OldRoads.com

This is an archive of Vintage Bicycle Information.
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which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, brake types, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your old bicycle.

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which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your vintage bicycle.

Archived: Vintage Lightweights







AGE / VALUE:   FG ballcups posted by: Pete on 1/10/2003 at 5:15:01 PM
Hello again I have come up with some NOS Sturmey Archer
FG ballcups. These are very often worn out because of bad
adjustment and extra load of the dynohub $20 inc shipping







AGE / VALUE:   Sumbeam for sale posted by: Pete on 1/10/2003 at 5:13:40 PM
Hello All I have for sale a just prewar Sunbeam sports (light roadster?)bike in orginal, complete ,unrestored condition. it has a 21" frame and 26" wheels. It retains most of it's paint and there are faint signs of pinstriping and transfers. It is fitted with BSA side pull brakes, BSA threespeed,with banjo
shifter and downturned north road bars $250 + shipping








AGE / VALUE:   Brooks saddle posted by: Darryl on 1/10/2003 at 1:04:14 PM
What's the best way to soften a vintage (1973?) Brooks leather saddle? It is hard as a board. Thanks, Darryl


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Brooks saddle posted by Keith on 1/10/2003 at 2:56:25 PM
This may require more than Proofide, etc. In the archives of this site, in the English Roadster discusion, a leather-worker (cobbler?)once gave a recipe that entailed a suspension of neats foot oil and, believe it or not, water, made in a double boiler. He explained that when leather is completely dreid out, it actually neads moisture in addition to the oil. I've never tried this and I'm no expert, but it sounds like it's worth lokking into.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Brooks saddle posted by Fred on 1/10/2003 at 4:49:39 PM
A few years ago I took the recommendation of a well known expert and used neatsfoot oil to soften a new Brooks saddle.
I ended up with a very oily and soft saddle. Maybe I overdid it but needless to say I will not do that again. I haven't looked at the saddle in a couple of years, maybe it has dried up a bit. As for Proofide, I use it exclusively on a half dozen new saddles, however, I don't see how the leather could absorb much of it. It has the consistancy of slightly warm bees wax. Since I am a fair weather rider any way I'll stick with Proofide. The folks at S-A obviously knew something about the subject.


   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Brooks saddle posted by Skip Echert on 1/10/2003 at 6:35:04 PM
Hello Darryl -
The Brooks FAQ has what they recommend: http://www.brookssaddles.com/ then click on FAQ from the left menu. They say Proofhide only. My humble opinion - Brooks has been making saddles a looooong time - using anything but Proofhide is an experiment whose results, success or failure, may not be known for years. Fred's experiment (above) is an example. Baseball glove makers usually recommend neatsfoot oil. A glove is stressed a fraction of a second at a time. A bike seat is stressed mightly for hours. Both leather, but applied to vastly different uses.
Cheers,
Skip

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Brooks saddle posted by Chuck Schmidt on 1/11/2003 at 12:16:38 AM
The 1930s vintage Brooks catalogs say to use either Brooks Proofide® or neat's-foot oil. Go easy on the oil. Don't overdo it!

Regards,
Chuck

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Brooks saddle posted by P.C. Kohler on 1/11/2003 at 5:26:08 AM
Sorry, just my two pence..

A Brooks leather saddle is a SADDLE people. It's not a sofa or a mattress. And it's not a baseball glove. It's NOT supposed to be 'soft'. If you want a soft seat, get a plastic gell thingy. A real Brooks saddle is designed to support your body and doesn't require 'breaking in' or oil or baking or making into a pudding to do so. I have been riding Brooks saddles since I was about 10 years old. After 35 years, I am still riding them. Every one I've used, B72, B66, B33 etc. has been super comfortable from the moment I sat on it. That's the way it supposed to be. Proofide is to preserve and nourish the leather. It's not to make it 'soft'. All the Proofide in the world is not going to make a good Brooks saddle into a beanbag. Honest. Ride it. Enjoy it. Leave it alone.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Brooks saddle posted by andym on 1/11/2003 at 1:54:16 PM
I have resurrected a few Brooks and Ideale saddles by soaking them in neat's-foot oil.These saddles were so weathered and dried out that the sides of the saddle were flat and almost even with the top of the saddle.By loosening the tensioning bolt at the front of the saddle and stretching the sides back to their original position.The trade off is a very oily saddle,but is'nt that why racing shorts were black to begin with? I also agree with P.C.Kohler as far as new saddles go,don't try and soften it.You have to put alot of hours in that saddle,and eventually it will conform to you.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Brooks saddle posted by freeespirit on 1/11/2003 at 7:56:37 PM
I bought a product at a shop that restores horse ridding saddles called lexol, thats supposed to restore old dried out leather. I've also tried kiwi neatsfoot oil and kiwi leather lotion, on saddles that were hard and dried out and it really didnt make much difference.I've also tried Brooks proofhide which works well on saddles that are in good shape giving tham a nice patina and luster.

      Brooks saddle posted by John E on 1/12/2003 at 2:47:05 AM
My 45K mile, 1972 Brooks Pro saddle has been treated exclusively with Proofhide, and I have yet to retension it. It is the most comfortable saddle I have ever owned.

   RE:AGE / VALUE: Brooks saddle posted by J. M. Vernooy on 1/12/2003 at 2:57:28 PM
Neatsfoot oil is for breaking down the leather. That is how it softens leather. Do not use it on any leather unless you are willing to trade in a part of the leather's lifetime for softness. Don't try to soften a Brooks leather saddle. It was not meant to be soft. If it is not comfortable for you, it may be at the wrong angle or the wrong height. Sheldon Brown has what is probably the the best saddle advice page at http://www.sheldonbrown.com/saddles.html that you could find. As for baseball gloves, avoid neatsfoot oil there too. The best glove dressing is untreated patroleum jelly which Nokona offers as Nokona NLT Classic Glove Conditioner.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Brooks saddle posted by andym on 1/12/2003 at 4:37:34 PM
Check out http://mmd.foxtail.com/Archives/Digests/2002.07.22.09.html

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE: Brooks saddle posted by andym on 1/12/2003 at 4:55:19 PM
Oops! Sorry,you'll have to go to mmd.foxtail.com and search the archives under the letter N for neat's-foot oil.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Brooks saddle posted by Keith on 1/13/2003 at 4:23:34 PM
I've only been riding Brooks for 32 years, so I guess I'll defer to others with more experience. This is not a "breaking in" issue (I agree they don't even need to be broken in -- they're comfy right out of the box). But I've seen and acquired Brooks saddles that are absolutely fossilized. Proofide does not penetrate, so it can't possibly address this level of neglect. I've never found a solution that everyone agrees on. I'm thinking the recipe in the archives may involve something other than neatsfoot. Let's search the archives.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Brooks saddle posted by sam on 1/13/2003 at 5:05:23 PM
Darryl,What most said here is true.You should not soften a new brooks,or use neatsfoot oil,etc.But you are talkin about an old piece of leather,it dries out just like your skin in dry-cold weather.And will rip if stressed.And again just like your skin it needs water.If you only add water it will soon dry and be even harder,the small amount of water must be keep in the leather.That's where the oil/grease comes in.Take a small amount of water in a pan,heat till boil,add lard(yes from the gro.store)and the same amount of neatsfoot oil.Now I hope you were following me close on this DO NOT HEAT THE OIL/LARD AND ADD WATER!!!heat the water and add the oil/lard this way you will not get hurt.When all is melted brush on the dry leather , some say to put it in a plastic bag over night , you be the judge--sam

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Brooks saddle posted by Chuck Schmidt on 1/13/2003 at 8:22:31 PM
From a lot of reading on the web on leather preservation what is used is a mixture of neat's-foot oil and lanolin (some say 60/40, some say 40/60). This is used to keep the leather from drying out, not to soften it. It is used sparingly.

If however your saddle is so dry that there is nothing bonding the fibers of the leather together the saddle leather will tear. I've seen more that a few old saddles that have torn in half crosswise because they dried out and nothing was holding the leather fiber together anymore. Visually the old saddle look okay, but tore the instant you sat on it! Pity...

Regards, Chuck

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Brooks saddle posted by Keith on 1/13/2003 at 10:10:07 PM
I've had that experience -- old saddle looks okay. Treat it with Proofide and ride it then RIP, it tears apart while you're riding.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Brooks saddle posted by Richard on 1/14/2003 at 8:00:54 AM
Might want to try LEXOL leather conditioner. It can be found at auto parts stores.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Gitane Tour de France posted by: Junglejim on 1/10/2003 at 4:49:27 AM
I liked the Gitane Tour de France because of it's flexibility. I've read several negative discussions over the past month about "Whip". The Tour had alot of whip especially when you torqued the bottom bracket. I rode mine for a couple thousand miles and loved the flex in the frame. Alas, my Tour de France got sold to pay for an engagement ring. I now have the opportunity to buy another frame from a person in NY. I know that a complete bicycle sold for $350 in 1971 but I have no idea what a frame that is in need of new paint is worth today. What is y'alls advice?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Gitane Tour de France posted by Keith on 1/10/2003 at 3:10:13 PM
Frame "whippiness" generally describes bottom bracket flex. Sheldon Brown discusses it in his frame materials article, and also links to the only objective testing I've seen done on this subject.
One issue with whip is energy loss. Sheldon Brown, who's pretty dang smart, says it's a myth because frame materials are efficient springs and the energy is returned. I realy wonder about that, and question whether in real life it's returned in a mannter that drives the bike forward. The other issue with frame flex is handling. If a frame flexes under the stress of high speed cornering, it's not going to track as well as a stiffer frame. As for your question about price -- assuming the frame is not dented, cracked, and is rust free (other than very minor surface rust), but lousy paint, I'd peg it anywhere between $50-$100. This takes into account that it's not a true high-end bike, the workmanship was basically just okay, and you'll be stuck with French threads (good luck!). As I recall, in central Ohio, in the early 70s a Gitane Tour de France sold for the same price as a Peugeot PX-10, about $250, or $100 less than the lowest priced Campy-equiped bikes (FWIW the 1972 Consumer Guide lists it as $195). But if you yearn for the bike of your youth, what price can you put on it?

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Gitane Tour de France posted by Skip Echert on 1/10/2003 at 6:52:26 PM
Hello JungleJim -
Gitane Tour de France bikes, in good condition, generally sell for $200 - $350 or more on Ebay. I think that is a lot, but as Darryl says above what price for the bike of your youth? You probably know that early ones were mostly/nearly all French with a bit of Campy. Newer ones have lots of Japanese components.
A Question - The one I had, bought used in 1979 for $225, (Nuovo Tipo hubs, tubulars, 54 cm) was very twitchy - hard to ride. Was this typical of all of them? Really targeted, and built, for racers?
cheers,
skip

   frame whip posted by John E on 1/12/2003 at 2:52:26 AM
Whippy, stiff, and in-between frames all have their applications. Keith and I discussed the energy recovery issue a couple of years back; I still think the percent recovery of energy depends on one's pedaling style. I do know that I can accelerate and climb more effectively on (moderately stiff) my 1982 Bianchi than on my (very whippy) 1959 Capo, each of which followed the prevailing Tour de France design fashion of its day. I also know I always want at least one whippy frame in my stable, for long distance rides and unloaded commuting.

   RE:frame whip posted by junglejim on 1/13/2003 at 2:00:45 AM
We all know that some energy is lost converting from the pedals to the spring-like frame and then to the forward motion but whippiness is like a release of potential energy. Much like flexing a fishing rod when casting or a pole vaulter's pole as it slings the person over the standard. I think that you make a good point when you say that it is more conducive to touring and unloaded commuting.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Gitane Tour de France posted by Ray on 1/14/2003 at 3:15:57 PM
I may be new to road riding (not really) but I do understand the physical aspects of what is being called Whip in a bike frame. With all the forces in play when you ride a certain amount of whip is desired and even safer than a stiff frame. What people call a stiff or firm frame merely transferrs these forces somewhere else. When you corner at a high speed and the frame flexes it is finding the best center of gravity to allow for a safe turn. When you have a stiff frame this force is transferred to the only other part that will flex your wheels and tires. Just because they are high pressure do not believe that they do not flex. If the tire cannot handle the flex then you get the same effect as riding on gravel or poor adhesion to the road surface. Ever take a turn to tight and your front wheel says NO NO and you have to adjust. Hopefully you had room to adjust or a nasty spill will result. Just because you have spent a bankroll on hi end frames and wheels that will not negate the physical forces that are still there. You may move them around a little but according to the laws of physics you cannot eliminate them.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Gitane Tour de France posted by Keith on 1/14/2003 at 7:29:15 PM
Ray, I understand your "center of gravity" point, but nonetheless, a more flexible frame will not corner as well as a stiff frame. Frame flex can cause unexpected changes in the steering or even occilations as the positions of the wheels relative to the frame and each other. I'm struggling to articulate this 3-D phenomenon, and perhaps an engineer like John could help explain it more clearly, if he agrees. It may not be a valid analogy, but I'd note that sports cars, designed to corner precisely at high speeds, have stiffer frames and suspensions, in addition to lower centers of gravity.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Gitane Tour de France posted by Ken on 1/15/2003 at 8:02:09 PM
I rode a Gitane Track Bike for years in the early 60's. It was all campy and Reynolds 531. It was a great bike although a little long in the wheelbase. It was a bright yellow-green color and quite daring for the 60's.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Gitane Tour de France posted by Keith on 1/16/2003 at 2:11:49 PM
My early 70s Peugeot track bike is the same -- longish. In fact, there's plenty of room for fenders.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   SL & SP TUBING posted by: Darryl on 1/9/2003 at 1:39:31 PM
I recently posted a message re: the difference between SL & SP tubing and the discussion helped. I also received a reply to my e-mail to the frame Mfg. (Marinoni) which stated "the thickness of the tube is the difference, it is 0.9/0.6 for the SL and 1.0/.7 for the SP." Thanks, Darryl







AGE / VALUE:   Parts for 34 Schwinn Packard track bike posted by: JOEL on 1/8/2003 at 8:04:43 PM
Hi,
I'm looking for a set of pedals and a correct fork for this 34 Packard track bike. Thanks.

http://image1ex.villagephotos.com/pubimage.asp?id_=1171701

http://image1ex.villagephotos.com/pubimage.asp?id_=1171702

http://image1ex.villagephotos.com/pubimage.asp?id_=1171700


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Parts for 34 Schwinn Packard track bike posted by Gralyn on 1/8/2003 at 9:46:56 PM
I'm jealous!
I wish I could help - but I don't know what would be correct - and I wouldn't have it anyway. Wow, 1934!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Parts for 34 Schwinn Packard track bike posted by Warren on 1/9/2003 at 1:41:14 PM
I'm curious...is that the original fork and it is damaged or is it a replacement? It looks like a roadster fork with the flat blades and drilled crown. Are you looking for an exact Packard fork or any good period track fork that could be resprayed to match?

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Parts for 34 Schwinn Packard track bike posted by Joel on 1/9/2003 at 3:58:22 PM
THe fork in the photo is a later Schwinn lightweight locking fork. I don't have the original. I would like to find a prewar nonlocking Schwinn fork either color matched or to paint. For pedals, a period set in apropriate condition would be fine.

Warren, the fork shown is more tubular, looks the same as a 50s Traveler,...

   RE: Traveler fork posted by Eric Amlie on 1/9/2003 at 6:14:43 PM
Joel, if you find a more correct fork for the bike and want to get rid of this one, I have a '56 Traveler that needs the correct fork.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old decals posted by: Brian L. on 1/8/2003 at 4:00:20 PM
I know this has been asked before, but what have people had the most success with to remove old stickers and decals?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old decals posted by Dave on 1/8/2003 at 6:56:53 PM
I had read somewhere a heatgun would remove them just be careful not to take paint with it.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old decals posted by P.C. Kohler on 1/9/2003 at 5:24:45 AM
Just a plain old hairdryer works great; at least on removing those darned bike registration stickers.

P.C. Kohler

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old decals posted by Bill Putnam on 1/9/2003 at 9:37:16 PM
Personally, I like old bike registration stickers on an old bike as to me this is a part of the bike's history and helps make it what it is. In the classic car arena, I see far too many over restored cars that are nicer than when new, but not representative of the time when they were built or how people actually used them.

Just my point of view,

Bill Putnam

   RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   old decals posted by P.C. Kohler on 1/11/2003 at 5:31:02 AM
An interesting tact, Bill. No, I hate those stickers with a passion nonetheless especially when they cover up original transfers etc. But I will keep the 1948 Ann Arbor, MI, bicycle license plate on my Raleigh 'Dawn Tourist' of the same date. The sticker I removed from the rear mudguard was dated 1961 so this was a real garage queen thereafter it seems. But as you say, a part of finding out the machine's history.

P.C. Kohler






AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn "super sport"; 1972 posted by: JONathan on 1/8/2003 at 3:47:22 AM
Wedged in a pile of beater-bikes, I spotted a yellow Super Sport with only the leather seat missing from what is otherwise all original componentry. $10 US was all the price. After some lubrication; a new seat; spoke adjustment; new br. pads and head bearing adjustment the bike was road ready. What a great ride! I don't know whether to give it away or save it as a collector bike. The paint and decals are near perfect. Some wear-off where one of those silly racks did the usual scratch number on the seat stays! The fillet-brazing gives a unique craftsmanlike look to what I'm sure was a mass produced bike. How'd the Schwinn company make a bike like that for $136 US? Pretty amazing to this duffer. The pointed seat stays are cool, too. Is this a collectible or a "beater"...straight scoop, Thanks and happy rides. Jonathan


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn posted by andym on 1/8/2003 at 6:16:18 AM
Certainly a great find for 10 dollars,I think these are pretty unique bikes.I own one myself,along with a couple of late seventies schwinn superiors.These were also fillet brazed but with three piece cranks.Not many people notice the super sports because at a glance they look similar to the varsitys and continentals.I believe they have some collector interest but they aren't valued very high...yet. hang on to it,ride it around and enjoy it

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn posted by JONathan on 1/8/2003 at 7:30:29 PM
Thanks for reply, andym. My "varsity" could serve as a double for the "super sport", except the massive nature of the former becomes readily apparent in a ride...especially uphill. The "varsity" forged forks weigh about as much as the whole "super sport"! THe cp DiaComp brakes seem superior to the side-pulls ("varsity"). Bikes such as the "super sport"/"superior" models seem excellent choices for everyday riding, IMHO. The very low maintenance reqs. and the robust construction are plus features. I'm surprised that more can't be seen in the commuter ranks. How about the chrome? Is that heavy-duty or what?! Happy rides, Jonathan.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn posted by Kevin K on 1/8/2003 at 7:57:22 PM
Hi. Your Super Sport is a keeper. Most local bike shops and even second hand stores here have all jumped on the Schwinn "GET THEM NOW " trend. Not all Schwinns will be real collectors. Your SS will be. So polish her up and enjoy riding a 30 plus year old classic. Kevin K

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn posted by JONathan on 1/9/2003 at 5:47:15 AM
Thanks, Kevin. I have gotten a few for 0 to 10$ this year. They are servicable and definitely easy riding. With a few exceptions, most of the ones I've fixed and given away are getting some good miles...even the 1 speed, coaster brake models! My effort is rewarded by the bikes being so easy to fix and they clean up to a nearly new look. Possibly this is the result of them being stored rather than used, but the materials and finish have a lot to say about the results of my effort. To me, the Schwinns that I fix up are prime examples of how quality product can be achieved with a reasonable cost if the volume is high. The "super sport" is surprising well finished, unlike my "varsities" that have kind of roughed up BB joinery.
Have a good ride, Jonathan.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn posted by Bill Putnam on 1/9/2003 at 9:39:44 PM
See http://www.sheldonbrown.com/schwinn-braze.html
for a discussion of these nice frames, which had much hand work involved in their manufacture.

Bill Putnam

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn posted by Kevin K on 1/9/2003 at 10:20:30 PM
Hi Bill. I feel that is where the value will be in these frames. They were brazed and finished by American hands. Another lost art. Kevin K

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Schwinn posted by JONathan on 1/10/2003 at 5:42:56 AM
Thanks, Bill. Great site. How can one say if the dropout is forged; as opposed to stamped? It says on that site about the stamped dropouts were used in the '70's "super sports". I think mine are of the stamped variety because the edges look sharp with no signs of mold roughness.






MISC:   saving Tange fork? posted by: Lincoln on 1/8/2003 at 3:56:24 AM
Have been looking for forks for a Reynolds 531 frame I'm trying
to turn back into a bike. Was given this really neat looking
Tange chrome fork, but some bozo must have attacked it with an
oversize wrench as the threads seem to have been damaged somehow.
I can wind a nut over them easily, but the outside diameter has
been reduced by maybe .025", so I think they won't hold a nut well.
I'm wondering if there's some cost effective trick for fixing this?
If I had access to a machine shop I might turn an inner sleeve to
splice and braze a piece on to replace the affected area, but
I don't. Thanks.


   RE:MISC:   saving Tange fork? posted by Warren on 1/8/2003 at 2:26:25 PM
You would likely need to replace the whole steerer to prevent interference between the "sleeve" and the stem. If the threads can't be cleaned up as they are, then it's cheaper and easier to replace the Tange fork. They are very easy to find. 531 forks shouldn't be too difficult either.

If this were an original fork for an important historical bike, maybe the effort and costs would be worth it.

   RE:MISC:   saving Tange fork? posted by Keith on 1/8/2003 at 5:03:20 PM
I may be too conservative but I'd avoid using a fork with a damaged steerer. As Warren says, new Tange forks are cheap -- about $30. I think aebikes.com sells a variety of Tange forks.

   RE:RE:MISC:   saving Tange fork? posted by Keith on 1/8/2003 at 5:06:57 PM
Sorry, it's aebike.com, but they show they're temorarily out of these. Your LBS may have one or could easily order one from QBP.

   RE:RE:RE:MISC:   saving Tange fork? posted by Lincoln on 1/9/2003 at 2:37:21 AM
Thanks. I think I was indulging in wishful thinking.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Handlebar Tape posted by: Robby on 1/7/2003 at 1:53:40 PM
Hello
What type of Handlebar tape would have gone on a late 60's Bianchi, is it too early for Cello tape, let me know..



   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Handlebar Tape posted by Gralyn on 1/7/2003 at 2:50:37 PM
I also have a handlebar tape question. I have an early 80's Lotus that originally had the cloth adhesive-back tape. Is there anywhere to get this old cloth tape anymore? I haven't seen any.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Handlebar Tape posted by Ray on 1/7/2003 at 3:21:56 PM
You can still buy black cloth bar tape. Go to your LBS and ask them to order it. My friend just bought two rolls a week ago so I know it is still out there.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Handlebar Tape posted by Keith on 1/7/2003 at 7:07:29 PM
Rivendell (rivendellbicycles.com) and Harris (sheldonbrown.com) both sell cloth tape in a VARIETY OF COLORS. For the fanatic, Rivendell also sells shellac and hemp twine for finishing.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Handlebar Tape posted by Brian L. on 1/8/2003 at 1:49:31 AM
Also check out: http://www.jitensha.com/eng/

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Handlebar Tape posted by Oscar on 1/8/2003 at 2:53:34 AM
Also your neighborhood REI.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Handlebar Tape posted by Oscar on 1/8/2003 at 2:53:58 AM
Also your neighborhood REI.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   chicago frame schwinn with japan components posted by: Jr. on 1/6/2003 at 9:08:03 PM
I have recently aquired a schwinn 12 speed black with a definite round metal chicago schwinn emblem on the front tube, no serial no#. on the front tube. The frame also has a chicago sticker emblem on the down tube from the seat, also has a torn sticker on the top tube possible LeTour.Has a definite stamped serial no#.on th left rear drop SB306448, also a stamped no#. on the bottom of the crank housing 865A, also a stamped no#. on the right fork T462.components as follows; headset Sakae custom handlebar w/J-82 and C420 stamped on it, brake lever schwinn japan w/ 08 81 and US Patno.3403577 on it. Stem shifters Atlus Centeron Japan on it, Brakes front and rear schwinn approved cantilever style front has 03 82 0n it rear no#. not visible, reflectors schwinn approved frnt 707S rear 707S.Crank siguno with siguno forged japan 170 and 232 inside the crank arm. pedals KKT japan. Derailers rear shimano Atlus with pat.pending shimano stamped on it. Front derailer Shimano Atlus.Rims Araya 27x1 1/4 ,Front quick release, front and rear have schwinn approved hubs made in france w/ 29 schwinn approved 81 france stamped on rear hub and 29 schwinn approved 82 on front hub. Rim both laced w/ zinc spokes.Tires schwinn hp sports touring made in USA 35lb. UU 1 3 6 27x1 1/4 schwinn S-6 orK-2.Seat schwinn avocet touring.Kickstand japan. What I would like to know is what year the frame is and what make it is and also if it is a fillet brazed frame being that it is a definite chicago frame with a chicago round metal emblem on the front tube with no serial no#. on the front tube.I haven't been able to find the serial no#. SB306448 that is on the left rear drop on anyones serial no# lists. Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks Jr.







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   chicago frame schwinn with japan components posted by: Jr. on 1/6/2003 at 9:08:03 PM
I have recently aquired a schwinn 12 speed black with a definite round metal chicago schwinn emblem on the front tube, no serial no#. on the front tube. The frame also has a chicago sticker emblem on the down tube from the seat, also has a torn sticker on the top tube possible LeTour.Has a definite stamped serial no#.on th left rear drop SB306448, also a stamped no#. on the bottom of the crank housing 865A, also a stamped no#. on the right fork T462.components as follows; headset Sakae custom handlebar w/J-82 and C420 stamped on it, brake lever schwinn japan w/ 08 81 and US Patno.3403577 on it. Stem shifters Atlus Centeron Japan on it, Brakes front and rear schwinn approved cantilever style front has 03 82 0n it rear no#. not visible, reflectors schwinn approved frnt 707S rear 707S.Crank siguno with siguno forged japan 170 and 232 inside the crank arm. pedals KKT japan. Derailers rear shimano Atlus with pat.pending shimano stamped on it. Front derailer Shimano Atlus.Rims Araya 27x1 1/4 ,Front quick release, front and rear have schwinn approved hubs made in france w/ 29 schwinn approved 81 france stamped on rear hub and 29 schwinn approved 82 on front hub. Rim both laced w/ zinc spokes.Tires schwinn hp sports touring made in USA 35lb. UU 1 3 6 27x1 1/4 schwinn S-6 orK-2.Seat schwinn avocet touring.Kickstand japan. What I would like to know is what year the frame is and what make it is and also if it is a fillet brazed frame being that it is a definite chicago frame with a chicago round metal emblem on the front tube with no serial no#. on the front tube.I haven't been able to find the serial no#. SB306448 that is on the left rear drop on anyones serial no# lists. Any help would be greatly appreciated, thanks Jr.


     chicago frame schwinn with japan components posted by John E on 1/7/2003 at 3:20:05 AM
You have an early 1980s Japanese-built Schwinn, possibly one of the LeTour or World series. (Schwinn experts -- help!)

   RE:  chicago frame schwinn with japan components posted by Kevin K on 1/8/2003 at 1:38:17 AM
Hi guys. I do believe that John is on the right track. Outfitted with Shimano Altus derailleurs it could be a straight Letour OR even a Super Letour. Or even a Super Letour 12.2.Next we need to look at the dropouts. Are they stamped steel? If so the Letour it probally is. It could also be a Voyageur 11.8 as these bikes used Shimano Altus pieces. The Voyageur 11.8 also had forged dropouts. What throws me is the cantilever brakes. These were only on UPPER end Schwinn touring bikes. Possibly a Voyageur SP or again a Voyageur. Your bike appears to be a 1982 but unsure. I could use more info. Tell me about the dropouts. Has the bike been painted? Is that why there are no decals or I.D. Are the shifters on the down tube? Need as much info as you can provide. Kevin K

   RE:RE:  chicago frame schwinn with japan components posted by Kevin K on 1/8/2003 at 2:14:04 PM
Hi. Look for a number on the headbadge. Kevin K

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   chicago frame schwinn with japan components posted by Keith on 1/8/2003 at 5:12:41 PM
Kevin, I don't know whether this model is in your catelogs, but I once owned a Le Tour Luxe that had cantelever brazeons. Gave it to a friend who'd given me lots of bike stuff.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   chicago frame schwinn with japan components posted by Ken on 1/8/2003 at 7:11:05 PM
check the Schwinn Lightweight Data Book at
www.geocities.com/sldatabook/cover.html
for good info like part specs, what colors were available various years, etc. Let us know when you find yours!

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   chicago frame schwinn with japan components posted by Kevin K on 1/9/2003 at 1:28:52 AM
Hi Keith. Man I'm an idiot. I'm looking at books and 10' away from me sits my Letour Luxe with cantilevers. DA! Need to know if the bike has stamped steel dropouts or not. Too many Schwinn bikes. Kevin K

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   chicago frame schwinn with japan components posted by Danny Joe on 1/9/2003 at 4:08:39 AM
Now I'm curious about the Schwinn World I recently bought. It's a 10-spd. which had me thinking it was from the 70's but I couldn't find it in the above databook. It showed a World Sport in 1979, but my model just say's World. Is there a data site for '80's Schwinn's ? The rear derailuer is a Shimano Tourney and the front is a Suntour with Suntour stem shifters, also has a Sugino VP crank.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   chicago frame schwinn with japan components posted by Danny Joe on 1/9/2003 at 4:14:57 AM
derailleur,derailleur,deraileur, GOT IT !!!

   RE:RE:RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   chicago frame schwinn with japan components posted by Danny Joe on 1/9/2003 at 4:22:47 AM
Oh boy! DON'T GOT IT :)






MISC:   GITANES posted by: Ian on 1/6/2003 at 9:25:58 AM
Hi, I have been offered (but have not yet seen) a Gitane tandem frame. I have to go a 100 miles to see it am hoping somebody can tell me something about the maker and their bikes before I go. All I know so far is that it is a fully chromed tandem frame with cottered cranks and the name Gitane on both down tubes. It has forks, stems and seat posts (marked as well) but no brakes or deraiileurs or wheels. Are there any identifying features to look for? What sort of componentry would it have originally been fitted with? Any input welcome. Thanks, Ian.


   RE:MISC:   GITANES posted by Keith on 1/6/2003 at 3:45:58 PM
I was a stoker on one of these for a few rides, including a century. I the Gitane "Tandem Sport" was the first choice of the 1972 Consumer Guide to Bicycles. I'm not positive but I believe it was plain carbon steel. It came with canti brakes plus a rear drujm brake. Gitane means gypsy in French. Gitane is a fairly large maker on the lines of Peugeot, and its name appears in the peloton, most notably under five-me Tour de France winner Jaques Ancquitil (sp?). The bike you're looking at is decent, but would be considered whippy by today's standards, and stiffness is all the more important for a tandem, as it affects handling, and hence safety (though I'm not saying it's unsafe, just take those switchback descents slower). The big disadvantage, though, is French threading throughout, so it may be harder or more expensive to get parts.

   RE:RE:MISC:   GITANES posted by Steven on 1/6/2003 at 11:00:56 PM
The Gitane brand now belongs to the same conglomerate as Bianchi. Beyond, Anquétil, they were also ridden to more recent tour victories by Hinault and Fignon... I would say that the most comparable tandem would be the Motobécane or Follis. These are all 'old-school' tandems with short rear top-tubes. They handle exceptionally well and because of the high tensile steel frame are very comfortable. I would highly recommend then for any beginner or the occasional weekend rider. I wouldn't be keen to take one out for a century. Most were diamond frame in the front and mixte in the back. Whether it is worthwhile, all depends on the price. For a full ridable Gitane tandem, I would be willing to pay $200-500 (unless it is one of the rare Reynolds 531-tubed models, in which case it would be worth more)

   RE:MISC:   GITANES posted by Keith on 1/7/2003 at 2:49:54 PM
I forgot to mention the componentry is what you'd expect on a French bike of this period (assuming it's 70s vintage -- the cottered cranks suggest this): the cantilever brakes were Mafac, the pedels were Lyatard, and the derailleurs were Simplex. And, lest we forget, Greg LeMond also rode a Gitane when he was on the Renault team. I'm not sure what Steven refers to when he mentions handling. Yes these are comfortable bikes, but having ridden on the back of one, I can say I wouldn't want to try diving into corners on a fast decent with the same vigor as I would on, for example, a far stiffer modern Cannondale tandem.

   Handling posted by Steven on 1/8/2003 at 6:28:01 AM
When I mentioned the handling being good, I was especially referring to the short wheelbase and how it handles at slow speeds most common to beginners. At high speed or for experienced riders, it is not what you would normally want.






FOR SALE:   1975 ItalVega Superlight, mint - original posted by: Tom Cat on 1/5/2003 at 6:08:51 PM
Father bought in 1975 for $1,300. Finest manufacturered bike in the world in 1975. Full Nuovo Record Campagnolo components. Columbus SL frame with chromed/drilled dropouts. Bike has custom drilling (brake calipers/handles, chainrings, base of bottom bracket/frame) by ItalVega. A work of art. I have not seen another being sold. Has less than 500 miles on it. This bike is all original and in perfect condition. Has been in storage for 25 years. I have no idea what it is worth. But would like for someone who can appreciate it to make a good home for it.


   RE:FOR SALE:   1975 ItalVega Superlight, mint - original posted by Steven on 1/5/2003 at 8:32:49 PM
Tom, ItalVega were actually nothing more than marketed products. There never was an ItalVega frame shop, but rather a marketing company had frames built for them by various frame builders, putting on their name on the frames. As such, they have never had great collector interest. Some of the nicer frames are therefore severely under-rated and under-valued. I'm sorry to say that your bike will likely not go for much more than $400. About the only way to know for sure is to put it up on ebay.

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:   1975 ItalVega Superlight, mint - original posted by Skip Echert on 1/9/2003 at 3:02:41 AM
Hello Tom -
Steven is right about ItalVega not being a highly desirable brand for collectors. However, any quality bike in great condition, like yours must be, equipped with Nuovo Record, should fetch more than $400 on Ebay.com. I would estimate $650+, IF YOU HAVE GOOD PICTURES to show the condition. Especially important is to show the level of craftsmanship on the lugs, bottom bracket and fork.
Cheers,
skip

   RE:FOR SALE:   1975 ItalVega Superlight, mint - original posted by Mark Medinnus on 1/9/2003 at 6:02:11 AM
Hi! How much are you asking for it? And what are the rims?

Thanks!!






FOR SALE:   Lightweight Wheels posted by: Tom on 1/5/2003 at 2:41:34 PM
I have 2 wheels that I don't need and thought someone on this site might need them. 1 is a rear Suzue Sealed Tech black hub laced to a black Ukai 700 x 25c rim with a Panaracer 700 x 25c tire. It comes with a 6 speed freewheel 13-26 cogs and a QR lever. Tire is usable and rim is very straight and true. Paint missing where the brakes touch rim. The other is a front Campagnolo hub unknown model with a QR lever maybe 80's. It is laced to a gold Montreal Ambrosio Medaille D'Or sew-up rim. The rim looks unused has no glue on the rim. The rim has no damage some light shop wear. It needs to be trued. Loose spokes. I would like to trade these 2 wheels for 4 used straight balloon tire rims from the 40's or 50's. I need 4 rims for project bikes. The rims will be painted so they don't have to be perfect just straight and not rotted. Someone out there may have what I need. Email me off line.