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Archived: Vintage Lightweights







VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Frame material posted by: Darryl on 1/5/2003 at 1:25:43 PM
Does anyone know the difference between Columbus SL and SP tubing? I recently acquired an Marinoni frame with SP Tubes.Thanks, Darryl


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Frame material posted by Walter on 1/5/2003 at 2:00:21 PM
As I recall the SP is a slightly heavier guage or at least has heavier butting and therefore makes a marginally stiffer frame but at a weight penalty. SL was Columbus' best until SLX came out sometime in the 80s. I'm sure others hame more precise metallurgy info.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Frame material posted by Warren on 1/5/2003 at 4:32:06 PM
Correct...you see SP on very large frames or touring bikes for strength and stiffness.

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Frame material posted by Steven on 1/5/2003 at 8:37:29 PM
SL tubing was not exactly the 'best' but rather the 'lightest' of the tubing that could be used for day to day riding. There was also an even lighter tubing that I seem to recall as being called KL. With regards to SL and SP, they are both the same alloy and only have a different thickness. SP was recommended on frames larger than 58 cm.






FOR SALE:   c.1934 Hercule's Sports with Villiers chain drive 2 speed posted by: Tim on 1/4/2003 at 4:41:14 PM
For sale:
I have for sale a c.1935 Hercules Sports with a Villiers chain drive 2 speed gear.
It is in need of an overhaul, but is complete.
Original enamel on the frame with faded transfer on the headset.A nice machine.
£145 or $225 + shipping costs.
I can take photo's if required.
Any interest to Gunngrafton@aol.com







FOR SALE:   1914 LABOR french velodrome Bicycle. posted by: Tim on 1/4/2003 at 1:20:03 PM
I have forsale: 1914 L A B O R french velodrome bicycle,
It is in very good order, wooden sprint wheels are true and the frame has original enamel,Lovely early and typically french dropped bars and a head badge that is embossed with a bicycle frame, above which is a bridge carrying a stream train and carriages, complete with trailing smoke.
Altogether a very beautiful bicycle in very good order.
Jpeg photo's availiable.Price is £475 Or $750 US + shipping.
Email Gunngrafton@aol.com







AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Clubman 1949 for sale posted by: Pete on 1/4/2003 at 11:10:52 AM
Hello I have for sale a 1949 Raleigh clubman for sale. It is complete and totally orginal (except saddle)even down to the cables. The paint is tatty with some light surface rust but again original and the transfers can still be made out. The chrome is about 6/10 and with care could be improved. It is fixed/free Pics available. $220 + shipping
Cheers Pete


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Raleigh Clubman 1949 for sale posted by humberchristopher28@hotmail.com on 1/5/2003 at 9:15:11 PM
What type rear hub?






AGE / VALUE:   Bridgestone Synergy posted by: Gralyn on 1/4/2003 at 4:34:22 AM
I made a few stops today....hoping to find maybe a good parts bike, a really old lightweight, etc. Well, every stop was turning up pretty dry. There was this one bike....a Kawahara....or something like that...nothing special...and your common components found on most of the bike boom bikes....it's been there a long time....it was $30 one day...and I could have got it for half that during a 1/2 price sale....but I didn't. Now it's $20. Maybe if they have a 1/2 price sale - I will pick it up for $10. Well, back to the subject....it was on my last stop....and so far...nothing....but on the final stop....I spot a Bridgestone...can't remember...maybe a RB 1 or something like that...some letter/number combo....and "Synergy" I believe on the top tube. This was one that I just grabbed up....didn't have to look at it and think about it and try to decide....The price was right....and I just grabbed it! It was all CroMo including the seat post. I think the stem is aluminum. Nitto bars...aero brakes...I think it's a road racing bike. It has 7-speed cassette - and the gear ratios are very close (I have 7 speed on my Lotus...but is more wide ratio). Down-tube shifters, 700C wheels. It's very lightweight. Wheelbase is about 38 inches. My Lotus has a short base...I think the distances from the crank to the front wheel are about the same - but the Bridgestone is even shorter from the crank to the rear wheel. The rear wheel is really close-in. More racing geometry (I had posted previously about how few bikes I spot with racing geometry). Well, I am excited and can't wait to go over it and clean it up and tune it and RIDE it! I would like to determine the date of manufacture...if anyone has any idea - please let me know.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bridgestone Synergy posted by Gralyn on 1/4/2003 at 5:10:09 AM
Here's one like it on e-bay. The one I have hasn't had so many of the comnponents upgraded...but it's the same frame, etc.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=7298&item=1986826470

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bridgestone Synergy posted by Skip Echert on 1/4/2003 at 8:43:42 AM
Hello Gralyn -
Great Find! Congratulations.
Many Bridgestone brochures can be found here:

Cheers,
skip

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bridgestone Synergy posted by Richard on 1/4/2003 at 6:26:25 PM
Better disable the car before you go for a spin (LOL)...

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bridgestone Synergy posted by Keith on 1/6/2003 at 3:54:09 PM
Nicely done. The RB-1 was indeed Bridgestone's top-of-the-line racing bike. It has something of a cult following among Bridgestone Owners Bunch ("BOB") folks, some of whom apparently incorrectly equate it with the current Rivendell. It's resale value would be higher than similarly equiped bikes of the period. You can still buy some of the Bridgesone catelogs from Rivendell.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bridgestone Synergy posted by Gralyn on 1/7/2003 at 2:16:25 AM
I have been really thrilled with this bike. I tuned it a bit - and Saturday night I cleaned it up and polished it. it has a few scratches and a few places where the decals are peeled a bit - but aside from that - it looks great. I replaced the bar tape with some white speckled cork tape. I replaced the Avocet touring saddle with a body geometry saddle. It currently has 700 X 32 C Avocet tires - I suppose they are supposed to be smooth - no tread. I have a set of 25mm tires I may put on it. I think it's a 91 or 92 model. I'm going to do some more research and see what all I can find about it.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bridgestone Synergy posted by Warren on 1/7/2003 at 3:46:02 AM
If those are the Avocet Cross tires with the inverted tread pattern and have a "K" next to the name on the sidewall, keep them. They are bombproof kevlar, expensive and desirable. Use them on a commuter...or sell them to me.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bridgestone Synergy posted by Keith on 1/7/2003 at 2:53:49 PM
Ditto Warren on the Avocet Cross -- they last forever, and they work well for light trail riding too.

   RE:RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bridgestone Synergy posted by Gralyn on 1/7/2003 at 2:59:11 PM
I don't think these tires ever had tread on them. They are smooth and slick and rounded....they look like they were made that way....no tread pattern...no sign of where tread ever existed.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Bridgestone Synergy posted by Bill Putnam on 1/9/2003 at 9:50:35 PM
Your tires are likely intended to be smooth such as the Avocet FasGrip Duro series. These are some of the nicest riding tires every made IMHO. For street riding, tread on bicycle tires does not increase adhesion. For a discussion on smooth tires see

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tires.html

scroll down part way to "Tread for on-road use"

I like the Avocet smooth tires (and cross for that matter) very much, but often use IRC brand tires as they are both made by the same manufacturer and the IRC tires have only a cosmetic tread pattern, but are half or less the cost of the Avocets.

Bill Putnam






FOR SALE:   "Varsinental" tandem on ebay posted by: David on 1/4/2003 at 3:02:38 AM
I haven't seen one of these before. Could be a good deal if you're near Orlando.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/ebayISAPI.dll?MfcISAPICommand=ViewItem&item=1985727666


   RE:FOR SALE:    posted by Warren on 1/4/2003 at 4:48:09 AM
Can you imagine how much that puppy weighs!






AGE / VALUE:   barring races posted by: sam on 1/4/2003 at 1:58:59 AM
Can you buy barring races that go in front hubs?The reason I ask is I got some Bonotto alum. hubs from Mex,the races they used are really cheap! I'd like to replace them with higher quality ones like used in the shimmano hubs.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   barring races posted by David on 1/4/2003 at 2:18:57 PM
Aren't Campy hub races replaceable? If the Benotto is a similar enough knockoff, Campy races might work.






AGE / VALUE:   Ross with CroMo frame posted by: Gralyn on 1/3/2003 at 2:15:43 PM
I was able to resist the temptation once again. I spotted a Ross - I don't know what particular model - but I'm thinking it had to be 70's. It had a 5-speed cassette and a really funky-looking chain ring. I did see a CroMo frame sticker. It had some Shimano SIS componentry....and alloy wheels. I think QR on both wheels. It was in decent shape. But, I resisted....I passed on it. But, if it had been cheap enough...I would probably have picked it up.


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Ross with CroMo frame posted by Keith on 1/3/2003 at 3:20:48 PM
Shimano SIS would put it in the mid-80s or later, unless it wasn't SIS but instead Positron coupled with a free-chainring, which would account for the funny-looking chainring, in which case it could be late 70s.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Ross with CroMo frame posted by Ray on 1/3/2003 at 5:15:39 PM
This system was called the FF by Shimano. Many bike shops called it something else using the FF initials but I will not get into that. These had the unique feature of allowing the chainring to turn without he crank turning when coasting. You can spot one easily because of a black metal ring right where the crank meets the chainring in the center. They have a few unique features. For one you can put a kickstand down on these bikes and roll the bike backwards and not have the crank lock up against it. It also facilitated Shimano's first index shifting. The shifter and derailleur used a solid wire and not a cable to shift with. You cannot remove the rear cogs and replace them with a standard cog set as they are incompatible. You have to change out both the cogs and cranks. Personally I thought they had a lot to offer and would have liked to see them developed more before becoming dinosaurs. As they were sold, they were too heavy for the high end market and were generally used on the low to mid range bikes. I have seen them on Schwinn and other notable bikes but once they ran into trouble the bike shops usually changed it out for a more conventional model which was quite an expensive operation for a low to mid range bike.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Ross with CroMo frame posted by Gralyn on 1/3/2003 at 7:01:51 PM
well, now I'm curious. I couldn't really get access to the bike to examine it thoroughly at the time - there were just too many people crowded around. But I think I will stop by - and if it's still there - I will try to examine it more closely. It was just one of those weird bikes that I have difficulty puting a date on. I have seen so many bikes....one thing leads you to believe 70's, and it could be early or late, and another thing looks like 80's for sure....but it all looks original....it's difficult to tell sometimes. Like for example, you see one that obviously has the original grips...the thick foam padded rubber over the bars...for the 80's....and yet it may have center pull brakes and a 5-speed cassette. I guess the early 80's it was a mixture of using up all the older stuff combined with some newer stuff...until all the old was gone.

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Grab-ons posted by Walter on 1/3/2003 at 9:55:34 PM
Those foam grips you mentioned were (are?) Grab-Ons. I used them on a later 1970s Motobecane for years. They were popular, esp. when good cork or otherwise cushioned bartapes were still in the future.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Ross with CroMo frame posted by Richard on 1/4/2003 at 12:57:31 AM
Good thing you resisted. Your wife might try to run you down again (LOL).

   RE:RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Ross with CroMo frame posted by Gralyn on 1/4/2003 at 4:33:14 AM
I stopped by and checked it out. The chain ring had a funky design - but it was just your routine set-up. Looked like Shimano SIS deraillieur. It was a Grand Tour model.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Ross with CroMo frame posted by Gralyn on 1/4/2003 at 4:58:10 AM
Richard....see my post above....

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Ross with CroMo frame posted by JimW. on 1/5/2003 at 11:10:48 AM
I just bought a NOS example of the Shimano FF crankset on eBay. It has 52 and 36-tooth chainrings. I got it to use in driving a flywheel-equipped drag-racing trike. It has the advantage of not breaking your ankle if your foot slips off the pedal.






FOR SALE:   New (NOS) Parts Site posted by: Ginny Rini on 1/3/2003 at 4:57:50 AM
I have a new site that I am beginning to post parts on (It will take awhile to get them all posted). Keep an eye on http://rini20@attbi.com. I also have a operational site for Old School BMX at http://ginnyrini.home.attbi.com



   RE:FOR SALE:   New (NOS) Parts Site posted by ginny rini on 1/5/2003 at 6:07:27 AM
sorry i posted a bad link--try http://rinienterprises.home.attbi.com that will give you access to all 3 of my bicycle sites.






AGE / VALUE:   italian bikes posted by: mark on 1/2/2003 at 12:37:08 AM
Hi I RECENTLY GOT A EARLY 50'S OLMO THE FRAME ,IT DOES NOT HAVE A DERAILLUER HANGER ,IT HAS A BRACKET ON THE DERAILLER, IS THIS A SIGN OF A CHEAP BIKE OR WERE AL BIKES OF THIS ERA THE SAME. THANK YOU mark


   RE:AGE / VALUE:   italian bikes posted by Steven on 1/2/2003 at 5:28:56 AM
The gear hanger only became ubiquitous among Italian bikes in the mid-50's, after Campagnolo's gran sport derailleur became truly successful. From the 40's onwards, the better bikes had forged drop-outs that were either smooth or made by Campagnolo with the teeth needed for the Corsa gear. Therefore to have an idea of the 'quality' of a 50's Italian frame, the drop-outs can give you an indication, but not hte derailleur hanger.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   italian bikes posted by Steven on 1/2/2003 at 5:30:53 AM
The gear hanger only became ubiquitous among Italian bikes in the mid-50's, after Campagnolo's gran sport derailleur became truly successful. From the 40's onwards, the better bikes had forged drop-outs that were either smooth or made by Campagnolo with the teeth needed for the Corsa gear. Therefore to have an idea of the 'quality' of a 50's Italian frame, the drop-outs can give you an indication, but not hte derailleur hanger.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   italian bikes posted by Steven on 1/2/2003 at 5:31:54 AM
The gear hanger only became ubiquitous among Italian bikes in the mid-50's, after Campagnolo's gran sport derailleur became truly successful. From the 40's onwards, the better bikes had forged drop-outs that were either smooth or made by Campagnolo with the teeth needed for the Corsa gear. Therefore to have an idea of the 'quality' of a 50's Italian frame, the drop-outs can give you an indication, but not hte derailleur hanger.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   italian bikes posted by Steven on 1/2/2003 at 5:37:32 AM
The gear hanger only became ubiquitous among Italian bikes in the mid-50's, after Campagnolo's gran sport derailleur became truly successful. From the 40's onwards, the better bikes had forged drop-outs that were either smooth or made by Campagnolo with the teeth needed for the Corsa gear. Therefore to have an idea of the 'quality' of a 50's Italian frame, the drop-outs can give you an indication, but not hte derailleur hanger.






AGE / VALUE:   Peugot Ventoux: sell or abandon? posted by: Scy on 1/1/2003 at 11:33:34 AM
A relative has a old Peugot Ventoux that he bought about 15/20 years ago. It has a Reynolds 501 (is that good?) frame and fork, with a Sachs Huret drivetrain. A couple of years ago, I did him a favor and totally tuned the bike, including packing the bearings. I killed several hours, b/c the bike was in miserable shape. Despite all this work, my relative didn't even ride the damn thing; so he felt bad and insisted that I have it.
I know nothing about the quality of the bike or its components except that it's too big for me (a 61 cm frame for my 6' height), and pretty light at about 22 or 23 pounds.

I was thinking about selling it, but don't have any idea of its worth. Should I just give it to the Salvation Army?



   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Peugot Ventoux: sell or abandon? posted by andym on 1/1/2003 at 3:45:37 PM
I'm not familiar with the ventoux model but reynolds 501 tubing is/was used on fairly mid-range bikes. I personally do'nt care a whole lot for 501 frames because they can be a bit flexy or "whippy" especially with a large frame size.As
far as the value of the bike,that probably depends on whether its a lugged or non-lugged (internally lugged) frame,also the general condition of the bike of course.Someone who does'nt know much about bicycles might pay more because the Peugeot name was so well known,and might still be.I've owned several Peugeots including a couple of PX-10's,and always got alot of attention from people who knew very little about "10 speeds".I'm guessing you might be able to get about 100.00 to 150.00 for it,but like I said I'm no expert.You might try riding it around a bit,61cm is'nt too incredibly tall for a six footer.Unless you have short legs. I'm also six foot tall and I ride anything from 59 to 63 cm.You might just be used to a smaller frame.I would'nt give it away.

     Peugot Ventoux posted by John E on 1/1/2003 at 5:46:05 PM
This is a basic commuting/touring rig, at best.

You are right about the Peugeot mystique and cult following -- people at all levels of bicycle knowledge tend to notice my Peugeot, strictly because of the marque, even though it is the least collectible, least interesting, and least well-crafted of my four bicycles.

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Peugot Ventoux: sell or abandon? posted by Keith on 1/2/2003 at 2:58:26 PM
Sounds like practical transportation. The only Sachs-Huret I've had was the Rival, and it shifted terribly IMHO. I believe 501 was seamed/welded tubing which, contrary to popular belief, was plenty strong for its intended purpose, although not terribly light. Although Peugeot is a well known and respected brand, there are lots of cheaper models out there. Most folks who are paying serious bucks for cultworthy Peugeots are seeking pre-1970 PX-10s, and they know exactly what they're looking for, and it's not the cheaper stuff. I think $100-150 may be too optomistic, but if it all works well it's not a throw away either. I agree with andym about sizing -- depending on your inseam 61 might be fine. I'm 5'10" and ride a 58-60cm c-t 'cause I got long legs. Go to the Rivendell site and look at the "Fistfull of Seatpost" sizing philosophy of Grant Petersen. http://www.rivendellbicycles.com/html/bikes_framesize.html

   RE:AGE / VALUE:   Peugot Ventoux: sell or abandon? posted by Richard on 1/2/2003 at 6:32:45 PM
The most you would get if ya sell it is $50. If ya give it to SA someone will buy it, strip it, and hock the parts on Ebay. Id keep it and ride it, Im 6' (w/34" inseam) and I have bikes ranging from 52cm to 62cm all set up so pedal to seat, seat to bars, and bars to ground are same or within a few mm's. Ridable size and handling have more to do with the riders center of gravity location between the axles and of course how close you want the top tube to your crotch. I will admit that when I stand and rock the frame while riding the 62cm frame the top tube touches the inside of my thighs.

   RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   Peugot Ventoux: sell or abandon? posted by Brian L. on 1/2/2003 at 8:39:45 PM
The Huret Duopar I just put on my scrounged Raleigh Grand Sports seems to shift just fine, with a little feathering. As with most vintage shifters, under wouldn't attempting dumping a bunch of gears under load.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Help me ID this Specialized Allez posted by: Scy on 1/1/2003 at 11:22:01 AM
Picked up a steel 12-speed Specialized race bike (not touring--no eyelets for racks). Can anyone tell me anything about this bike? How old it really is, what kind of steel/tubing, and whether it's worth upgrading.

I've ridden it a few times; it's a little heavy, but it's quick and feels great on the downhills and sharp turns. At this point, I may make it my main ride and upgrade to modern Shimano DA/Ultegra 2x9.

According to the previous owner, it's a 15-year-old Allez. He had it professionally stripped and repainted, so there are no names/lettering on the frame, just the imprinted Specialized “S” logo at the top of the fork crown and at the top of the seat stays.

It's a 56 cm lugged steel frame, 56 cm top tube, and 99 cm wheelbase (c-to-c). It has Shimano 600 components throughout and Saturae C20 rims. I've posted to roadbikesreview.com, and I've been told that it's likely made by 3rensho.

Any help is appreciated.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   Help me ID this Specialized Allez posted by Warren on 1/1/2003 at 3:12:52 PM
There were many Specialized Allez steel frames made in the late 80's. Only a token few (dozen?) of them were made by 3Rensho and these are very special bikes. I would get the frame serial number and contact Specialized to find out when and where your bike was made.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   SR road bikes posted by: andym on 1/1/2003 at 1:13:16 AM
Can anyone shed some light on SR bicycles? I own two,a semi-
professional touring with what I believe is late seventies
shimano 600 components.The other an early eighties profess-
ional road with full suntour superbe groupo,in like new con-
dition.I purchased this one at a thrift store for five bucks! They both are very light and ride beautifully! I can't seem to find any info on these bicycles. The frames don't have any decals as to what the tubes are.Also are the
frames made by SR or another company such as Panasonic or Miyata? Any info would be appreciated.


   RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   SR road bikes posted by Warren on 1/1/2003 at 5:56:30 AM
I have some spec sheets on the Semi-pro touring from around 1980 I could scan and send to you. Also for the pro model from the same timeframe. SR bikes were not related to the SR component manfacturer. Your bikes probably use Tange Champion #2 (touring) and Tange champion #1 for the pro bike. Nice...you stole that one. I have a late 70's Semi-Pro Aero with #2 tubes and it is nice as well. I've talked to a few other "experts" here and no one knows who made the frames...Kuwahara is a likely candidate but there were many smaller frame shops in Japan who could have put out the smaller numbers required by SR.

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   SR road bikes posted by andym on 1/1/2003 at 7:18:12 AM
Thanks Warren,those spec sheets would be great.Hey while I'm here,what do you know about Favorit bicycles? This was another thrift store find.It has alloy/steel low flanged hubs,sorta campy sr looking,alloy 700c clincher rims,4speed freewheel,mustache style handle bar,three piece cottered steel crank,leather saddle (dont remember brand).This is a touring model with alloy mud guards and generator light set. Almost everything on this bicycle is marked "favorit",including lights and fenders!The frame has fairly ornate lugs and a seat cluster like I've never seen. Stamped drop-outs and very large alloy axle wingnuts.Really cool looking and made in Czechoslovakia.What do you know? worth anything

   RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   SR road bikes posted by andym on 1/1/2003 at 7:19:31 AM
Thanks Warren,those spec sheets would be great.Hey while I'm here,what do you know about Favorit bicycles? This was another thrift store find.It has alloy/steel low flanged hubs,sorta campy sr looking,alloy 700c clincher rims,4speed freewheel,mustache style handle bar,three piece cottered steel crank,leather saddle (dont remember brand).This is a touring model with alloy mud guards and generator light set. Almost everything on this bicycle is marked "favorit",including lights and fenders!The frame has fairly ornate lugs and a seat cluster like I've never seen. Stamped drop-outs and very large alloy axle wingnuts.Really cool looking and made in Czechoslovakia.What do you know? worth anything

   RE:RE:RE:VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   SR road bikes posted by Warren on 1/1/2003 at 2:48:22 PM
Normally I wouldn't get excited about a Favorit bike...their components and frames are somewhat lacking in fit and finish. Yours however, sounds like it is older and desireable. The whole touring kit, 4 speed freewheel etc sounds very exciting. Check the hubs and see if they say FB (Fratelli Brothers). They made their own three piece hubs as well as supplying campy and others with hubs during the 50's and early 60's. Not likely to be valuable but certainly desireable.

   Favorit Bikes posted by Steven on 1/1/2003 at 7:31:17 PM
The Favorit bike you described was likely the cheapest bike available in the 70's. Apart from the 'iron curtain' mystique there is nothing of any true merit in the model described and I would expect it to cost anything more than $5. The 4 speed derailleur was due to there not being able to produce a reliable 5 block like everybody else. This was built completely in-house by Favorit. Sorry!

   Favorit Bikes posted by Steven on 1/1/2003 at 7:31:56 PM
The Favorit bike you described was likely the cheapest bike available in the 70's. Apart from the 'iron curtain' mystique there is nothing of any true merit in the model described and I would not expect it to cost anything more than $5. The 4 speed derailleur was due to there not being able to produce a reliable 5 block like everybody else. This was built completely in-house by Favorit. Sorry!

   RE:Favorit Bikes posted by Warren on 1/1/2003 at 8:20:14 PM
Rats...I hear 4 speed block and moustache bars and start dreaming of the Champs d'Elysee in the 50's.

   RE:Favorit Bikes posted by andym on 1/1/2003 at 11:32:58 PM
"Cheapest bike available in the 70's"? I sorta doubt it. This bike is definitely built better than a lot of lesser expensive french bicycles I've played with.True,its not even close to being a professional level bicycle,but its also not a bad bicycle!

   RE:RE:Favorit Bikes posted by Steven on 1/2/2003 at 5:43:24 AM
The Favorit bikes were an absolutely great buy for the money. They were cheaper than any of the French bikes. They also offered a model called F1 which was equipped with Campagnolo Nuovo Record. The whole bike cost just a bit more than the cost of the gruppo! I don't think that they were even sold in the US directly; most came in via Canada.






VINTAGE LIGHTWEIGHTS:   1967 Schwinn Paramount P-13 posted by: Chas P. on 1/1/2003 at 12:28:37 AM
Gorgeous black 22" frame Schwinn Paramount P-13. Frame recently restored, aligned, polished, painted, decaled, by Waterford factory. Selling with extra wheels, cranks, pedals, FWs. $850 O.B.O. plus shipping via UPS. I am a former pro-shop manager and will make sure the bike is packed properly. See detail at: http://www.nmagent.com/paramount67.html







MISC:   Sturmey Archer Wheel posted by: Gralyn on 12/31/2002 at 1:55:17 AM
I know that the date is stamped on Sturmey-Archer 3-speed hubs. But what about a Sturmey Archer free-hub with cassette? Is the date stamped somewhere on the hub?