliper to straddle reflector brackets, and rear carrier attaching hardware on some bikes, as well as alloy teh use of shorter cables on very large frame bikes I suppose.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Universal Centerpull Brakes posted by T-Mar on 11/6/2003 at 3:46:29 PM
My LBS still has them in stock, in three lengths: 100mm ($1.50), 120mm ($2.25), 190mm ($2.25). The measurements quoted are from centre to centre of the barrel ends. The shop also has Shimano yoke cables in various lengths for $2.75. They have an offset lead sleeve on the cable to aid in installing/disengaging the cable. I believe they were used on the old Tourney and Dura Ace centre-pull brakesets.

   RE:RE:WEINMANNS, not Universal posted by Shaun on 11/7/2003 at 2:44:45 AM
Thanks Joe.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh RRA 1973 posted by: Ann on 11/4/2003 at 3:40:15 AM
My husband bought this NEW for me in 1974 when we were dating. I am the original owner, road it a few times and hung it up in the garage...(got married,bought a sailboat). This bicycle was only made in 1973 by Raleigh of England. I ought to know, my husband worked for them at the time. He was there number one sales person in the 70's in California. We are cleaning out the garage and finding many bicycling items that have been packed away for more then 25 years. (more Raleigh, ETC. bicycle stuff will be coming up for sale over next couple of weeks, see my other listings) He took many pictures of my bicycle which you will see some below. I did not get a good picture of the S/N, but will try again and make it and other photos available to interested persons) This is from a non smoking home. It will be packed in a bicycle box, probably shipped UPS, buyer pays shipping cost and insurance. Any questions, email annlynn032@yahoo.com and my husband will answer..........as I know very little about bicycles: Information below from the internet regarding Raleigh RRA's

I now have a little more info: If I measured correctly the frame is 21 or 21 1/2 in. (I am 5 ft 6 in. tall) If it was a girls style bicycle I would keep it, but I am going on 60 years old and will never be able to ride this type of bicycle again due to injuries to my back. The S/N is H1804, there are a few very minor scratches on the frame, no dents, no damage anywhere, never in an accident. I put on my reading glasses on and checked very closely, I can see a few minor scratches here and there, very very few. The biggest scratch is in the picture where you put the wheel on and off, and it is the largest scratch on the fram. Hope this helps. More pictures available w/ email request.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Raleigh RRA 1973 posted by Nick on 11/5/2003 at 6:19:00 PM
Smells like an ebay copy and paste No auction number either






AGE / VALUE:   Moser derailleur posted by: Randy on 11/4/2003 at 12:28:03 AM
A few weeks ago I picked up an old CCM Official Boy Scout bicycle. Not my gendre but I was very lucky to cross paths with a nice fellow who traded me a NOS Francesco Moser frame. It is a very nice frame but offered me one surprise - a braze on for the front derailleur. I have a full Campagnolo Super Record group to install but the derailleur is a clamp-on style. Can I use a braze on derailleur from a seven speed when running six cogs? Or, can I run a seven kog set on a freewheel style hub? Your help on this would be much appreciated.

I might add that it was frequenting this forum that made it possible for me to meet up with the Moser frame. On a recent visit to Winnipeg, Canada, I met a fellow forumer(if there is such a word). He too would have liked to have had the Boy Scout but he was nice enough to web-introduce me to the fellow collector who participated in the trade. Thanks to my friend in the Peg(Canadian for Winnipeg).


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Moser derailleur posted by Keith on 11/4/2003 at 2:23:46 PM
You should be able to run either setup you mention. I'd add that Campy SR brazeon front derailleurs show up regularly on eBay at fairly reasonable prices. I'm not certain but I believe I came across one just the other day.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Moser derailleur posted by Keith on 11/4/2003 at 4:51:57 PM
Well, here's a whole set of Campy front derailleurs with one SR brazeon.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3635332873&category=27950






MISC:   Fun bike on eBay posted by: Keith on 11/3/2003 at 6:56:17 PM
No relation to seller, here's a unique prize winning Cinelli for your wife or daughter.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3635136334&category=7298


   RE:MISC: Fun bike on eBay posted by Warren on 11/4/2003 at 6:24:26 PM
Wow...






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Shimano Exage Bio-Pace on 1984 Bianchi posted by: Gralyn on 11/3/2003 at 5:08:32 PM
I have mostly been riding my 1984 Bianchi Professional here lately. When I got it - it was frame, stem, bars, and Shimano 105 cranks - only...no other componentry. I wanted to build it up with a matching group - so I already had a mid-80's bio-pace group - and built it up with that.

The only problem I have had with this system - is the front deraillieur. I have a difficult time getting it adjusted properly....then when I think I have it...after a couple rides....it will either not go onto the large chainring - or it will throw the chain off past the large chainring.

Are those systems that sensitive? Or do I not have something set-up properly. How high should the front der. be above the large chainring?

I have a bio-pace system also on my son's Bianchi - and it gives no problems at all with the front der.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Shimano Exage Bio-Pace on 1984 Bianchi posted by Ken on 11/3/2003 at 7:26:19 PM
Gralyn, was your front derailleur originally spec'd with the biopace rings? I also had a job resetting a similar setup. Rereading Sheldon Brown's instructions at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/derailer-adjustment.html reinforced my notion that you might want to check the rotation of the clamp on the seat tube before setting the limits so you can't overshift. He basically says set it as close as you can. My experience has been that front der. adjustment is indeed that sensitive, that one tiny touch will make the difference between missed shifts and perfection- and it behaves differently on the street than on the stand. It's going to be perfect. Take a deep breath, and say ohmmmm...

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Shimano Exage Bio-Pace on 1984 Bianchi posted by Corey on 11/4/2003 at 2:10:46 AM
Hi Gralyn,

Shimano made a tool to adjust the height of the derailleur over the outer chainring. It was a white plastic spacer the length of the outer cage plate and would slip over that part of the derailleur. Don't know if one could be found, but surely some older shops have one laying around.

Basically, set the der. cage plate about a 3/16 - 1/4" above the high lobe of the chainring. Shifting quality is somewhat dependent on frame flex, and the limits. Sometimes the limit screws might back themselves out slightly and change the settings. Good luck!

Corey

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Shimano Exage Bio-Pace on 1984 Bianchi posted by Corey on 11/4/2003 at 2:16:00 AM
P. S. Actually, make that 1/8" - 3/16" above the chainring.

Corey

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Shimano Exage Bio-Pace on 1984 Bianchi posted by T-Mar on 11/5/2003 at 1:54:17 PM
The tool Corey mentions was primarily designed to set the angle of the cage relative to the chainline. Due to the bends in the cage and the fact that the inner and outer cage are not parallel, this can be rather difficult. However, it could also be used to set the derailleur height as Corey suggests, though Shimano normally provided a clear, adhesive backed template, with two lines scribed on it, to facilitate this task.

There are two tools, one blue (TL-FD21) and one white (TD-FD20). The white is for road bike (i.e double crankset), while the blue is for the mountain bikes (i.e triple crankset). Shimano devised the Biopace front derailleurs to be used with specific size chainrings. The road set-up usess a 52T large chainring, while the mountain bike set-up uses a 48T chainring. So if somebody has mixed and matched derailleurs or chainrings, the system will not function optimally.

Based on the set-up instructions that came with the tools, the following would be the procedure for somebody lacking the tool.

1.To adjust the angle of the cage, use the shift lever to position the front section of the outer cage directly over the large chainring. The derailleur should be positioned so that the front section of the outer cage is parallel to the large chainring.

2. In order to set the derailleur height above the large chainring, first ensure that the chainring is located properly on the crankarm spider. The pin on the large chainring should be located behind the crankarm. Now, rotate the crankarm so that the arm extends below the bracket, but is in line with the seat tube. Set the lower edge of the derailleur cage so that it is 1/16" above the tip of the chainring teeth.

3. Double check the set-up, as performing the height adjustment may have thrown off the chainline alignment or vice-versa.

4. Once you have performed these operations, set your travel limits.

Good luck.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Shimano Exage Bio-Pace on 1984 Bianchi posted by T-Mar on 11/5/2003 at 8:33:38 PM
There is one bit of additional info that I forgot to mention in my previous post. Shimano states chainline dimensions of 42-45 mm for dopuble cranksets and 45-47 mm for triple cranksets. The chainline dimension is the distance from the centre line of the frame, to the centre line between the inner and outer chainrings.

Variation in this dimension (i.e. substituting shorter or longer crank spindles) may cause shifting problems because Shimano's derailleurs at that time moved in a progressive arc, as opposed to a true parallel movement. The arc was intended to aid upshifts.






MISC:   Clear Channel posted by: John E on 11/3/2003 at 4:14:42 PM
Thanks for the banner regarding Clear Channel Communications, Vin. They have advocated violence against bicyclists on 5 different occasions in 5 different cities, starting with the San Jose / Santa Cruz / Silicon Valley area of northern California 2-3 years ago. The issue is not freedom of speech, but responsible, ethical use of the PUBLIC's licensed airwaves. Clear Channel has betrayed the public trust and deserves a reprimand severe enough to act as an effective deterrent.







MISC:   Clear Channel Update posted by: Keith on 11/3/2003 at 4:14:32 PM
This was forwarded to me today:

To the dozens of people who e-mailed me about the most recent Clear Channel article,

Thank you for taking the time to contact me! Many of you asked how you can help. Here's how you can make a difference:

There are two groups of negotiators scheduled to meet with Clear Channel executives this week. We are hoping to get them to agree to a number of things, the most important being a nationwide "Share the Road" campaign to launch next spring.

Please send an e-mail (between now and Friday, Nov 8) protesting Clear Channel's broadcasting of anti-bicycle programs to:

johnhogan@clearchannel.com
omarthompson@clearchannel.com
lisadollinger@clearchannel.com

This is the final sprint to the finish. Alot rests on the next few days. This is when the bicyling community can take a stand and make a difference.

Your e-mail does not need to be lengthy or detailed. Communicating the basic message that bicyclists will not tolerate this type of programming is what is important.

If you have friends or family who also agree that Clear Channel should not promote violence against bicyclists, forward this to them.


     Clear Channel Update posted by John E on 11/3/2003 at 4:32:02 PM
Here's my letter:

"Dear Clear Channel executive staff,

"Over the past 2-3 years, in five different cities, Clear Channel announcers have betrayed the public trust by openly advocating violence against bicyclists on our public roadways. This is not a First Amendment issue, but is as antisocial and unacceptable as yelling "Fire!" in a crowded theater.

"To Clear Channel management's credit, at least two of the pairs of offending announcers were reprimanded, but why does this sort of behavior persist? Why were they merely suspended with a wrist-slap, instead of being fired? Until Clear Channel institutes and enforces policies which promote responsible, ethical use of the public airwaves, including a nationwide "Share the Road" campaign to try to undo some of the past damage, I shall continue to ask the FCC to withhold all Clear Channel license renewals as they arise."

All the best,

John A. Eldon, D.Eng.

Electronic Design Engineer
Instructor, UCSD Extension

     Clear Channel Update posted by John E on 11/3/2003 at 4:33:21 PM
Here's my letter:

"Dear Clear Channel executive staff,

"Over the past 2-3 years, in five different cities, Clear Channel announcers have betrayed the public trust by openly advocating violence against bicyclists on our public roadways. This is not a First Amendment issue, but is as antisocial and unacceptable as yelling "Fire!" in a crowded theater.

"To Clear Channel management's credit, at least two of the pairs of offending announcers were reprimanded, but why does this sort of behavior persist? Why were they merely suspended with a wrist-slap, instead of being fired? Until Clear Channel institutes and enforces policies which promote responsible, ethical use of the public airwaves, including a nationwide "Share the Road" campaign to try to undo some of the past damage, I shall continue to ask the FCC to withhold all Clear Channel license renewals as they arise."

All the best,

John A. Eldon, D.Eng.

Electronic Design Engineer
Instructor, UCSD Extension

   RE:  Clear Channel Update posted by Mike Patterson on 11/4/2003 at 6:05:50 PM
in todays constant law suit world, it would certainly be to any driver's advantage if caught, to say that he was influenced by the radio comments and have them a co-defendant, and any injured riders advantage in a civil suit to also name the radio network as co-defendants. Could be expensive for the radio network. If common sense won't help, maybe dollars and cents. Mike

   RE:RE:  Clear Channel Update posted by Derek Coghill on 11/5/2003 at 11:15:49 PM
What's the background to this (I ask because, as a foreigner, I've never heard of them); are they anti-bike, pro-car, or just daft?

   RE:RE:RE: Clear Channel Update posted by jack on 11/6/2003 at 8:12:29 AM
Derek, they are all three. Clear Channel is another US mega- corporation which owns hundreds of radio stations spewing the right-wing agenda which includes support for the divine right of Americans to drive what they want no matter how destructive.