OldRoads.com

This is an archive of Vintage Bicycle Information.
For current Discussions, go to our main site: OldRoads.com

If you are trying to determine the genealogy of your bicycle by it's features, go to our Vintage Bicycle Price Guide
which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, brake types, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your old bicycle.

If you are trying to determine the make and model of your bicycle, go to our Vintage Bicycle Picture Database
which details bicycle features, wheel sizes, etc., as well as showing a price estimate for your vintage bicycle.

Archived: Vintage Lightweights







AGE / VALUE:   Spoke N Word posted by: Richard on 1/25/2003 at 6:44:34 PM
I built a 27" rear wheel with 8/9 speed hub the other day using some 15ga spokes I had on hand and I just noticed this morning that the ones I used on the drive side are 15/16 swagged (very subtle change in thickness hard to tell) and the non drive side are straight 15's. Anyway since I couldnt find anything in my wheel building book about using mixed spoke gauges, has anyone out there tryed this and what where their results? Considering the fact that the nondrive side has less tension than the drive, yet the swagged spokes have more flex (as used on drive side) will the effects counter each other and make a well balanced wheel? Or is this Rocky and Bullwinkle engineering? I guess I'll have to go for a ride and see if it implodes, LOL.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Spoke N Word posted by Oscar on 1/26/2003 at 12:18:08 AM
Too much science for this feeble mind. Just ride it as though they are straight gauge on both sides and see what happens. Probably no problems.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Spoke N Word posted by Richard on 1/26/2003 at 7:24:09 PM
I was just curious if this had been tried (I'm sure it has). I've had rear wheels with different cross patterns (14ga 4x nondrive, 14ga 3x drive same flange diameter) which balanced stiffness, but never with different gauge spokes. JB didnt cover this in the book. If I get a dry day I'll give it the ACME brand Coyote test. I was also pondering the question: If gravitational pull is created by a objects rotational speed, would a object rotating in the oppisite direction at the same speed defy gravity?

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Spoke N Word posted by Keith on 1/27/2003 at 4:04:38 PM
I sort of doubt that it will make a huge difference, unless you're a very heavy rider who likes to take switchbacks at high speed.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Spoke N Word posted by Richard on 1/27/2003 at 6:42:32 PM
I'm 6' and weight is 170, I usualy use 14ga straight w/ 3x pattern. I was just using what was on hand. Funny thing is that the swage is so subtle I didnt even notice it when I was building the wheel or even realize I had 15/16 spokes, LOL. If it fails it will be starting from a stop, I have a bad habit of pushing to high a gear to start off (broke lots of spokes and frames doing this and still I dont learn). Another science question to ponder: If a flushed toilet swirls in the southern half of the earth the oppisite direction as the northern half, wouldnt it flush straight down with no swirl at the equator?

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Spoke N Word posted by Stacey on 1/27/2003 at 11:56:27 PM
No, you can't have a toilet directly on the equator. They won't flush at all :-)

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Spoke N Word posted by Richard on 1/28/2003 at 11:16:46 PM
Too hot there, might burn the bum on the seat;)

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Spoke N Word posted by sam on 1/30/2003 at 1:23:21 AM
If you own a toilet at the equator they call you Presidenty!

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Spoke N Word posted by Richard on 2/1/2003 at 6:20:50 PM
Viva la wheels revolution! To bring this post to a "full circle" (ouch);)...






AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh 555 SL tubing posted by: Kevin K on 1/25/2003 at 3:18:17 PM
Hi all. A friend purchased a Raleigh built with 555 SL tubing. Is this a quality tubing? Thanks, Kevin K







AGE / VALUE:   RALEIGH 555 SL TUBING posted by: Kevin K on 1/25/2003 at 3:18:17 PM
Hi. A friend purchased a Raleigh with 555 SL tubing. He's wondering exactly what the 555 tubing quality is. Kevin K


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   RALEIGH 555 SL TUBING posted by Skip Echert on 1/28/2003 at 4:08:34 PM
Hello Kevin -
Raleigh 555 and 555 SL was used on "Raleigh Cycle Company of America" bikes made in Taiwan. It was a house brand of tubing, made either in Japan (Tange?) or in Taiwan. SL was the lighter version of 555. The question has been asked in other online forums with no definite answer as to exactly who made it or it's properties. The 555 sticker on my Raleigh Wyoming says it is chrome-moly.
Cheers,
Skip

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   RALEIGH 555 SL TUBING posted by Kevin K on 1/28/2003 at 8:54:23 PM
Hi Skip. Thanks! I'll pass on the info. Kevin K

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   RALEIGH 555 SL TUBING posted by Mike P on 1/29/2003 at 4:44:50 AM
Also have seen 555sl and 555rsl tubing, along with the more common 531, used on the English-built 'Racing USA' framesets sold in the mid-80s...
The Reynolds decal proclaims "All Tubes Manganese Moly".






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Sunny side up? posted by: Oscar on 1/25/2003 at 4:35:15 AM
Here's a chuckle...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2154264050&category=420


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Sunny side up? posted by Gralyn on 1/25/2003 at 2:12:05 PM
I was wondering what I could ever do with all those things! I had thought of using them for frisbees - but, hey, they could be handy in the kitchen!

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Sunny side up? posted by Richard on 1/25/2003 at 7:15:58 PM
Wait till George Forman sees this!!!






AGE / VALUE:    posted by: Mark on 1/25/2003 at 12:42:39 AM
Hi, Does any one know what kind of derailleurs a 1959 px10 would have on it.I bought it as just a frame and am looking to restore it, it has a double rear derailleur braze- on. Was it a juy 543 or was there another double cable deraileur that would be suitable for it.Was the front a simplex tour de france? Thank you


   Try this posted by Ray on 1/27/2003 at 2:51:22 PM
Here are a couple of sites you can use for reference. Perhaps you can find the answers to your questions here.

http://www.classicrendezvous.com/PX-10.htm

http://www.ucad.fr/pub/virt/mp/peugeot/index_anglais.html






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Quiet Ride posted by: Gralyn on 1/24/2003 at 4:41:52 PM
I was riding my Lotus 3000R down a paved bike / walking trail....I came upon a couple - each with a dog on a leash - and they were taking up the entire width of the trail. As I got closer....and closer...and closer....I realize that they don't know I'm coming....so I call out to alert them. They move to one side to let me pass. Just as I pass, the woman comments to me about how quietly I was riding. Then, as I rode on...I got to thinking....hey, that's good....if the bike is not making noise...that means everything is lubed properly, adjusted properly, and running very efficiently, well-tuned, etc.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Quiet Ride posted by Darryl on 1/24/2003 at 9:42:41 PM
On a vintage lightweight all you should hear is a quiet buzz from the chain. I've spent hours getting rid of clicks,tics,rattles and squeaks.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Quiet Ride posted by Dave on 1/24/2003 at 10:17:08 PM
I have an Older Peugeot fixed-gear which has a Chinese Bell attached oherwise it is completly silent...






WANTED:   24" frame posted by: David on 1/24/2003 at 12:05:41 PM
Well, no bites on a swap. Does anyone have full 531 frame they'd like to sell? I'm looking for 24 - 24 1/2 inches, English-threaded, touring geometry, narrow spread rear triangle. I want to use it with a SA AM hub and maybe fixed. Contact me off line please.







FOR SALE:   Park wheel truing stand for sale posted by: Greg on 1/24/2003 at 3:10:03 AM
Park wheel truing stand for sale. It is not the expensive model. If I can get $70.00 for it I will throw in a dishing tool. E mail with questions. Will send via ups for $10.00. Thanks It was lightly used.


   RE:FOR SALE:   Park wheel truing stand for sale posted by David on 1/24/2003 at 12:04:24 PM
For $70 you should throw in the dishing tool because that is how much the kit of both tools sells for new at retail.

   RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Park wheel truing stand for sale posted by Greg on 1/24/2003 at 12:36:43 PM
My appologies. I was not aware of the "new" package price. I bought it from a friend and have never used it. I paid more than that for it. $45.00 obo. Guess I was taken!!






FOR SALE:   1st generation Shimano 105 & 600 components posted by: Jim on 1/23/2003 at 6:13:39 PM
A little shameless self promotion. I have a few 1st gen. Shimano 600 & 105 bits on ebay. Here's one item number : 2154643630 , just click on 'view seller's other items' to see the rest. I'll pay for shipping via Priority Mail for anyone from Old Roads. Opening bids are all low, to get it to someone who will actually use it. After the cost of shipping, most of it would net me enough for two days lunch at Subway ! Thanks for the indulgence & apologies in advance. -Jim


   RE:FOR SALE:   1st generation Shimano 105 & 600 components posted by Jim on 1/23/2003 at 6:48:15 PM
If you'd rather search ebay by user ID, it's the same as my email address : jbanahan@msn.com

   RE:FOR SALE:   1st generation Shimano 105 & 600 components posted by Keith on 1/23/2003 at 6:55:18 PM
I've had numerous dealings with Jim over the years and will vouch for his honesty and integrity in these matters.






AGE / VALUE:   COLLECTOR BIKES posted by: Kevin K on 1/22/2003 at 8:16:40 PM
Hi all. This posting is in reference to a lower posting about not wanting to hurt the feelings of guys that spray bomb old bikes then ask hundreds of dollars for them. I've a buddy here in town I'll call Mac. Mac gets some really nice pieces from time to time. He washes them. Then he will start to recondition them as he calls it. This usually means spraying rusty chrome with CHROME ALUMINUM paint( after he's taken a steel wire brush to the chrome ) and using a chemical brew he's worked up to degrease the bikes. This does remove grease, and decals and sometimes even paint. I've convinced Mac by hurting his feeling that some bikes are better off left alone for the new owner to clean up and detail than for him to touch it. I proved this to him a couple years ago when he picked up a Violet 1966 Stingray Delux for $5. Just as he started to RECONDITION IT I could no longer keep quiet. I told him politely " you will ruin that bike " He did not take it well. I told him leave it dirty and I'll sell it as is for far more than you'll ever get out of it. And I did. I gave him $150 about an hour after I left with the bike. Now he's more than forgotten about the hurt feelings and calls me to have a look at the bikes that might have collector value before he even washes them. Knowledge makes wise choices. I too have been in a situation where people ask way too much money. I do politely tell them the it's not worth that kind of money at all. Usually they get mad. Too bad. But sometimes they are wise enough to ask what would you pay for it. I tell them a dollar ammount. Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Then on trash day the bike is usually at the curb. Then it's free. So advise these people instead of letting them look foolish. Just might impress them too. Kevin K







AGE / VALUE:   COLLECTOR BIKES posted by: Kevin K on 1/22/2003 at 8:16:40 PM
Hi all. This posting is in reference to a lower posting about not wanting to hurt the feelings of guys that spray bomb old bikes then ask hundreds of dollars for them. I've a buddy here in town I'll call Mac. Mac gets some really nice pieces from time to time. He washes them. Then he will start to recondition them as he calls it. This usually means spraying rusty chrome with CHROME ALUMINUM paint( after he's taken a steel wire brush to the chrome ) and using a chemical brew he's worked up to degrease the bikes. This does remove grease, and decals and sometimes even paint. I've convinced Mac by hurting his feeling that some bikes are better off left alone for the new owner to clean up and detail than for him to touch it. I proved this to him a couple years ago when he picked up a Violet 1966 Stingray Delux for $5. Just as he started to RECONDITION IT I could no longer keep quiet. I told him politely " you will ruin that bike " He did not take it well. I told him leave it dirty and I'll sell it as is for far more than you'll ever get out of it. And I did. I gave him $150 about an hour after I left with the bike. Now he's more than forgotten about the hurt feelings and calls me to have a look at the bikes that might have collector value before he even washes them. Knowledge makes wise choices. I too have been in a situation where people ask way too much money. I do politely tell them the it's not worth that kind of money at all. Usually they get mad. Too bad. But sometimes they are wise enough to ask what would you pay for it. I tell them a dollar ammount. Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Then on trash day the bike is usually at the curb. Then it's free. So advise these people instead of letting them look foolish. Just might impress them too. Kevin K


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   COLLECTOR BIKES posted by Chris on 1/23/2003 at 2:04:57 AM
The room temperature drops 50 degrees, This wispy, apparition appears around the bike and suddenly they drop that can and flee off down the street. Too scared to return to collect the bike. Yup! It's haunted until it falls into somebody's hands who will restore it properly.
What happened?
Well, that bike belonged to me while I was still alive and I came back from the beyond to let the living know how I feel about what they were doing to my 150 year old Raleigh Record Ace.
Silver spray paint on chrome, yes that may just do me in if I see this again.
I'll be listening for that rattle can sound in the afterlife.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   COLLECTOR BIKES posted by Kevin K on 1/23/2003 at 4:01:10 AM
Hi Chris. Very creative. Enjoy, Kevin

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   COLLECTOR BIKES posted by Gralyn on 1/24/2003 at 4:39:23 PM
I like to break them down, clean and polish the componentry, clean and wax the frame, etc. The only thing I will re-paint is one not all that valuable, and that the finish is way too rusted and not salvageable. If I was to happen on a particularly old or valuable bike....even if the finish was really bad - I don't think I would re-paint it.
But I remember when I was a kid....we would change the color of our old muscle bikes about once a week!






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Sprint posted by: Brian L. on 1/22/2003 at 8:21:15 PM
See: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2702587147&category=7298. Interesting frame. Seller forks are not bent, but? He does not know if this is a chromoly frame and could not find the chromoly sticker. Anyone know?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Sprint posted by Kevin K on 1/22/2003 at 10:20:19 PM
Hi all. That is a 1974 Schwinn Sprint with the unusual bent seat tube. The bike was made for 2 years only. 1974 and 1975. In Chicago. Schwinn later reissued the bike minus bent tube. The color is Opaque Blue. The crankset is not a Sprint crank but rather just a plain old everyday Schwinn item. Sorta neat. Got one here just like it. Kevin K

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Sprint posted by Oscar on 1/23/2003 at 12:35:07 AM
I believe it's basically a Continental with a bent downtube. No cromoly, but heavy Schwinn 1010 steel. The forks (or steerer tube) indeed looks bent.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Sprint posted by Kevin K on 1/23/2003 at 1:55:59 AM
Hi all. Just a note of interest on the 74 and 75 Sprints. The area where the bottom bracket housing, seat tube, down tube and chain stays all come together is actually hand brazed. I had a Sprint with bad paint on it so I scraped away the paint. Sure enough brass welded. Same on the 74 Opaque Blue on I currently own. Scraped away a small area, same thing. That section of the Sprint frame is completely different from the Varsity / Continental. Also the kickstand is brazed on the bottom of the bottom bracket housing instead of on the chain stays. FYI. Kevin K

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Schwinn Sprint posted by Oscar on 1/25/2003 at 3:07:57 PM
Thanks for the info, Kevin. I'll bet the Sprint was an expensive model to build next to the other electroforged lightweights. I guess that's why it was only around for a couple of years. It should be considered a rare bike, but rare doesn't always mean valuable...yet.






MISC:   Chains posted by: John on 1/22/2003 at 7:20:04 PM
Hi, this may be a dumb questions, but I'll ask anyway. I know you can't use an old chain (i.e. 5-speed freewheel chain) with new systems, but can you use a new chain with an old 5-speed set-up? I have recently gotten back into cycling and have a couple of 70's vintage racers with regina chains and don't want to wear them out and was thinking of buying new chains and using the old ones only occasionally.


   RE:MISC:   Chains posted by Gralyn on 1/22/2003 at 7:32:15 PM
I'm not for certain - but I would think that the old deraillieur chains are too wide for the new systems - there may be interference between the cogs. And also, the new chains may not be wide enough to fit over the older cogs. It may be kind of like between an old 3-speed chain vs. a deraillieur chain.....the 3-speed chain is too wide...and a deraillieur chain won't fit on the old 3-speed cog.

   RE:MISC:   Chains posted by Ray on 1/22/2003 at 8:10:17 PM
I have used 8sp chains with 5sp freewheels with no problems, the 9 and 10sp chains may be too narrow.

   RE:MISC:   Chains posted by Keith on 1/22/2003 at 8:26:39 PM
I think the answer has to be, it depends. Some older freewheel cogs are really chunky, and I question whether they'd work well, if at all, with significantly narrower chains. But correct width chains are plentiful and cheap, so I don't understand why you'd use anything other than the recommended width (although I've heard some say use a narrower chain because it will work more quietly). I've read and heard some who say the old Nouvo Record stuff shifts better with older chains with bushings, but I've never noticed any difference myself. Go to www.sheldonbrown.com and follow links to his blurb on chains. But anyway, any local bike store will sell either Sunrace or Z-chains -- 6-speed would do fine in your case -- for about $10. But, alas, you can't avoid the issue of wear with a new chain. The wear will still occur on the freewheel cogs and chainrings, which do waer out, and are expensive to replace if you insist on correct 70s vintage parts, like Regina, Campy, and Stronglight. Sorry for the bad news.

   RE:MISC:   Chains posted by John on 1/22/2003 at 9:08:23 PM
Thanks for the comments. I assumed that since 5-speed freewheels were no longer made, the chains to use them were also not made. I've located an inexpensive 6-speed chains on Bike Nashbar. Do they suck? I mean I still want a quality chain even if it isn't vintage. I still have a few vintage chains and have begun hording 5-speed freewheels while they are still available for reasonable prices.

Speaking of reasonable, does anyone have any good ideas for 70's vintage Campy Brake hoods. Good gosh, those things are going for about $50.

   RE:RE:MISC:   Chains posted by Warren on 1/23/2003 at 3:00:50 AM
If you want Campy hoods you've gotta pay. If you can afford Campy hoods, splurge a bit and get a better quality Sachs nickel plated chain (PC-1?). It's worth it.

      Chains posted by John E on 1/23/2003 at 3:06:00 AM
I've had good luck matching modern SRAM 8-speed chains with older cogs and chainrings.

   RE:   Chains posted by Wings on 1/23/2003 at 7:36:37 AM
I just got some Sram 8 speed chains today and I have used them on 6 speed 20 inch wheel bikes. They shift better (more flexible) and have a great connector. One bike shop owner told me any chain will work -- I have not verified that yet but perhaps he had tested it. I also use 8 speed chains on 7 cog freewheels and get better results shifting than with the cheap Z chains.


   RE:MISC:   Chains posted by Richard on 1/23/2003 at 5:59:50 PM
Im using newer 8spd chains on older freewheels 5/6 speed with no problems, they actualy work better. I also have used a 6/7spd chain (a newer chain labled for 6/7spd usage) for a 8spd (it is the same chain just a lower end quality).






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Frejus Road Bike posted by: Mark on 1/22/2003 at 4:34:55 PM
I have a sixties vintage Frejus Road Bike that I've had for about twenty years. It is Reynolds 531, all Campy NR, Brooks leather saddle, Mavic rims, TTT and Cinelli handle bars, etc. Any idea of it's worth?


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Frejus Road Bike posted by Brian L. on 1/22/2003 at 6:20:14 PM
It all depends on condition and the buyer. I would put the range @ $500-1200. More details?

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Frejus Road Bike posted by Steven on 1/22/2003 at 6:45:53 PM
If the bike is truly from the 60's with a full NR gruppo including the brakes, it could be worth much more. The 1968 brakes, the first year that they were made, without any Camagnolo name on the calipers, on their own could be worth more than $1000. The 1969 ones are worth considerably less. Anything prior to 1968 could not possibly be equipped with original Campagnolo brakes as they did not exist. An early 60's Fréjus, in almost mint shape, recently sold on ebay for more than $1500. This was an extreme however and I would agree with Brian's value guess. As he writes, much depends on the condition and the frame size.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Frejus Road Bike posted by Mark on 1/23/2003 at 3:35:28 AM
The bike came originally with a full Campy NR gruppo, except the brakes, which are Universal No. 61 centerpulls. I replaced the Universal brakes with Campy NR sidepulls in the early eighties when the frame was resprayed with Imron by Dave Hartranft in Cambridge, MA. The seat tube has the code 175LL embossed on it and measures approximately 60cm from the middle of the bottom bracket to the top in the middle of where the top tube intersects. The colored brass badge says that it is a Frejus Torino.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Frejus Road Bike posted by Steven on 1/23/2003 at 6:17:32 AM
Mark, as I mentioned above, a mint bike sold recently for over $1500 on ebay, your bike will not reach such levels however because it is not fully original (the paint and the non-original brakes) You could perhaps return the brakes to original but the paint cannot be returned. I would expect the bike to be worth perhaps $800-1000 as it stands. It does however have a good chance of increasing in value in the future. If you go the www.classicrendezvous.com website, they are setting up a Fréjus registry.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Frejus Road Bike posted by Mark on 1/23/2003 at 4:49:08 PM
Thanks Steven. It's such a nice bike, I think it makes sense to just hang on to it anyway. I'll checkout the registry.

   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Frejus Road Bike posted by Paul on 1/24/2003 at 3:39:36 PM
On your Frejus, where is the serial # I have a frame and was told it may be a Frejus. I have no idea. The serial # on mine is just below the intersection of the top tube and the seat tube. Anyone else with info can let me know as well. go to http://photos.yahoo.com/bc/wags1967/lst?.dir=/frame&.view=t to see a pic. THANKS






FOR SALE:   Carlton 1948 Paris 1946 posted by: Pete on 1/22/2003 at 3:35:45 PM
Hello All I have the following items for sale

1/ Carlton Python 1948. Offered as a complete bike with period parts, The frame size is 231/2 ctt with a 23" ctc top tube. The frame has plainish lugs,round forks, and a Chater Lea type oversze bb. It finished in black with single box lining. It has good chrome on the forks and drop outs.
It has aGB bar ,stem, and Hiduminium brakeset. Williams C34 chainset, Sturmey Archer AM with wingnuts and a oval
badged Brooks B17 standard 26x1/4 wheels and Bluemels
fenders $650 + shipping

2/ 1946/7 Paris Tour de France t 213/4" ctt 211/2 ctc toptube Bronze welded (lugless)frameset built with 531 db tubing #2044. It has the typical Paris twin plate crown ,11/8 dia top tube, Osgear type dropouts and a Eiffel tower head badge The condition of the frame is very good, but will need refinishing. $250 + shipping

If you need and additional infor or a pic please let me know